Tree Frog Forestry News

Daily Archives: November 19, 2015

Business & Politics

Port Hawkebury Paper faces years of U.S. tariffs as appeals drag on

The Chronicle Herald
November 18, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, United States

Port Hawkesbury Paper will be shackled with U.S. export tariffs for the foreseeable future. “We filed an appeal under the North American Free Trade Agreement,” Marc Dube, development manager of the Point Tupper mill, said Wednesday. What the mill is appealing is the move earlier in the day by the United States International Trade Commission to rubber-stamp a U.S. Commerce Department decision in October to place a 20.18 per cent tariff on supercalendered paper produced by Port Hawkesbury Paper, along with slightly lower tariffs for three other Canadian mills. U.S. industry is “materially injured by reason of imports of supercalendered paper from Canada” that the Commerce Department had already determined to be subsidized, the trade commission decision read.

Port Hawkesbury Paper, government to file NAFTA appeal in tariff dispute from CBC News

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Canada seeks NAFTA review of U.S. tariffs on glossy paper

Bloomberg News in The Globe and Mail
November 19, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, United States

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau challenged a U.S. decision to impose new tariffs on imports of glossy paper, just hours before the new Canadian leader holds his first meeting with U.S. President Barack Obama. Canada has requested a review under the North American free-trade agreement of import tariffs imposed by the U.S. Department of Commerce of as much as 20 per cent on supercalendered paper from four Canadian companies – Catalyst Paper Corp., J.D. Irving Ltd., Port Hawkesbury Paper LP and Resolute Forest Products Inc. The tariffs were imposed after U.S. producers filed a petition earlier this year claiming the Canadian companies were unfairly subsidized. “Canada believes that the U.S. Department of Commerce erred in calculating subsidy rates on Canadian exports of supercalendered paper,” Trade Minister Chrystia Freeland said in an e-mailed statement.

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FPAC names Paul Lansbergen as acting president and CEO

Lesprom
November 18, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada

The Chair of the Board of Forest Products Association of Canada (FPAC), Curt Stevens, announced that Paul Lansbergen will be taking over as acting President and CEO of FPAC as of December 14, 2015. Lansbergen will replace the departing CEO, David Lindsay, who held the leadership position for the last three years. Lansbergen, a Certified Association Executive, has had progressively more senior positions at FPAC for the past 13 years. He is currently the Vice-President of Regulations and Partnerships, and Corporate Secretary. FPAC provides a voice for Canada’s wood, pulp, and paper producers nationally and internationally in government, trade, and environmental affairs.

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Trade mission to support diversification of agriculture and forestry economy

November 19, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

Minister Carlier is joining Alberta industry and business representatives from November 22 – 28 to develop commercial and trade opportunities in Japan. …“Japan is a particularly important market for the forest sector because of the high-grade lumber, pulp, and paper products that we provide them. We anticipate exploring a number of arrangements with Japanese businesses while promoting Alberta’s record as an environmentally responsible supplier of resources during the mission.” Paul Whittaker, President, Alberta Forest Products Association

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Canfor gives trades students grants

Prince George Citizen
November 18, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

Seven Prince George students are $1,500 richer this week after receiving bursaries for work completed in a high school technical training program. Canfor handed out the cheques Wednesday to the students who took part in the summer training and work experience, as part of the Career Technical Centre program. CTC is a partnership between the College of New Caledonia and School District 57, offering high school students a chance to earn dual credits and gain trade experience. The partnership with Canfor has been going on for about 10 years, said CTC coordinator Doug Borden. “The students like to work. They think it’s interesting. Canfor is a great sponsor because they do a lot of different kind of work. (Students) get a lot of time with the tradesmen to figure out the next step of their career,” said Borden of the students who went through a week of training and four weeks of work experience this summer.

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WFCF Canada Agents Tembec’s New Asset-Based Loan

ABL Advisor
November 19, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada East, Canada

Tembec announced it has entered into a new asset-based secured revolving credit facility which consists of a $150 million revolving credit facility with Wells Fargo Capital Finance Corporation Canada, as administrative agent, and PNC Financial Bank, National Association as syndication agent, and a U.S.$ 62 million “first-in, last-out” term loan. The New ABL Facility replaces the company’s existing $175 million revolving credit facility. The revolving facility will expire on November 18, 2020, provided several conditions are met, including the repayment of the FILO Facility prior to March 2, 2018, failing which the maturity would be accelerated to an earlier date, but no earlier than March 2, 2018.

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U.S. Wood Pellet Export Market No Threat to U.S. Southern Forests

Business Wire
November 19, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States

WASHINGTON–The U.S. export of industrial wood pellets to meet renewable energy goals in the European Union is not a threat to the sustainability of U.S. Southern forests, according to a new report by independent forest analysts and economists using U.S. government and marketplace data. The report was commissioned by the U.S. Endowment for Forestry and Communities, National Alliance of Forest Owners (NAFO) and the U.S. Industrial Pellet Association (USIPA). “This report puts to rest concerns that wood pellet export markets pose threats to the sustainability of U.S. Southern forests or the viability of other forest products manufacturers,” said Carlton Owen, President and CEO, U.S. Endowment for Forestry and Communities.

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Timber deal

Montana forests to become even smaller corporate limb
Missoulia Independent
November 18, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States, US West

Earlier this month Seattle timber company Weyerhaeuser announced its plans to acquire crosstown rival Plum Creek Timber. …The deal, however, is about more than turning logs into lumber. Plum Creek and, more recently, Weyerhaeuser are organized as real estate investment trusts, or REITs, a type of security similar to a mutual fund. The structure puts timberlands, not wood products, at the center of the company’s revenue stream. …Morgan says Weyerhaeuser’s approach to its Montana timberlands likely will be tied to how much value it sees in the Plum Creek mills located in Evergreen and Columbia Falls, which employ more than 700 people.

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Samoa Pulp Mill cleanup updates, future plans discussed

KRCRTV.com
November 18, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States, US West

ARCATA, Calif. – Humboldt Bay Harbor Commissioner Mike Wilson gave a talk in Arcata on Wednesday night about the cleanup efforts of the old Samoa pulp mill. The mill, which was almost abandoned overnight in 2008, has been undergoing extensive cleanup efforts since 2013. Wilson said over 3 million gallons of acidic mixed liquors have been removed. 30,000 gallons of sulfuric acid, 10,000 gallons of hydrochloric acid along with 9,000 tons of sludge have also been removed. Wilson said the cleanup is slow and steady with the most harmful threats already taken care of. The focus now is on what’s next for the site. “We are really trying to create a multi-use location that helps diversify our economy and make a healthy working waterfront,” Wilson said.

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Message at summit: Don’t close the book on Maine’s pulp and paper mills

The industry leads manufacturing in the state despite recent shutdowns, and companies are investing $173 million in facilities this year, the most since 2003.
Portland Press Herald
November 18, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: US East, United States

Recent mill closures and layoffs may have reduced the pulp and paper industry’s economic impact in Maine, but there are still significant investments being made in the state’s mills. The pulp and paper industry employed 4,532 people in 2014, according to figures released Tuesday by the Maine Pulp and Paper Association, based on a survey of all Maine mills. That’s a 25 percent reduction from 6,039 employees in 2010. During the same period, total payroll at Maine mills fell from $534 million to $354 million. But investments in the industry’s infrastructure remain strong, an indication that the state’s remaining paper companies are committed for the long term.

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Wood, Paper & Green Building

The World’s Most Sustainable High-Rise Construction Material Is… Wood?

The Portland Mercury
November 18, 2015
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: United States, US West

PORTLAND IS GROWING UP—adding high-rises, increasing density, and pricing many people out. But two local firms are exploring a state-of-the-art building material that could help solve the city’s affordability problem, create living-wage jobs in rural communities, and help save the planet. It’s wood. Right now, Portland-based LEVER Architecture and real estate development firm Project^ are designing a 12-story mixed-use building in the Pearl District that will be made primarily of a material called cross-laminated timber (CLT). That’s an unheard of height for wood structures, which top out at six stories in most of the US. And it’s not the project’s only unique attribute. Five of those stories will be affordable housing, something Portland desperately needs.

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Hydebank: Prison turns college to build brighter futures [with video]

BBC News
November 18, 2015
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: International

The workshop at Belfast’s newest college is full of students. The sound of hammers and saws echoes across the leafy grounds on the outskirts of the city. In the classes, young men make everything from bird boxes to furniture. Many have lunch in the college’s new café before an afternoon of gardening and working with animals. They are young men from all parts of Northern Ireland. They are also being held at Hydebank Wood women’s prison and young offenders’ centre. Each one is either on remand or serving a sentence for a criminal offence. They share the site with about 40 women prisoners.

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Forestry

SCIENCE MATTERS: Urban trees should be regarded as national asset

The Chronicle Herald
November 18, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada

Across Canada, towns and cities face a one-two punch: aging infrastructure and the extreme weather climate change brings. Unless we do something, many of our roads, railways, transit lines, bridges, stormwater pipes and other built structures could become obsolete. Our newly elected federal government took up the challenge with a campaign pledge to double infrastructure investments from $65 billion to nearly $125 billion over the next 10 years. Ontario has committed to spending $130 billion over the same time period, and Alberta Premier Rachel Notley has also promised a hefty infrastructure stimulus package. While these political commitments are long overdue, we shouldn’t lose sight of less-expensive and longer-lasting solutions to many of our infrastructure needs, like planting trees in urban areas for stormwater management and other services.

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Can our trees withstand the extreme weather events of the future?

After two severe windstorms in less than four months, Metro Vancouver launches study
Vancouver Sun
November 18, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Metro Vancouver is taking measures to protect its urban forests from the effects of climate change, including a summer drought and the recent windstorm that toppled trees and snapped power lines, leaving thousands in the dark. The regional district has commissioned a report looking at 40 species of trees across the region to determine whether they are resilient enough to withstand issues such as pests and droughts. The move follows two windstorms, one on Tuesday and another in August, which saw trees falling on BC Hydro transmission wires, plunging thousands of homes into darkness, some of them for days. On Tuesday, electricity was cut to about 110,000 B.C. homes after winds gusting up to 70 km/h toppled trees and snapped power lines.

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Crown firewood changes fueling anger in Miramichi region

Residents can no longer hire skidders to get 7 cords of firewood from Crown land
CBC News
November 19, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

People in central New Brunswick say new rules on how they harvest firewood from Crown land are unfair and could leave many of them without a vital fuel supply for the winter. Before last year, New Brunswick residents could get a permit from the Department of Natural Resources and pay someone with a skidder to cut seven cords of wood for them from Crown land. But now the use of skidders — heavy equipment used in a logging operation for pulling cut trees out of the forest — is banned. The change has many people in central New Brunswick upset and they packed a community hall in Doaktown Wednesday night to talk about the change.

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Parks Canada plans to meet with moose hunt protesters

Cape Breton Post
November 17, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

SYDNEY – Parks Canada plans to meet with a group of protesters after the temporary suspension of a moose harvesting initiative in the Cape Breton Highlands National Park. Parks Canada has set aside a 20-square-kilometre area on North Mountain for the hunt, which was tentatively scheduled to take place over two weeks this month. However, on Nov. 11, 30 protesters entered the restricted area and some proceeded to a staging area to confront Mi’kmaq harvesters, prompting a suspension of the hunt. Parks Canada has stated the current moose population in the proposed hunt area was unsustainable, while the protesting group believes the population is on the decline.

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Pointe-Claire to fell 325 of ash trees

Montreal Gazette
November 18, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

Pointe-Claire will cut down 325 ash trees on public property over the next four months to prevent the spread of the invasive emerald ash borer. For a variety of reasons, the trees tagged for removal could not be treated by TreeAzin, a liquid that can help prevent infestations of the tiny beetle that has already killed millions of ash trees in North America. The trees are being cut down during a period when the beetle is least likely to be active.

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Why Fire Suppression Has Little Influence on Forest Fires

Counter Punch
November 19, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States

A common assertion, oft repeated by the timber industry, the Forest Service, and far too many conservation groups (such as, The Nature Conservancy) is that a century of fire suppression has contributed to the large wildfires we are seeing around the West. The logic goes like this. Due to effective fire suppression, fuels have accumulated in most forest types and hence we are experiencing larger fires. The solution, therefore, is to reduce the fuels—usually proponents of the fire suppression paradigm want to accomplish this by logging. The main problem with this logic is that most plant communities in the forests of the West are not characterized by frequent fires under natural conditions, thus fire suppression, even if it were effective, would not have altered the natural fire patterns.

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Forest Service Backs Down, Cancels Controversial Tongass Old-growth Timber Sale

Logging Would Harm Wildlife, Subsistence Hunters in Alaska
Center for Biological Diversity
November 18, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

PETERSBURG, Alaska— The U.S. Forest Service has formally withdrawn its March authorization of the Mitkof Island Project — a large, 35-million-board-foot timber sale — through documents made available to the public on its website yesterday. Five environmental organizations sued the Forest Service in May to stop the sale. Those organizations — the Greater Southeast Alaska Conservation Community, Cascadia Wildlands, the Center for Biological Diversity, Greenpeace and the Alaska Wildlife Alliance — are represented by attorneys with Crag Law Center in Portland and Cascadia Wildlands in Cordova.  “The agency was forced to walk away from this timber sale because it
failed to listen to serious environmental concerns raised by the local
community,” said Gabe Scott with Cascadia Wildlands.

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State Forester: Feds should ease certification for fire aircraft

Alaska Public Media
November 18, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

After Alaska’s second worst fire season on record, the state forester told a U.S. Senate committee the government should stop practices that he says needlessly sideline firefighting aircraft. Sen. Lisa Murkowski called the hearing to discuss how to improve federal fire management. Alaska State Forester Chris Maisch says one long-standing problem is that both the Forest Service and the Interior Department require aircraft to meet certain standards for firefighting, and each agency certifies – or “cards”– separately. Maisch says the two agencies aren’t well coordinated. “It’s basically some bureaucracy,” he said.

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Bitterroot National Forest seeks public comment on logging near Sula

The Missoulian
November 18, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

SULA – The Bitterroot National Forest is inviting the public to review and make comments on a proposed vegetation management, fuels reduction, and watershed improvement project east of Sula. The Meadow Vapor Project proposes harvest and thinning, slash piling, and prescribed burning on approximately 3,200 acres of overstocked National Forest System lands surrounding the communities of Springer Memorial and Bonzana in the upper East Fork of the Bitterroot River. The Meadow Vapor project area is approximately 8,400 acres and includes numerous drainages which flow into the East Fork of the Bitterroot River, including Meadow Creek, Vapor Creek, Needle Creek, Lick Creek, Reynolds Creek, and Tepee Creek.

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Land-use planning can reduce wildfire threat, costs

The Argus Observer
November 17, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

The 2015 fire season was worse than any on record, and summertime temperatures are steadily escalating. Increasing the average summer temperature by just 1 degree Fahrenheit results in an increase of 420 wildfires in the state annually, according to estimates by the Oregon Department of Forestry. Research and news articles have focused on the need for forest fuels reduction, creating defensible space around rural dwellings and improving firefighting methods. However, effective land-use planning has perhaps the greatest potential for reducing wildfire threat. The USDA Forest Service defines transition areas just outside communities as the “wildland-urban interface.”

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Colorado Sen. Gardner: State has felt the burn of wildfires

The Durango Herald
November 17, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

In order to improve wildfire management strategies, members of the U.S. Senate’s Energy and Natural Resources Committee met Tuesday to examine methods for combatting the growing threat posed by larger and more uncontrollable wildfires. “We’ve experienced significant wildfires over the past 15 years,” Sen. Cory Gardner, R-Colo., who serves on the committee, said, citing the devastation from the 2013 Black Forest Fire, the Waldo Canyon Fire of 2012 and the destructive 2002 Hayman Fire. Committee Chairwoman Sen. Lisa Murkowski, R-Alaska, said it was important to address budgetary issues associated with combatting wildfires, but added that it was also essential to more effectively streamline firefighting efforts as fires grow in size and threaten more communities.

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Time for US Senate to act on forest solutions

Letter from Jeremy Martin
The Olympian
November 17, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Over 65 million acres of national forest lands are in need of treatment due to poor forest health associated with insects, disease, a century of fire suppression and the resulting build-up of hazardous fuels. We witnessed the disastrous results of our current forest policies this summer when over 9 million acres burned and federal wildfire suppression budgets were exhausted. On July 9, the U.S. House approved H.R. 2647 to give federal agencies policy and legal tools to make federal forests less vulnerable to catastrophic wildfire, insects and disease while putting more Americans back to work. It will expedite critical forest health projects, speed post-fire recovery efforts and fix wildfire funding.

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Daines: We Need Forest Management Reform

KMMSAM
November 17, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West


Senator Steve Daines today implored his Senate colleagues to take long-needed action and move forward bipartisan legislation that includes both a solution for wildfire funding and responsible forest management reforms. “I urge my colleagues on both sides of the aisle, let’s come together and pass a wildfire funding solution as well as timber management that includes some litigation reform – so we can move forward here and protect our forests, protect our jobs and protect the lives of the men and women who fight these fires,” Daines stated.

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Wildfire Conundrum: Weeding the Forest

KCTS9
November 18, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

A century of putting out wildfires has left many forests in the West much thicker than in the past. That buildup of fire fuel is widely seen as a disaster waiting to happen. And an innovative project in Ashland, Ore. is an example of an increasingly popular approach to dealing with that fire risk. At a trailhead in the mountains just outside Ashland, forester Andy Lerch gives his crew a last-minute safety reminder: “Be careful with your footing. Also, overhead hazards are always something to be aware of … and bees. Yeah, watch out for bees, as well. Those are … our nemesis.” The six-member crew loads up with cans of spray paint and heads off single-file down the trail. Lerch and his crew work for the non-profit Lomakatsi Restoration Project. Today’s job is to mark trees for removal. But this isn’t your standard commercial logging operation.

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500 miles of Colorado forest roads under review for closure

Settlement accepted in U.S. District Court forces feds to review 500 miles of roads
The Denver Post
November 18, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

The U.S. Forest Service has agreed to consider closing 500 miles of roads for motorized vehicles that land managers improperly allowed in mountains west of Front Range cities. Under a legal settlement accepted Monday in U.S. District Court, the Forest Service also must consult with state wildlife experts within three months on whether immediate changes must be made to protect deer and elk. A coalition of environmental groups forced the settlement, the result of a 2011 lawsuit challenging the roads across 1.1 million acres of the Pike-San Isabel National Forest.

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Senate told to change way nation fights wildfires

The Spokesman-Review
November 17, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

WASHINGTON – Spending money meant for forest preservation to fight wildfires increases the risk of more fires in the future, witnesses told a Senate committee Tuesday. “What we have learned over the years is that it is expensive to manage the lands, but even more so to repair the lands devastated by wildfires,” said Jon Wyss, chairman of the Okanogan and Carlton Complex Long Term Recovery group. The Forest Service, which manages federal land that covers about 30 percent of Washington and 60 percent of Idaho, redirected $700 million of its budget this year because it ran out of money for fire suppression. At least 65 million acres of federal land still needs restoration work, but the service’s ability to continue the projects is “severely constrained” by the current system, the U.S. Agriculture Department reported last week.

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Funding available to help increase for forestry practices

Associated Press in Washington Post
November 19, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va. — The USDA’s Natural Resources Conservation Services is making a $470,000 fund available to help increase adoption of forestry practices across the state. In a statement, the NRCS said the funding offers landowners an opportunity to help establish and maintain forestlands. It is available through the Regional Conservation Partnership Program and is offered in cooperation with Virginia Department of Forestry. The VDOF will help eligible landowners develop a plan to manage their land for purposes such as recreation or wildlife habitat. Financial assistance is also available for installing practices including prescribed burning, critical area planting and forest stand improvement.

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School of Forestry Brings American Chestnut Back to the Keweenaw

Michigan Tech News
November 18, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States


Back in the late 1980s, when Terry Sharik was teaching at Michigan Tech’s School of Forest Resources and Environmental Science—then called the School of Forestry and Wood Products—he discovered what he calls “one of the finest forest-grown large American chestnut trees I have ever seen.”.. When he returned to Michigan Tech as dean of SFRES in 2012, one of his goals was to someday return the American chestnut to the BHK site it used to call home.

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Kew’s Millennium Seed Bank to take Scottish specimens

BBC News
November 18, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: International

Seeds from trees native to Scotland are to be collected and stored for their long-term conservation. Target species include Scots pine, which is Scotland’s national tree, common juniper, common ash, common alder and silver birch. The seeds will be placed in Kew Royal Botanic Gardens’ Millennium Seed Bank. Fifteen organisations, including Trees for Life, Forestry Commission Scotland and Woodland Trust, will be involved in gathering healthy seeds. Funding for the collection and analysis work has been secured from the People’s Postcode Lottery. Environment Minister Aileen McLeod said the effort would “safeguard” Scotland’s forests.

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Companies show little progress on forest protection pledge

No signs deforestation is slowing a year after New York Declaration on Forests, warn NGOs, but some positive measures
Climate Home
November 18, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: International

Business has made a slow start on last year’s landmark pledge to fight deforestation, environmental groups have warned. Last September, 150 companies signed the New York Declaration on Forests, vowing to halt clearance of natural forest within 15 years by making supply chains sustainable. That means making sure trees are not hacked down to produce agricultural products like soy, palm oil and beef. According to a report by a group of six green groups including the Environmental Defense Fund and Forest Trends, little progress has been registered. “Unfortunately, there are no signs that the annual rate of forest loss is slowing,” said Charlotte Streck at Climate Focus.

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Hundreds of starving koalas moved north along Great Ocean Road for chance at surviving summer

ABC News Australia
November 19, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: International

About 400 koalas are being moved from Cape Otway, on Victoria’s Great Ocean Road, as part of plans to manage a huge spike in the animal’s population. Wildlife officers from Victoria’s Department of Environment, Land, Water and Planning (DELWP) said there were at least 1,000 koalas at Cape Otway – an area that should house about 200. Almost 800 starving koalas have been put down at Cape Otway in the past two years. “We’re hoping that by moving about 400 this time around that will reduce the population by about a third, and that will give the habitat time to recover somewhat and certainly give it some respite over the summer,” DELWP senior biodiversity officer Mandy Watson said.

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Champion Tasmanian axeman recalls ‘killer instinct’ that made wood his enemy

ABC News Australia
November 19, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: International

David Foster is a world champion axeman from the north-west coast of Tasmania — and he is larger than life. Mr Foster has won 186 world woodchopping titles, and growing up he can remember wanting to be just like his dad, also a competitive woodchopper. “As long as I can remember we had a little axe in our hand,” Mr Foster said. …Mr Foster is a big man, with a loud voice and a slightly greying moustache which has been his trademark throughout his career. Even after hundreds of titles, ribbons and prizes to his name from woodchopping, Mr Foster said there was one clear difference between him and anyone else.

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Ireland bets on forestry to meet climate change targets

Irish Famers Journal
November 18, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: International

While all sectors will have to produce less greenhouse gases, the Irish Government hopes its efforts to plant more trees will be recognised as a way of offsetting emissions from agriculture. Speaking at a briefing on Irish agriculture and climate change on Wednesday, Agriculture Minister Simon Coveney said that “afforestation is the most significant mitigation option” against climate change that’s available to Ireland’s land-use sector. Minister of State Tom Hayes added that an important way of using this potential was to convert less efficient grazing land to forestry, mainly on beef farms. While all types of Irish farming present opportunities to reduce greenhouse gas emissions through better practices, there is more room from improvement through afforestation (the conversion of new land to forests) than anywhere else.

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Parrot concerns suspend Tas logging

The Australian
November 19, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: International

LOGGING on Bruny Island, south of Hobart, has been temporarily suspended as part of efforts to save the dwindling habitat of the critically endangered swift parrot. TASMANIAN resources minister Paul Harriss on Thursday told parliament that plans by Forestry Tasmania to begin works on the island in early 2016 will be put off. “It has been decided to temporarily cease harvesting on Bruny Island, pending the completion of an evidence-based swift parrot management plan informed by an Australian government reassessment of the status of the species,” he said. The International Union for Conservation of Nature in October listed the parrot as critically endangered, following data from researchers showing the birds are in rapid decline as they fight the threat of logging and their main predator, the sugar glider.

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Scientists may have just found a really surprising way to see religion from space

The Washington Post
November 17, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: International

A surprising new scientific paper suggests that the pattern of global wildfires varies based on the day of the week — with considerably fewer fires globally on Sunday than on other days. And not only that: It partly attributes this pattern not to anything natural about ecosystems, but rather to human behavioral patterns — including weekly rituals that are ultimately rooted in culture and faith. “Our weekly routines are based on religion originally,” says Nick Earl of the University of Melbourne in Australia, who published the research in Geophysical Research Letters with two colleagues. “And you can see that in the weekly cycle of fires.” To show as much, the researchers used NASA satellite imagery to look at all global fires from 2001 to 2013, with images taken four times each day.

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Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy

Canadian Forest Industry To Host Climate Change Panel Discussion With Leading Scientists And Environmentalists In Ottawa

Nation Talk
November 18, 2015
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: Canada

OTTAWA: Members of the working media as well as the general public are invited to tune in online as the Forest Products Association of Canada (FPAC), in partnership with the Canadian Climate Forum is set to host a panel discussion in Ottawa on November 19 th , in advance of the upcoming United Nations Paris Climate Conference. Forest Products, Part of the Solution to Climate Change will feature a discussion with leading experts in sustainable industry, climate science and environmental conservation. Speakers will include Michael Green, leading sustainability architect, Dr. Steve Colombo, research scientist representing the Canadian Climate Forum and Tim Gray, Executive Director of Environmental Defence Canada, representing the Canadian Boreal Forest Agreement. 

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Climate change is ‘single biggest threat’ to polar bear survival

The Guardian
November 19, 2015
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: International

Global warming is now the single most important threat to the survival of the polar bear with retreating sea ice set to decimate populations, according to a new study by the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN). It found a “high probability” that the planet’s 26,000 polar bears will suffer a 30% decline in population by 2050 due to the loss of their habitat, which is disappearing at a faster rate than predicted by climate models. “There is a high risk of extinction and the threat is serious,” said Dena Cator of the IUCN’s species survival commission. “You could consider polar bears to be a canary in the coal mine. They are an iconic and beautiful species that is extremely important to indigenous communities. But changes to their sea ice habitat are already being seen as a result of climate change.”

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Cardiff uni researchers help unearth ancient forest

BBC News
November 19, 2015
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: International

Researchers have unearthed fossil forests, thought to have been partly responsible for a huge change in the earth’s climate 380 million years ago. Preserved tree stumps were uncovered in Norway by a team including Cardiff University researchers. Scientists believe the forest could help explain a 15-fold reduction in carbon dioxide levels at the time. Dr Chris Berry said it showed what the landscape was like as “the first trees were beginning to appear on Earth”. The forests, found in Svalbard, an archipelago in the Arctic Ocean, grew near the equator during the Devonian period (420 – 360 million years ago).

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