Tree Frog Forestry News

Daily Archives: December 4, 2015

Froggy Foibles

There’s a strange forest in Poland that’s filled with crooked trees — and no one can explain how it got that way

Business Insider Australia
December 3, 2015
Category: Froggy Foibles
Region: International

Deep in the woods of the West Pomerania region of Poland, an entire section of trees bends at sharp angles near their bases, forming an odd and entrancing phenomenon known as “The Crooked Forest.” Why do the trees bend like this? No one is quite sure. Some have theorised that harsh weather conditions made them this way. Others have said that man-made development uprooted the trees. Landscape photographer Kilian Schoönberger shared some of his photos of the forest, as well as the folklore surrounding it.

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Business & Politics

Trade mission a success

Castanet News
December 3, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations Minister Steve Thomson characterizes his trade mission to Japan and China as a success. …”(These are) number two and three most important markets for the forest sector,” said Thomson on the importance of the trip. …During the trip, Thomson said he had a chance to tour a five-story elderly care facility which, once complete, will be the largest two-by-four wooden structure in Japan. …Thomson also renewed a five-year memorandum of understand with China today to promote wood-frame construction in China. The delegation included Susan Yurkovich, president and CEO of the Council of Forest Industries.

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Ontario’s electricity management won’t accept more power from Hornepayne mill

3-week shutdown of sawmill and co-gen plant could be permanent, which would devastate town
CBC News
December 3, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada East, Canada

The Crown corporation responsible for regulating the electricity market in Ontario says there’s nothing keeping the threatened sawmill and co-generation plant in Hornepayne, Ont., from selling more power — it just won’t be to the province. The Haavalsrud Timber Company told employees last week it would shut down the sawmill and Becker Cogeneration Plant if it did not come to an agreement with the province by Christmas. A complete shutdown would cost the township 146 jobs, or about 40 per cent of its workforce, its mayor has said. According to a steward for the Steelworkers Union who works at the mill, the company told employees the shutdown could be avoided if the company is allowed to produce more power for the provincial grid.

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Athol Forestry receives Lt. Gov. partnership award

Daily Business Buzz
December 3, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada East, Canada

AMHERST – A local cooperative is being recognized for its role making employment accessible. Athol Forestry General Manager Ian Ripley reviews a forestry management plan the cooperative works on. Athol Forestry was recognized with the Lt. Governor’s Persons with Disabilities Employer Partnership regional award this week. Athol Forestry Cooperative received the Lt. Governor’s Persons with Disabilities Employer Partnership Award during the Annual Ability Starts Here Symposium in Halifax on Dec. 1. The regional award recognizes Athol’s partnership with the Canadian African Nova Scotian Association to employee and train persons with learning or physical disabilities for an eight-week period.

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Boise Cascade Co Stock Price Down 3.8%

Putnam Standard
December 3, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States, US West

Boise Cascade Co (NYSE:BCC)’s share price fell 3.8% on Thursday , AnalystRatings.NET reports. The company traded as low as $28.98 and last traded at $29.23, with a volume of 85,885 shares traded. The stock had previously closed at $30.37. The firm has a 50-day moving average price of $30.13 and a 200-day moving average price of $32.15. The company has a market cap of $1.12 billion and a price-to-earnings ratio of 17.37. Boise Cascade (NYSE:BCC) last released its quarterly earnings results on Thursday, October 22nd. The company reported $0.56 earnings per share for the quarter, topping analysts’ consensus estimates of $0.48 by $0.08.

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Small-scale logging businesses fret Tongass timber regs

Alaska Public Radio Network
December 3, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States, US West

The U.S. Forest Service recently released a plan giving loggers a timeline for the transition to second-growth harvesting. The plan is currently open for public comment. A proposal to end clearcutting of old-growth trees in the Tongass National Forest has some Southeast logging companies concerned about the future. Susan Tyler runs Icy Straits Lumber & Milling in Hoonah with her husband Wes. It’s a family business and one of the few surviving timber companies in the region. Wes has been harvesting trees in Alaska since 1967.

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Danzer to invest Euro 15 million in processing technologies for hardwood

Lesprom Network
December 3, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: International

In the next years, Danzer will invest approximately Euro 15 million in technologies to increase resource efficiency in hardwood production, as the company says in the press release received by Lesprom Network. Danzer plants in France, in the Czech Republic and in the US are going to be adapted or upgraded, respectively. The companies’ curve-saw and log scanning technologies will also be optimized further. The use of new processes will pave the way to major improvements in resource efficiencies. Initially, three projects are in focus: Increase of the production of deck layers for the engineered flooring industry as well as further optimization of veneer and lumber production.

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Stable 2016 outlook for global paper and forest products sector on increasing home construction

Moody’s Investor’s Service
December 2, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: International

Toronto, – Increasing housing starts and higher consumer spending will drive anticipated operating income growth for the global paper and forest products industry of 1%-3% in 2016, underpinning the current stable outlook for the sector for the next 12 months, says Moody’s Investors Service in a report published today. However, the outlook for the Printing and Writing Paper segment is negative as digital alternatives continue to curb paper demand. ..”Our outlook for the global paper and forest products sector over the next year remains within our stable range as increasing home construction and economic growth drive wood product, packaging and market pulp earnings growth in the low single digits in 2016,” says Ed Sustar, a Moody’s Vice President — Senior Credit Officer and author of the report.

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Foresty Tasmania prepares to sell Tahune Airwalk in latest move to offset losses

ABC News Australia
December 3, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: International

Forestry Tasmania is preparing to sell its tourism venture Tahune Airwalk in the south of the state in the latest move to limit losses. In government business scrutiny hearings, Forestry Tasmania chairman Bob Annells declared “we shouldn’t be in the tourism business”. The business is considering the future of the popular tourism venture and expects to put a proposal to Resources Minister Paul Harriss early next year. “The private sector has a lot of experience in Tasmania in running these sorts of adventure activities,” Mr Annells said.  “As long as we can be satisfied it’ll be maintained appropriately and good services will be provided.  “It clearly doesn’t fit now into Forestry Tas business strategy going forward.”

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Forestry Tasmania committed to FSC journey, says boss Bob Annells

The Mercury
December 3, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: International

FORESTRY Tasmania’s chairman says “nobody is more frustrated” than the FT board by the time it’s taking to move forward in its quest for top environmental certification. A Government Business Enterprise hearing has been told Forestry Tasmania still doesn’t know when it may receive a final audit report on its bid for Forest Stewardship Council certification. But chairman Bob Annells said the company had not been sitting on its hands when it came to improving its processes in pursuit of FSC approval. In a major shift for the Tasmanian industry, Forestry Tasmania will cease clearfelling of old growth forest after this financial year. “This is a very important and significant change in our operations,” Mr Annells said. Mr Annells said Forestry Tasmania had made moves to protect the swift parrot by halting logging on Bruny Island.

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Wood, Paper & Green Building

Saving the GTA’s beetle-ravaged ash wood (creatively!)

Yonge Street – Toronto
December 3, 2015
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: Canada East, Canada

Sebai and his partners have taken an innovative approach to those dead [ash] trees. In the past, felled trees would be chipped into mulch or converted into firewood. Some trees would inevitably end up in landfills. But the ash trees that have been infected with the emerald ash borer are different. With the damage confined to the surface of the trunk, the cores can be repurposed. …Sawmill Sid, a local lumber milling company, could provide on-site milling, which Sebai says removed the carbon costs of transporting the wood. As a result, up to half the ash trees slated for removal have been diverted into high-value uses such as lumber and raw-edge wood. “We perceive trees as being a resource rather than a waste, so we wanted to find a way to recover the trees for the highest value, which is lumber,” says Sebai. “Mulch and firewood is diversion, but we can do better.”

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WA student architects win again

Domain.com.au
December 4, 2015
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: International

As a result of turning two-dimensional design theory into three-dimensional structures of beauty and utility, for three years running now, fourth and fifth year students at the University of Western Australia’s faculty of architecture, landscape and visual arts, have won top prizes in the annual and nationally contested Australia Timber Design Awards. In the recent 2015 finals of the category “excellence in the use of timber product”, the WA students were even competing against themselves with two very different entries. Their lyrical, two-part construction named “The Rose” because of its complex design and as a timber abstraction of the petal form of roses, beat their just as interesting jarrah pavement that turns into a seating arrangement called “Wood Wave”.

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Wooden Empire State Building could be first sustainable skyscraper

Proud Green Building
December 3, 2015
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: International

…However, Metsä Wood, a Finnish wood products producer, and Michael Green, renowned sustainable Canadian architect, have designed a wooden version of the Empire State Building to prove that sustainable construction is possible when designing tall buildings, according to a story published on the PSFK Labs website. “While many things have changed in 85 years, architects still strive to give form to new ideas about structure, energy consumption, climate change and the list goes on. We designed a skyscraper using Metsä Wood’s Kerto LVL engineered wood as the main material from floors to column spacing,” said Michael Green, the head architect on the project.

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Forestry

Logging on private lands needs work

Letter by Wayne Crowley
Alberni Valley News
December 3, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Water, water everywhere and not a clean drop to drink…that used to be a regular refrain, especially if you live in the Beaver Creek Water District. That’s where TimberWest logging company logged the beautiful Beaufort Mountains from Wolf Creek on the west side to Kitsuksis Creek on the east side, and all the stream beds and water courses in between including Beaver Creek itself. Some of their actions caused numerous boil water orders and forced residents to use city water from the China Creek watershed. TimberWest is the same company that has been logging the China Creek watershed for years, now under the Private Lands Council, where they have their own rules and self-supervision. 

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Battle for the Boreal

December 4, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

The boreal is the world’s largest forest: a vast ring of evergreens that stretches across Russia, Europe and North America. About a quarter of it lives in Canada. Last year the group that forest firms pay to audit their behaviour in the boreal, the Forest Stewardship Council, sent Resolute reeling when it revoked its seal of approval for logging projects that comprise about half of Resolute’s Canadian forest operations. The council, which was founded in Toronto in 1993 but is now based in Germany, said Resolute didn’t get permission from First Nations to log certain forests, and wasn’t doing enough to protect caribou habitat. Greenpeace, which styles itself a protector of the forest, saw a chance to seize on what it sensed could be a 21st-century Clayoquot Sound, the anti-logging protest in B.C. that became a global campaign and ended up driving everyone but the First Nations out of the logging business in that pocket of Vancouver Island.

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Battle for the Boreal

December 4, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

The boreal is the world’s largest forest: a vast ring of evergreens that stretches across Russia, Europe and North America. About a quarter of it lives in Canada. Last year the group that forest firms pay to audit their behaviour in the boreal, the Forest Stewardship Council, sent Resolute reeling when it revoked its seal of approval for logging projects that comprise about half of Resolute’s Canadian forest operations. The council, which was founded in Toronto in 1993 but is now based in Germany, said Resolute didn’t get permission from First Nations to log certain forests, and wasn’t doing enough to protect caribou habitat. Greenpeace, which styles itself a protector of the forest, saw a chance to seize on what it sensed could be a 21st-century Clayoquot Sound, the anti-logging protest in B.C. that became a global campaign and ended up driving everyone but the First Nations out of the logging business in that pocket of Vancouver Island.

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Green Diamond proposes McKinleyville community forest plan

KAEFTV.com
December 2, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

MCKINLEYVILLE, Calif. – People living in McKinelyville could soon have access to a community forest in their own backyard. Staff from Green Diamond Resource Company will give a presentation to the McKinleyville Community Services District Wednesday night regarding the plan for the community forest. Green Diamond has owned much of the 3,600 acre space for 50 years and is proposing three separate plans for land management. The plans result in establishing a community forest ranging from 400 to 600 acres. Almost 300 acres would remain for possible development while around 3,000 acres would remain for forest management by Green Diamond.

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Weasel-Like Fishers Return To The South Cascades Of Washington

Oregon Public Broadcasting
December 3, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

It’s been more than 70 years since anyone saw the weasel-like fisher in Washington’s south Cascades. But on Thursday, wildlife officials introduced seven of these elusive carnivores into the woods of Gifford Pinchot National Forest. Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife biologist Jeff Lewis recruited several children to help release the fishers from wooden kennels. It didn’t take long for the furry, cat-sized mammals to make a run for the woods, away from a gathering of about 50 people who came to watch and photograph the event. Fishers were eliminated from Washington by the mid-1950s through over-trapping. 

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Guest Column: Consider the possible economic opportunities

by George Wuerthner
NR Today
December 2, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

The Douglas County Commissioners passed a resolution opposing the Crater Lake Wilderness supported by Oregon Wild. This is a very common reaction to any land protection proposals. The problem is most locals see their economies in the rear view mirror. In the case of Douglas County, everyone longs for the days when timber was the main economic driver. But that is not what is driving today’s economies. The best thing that happened to Bend is when the timber companies left town. It forced people to start looking forward instead of backwards. Today Bend is one of the most sought after places to live in the West with a diversified economy, in part, because of the close proximity to protected wilderness and natural landscapes.

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Record stumpage sales projected

Star Journal Now
December 3, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

Oneida County Forestry Department projects a revenue total of $1,735,000 for 2015 stumpage. Stumpage is the price on standing timber, which is used to contract timber harvests. Projected revenue is dependent on the ability of lumber contractors to harvest through the fall. The current projection is $20,000 over the existing all-time high for Oneida County, which was set just last year. John Bilogan, Oneida County Forest Director, said the numbers are the result of a “perfect storm of events.” Not only were conditions—a wet spring, wet summer and shortage of wood statewide—perfect for wood harvest, but a delayed reaction to a change several years ago in the allowable cut for sustainability has provided a boost.

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Bill would give break to Wisconsin forest owners in state program

WHBL
December 3, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

MADISON, WI – There’s a new effort to let Wisconsin landowners in a state forestry program close more of their property to public recreation, while keeping the tax breaks they received for opening that land. Senate Republican Tom Tiffany of Hazelhurst and Assembly Republican Jeff Mursau of Crivitz have been seeking co-sponsors for their proposed bill. It would end a provision that lets landowners in the Managed Forest program designate up to 160 acres for their private use. Instead, all public access could be restricted on non-industrial timber lands. Under the 30-year-old law, timber land owners pay one-fifth of their normal property taxes for keeping their timber sites open to people like hunters. That’s a saving of more than $30,000 for sites of 1,000 acres.

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Red pine purge as invasive insect threatens trees

New Hampshire Union Leader
December 2, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

AUBURN — Tom Cushman fires up the large yellow feller buncher, grabs an 80-year-old red pine tree with its oversized claw and slices through the base with a large circular saw. The entire process takes roughly 15 seconds. Four more trees come down, a combined 400 years of growth toppled in just under five minutes. Manchester Water Works plans to remove stands of red pine trees across 400 acres over the next five years in response to what Watershed Forester John O’Neil terms the “immient threat of severe mortality” by the invasive red pine scale insect. The bug is blamed for widespread devastation throughout New England over the last 50 years, and has recently been detected in New Hampshire.

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Anti-logging group ‘devastated’ Minister will not halt logging at Lapoinya

ABC News Australia
December 4, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: International

Resources Minister Paul Harriss has refused to stop Forestry Tasmania from clear felling a regrowth coupe at Lapoinya in the state’s north-west. The Forests of Lapoinya Action Group claimed logging the coupe would adversely affect endangered animals in the area. Members of the group met Mr Harriss in Hobart yesterday to ask him to remove the coupe from Forestry Tasmania’s current harvesting schedule. Within hours of the meeting Mr Harriss wrote to the group telling them he could not agree to their request. A spokesman from the Minister said the coupe would remain in the harvesting schedule.

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End to clear-felling a sticking point to Forestry Tasmania ‘green stamp’

ABC News Australia
December 4, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: International

Forestry Tasmania has been told it needs to improve its practices in three key areas to have any chance of gaining international environmental approval including swift parrot protection and ceasing old growth clear-felling. The state’s forest manager is yet to receive the final report from the Forest Stewardship Council’s auditor after receiving a draft in April. Forestry Tasmania chairman Bob Annells told a government business scrutiny hearing that nobody was more frustrated with the time the audit was taking than the board. He said discussions with the auditor had identified three key areas where Forestry Tasmania was not meeting the required standard.

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Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy

Climate Change Plan Needs to Include Wildlife Conservation

Canadian Wildlife Federation press release in Marketwired
December 3, 2015
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: Canada

The Canadian Wildlife Federation (CWF) is releasing a comprehensive new land use study that simulates the benefits and liabilities of the next 50 years of development in the western boreal forest region in order to inform dialogue on the options for wildlife conservation in this rapidly developing region. The western boreal forest is an economic powerhouse, rich in energy and forest resources and one of the most controversial oil producing regions in the world. It is also a vast wilderness area and home to wildlife including caribou, moose, sport fish such as Arctic grayling and walleye, and over 200 songbird species. Climate change actions and resource development plans for this area need to include goals for wildlife conservation in order to ensure a future for species that live in the Western Boreal.

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Forests Can Only Fight Climate Change if We Become Better Stewards

By Jens Wieting
The Tyee
December 4, 2015
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: Canada, Canada West

Canada harbours one-tenth of world’s carbon-absorbing trees – After a 10-year “climate action pause,” Canada is back at the international table. Though expectations are high that the new government will work to end our dependence on fossil fuels and speed up the transition to renewable energy, there has been little discussion about the importance of and threats to our forests in the fight against global warming. …For Canada, the gradual process of forest degradation (the long-term loss of forest structure from industrial logging or frequent fire) is a much greater problem than deforestation (the complete loss of forest). According to analysis by Greenpeace and the University of Maryland, globally over 100 million hectares of intact forests were lost to degradation from 2000 to 2013… Shockingly, Canada contributed 21 per cent of this loss, more than any other country.

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Ontario Liberals politically motivated in converting plant to biomass fuel, says PC leader

Toronto Star
December 3, 2015
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: Canada East, Canada

The Liberal government was protecting the seats of two Thunder Bay cabinet ministers when it ignored warnings about converting a coal-fired power plant to a pricey biomass fuel, Progressive Conservative Leader Patrick Brown says. “It’s part of a broader problem we have — it’s political intervention in energy and it’s resulted in us paying among the highest energy prices in North America.” Brown told reporters Thursday in the wake of a scathing report from auditor general Bonnie Lysyk. She found the Ministry of Energy directed the now defunct Ontario Power Authority to convert the Thunder Bay plant to biomass imported from Europe despite the OPA’s advice it would not be “cost-effective.”

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LETTER: Seriously?

Letter by Dennis Rizzo
Orillia Packet and Times
December 3, 2015
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: Canada East, Canada

Re: “Grit hydro planning broken: AG,” Dec. 3 Sometimes it is in the little, off-hand statements in public documents that we find the most irony. The article on the AG’s report from the Packet & Times has such an info blip. Quote: “Ontario’s last coal-burning station in Thunder Bay was converted to biomass, but it has to import wood products from Europe to burn, pushing the cost of the electricity it generates to 25 times higher than other biomass generators.” Import wood products? To Thunder Bay? Excuse me — does not Canada export wood products to the rest of the world? Could it be that rank incompetence or personal gain (or both) factored in the design and planning of this facility? How many others? For how long? Just sayin’.

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Generating station costs 25 times more to produce than other biomass facilities in Ontario

TB Newswatch
December 3, 2015
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: Canada East, Canada

Citing power that is 25 times more expensive to produce than other biomass facilities in Ontario, the conversion of Thunder Bay’s coal-fired power-generating station has come under fire from the province’s auditor general. In her annual report, Bonnie Lysyk lists the conversion to biomass among the decisions made by the Ministry of Energy that has led to “significant costs to electricity consumers.” The auditor general points out the conversion of the Ontario Power Generation plant from coal to biomass was done despite the Ontario Power Authority’s advice that it was not a cost-effective plan. “The ministry cites facilitating economic growth and job creation in the forestry industry as its reasons for going ahead with the project despite the fact that this facility uses imported forestry resources that can only be purchased outside of Canada,” the report reads.

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From Paris: The World Agrees To Save Trees

WWNO.org
December 3, 2015
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: United States, International

The international climate talks continue in Paris this week and one of the hot topics has been deforestation. Louisiana cut down many of its forests in the 1800s, and as WWNO’s Tegan Wendland reports, the world has learned from our mistakes. Forests are in the spotlight at COP21 this week. A group of US companies have pledged to revamp their supply chains to stop deforestation – by using sustainable paper and palm oil. Prince Charles of Wales gave a speech appealing to the nations of the world to stop deforestation. Jason Funk is Senior scientist with The Union of Concerned Scientists. He says forests in coastal areas, like mangroves in more tropical areas, and cypress in Louisiana, are especially important.

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Red Rock Biofuels gets local go-ahead

Lake County Examiner
December 2, 2015
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: United States, US West

A joint session meeting was held on Tuesday, Nov. 24 between Lakeview Town Council and Lake County Commissioners to decide on whether or not to approve a long-term enterprise zone agreement for Red Rock Biofuels. …Once fully operational, the company will employ over 30 staff at the facility with an additional 80 jobs or more involved in forest management, collection and transport of materials. The plant will use a chemical process to convert agriculture waste and forest fuels to jet fuel, generating millions of gallons each year to be utilized by the military and airlines. The collection of mill waste and excess forest materials has the added benefit of reducing potential fuels for wildfires, promoting healthier and more resilient forests.

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Norway to grant US$ 5 million to Peru forest preservation

December 4, 2015
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: International

At the UN Climate Change Conference (COP 21), the Norwegian Government announced it will pledge US$ 5 million to support Peru’s forest management and preservation efforts, reports Andina. In Paris, France, world leaders are currently meeting to come up with an agreement to reduce drastic effects of climate change. One of Norway’s contribution efforts, the pledge to Peru, was announced by the Norwegian Climate and Environment Miniser Tine Sundtoft with Peru’s Minister of the Environment, Manuel Pulgar-Vidal.  “Peruvian forests provide Peru and the world with water, food and every kind of benefit. It is our duty to assist Peru in the preservation of such ecosystems and such important natural resources in favor of humankind,” Sundtoft said reports Andina.

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Climate change: Why Indonesia’s forests are crucial to emission curbs

Yahoo News
December 3, 2015
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: International

Negotiators in Paris say it’s essential to safeguard tropical forests in order to curb carbon emissions. Indonesia ranks among the top five emitters because of its errant forestry practices. …Deforestation accounts for 11 percent of global carbon emissions, according to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Climatologists warn that it will be impossible to slow the Earth’s rising temperature without addressing it, which is why negotiators from nearly 200 nations meeting this week in Paris are expected for the first time to formally recognize deforestation’s contribution to climate change.

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What’s the best way to protect forests? That’s a big question at the Paris climate talks

Grist
December 3, 2015
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: International

At a climate summit mired in policy debate and finger-pointing, it is easy to forget about the potential of something as simple as a tree. But there are 3 trillion trees in the world, and they are intimately tied to the climate. Alive, they sequester a massive amount of carbon. Chopped down, they release that carbon into the atmosphere. Burned, their contribution to climate change is even worse. Deforestation accounts for at least 11 percent of global greenhouse gas emissions. …Smokestacks have tended to get much more attention than trees in the climate conversation, but now, thanks to improved scientific understanding of forest carbon sequestration and better technologies for tracking deforestation, that’s beginning to change.  

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General

Norway to grant US$ 5 million to Peru forest preservation

December 4, 2015
Category: Uncategorised

At the UN Climate Change Conference (COP 21), the Norwegian Government announced it will pledge US$ 5 million to support Peru’s forest management and preservation efforts, reports Andina. In Paris, France, world leaders are currently meeting to come up with an agreement to reduce drastic effects of climate change. One of Norway’s contribution efforts, the pledge to Peru, was announced by the Norwegian Climate and Environment Miniser Tine Sundtoft with Peru’s Minister of the Environment, Manuel Pulgar-Vidal.  “Peruvian forests provide Peru and the world with water, food and every kind of benefit. It is our duty to assist Peru in the preservation of such ecosystems and such important natural resources in favor of humankind,” Sundtoft said reports Andina.

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