Tree Frog Forestry News

Monthly Archives: January 2016

Forestry

Canada’s forest council may be flexible on sustainability requirements

Globe and Mail
January 28, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada

As it prepares to usher in new requirements, the group that audits the ecofriendliness of forestry companies is signalling that there is flexibility in the way the controversial motion behind those new standards will be implemented. “We’ll never go back to the old standards … but there is a flexibility in how it will be applied,” François Dufresne, president of the Canadian chapter of the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), told The Globe and Mail Thursday. He made his remarks the day after he and the council’s international director-general, Kim Carstensen, met with Quebec Forestry Minister Laurent Lessard and some industry representatives, including Richard Garneau, chief executive of Montreal-based Resolute Forest Products Inc. Seth Kursman, a spokesman for Resolute, said the comments by Mr. Dufresne and Mr. Carstensen did little to address the industry’s concerns.

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New West considers cost of tree bylaw

New Westminister Record
January 28, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

New Westminster is keen to grow its urban canopy – but it will come with a cost. The city’s 2016 to 2020 draft financial plan includes a request from the parks, culture and recreation department for a full-time arbourist to oversee the new urban tree management program. The position would cost $104,770, but that would be offset by about $70,000 in revenues estimated to be generated through application and permit fees. Dean Gibson, the city’s director of parks, culture and recreation, said it’s a very technical position so existing staff don’t have the ability to offer the services that could be provided by an arbourist. The arbourist would administer the tree protection bylaw and support the city’s planned stewardship and education initiatives related to trees.

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Province, First Nations set to sign land-use deal for Great Bear Rainforest

By Gordon Hamilton
Business in Vancouver
January 28, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

After almost 20 years of environmental protests, conflict and negotiation, the B.C. government and coastal First Nations are poised to ratify a sweeping land-use order for the Great Bear Rainforest aimed at protecting 70% of the area’s old-growth trees. The Great Bear land-use order is expected to be signed by the B.C. government and First Nations in the first week of February and made into law during the spring session of the legislature. It is the final step in balancing the economic, social and environmental objectives of a 6.4-million-hectare stretch of rugged B.C. coast extending from Kitimat in the north to Knight Inlet in the south. …Valerie Langer, one of three negotiators representing the three environmental groups, said stakeholders have been told the orders will be signed soon. She said she won’t know until she sees the final document whether the 70% old-growth target will be part of the order, but she is hopeful.

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New study says Resolute can share the forest, company says numbers are misleading

Thunder Bay News Watch
January 28, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

A new study says there’s enough forest in Northwestern Ontario for Resolute to share but the company says the organization that released it is misleading the public. Wildlands League, a chapter of the Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society, says Resolute Forest Products is holding around two million hectares of forest in Northwestern Ontario that it doesn’t need. Looking at the Caribou, English River, Black Spruce and Dog River-Matawin management units, Wildlands says that even at the company’s full capacity, there would still be 1.2 million hectares that could be used for caribou habitat and opened up to smaller forestry operations. “There doesn’t necessarily need to be a conflict between conservation and the economy,” forest conservation manager and study author Dave Pearce said.

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Controversial Cape Breton moose cull illuminated in new documentary

Cape Breton Post
January 27, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

HALIFAX — A recent moose cull in the Cape Breton Highlands National Park generated controversy and a protest but a new documentary finds ample evidence of the damage caused by the park’s large moose population. “Moose Cull” examines all sides of the issue, from Parks Canada’s call for a pilot project to reduce the number of moose in an attempt to bring back the boreal forest to the involvement of Mi’kmaq hunters exercising their treaty rights and revisiting traditional hunting practices, to angry protestors, some not believing a cull is necessary while others simply want to be part of it. …”Moose Cull,” produced by Halifax’s Creative Atlantic and airing this Sunday on CBC TV’s “Land and Sea,” tracks the history of the moose in the park — from extinction in the early 1900s to reintroduction in the 1940s to an estimated 2,000 today — and the effect on the North Mountain ecosystem, including the birch trees that serve as habitat for other creatures.

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Main 4FRI contractor confident it will achieve 300k-acre goal

Arizona Daily Sun
January 28, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

The head of the largest contractor on the Four Forest Restoration Initiative said he is “bullish” about the company’s forest thinning work in 2016. In a presentation to 4FRI stakeholders on Wednesday, Jason Rosamond said Good Earth Power AZ has plans to invest $100 million in equipment and infrastructure and thin 22,000 acres across northern Arizona next year. That’s compared to the 2,405 acres the company thinned from October 2014 to October 2015, the time period the Forest Service uses to track acreage progress on the 4FRI project.

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Marshall Woods decision cuts commercial logging, roads in Rattlesnake Rec Area

by Rob Chaney
The Missoulian
January 28, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

A final decision on the Marshall Woods Restoration Project gives a little to critics who thought it went too far and not far enough. “I have decided to authorize a mix of actions under Alternatives C and D,” Missoula District Ranger Jen Hensiek wrote Thursday. “My decision precludes commercial timber harvest and temporary road construction within the Rattlesnake National Recreation Area(.)” Hensiek did not return phone messages or emails requesting further comment. In her cover letter on the decision, she added that she dropped plans for thinning trees on 271 acres along the main Rattlesnake trail corridor because it wouldn’t meet goals for disease, insect and fire resiliency. “While this decision does not address what I believe to be the full extent of the ecological and wildland-urban interface issues and needs, I believe this decision strikes a balance between the social and ecological concerns,” Hensiek wrote.

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Letter to Merkley and Wyden

Letter by Dave Molony
The Chronicle
January 27, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

am writing this to address the lack of stewardship of our public lands. I see both of you as nothing more than publicity loving puppets. You care about the lobbyists who fill campaign chests, not the Oregonians that elected you to represent them. I and most Oregonians that have traveled east of the Cascade mountain range can see that our publicly owned forests are in a state of extreme neglect. If they haven’t burned, they’ve been killed by insects and left as monuments. The environmental industry has been effective in stopping or delaying the harvest of millions of acres of destroyed timber.

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Feds should shift firefighting burden in California, audit says

Feds too often protect forests and residential areas where firefighting is costly, audit says
Star Telegram
January 27, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

WASHINGTON – The U.S. Forest Service apparently overpaid for fighting some of California’s biggest wildland fires and was saddled with too many of the toughest areas to work in, federal investigators now say. Citing expenditures that “may have been questionable and unreasonable,” the Agriculture Department’s Office of Inspector General questioned more than $4.5 million in administrative costs that the federal agency paid to local firefighting agencies within California. “There was no assurance these costs were reasonable and accurate,” the investigators noted. More broadly, investigators said an agreement with the state left the Forest Service shouldering an unequal share of areas where wildlands meet urban areas, the costliest to protect.

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Forestry Agencies Release 2015 Aerial Survey Results for Colorado

Colorado State Forest Service – Colorado State University
January 28, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

GOLDEN, Colo. – Today, the Colorado State Forest Service (CSFS) and U.S. Forest Service (USFS), Rocky Mountain Region, released the 2015 forest health aerial survey results for Colorado. Every year the USFS and CSFS work together to aerially monitor forest health conditions on millions of forested acres across the state. Aerial survey observations of tree-damaging insects and diseases native to Colorado’s forests are highlighted below. …In 2015, the CSFS treated more than 17,000 acres in Colorado, predominantly on private and state lands, as part of forest management and wildfire mitigation efforts. The CSFS is committed to providing timely, relevant forestry information and education to the citizens of Colorado to achieve resilient forests and communities.

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Spruce beetles moving into more Colorado forests, survey shows

While size of forests devastated by pine beetles is dwindling, the number of acres hit by spruce beetles continues to climb
The Denver Post
January 28, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

The devastation caused by spruce beetles across Colorado forests accelerated for a fourth consecutive year, according to a new survey, while the once widespread infestation of mountain pine beetles has largely subsided. The spruce beetle was found to have newly infected 182,000 acres of previously unaffected forests, bringing the number of acres currently impacted to 409,000 across the state, according to the annual aerial survey conducted by the U.S. Forest Service and the Colorado State Forest Service. The bug has caused varying degrees of tree mortality to nearly 1.6 million acres across the state since 1996, though still far less than the mountain pine beetle.

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Benefits of thinning our forests are plentiful

The Taos News
January 28, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

The threat of catastrophic wildfire is one of the major challenges facing Taos and the entire Southwest today and in the decades to come. Devastating blazes have wreaked havoc on other parts of the state in recent years. Large swaths of forest have been reduced to barren moonscapes. The subsequent flooding and landslides have decimated watersheds. Add the dire effects that climate change is expected to bring, and our communities are looking at an uncertain future. That’s why we’re thrilled to see momentum building behind an effort that seeks to tackle the problem. The Río Grande Water Fund is a partnership of government agencies, utilities, businesses, nonprofits and other groups hoping to protect water quality by restoring hundreds of thousands of acres of forest across the Río Grande Basin.

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Forest proposes post-fire salvage logging

Daily Inter Lake
January 27, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

The Flathead National Forest is proposing a salvage timber sale within the more than 20,000 acres that burned in the Trail Creek Fire last summer. The forest is accepting public comments on its plan to log 1,351 acres — about 6 percent of the total fire area — about two miles northeast of the Spotted Bear Ranger Station. Forest officials estimate it would generate 6 million to 7 million board-feet of timber. The harvest, limited to burned areas outside the Bob Marshall Wilderness, would target only dead trees and those burned badly enough that they would likely die within three years.

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Critics say plan for Chattahoochee forest better job for Mother Nature

Atlanta Journal Constitution
January 28, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

BLAIRSVILLE —  David Govus and Jess Riddle bounded off the mountain ridge and into the forest below filled with tulip poplars, white oaks, Ohio buckeyes and black cherry trees and carpeted with a spongy mix of leaves, ferns and bark. The U.S. Forest Service, as part of the largest timbering operation in this Southern Appalachian region in at least a decade, wants to log a 40-acre stand to help “rejuvenate” the woods. Govus and Riddle, opponents of the plan, descended deeper into the Chattahoochee National Forest. …The Forest Service’s stated goal is to restore, in ever-larger chunks, the overall health of the North Georgia forest — a playground for metro Atlanta outdoor enthusiasts. An environmental assessment released last month calls for restoration of native plants and an improved habitat for wildlife. The public has until Feb. 5 to comment on the 202-page plan that has touched off a debate about who can best ensure the health of a forest, man or Mother Nature?

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Jay Sullivan named head of forest resources and environmental conservation department

Virginia Tech News
January 29, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

BLACKSBURG, Va., Jan. 28, 2016 – Jay Sullivan, professor of forestry economics and management, has been named head of Virginia Tech’s Department of Forest Resources and Environmental Conservation. “Dr. Sullivan emerged from an extremely strong applicant pool, and I’m especially pleased that we have identified new leadership from within the department,” said Paul Winistorfer, dean of the College of Natural Resources and Environment. …Sullivan earned a bachelor’s degree in forest management and a master’s degree in forest economics from Colorado State University. His doctoral work at the University of California, Berkeley focused on the economic impacts of forest and natural resources management and examined the impacts of timber harvest policies in California national forests on local forest-based communities.

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Sand Dunes forest discussion set

As planned timber harvests, oak savannah habitat restorations continue, DNR explains why the trees are coming down
USA Today
January 28, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

ZIMMERMAN — The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources will present information about the mission and management of Sand Dunes State Forest during an open house 6:30-8:30 p.m. Feb. 4 at the Zimmerman Civic Center, 25850 Main St. About 15 of the 200 adjacent property owners invited to an October field trip turned out. As a long-range management plan that involves timber harvest continues to unfold, the DNR is stepping up education efforts. “I think one of the realizations we had was there’s still misunderstanding out there,” said Harland Hiemstra, DNR information officer. “There’s still people out there that think we’re gong to go out and cut down all the trees.”

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Predator to combat Hemlock pest

Avery Journal
January 27, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

As part of its ongoing effort to manage an invasive pest that affects native Hemlock trees, earlier this month the U.S. Forest Service released a number of predatory beetles into North and South Carolina Forests. An ancient part of the immense roster of trees that call the region home left to its own devices, the Eastern Hemlock can live for as many as 800 years. But since the 1950s, their opportunity to reach those venerable heights has been curtailed by the sustained assault of an invasive pest that targets the trees. …The U.S. Forest Service has a vested interest in preventing the destruction of the native Hemlocks, which play a vital part in the local forest ecosystem. The large, long-lived trees stabilize soil and, by grace of their dense foliage, provide shade that can lower the temperature of the forest floor by as much as six to eight degrees.

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Veteran forester had little time for those tree-huggers

January 29, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: International

Veteran forester Norm Endacott was irked by environmental activists who sought to overturn the art and science of forestry. Partly due to their influence, his beloved Daylesford and its surrounding forests had become a very different place by the late 1990s to that where he had lived and worked in the 1950s. …Norman Endacott, who has died aged 93, worked in forestry for more than 70 years and was often frustrated by simplistic media campaigns that influenced political decisions and overturned sensible forest management. He and forestry colleagues from past eras were also aggrieved that their contribution was being unfairly denigrated by critics unaware of the challenges they had faced, particularly during war time and the post-war housing boom.

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Logging suspended in Victoria’s east after reported discovery of rare ‘clumsy possums’

ABC News, Australia
January 28, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: International

Victoria’s logging agency has halted the practice on the Errinundra Plateau in East Gippsland after the discovery of a colony of rare greater gliders. The Goongerah Environment Centre conducted a night time citizen survey on Monday and found 15 of the rare possums in two areas earmarked for logging.The greater glider has large furry ears, is capable of gliding up to 100 metres and is known as the “clumsy possum” because of its awkward gait on land. Ed Hill from the Goongerah Environment Centre said a pre-logging survey should have been completed to check for the species. “If our survey work was not taken, the [area] would have been logged and all of those greater gliders that we did detect would most likely be dead this week,” he said.

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Company & Business News

Low loonie expected to bring out U.S. protectionist forces: forestry firm Tembec

by Ross Marowits – Beware U.S. protectionist forces, Tembec says
Canadian Press in the Daily Courier
January 28, 2016
Category: Company & Business News
Region: Canada

MONTREAL – The boost Canadian lumber exports are getting from the falling loonie is certain to bring out protectionist forces in the U.S. lumber lobby, says the CEO of Quebec-based forestry company Tembec. “I think that they’re watching the Canadian dollar drop, particularly in lumber, and they’re saying, ‘This isn’t fair,'” CEO James Lopez said Thursday before a company meeting with shareholders. While groups like the U.S. Lumber Coalition didn’t complain about the Canadian dollar when it was above parity, Lopez suspects they will use the loonie’s slump to argue that American producers are now at a competitive disadvantage, particularly since the Canada-U.S. softwood lumber agreement expired in October. “I’m sure that will be part of the discussion when the governments engage.”

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Man dies after tractor rolls over; Crofton Mill shut for mourning

Victoria Times Colonist
January 28, 2016
Category: Company & Business News
Region: Canada, Canada West

The Crofton Mill has been shut down until further notice after an employee died in an industrial accident late Wednesday. A man in his 60s was killed when the Caterpillar tractor he was driving rolled over near the entrance to the Catalyst Paper Mill. North Cowichan Duncan RCMP, WorkPlace B.C. and the B.C. Coroners Service are investigating. The man’s name has not been released. RCMP victims services is offering support to the family and others affected by the tragedy. “We shut down the mill this morning,” said Eduarda Hodgins, director of communications for Catalyst Paper, on Thursday. “We made the decision because it’s the right thing to do. People are in mourning. There’s been a tragic event and out of respect and honour for this individual and his family, we did that.”

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Roundtable on access to skilled labour for the forestry sector

BC Ministry of Jobs, Tourism and Skills Training
January 29, 2016
Category: Company & Business News
Region: Canada, Canada West

VANCOUVER – Forestry sector representatives met with the federal and provincial governments today to discuss skilled-labour initiatives and human-resource planning, as part of a series of roundtables being held over coming months with sectors highlighted in the BC Jobs Plan. The roundtables aim to stimulate discussion and create awareness about how sectors can access skilled labour and satisfy human-resource requirements… Mike Cass, VP Timberlands at Western Forest Products and co-chair of the BC Forest Sector Workforce Initiative noted “prompt action is required given the lead time needed to address the forest sector’s challenges in training our next generation of workers.” The forestry sector employs over 60,000 British Columbians…and job openings are projected for logging machinery operators, truck drivers, hand fallers, and logging workers as well as those requiring higher levels of education, such as forestry professionals and technicians. More images available here https://treefrogcreative.smugmug.com/Forestry-Roundtable/

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Pulp mill pessimism

Paper Excellence offers a non-update in response to Mayor Greg Dionne’s State of the City Address.
Prince Albert Daily Herald
January 28, 2016
Category: Company & Business News
Region: Canada, Canada West

Don’t hold your breath for the Prince Albert Pulp Mill to re-open, Mayor Greg Dionne said during Thursday’s State of the City Address. “If the pulp mill opens, it will be six to eight years out,” he estimated, noting that the facility’s current owner, Paper Excellence, has a non-compete clause with the previous owners, Domtar Corp. The non-compete clause prevents Paper Excellence from producing kraft pulp product, something Paper Excellence initially planned to circumnavigate by producing dissolved pulp product. Then, China killed that effort’s financial viability by introducing countervailing duties on dissolved pulp product, pushing them to shift gears toward producing fluff pulp product, which hasn’t gone anywhere since it was announced in 2013.

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Accident at Crofton mill kills one

Cowichan Valley Citizen
January 28, 2016
Category: Company & Business News
Region: Canada, Canada West

A worker was killed at the Crofton pulp and paper mill on Wednesday night, Jan. 27. “We are confirming that there has been a fatal incident at the Crofton mill. North Cowichan/Duncan RCMP’s General Investigation Section is working in conjunction with the Coroner’s office and WorkSafe BC and they are onsite,” said Cpl. Krista Hobday, the detachment’s media relations officer. …But, once the RCMP hands over jurisdiction for the site, WorkSafeBC will swing into its investigation. “Our job is to find out, under the authority of the Workers’ Compensation Act, what happened, how it happened, why it happened and how it could be prevented from happening again in future,” McCloy said.

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Forest industry waits for Pacific trade deal

By Tom Fletcher
BC Local News in Victoria News
January 28, 2016
Category: Company & Business News
Region: Canada, Canada West

Wood products producers are encouraged by the Trudeau government’s decision to sign the Trans-Pacific Partnership, the first step to ratifying a sweeping agreement with Japan, Australia and other Asian countries. International Trade Minister Christia Freeland said this week she will take the next “technical step,” allowing the TPP to be debated in the House of Commons. It’s the first signal the Liberals will continue the work started by the Conservative government, which warned against being left out as the U.S. and Mexico go ahead with the TPP. “All in all we think this is a pretty good agreement,” said Paul Lansbergen, acting president of the Forest Products Association of Canada, in an interview from Vancouver.

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Halalt files billion dollar suits against Catalyst

by Kevin Rothbauer
Cowichan Valley Citizen
January 27, 2016
Category: Company & Business News
Region: Canada, Canada West

Catalyst Paper says it will “vigorously defend itself” against a pair of civil claims that were filed against the company by the Halalt First Nation last Friday. The claims relate to Catalyst’s Crofton Mill. The first alleges that Catalyst has illegally trespassed on and caused damage to the Halalt’s traditional territories and fisheries since the mill began operation in 1957. In that claim, the band is seeking $2 billion and an injunction stopping the mill from conducting operations that interfere with the Halalt’s claimed land rights. The second claim was filed by the Halalt along with business partners Sunvault Energy Inc. and Aboriginal Power Corp., and alleges that Catalyst disclosed confidential information about a proposed anaerobic digester facility in breach of a confidentiality agreement. 

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Dryden loses Domtar mill tax assessment appeal

Northern Ontario Business
January 28, 2016
Category: Company & Business News
Region: Canada East, Canada

The City of Dryden lost its appeal to have Domtar pay $7.9 million in unpaid taxes. An Ontario Superior Court has turned down the northwestern Ontario municipality’s request for the local mill to pay taxes and assessment from 2009 to 2012. The original Municipal Property Assessment Corporation (MPAC) assessed value for these years was $52 million. The Assessment Review Board’s (ARB) returned assessment for the pulp mill was $14.4 million. The result of the ARB’s decision was the city must pay Domtar a retroactive refund of property taxes amounting to $7.9 million.

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Company expands to Emmett

Independent Enterprise
January 27, 2016
Category: Company & Business News
Region: United States, US West

An acquisition by Woodgrain Millwork Inc. will help the company and the community in maintaining some jobs. The company announced last week it has purchased the assets of Gem Forest Products, including the sawmill, located in Emmett. As part of the agreement, Woodgrain Millwork will take ownership of the facility, equipment and the inventory of Gem Forest Products, the company said in a news release. Starting in February a group of employees will operate the mill for two to three months to process the existing inventory, according to the statement. That will be followed by several months of mill renovation prior to a permanent start-up later this year.

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Hardwoods producer to add new jobs to Fleming facility

WTVQ
January 28, 2016
Category: Company & Business News
Region: US East, United States

FRANKFORT, Ky. – The state says Appalachian hardwoods producer GreenTree Forest Products Inc. will add 10 full-time jobs with a $2.2 million investment for equipment upgrades at its Fleming County facility. The company’s current workforce includes 45 full-time positions. For its sawmill and pallet operation in Fleming County, GreenTree plans to buy new equipment including a 7-foot line bar resaw, a state-of-the-art 3D scanner and an optimized lineal edger. GreenTree says right now, the facility produces 8 million feet of Appalachian hardwood annually. The company says the investment should increase production by 30 percent.

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Landowners learn market strategies at forestry forum Bastrop Daily Enterprise

Bastrop Daily Enterprise
January 28, 2016
Category: Company & Business News
Region: US East, United States

WEST MONROE, La. – With forestry being the largest agricultural crop in the state, keeping landowners, loggers and others aware of the market conditions was the goal of the forestry forum held at the West Monroe Convention Center. The annual forum featured a lineup of professionals with information to keep those involved in the forest industry abreast of the latest market trends. LSU AgCenter forestry economist Shaun Tanger told the group that no one item determines price, but a combination has to be taken into account. On average, “Seventy-five percent of structural wood products go to housing – construction or remodeling,” Tanger said. Forestry consultant Steve Templin discussed the benefits of using the services of a forest consultant.

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SFPA: Southern pine lumber exports decreased by 6% in November

Lesprom
January 28, 2016
Category: Company & Business News
Region: US East, United States

As in previous years, November exports of Southern Pine (SP) lumber typically trend lower. SP exports to be just under 48 million board feet (MMbf) during November. This volume represents a drop of 6% below the same month of 2014, overall tallying a year-to-date increase of 6% when compared with the first eleven months of 2014, as Southern Forest Products Association (SFPA) said in the press release received by Lesprom Network. Offshore shipments during November roughly break down as follows: 30.1MMbf dressed, 8.5 MMbf rough, and 9.3 MMbf treated lumber.

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Verso reaches restructuring deal on $2.4 billion debt

Press Herald
January 27, 2016
Category: Company & Business News
Region: US East, United States

As its financial crunch worsened in November, Verso Paper Corp. marketed four of its eight mills, including the Androscoggin Mill in Jay, to potential buyers before deciding instead to file for bankruptcy and restructure its $2.4 billion debt. The company’s attempt to sell the mills was disclosed in a presentation it made to lenders this month when it was seeking money to finance operations and pay bills while it works through bankruptcy proceedings. The presentation was included in a filing with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission. Verso said it recognized in November that it was running out of money and decided to market the Jay mill’s paper and hydro operations and also sought to sell three NewPage mills, none of which is in Maine.

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Norbord to invest £95m in its factory near Inverness

BBC News
January 28, 2016
Category: Company & Business News
Region: International

Canadian company Norbord has announced that it plans to invest up to £95m in its wood panels factory near Inverness. The expansion proposal could see the plant at Dalcross on the A96 double its annual production from 350,000 cubic metres to 750,000. Highlands and Islands Enterprise has also offered a grant of about £11.5m towards the proposed expansion. Inverness, Nairn, Badenoch and Strathspey MP Drew Hendry has welcomed the announcement.

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Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy

Europe Probes Wood Energy Market, Climate Impacts

Climate Central
January 28, 2016
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: International

U.K. efforts to meet climate targets by subsidizing wood burning at power plants instead of relying on lower-carbon energy sources are being probed by European officials for their impacts on American manufacturers and on the environment. The U.K. is planning to use billions of dollars in climate fees imposed on electricity customers to help two large coal power plants switch to wood fuel, millions of tons of which is already being produced every year using trees from southern U.S. states. It’s also supporting construction of a third power plant that will use similar fuel. The expanding use of large-scale wood energy by Britain and other European Union countries is releasing more climate-changing carbon dioxide than burning coal. Because wood is renewable, a loophole allows energy from it to count as clean under energy laws designed to help Europe satisfy its international climate commitments.

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Esperance woodchip terminal officially opens

ABC News, Australia
January 29, 2016
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: International

The multi-million dollar Esperance woodchip terminal was officially opened on Western Australian’s south-east coast last night. The project, which is run by Southern Pacific Fibre (SPF), harvests around 2,000 tonne of woodchips per week from local properties and the company expected to send its first shipment to China in the middle of this year. The opening has been a long time coming for farmers in the region who have weathered the collapse of managed investment schemes, low paper prices, and the hollow promises of past potential chipping companies.

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Wood, Paper & Green Building

Woodcrafters elect new executive

Coast Reporter
January 28, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: Canada, Canada West

On Jan. 20, the Suncoast Woodcrafters Guild held their annual general meeting and election of officers and directors. Elected were: Kent Lindsey, president; Ron Johnson, vice president; Tim Dayton, secretary; Chuck Lenfesty, treasurer; and directors Tom Hourigan, Ken Karaloff, Dave Stamper, Heinz Tigges and Ken Walker. …The Woodcrafters promote the craft of woodworking as a hobby by the exchange of information about wood, woodworking tools and methods to improve members’ skills and enjoyment by creating with wood. They meet the third Tuesday of the month at Chatelech Secondary School. New members are always welcome.

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WoodWorks Announces 2016 Wood Design Award Winners

Forest Industry network
January 28, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: United States

“WoodWorks Wood Design Awards celebrate projects and design teams that showcase the innovative use of wood as both a structural and finish material,” said Jennifer Cover, PE, executive director of WoodWorks/Wood Products Council. “Ranging from mass timber to traditional wood-frame, this year’s winning projects exemplify wood’s many attributes, from structural performance and design versatility, to sustainability and cost effectiveness.”

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Australia becomes latest nation to embrace wooden high-rises

Dezeen Magazine
January 28, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: International

A change to building regulation codes in Australia means that architects will be allowed to build timber-framed structures up to eight storeys in height for the first time. As the result of a two-year research project, the country’s National Construction Code will be altered so that the permitted height of wooden buildings increases from three storeys to eight. The changes, effective from 1 May 2016, are expected to offer cost savings of up to 15 per cent compared with other construction systems. The new regulations are more line with buildings codes in North America and Europe, where many seven- to nine-storey wooden buildings have been completed, and a series of timber-framed skyscrapers are proposed.

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Architects welcome NCC changes allowing timber construction up to 8 storeys

Architecture and Design
January 28, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: International


Changes to the National Construction Code (NCC) that will allow timber construction in taller structures have been endorsed by architects.   Effective from May this year, the NCC changes will enable construction of timber buildings up to eight storeys without the need for expensive ‘alternative solutions’ to gain approval. The NCC changes apply to both modern engineered timbers and traditional timber frames. James Fitzpatrick of Sydney architecture firm Fitzpatrick and Partners described the initiative as an exciting step forward for architects and their clients. Architects will not only have new material options to create innovative design solutions for their clients, but can also deliver more environmentally advantaged and sustainable developments. He added that the code change will potentially mean quicker, more cost effective and environmentally friendlier construction of apartment, office and hotel buildings.

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General

Veteran forester had little time for those tree-huggers

January 29, 2016
Category: Uncategorised

Veteran forester Norm Endacott was irked by environmental activists who sought to overturn the art and science of forestry. Partly due to their influence, his beloved Daylesford and its surrounding forests had become a very different place by the late 1990s to that where he had lived and worked in the 1950s. …Norman Endacott, who has died aged 93, worked in forestry for more than 70 years and was often frustrated by simplistic media campaigns that influenced political decisions and overturned sensible forest management. He and forestry colleagues from past eras were also aggrieved that their contribution was being unfairly denigrated by critics unaware of the challenges they had faced, particularly during war time and the post-war housing boom.

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