Tree Frog Forestry News

Daily Archives: January 7, 2016

Special Feature

Natural Resources program at CNC launches new program website

College of New Caledonia
January 7, 2016
Category: Special Feature
Region: Canada, Canada West

The Natural Resources and Environmental Technology (NRET) program at CNC has launched a new recruitment and promotion program to attract prospective students. Forestry programs have to work harder than traditional programs like Arts or Sciences to attract the best and the brightest into their programs. For many years, student numbers in forestry programs have been in decline—causing several institutions across the country to suspend or terminate their programs—and yet, the forest sector requires specialized graduates to replace a rapidly retiring workforce. Centred on a new comprehensive web site, the NRET communications tool box is designed to give career seekers a fresh look at the resource sector – it’s TECH –naturally!

Read More

Business & Politics

Ministry was right to deny licence: Appeal Court

Prince George Citizen
January 6, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

The B.C. Court of Appeal has sided with the provincial government in a dispute over whether a Prince George logging company was wrongfully denied a licence to harvest timber on Crown land near Vanderhoof. The dispute was over a tender the ministry issued in June 2012. M.G. Logging owner Manuel Goncalves submitted what turned out to be the highest bid and in July 2012 the ministry posted a notice on its website stating the licence had been awarded to his company. But it was withdrawn the next day because the ministry concluded the bid was made by a company not registered as a B.C. Timber Sales Enterprise (BCSTE).

Read More

Wood products firm seeks bankruptcy protection

Capital Press
January 5, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States, US West

A lumber company in Washington state has filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection, which allows companies to stay in business while working out a repayment plan with creditors. Stampede Forest Products of Omak, Wash., owes more than $720,000 in debt to fewer than 50 creditors and owns nearly $178,000 in assets, primarily in the form of inventory and accounts receivable, according to its bankruptcy filing. In an annual statement of earnings, Stampede Forest Products said it earned $2 million in revenues in its last fiscal year but lost about $170,000 after its cost of goods and other expenses were deducted. The company began operations in April 2014, manufacturing lumber from the leftover log cores from the nearby Omak Wood Products plywood plant, according to a report from the Economic Alliance, which promotes business in Washington’s Okanogan County.

Read More

84 Lumber to open manufacturing center, hire up to 100 workers in Franklin

Indianapolis Star
January 6, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: US East, United States

Building materials supplier 84 Lumber Co. is planning to open a manufacturing center in Franklin that will create as many as 100 jobs by 2019. The company will spend $5.59 million to acquire and renovate the former Trussway building components plant at 1859 N. Graham Road. The 84,000-square-foot building, which has been vacant since 2009, will be used to manufacture wood roof trusses, floor trusses and wall panels under the company’s 84 Components division. Work will begin on the site this month. The Indiana Economic Development Corp. is providing tax credits of up to $450,000 depending on the eventual number of hires made by 84 Lumber. The Johnson County city of Franklin is considering additional incentives.

Read More

Maine mill closings hurt Vt.

Times Argus
January 3, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: US East, United States

The decline of the paper mill industry in Maine is a blow to the Vermont forestry industry, a state official said. Many of Vermont’s loggers sell their products to Maine’s mills. “A significant market that is drawing wood from all over the region is going to go away,” said Michael Snyder, commissioner of the Vermont Department of Forests, Parks and Recreation. “That represents a direct and significant challenge for the workforce.” Maine’s once-thriving paper mill industry, like American papermaking at large, continued its downturn in 2015 in the face of closures, digitization, foreign competition and consolidation.

Read More

Touring 4 Northwest Pennsylvania lumber mills

Woodworking Network
January 5, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: US East, United States

Last October I was invited to join my lumber supplier, Intermountain Wood Products, on a tour of four lumber mills in the northwest region of Pennsylvania. The mills, owned by Northwest Hardwoods (NH), Industrial Timber & Lumber (ITL), and Matson Lumber, supply much of the red oak, white oak, cherry, hard maple, and soft maple Intermountain Wood Products sells. …Our first mill tour began at NH’s concentration yard in Titusville, Pennsylvania. A concentration yard is a plant that does not mill the trees into boards, but rather receives truckloads of green lumber that is then graded, stickered, and kiln dried.

Read More

Wood, Paper & Green Building

Apostle of Wood

Canadian Architect
January 6, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: Canada

Michael Green’s mass timber innovations prove their mettle in two recently completed projects: the Wood Innovation and Design Centre along with Ronald McDonald House BC & Yukon. …While still at MGB, Green got intrigued with the possibilities of mass timber high-rise construction—buildings of 20 storeys and more—and formed a friendship with trail-blazing British timber architect Andrew Waugh. MGB and consultants lined up essential research and publication support funding from some of Canada’s wood industry organizations, and in 2012 co-authored the publication “The Case for Tall Wood Buildings” with engineer of choice and frequent collaborator Eric Karsh of Equilibrium Consulting. With this, the lecture invitations poured in and his career took off..

Read More

Forestry

Landslide and wildfire prompt log export exemption

BC Gov News
January 7, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

A company authorized to cut timber in the Meager Creek area northwest of Pemberton will receive an exemption to export up to 80,000 cubic metres of logs over a five-year period. There are about 600,000 cubic metres of Crown timber in the Meager Creek drainage area. The Province has approved the exemption that will apply to forest company Squamish Mills since a major landslide cut off access to the company’s licensed cutting operations and a large wildfire severely damaged forests in the area. The Capricorn landslide — the second-largest landslide in recorded Canadian history — occurred in the Sea to Sky Natural Resource District on Aug. 6, 2010. The slide washed out a bridge and blocked the access route to the Meager Creek drainage area, leaving 10 kilometres of forest service roads and about $1.1 million worth of bridge infrastructure stranded and inaccessible.

Read More

The tree that looks like an elk: History of Douglas fir pervades Missoula

by Rob Chaney
Helena Independent Record
January 6, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

MISSOULA — Missoulians often mistake Douglas fir trees for elk– a fact that would amuse David Douglas to no end. Had he made it to the Missoula Valley during his botanical explorations in the 1820s, the elk on Mount Jumbo would have no Douglas fir saplings to mingle with. Salish Indians regularly burned the mountainsides to deny ambush cover to Blackfeet Indians as they traveled through the vicinity. The only black spots in the winter range would be foraging ungulates, not invading evergreens. Today, the tree that bears Douglas’ name frequently winds up in the news. It’s one of the main targets in the Lolo National Forest’s Marshall Woods project in the Rattlesnake National Recreation Area.

Read More

Guest Column: Addressing wilderness misinformation

by George Wuerthner, senior scientist at the Foundation for Deep Ecology
The News-Review
January 5, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

The December 27th editorial in the News-Review opposing the proposed expansion of wilderness surrounding Crater Lake National Park was based upon two wide-spread, but flawed assumptions. The first flawed assumption is that setting aside new wilderness areas will hurt the regional economy. There is abundance of research that demonstrates that counties with parks, wilderness, and other protected lands have higher incomes, greater diversity of jobs, and tend to be more stable. …The second flawed assumption is that fire suppression has led to fuel buildups that are contributing to larger fires.

Read More

Film outlines risks of clearcut logging

Filmmakers seek to raise awareness of man-made environmental dangers in our forests.
The Daily Astorian
January 5, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

CANNON BEACH — Standing on the beach, looking east, you can see them — the expanding swaths of clearcuts carved out of the hills. Every few months it seems another is shaved away, almost like a haircut. What’s tougher to see ­— at least with the naked eye — is how those clearcuts have the potential to disturb both the water we drink and the air we breathe. Such potential for devastation is the subject of “Behind the Emerald Curtain,” a documentary film to be shown at the Cannon Beach Chamber of Commerce at 6 p.m. Wednesday. Admission is free. An informal question-and-answer session and reception follows the screening. The film is produced by the Portland-based nonprofit advocacy group Pacific Rivers along with North Fork Studios, and directed by Shane Anderson.

Read More

Logging starts on Bitterroot wildlife management area

The Missoulian
January 6, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

HAMILTON – Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks officials will use a windfall in logging receipts to expand thinning work on a Bitterroot Valley wildlife management area. FWP Forester Jason Parke said another 127 acres will be added to the project on the Three Mile Wildlife Management Area. As a result, a total of 350 acres of elk winter range will be thinned to encourage growth of more forage. The additional 127 acres were initially analyzed in the environmental analysis for the project, but were dropped following concerns that it wouldn’t be economically feasible to get that work completed, Parke said. The bid for the project came in twice the minimum amount allowed under the contract.

Read More

Just 89 of these wolves remain on this island, but are they endangered?

Christian Science Monitor
January 6, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Despite a 75 percent decline in population levels on the Prince of Wales island in the Alaska Panhandle over the past 10 years, the US Fish and Wildlife Service insists the Alexander Archipelago wolf is not endangered. The US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) announced Tuesday that Southeast Alaska’s Alexander Archipelago wolf does not warrant protection under the Endangered Species Act (ESA), even though its population has seriously declined on the Prince of Wales Island. The USFWS suggests in a November Species Status Assessment that the Alexander Archipelago wolf population occupying Prince of Wales Island declined by 75 percent between 1994 and 2014, from 356 to 89 individuals. 

Read More

32,000 acres acquired for elk restoration

Logan Banner
January 6, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

CHARLESTON, W.Va. —The Conservation Fund announced its purchase of 32,396 acres of working forestland in southern West Virginia that will eventually create the state’s largest, conserved block of prime habitat for elk restoration on Tuesday, January 5,. In partnership with the West Virginia Division of Natural Resources (DNR), the Fund’s historic conservation purchase will establish a vast protected landscape of sustainably managed land, supporting working forests and forestry-based jobs and increasing tourism opportunities for public hunting and other forms of wildlife-associated recreation. “This purchase and the first-of-its-kind elk restoration program in West Virginia is an investment in the economic development and future vitality of the state,” said Joe Hankins, Vice President for The Conservation Fund.

Read More

Forestry industry demands inquiry into devastating Wye River fire

The Age, Australia
January 7, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: International

The Otway bushfire that destroyed more than 100 houses at Wye River and Separation Creek should have been contained before Christmas Day, foresters say. And if no lessons are learned from the disaster then popular Great Ocean Road towns will be at risk again in the years to come. The Institute of Foresters Australia is demanding the Andrews government hold a special inquiry – just as was held for the Cobaw fire in October last year – into the fire which destroyed 116 houses on Christmas Day.

Read More

Advice for the Timber Industry – Become Tree Huggers

The Australian timber industry has had a fraught relationship with the environmental movement.
Sourceable
January 6, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: International

The industry is complex, many-faceted and encompasses diverse supply chains. However, over the years of disputes, primarily over native forest harvesting, perceptions both within and outside the industry have been negatively influenced as environmental debate has escalated. Public attitudes often now tend to lump all timber, whether sustainably grown or not, into the same basket. The image of rogue lumberjacks cutting swathes through virgin old growth forest has been planted into the public mindset. As a result of the media circus that enveloped issues such as Tasmanian forests, anecdotal evidence suggests many young, environmentally conscious people do not differentiate their value judgement about the timber industry whether one is talking about plantation pine or imported rainforest veneers.

Read More

Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy

The quest to hack trees and beat climate change

The Washington Post
January 6, 2016
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: US East, United States

In the fight against climate change, trees are an ally. They suck in carbon dioxide, reducing the harmful greenhouses gases in our air. But there’s a problem — we’re asking them to work overtime. Trees can’t absorb enough of the carbon dioxide humanity is throwing at them, unless we turn every inch of available land into a dense forest, according to Christophe Jospe, the chief strategist at Arizona State’s Center for Negative Carbon Emissions. But what if trees — or machines modeled after them — had superpowers? Artificial trees with otherworldly abilities are a great hope against climate change, as environmental experts say it’s not realistic to expect humanity to release significantly less carbon into the atmosphere. Our best bet may be to capture the excess carbon and store it or convert it into something useful such as fuel.

Read More

Letters: Nothing green about burning wood for electricity

by Jeremy Wates, Secretary General, European Environment Bureau, Brussels
The Independent
January 6, 2016
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: International

By burning wood pellets instead of coal Drax power station has turned green, according to your report “Green energy: How one power plant chips away at the UK’s carbon footprint” (5 January). We would strongly disagree. The pellets for Drax are coming from the forests of south-east America where pellet exports have dramatically increased in recent years. The European Commission has this week opened an investigation to assess whether UK government plans to support the conversion of part of the Drax plant to operate on biomass are in line with EU state aid rules. Wood pellets from the US are not made of only low-grade waste wood or residues that serve no other use.

Read More