Tree Frog Forestry News

Daily Archives: January 18, 2016

Business & Politics

Human body part found near Gatineau pulp and paper plant

CBC News
January 16, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada East, Canada

Gatineau police are working to remove a human body part found in a chemical basin at a local pulp and paper plant. Officers were called to Resolute Forest Products at 79 Main Street just before 10:30 a.m. ET Friday after employees made the discovery, said Gatineau police spokesperson Jean-Paul Lemay. “It’s a challenge because there are chemical products in the basin. It’s an unusual operation for us,” Lemay said. “It’s difficult to understand what could have happened. We’ll start with the first step, which is to recover the body part, and then search the rest of the basin for more body parts.”

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Weak dollar helps forestry, tourism

Chronicle Journal
January 17, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada East, Canada

If timing is everything, then there’s definitely a worse time to be in the lumber business. Just ask Frank Dottori. When the veteran forestry executive was working on resurrecting White River’s idle lumber mill about three years ago, few would have predicted just how far the formerly robust Canadian dollar would fall. As the loonie dips under 70 cents US, you could almost hear the collective fist-bumping among forest industry leaders. “We’re going to be making a lot more money,” Dottori said Thursday. Canadian lumber has once again become a bargain for U.S. customers due to an exchange rate well in their favour. Dottori said the boost in lumber sales won’t result in additional jobs at the White River mill, which “is pretty well crewed up” at 150 employees.

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Plans for paper mill site?

Timmins Press
January 15, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada East, Canada

IROQUOIS FALLS – A special council meeting was held in Iroquois Falls on Thursday, but the mayor and council have been very tight-lipped on the specifics of the bylaw motion carried at that meeting. While the meeting was open to the public, the details surrounding the execution of a asset transaction between the Town of Iroquois Falls, Resolute Forest Products Canada Inc., and Abitibi Riversedge Inc. are still confidential At the meeting, held in the council chambers, those present were informed that an asset agreement was authorized between the two companies and the town. While the meeting was open to the public, the details surrounding what will come of this agreement are still confidential, Coun. Colin Kennedy told The Daily Press.

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Laid-off workers could leave for good: mayor

Chronicle Journal
January 16, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada East, Canada

The longer Hornepayne’s lumber mill remains idle, the greater the chance that tradespeople may be forced to leave the community, perhaps permanently, the town’s mayor fears. “This is my biggest concern,” Morley Forster said Thursday. “Skilled labour is in demand all over the country, so if you can find a good job somewhere else you just might have to take it.” About 130 people were laid off in early December after Haavaldsrud Timber idled the mill over concerns over a power-supply contract for its 10-megawatt cogen plant. The company has said it needs to improve the contract for the cogen, which supplies electricity to the province as well as steam-heat for drying lumber. Last month, as Christmas loomed, the province’s Independent Electricity System Operator said it had no plans to change the existing 10-year contract.

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Shasta County economy showing some growth

Redding Record Searchlight
January 14, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States, US West

…Shasta County’s housing market has been boosted for years by equity refugees, who sell their homes in the Bay Area and Southern California and move to Redding and surrounding communities. Benefitting from housing starts, Anderson-based Sierra Pacific Industries is one of the largest employers in the North State and among the largest lumber producers in the United States. The company operates sawmills in California and Washington. SPI spokesman Mark Pawlicki said there is a significant supply of lumber in the United States and that is driving down prices. “2015 for us was not as good as 2014 from our standpoint,” Pawlicki said earlier this week. He did not speak at Thursday’s conference.Exports to Asia have been decreasing while Canada has increased its shipments into the United States.

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SKG halts testliner production at Sangüesa mill in Spain

EUWID Pulp and Paper
January 15, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: International

The testliner machine PM 1 at Smurfit Kappa’s Spanish Sangüesa mill is currently down. The group stopped the PM in order to switch it to machine-glazed paper. The Smurfit Kappa Group (SKG) has started conversion work on the PM 1 of its Sangüesa mill in northern Spain. The machine has been discontinued on 11 January and is scheduled to be recommissioned on 1 March, a company spokesman told EUWID. After conversion, the PM will be virtually new, since 90% of the machine parts will be replaced, he added.

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Kemira continues to invest in the growing market for bleaching chemicals

Lesprom
January 16, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: International

In 2014, Kemira announced a substantial capital investment in its Oulu plant in Finland to capture the growth potential in the tight bleaching chemical market. The new hydrogen peroxide production process was successfully started during the 3Q 2015 and the new volume has been sold out. Positive development in the fiber markets and the ongoing pulp mill capacity investments drive Kemira’s investments in bleaching chemical capacity.

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Wood, Paper & Green Building

This family home near Lake Washington feels like an urban beach cabin

The Seattle Times
January 15, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: United States, US West

…Jones says their home is the first permitted building in Seattle, and one of the first multistoried structures in the country, to use cross-laminated timber (CLT), highly energy-efficient, layered engineered wood panels oriented at right angles and glued into bigger, stronger structural panels. All told, 67 prefabricated CLT panels were delivered from British Columbia; they act as both structure and interior wall finish. The home’s exterior is strikingly charred shou-sugi-ban Douglas fir; inside it’s luminously light and open. The white pine CLT is raw, textured and only slightly whitewashed — six months after completion, it still smells like freshly cut wood. (Jones says approximately 20 sustainably harvested regional trees were used for construction; to even the forestry score, her family planted 20 western white pines and Douglas firs on her grandfather’s land on Orcas Island.)

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Forestry

WEB EXTRA: Inside the Walbran protest

By Tom Fletcher
BC Local News in Comox Valley Record
January 10, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Feedback continues to come in on my recent column on the orchestrated Walbran Valley logging protests. Much of it is in the form of sniping and lecturing from professional protesters and paid canvassers who insist they are detecting, rather than promoting, public opposition to logging. They challenge my assertion that this is the most regulated working forest in the world, but none has yet suggested anywhere more restricted. Many readers appreciate that they’re not getting the whole story from media coverage, but are not sure how extensive it is. When it comes to protesters manipulating media, TV is more vulnerable than print, as illustrated by photos above and below. …They won this ‘war in the woods’ in 1995, and B.C. has more parks and protected areas than anywhere else in North America. But that doesn’t matter to people who need another crisis.

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Truck Loggers Association elects first female president in 73-year history

Jacqui Beban took her 1st trip to a logging camp when she was 6 weeks old
CBC News
January 16, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

For the first time in its 73-year history, the Truck Loggers Association has elected a female president — a first for any logging association in B.C. But for Jacqui Beban of Qualicum Beach, getting elected on Jan. 14 was a natural fit as she has deep roots in the industry. Her great-grandfather, grandfather and father all owned logging companies, as well as her grandfather on her mother’s side of the family. “It was a huge part of my life,” Beban, 40, told On the Coast host Gloria Macarenko. “At six weeks old I took my first trip to a logging camp. Those were our summer vacations, we were at the logging camp,” she said. When she graduated from high school at 18 she took a job in an office of a logging company. As she took on more responsibility and began understanding the operations of work camps, she remembered her fondness for them.

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Fee schedule on mid-coast logs extended

Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations
BC Government
January 15, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

VICTORIA – The Province has extended the reduced fee in place for log exports in the Mid-Coast Timber Supply Area for one more year (to January 2017) to support forestry jobs in the area. In January 2013, the Province reduced fees on some log exports from the Mid-Coast Timber Supply Area in an effort to increase harvest levels. It is a difficult and expensive area to work in – with no local lumber mill, logs have to be sent to Vancouver to be cut or exported – and much of the wood is of low quality. Additionally, the volume of exempted timber is surplus to domestic mills.

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Forest tech suspended for failing to disclose conviction

Prince George Citizen
January 17, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

The Association of B.C. Forest Professionals has suspended one of its members for two months because he failed to disclose a criminal conviction. The penalty against Brian Stamp, a registered forest technologist, was issued in December, the ABCFP said in a posting on its website. Members are supposed to disclose convictions as part of their annual membership renewal. He was convicted of an indictable offence in January 2007, but Stamp did not note the conviction in his membership renewal for eight years. “Instead, he filed a false declaration each year indicating that he had not been convicted of any indictable offence in Canada within the previous 10 years,” the ABCFP says in the posting. Stamp eventually admitted the transgression and the matter was taken before an ABCFP council.

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Timber harvesting closes Trans Canada Trail south of Nanaimo

Nanaimo News Bulletin
January 16, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Don’t walk, jog, run or ride on the Extension Ridge section of the Trans Canada Trail for the next few months. As of Tuesday the trail, which runs between Harewood Mines and Extension roads and is popular with hikers, runners and mountain bikers is closed for logging operations by land owner Island Timberlands until the end of March. The closure also affects mountain bike and hiking trails “The land in question is on Island Timberlands property of which the Regional District of Nanaimo has a land-use agreement for purpose of the the Trans Canada Trail,” said Tom Osborne, regional district general manager of recreation and parks. The agreement allows for hikers, bikers and other non-motorized uses and includes Island Timberlands’ right to close the trails or reroute them if necessary for harvesting operations.

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The Cariboo Chilcotin Beetle Action Coalition taking new direction board says

Williams Lake Tribune
January 15, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

The Cariboo Chilcotin Beetle Action Coalition (CCBAC) board is planning a new strategic direction, focusing on support for economic development in the region. “CCBAC is turning a page,” said Quesnel Mayor Bob Simpson who is chair of the board in a press release. “First and foremost, the board wants to work with communities to identify the most important economic development opportunities and any resource gaps that prevent us from taking advantage of those opportunities,” Simpson said. “CCBAC will then set clear funding priorities, criteria, and processes, and we will make targeted investments of seed money to see results as quickly as possible.”

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Cumberland to buy gravel pit owned by Comox Timber

Comox Valley Echo
January 15, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

The Village of Cumberland is buying a gravel pit owned by Comox Timber. The acquisition of the land is being facilitated through the Cumberland Community Forest Society, which has been fundraising to buy parcels of land from timber companies located in the village. Cumberland has supported the society since 2000 in the acquisition of forest lands to retire them from timber harvesting and protect their ecological values as well as cultural, historic and recreational importance. A covenant was established to support the goals and objectives of the society.

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There’s a Fight Brewing Over a Really Important Forest in Canada

Vice News
January 15, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

As oil prices continue to drop towards an uncertain bottom, tensions between environmentalists and industry are mounting around another natural resource: Canada’s forests. A long brewing dispute over the largest undisturbed boreal forest on Earth, nearly 2-million square miles of pines and firs stretched across northern Canada, began to heat up this week when 13 American environmental advocacy groups wrote the governments of Ontario and Quebec urging them to support new conservation efforts. The letter comes in response to earlier lobbying by the Québec Forest Industry Council, which represents nearly half of Canada’s $20-billion timber industry, warning the government against new measures proposed by a watchdog, the Forest Stewardship Council. The new measures would threaten thousands of jobs and the communities that rely on them, the industry group warned in an October letter to Quebec’s minister of forests.

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Judge Upholds Injunction on Swan Valley Timber Sale

District Judge Donald Molloy rules that Forest Service skirted public involvement
Flathead Beacon
January 15, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

A federal judge has refused to lift an injunction on a logging project near Lindbergh Lake in the Swan Valley, siding with a coalition of environmental groups that argued the U.S. Forest Service skirted the public involvement process. …“The Forest Service tried to circumvent their obligation to involve the public in the re-analysis,” Arlene Montgomery, program director for Friends of the Wild Swan, said. “We are pleased that the court required them to revise their Environmental Assessment with full public review.” The Glacier Loon project includes 37,320 acres and extends south and west of Condon on the west side of Montana Highway 93 to the south end of Lindbergh Lake. The area has been logged in the past, with more than 10,000 acres of forest being clear-cut since 1950, according to the environmental groups.

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Forestry after a wildfire

Clearwater Tribune
January 13, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

..Salvage sooner than later. Dead trees’ wood quality degrades over time. Generally, the sooner you can harvest fire-killed trees, the better. Landowners often ask how much time they have to salvage trees before they “turn blue.” Blue stain is a fungus that turns wood blue to grey. While blue stain does not degrade wood quality, most mills still deduct for the discoloration. Blue stain is commonly introduced by bark beetles, which feed in the phloem – the green layer between the bark and the wood of the tree. Since burned trees were not killed by bark beetles, the wood may not be blue, but eventually, the trees will attract wood boring insects, which may introduce blue stain. Trees stressed but not killed by fire may attract bark beetles. Such trees may stain fairly quickly.

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Invasive plants taking a toll on nation’s forests, including those in Utah

Standard-Examiner
January 16, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

U.S. Forest Service researchers have compiled information on invasive species in forests throughout the nation. The results aren’t surprising — they’re a problem everywhere — but they paint an interesting picture on humans’ impact on forested ecosystems. The results, published in January 2015, show at least one exotic plant species is present in 39 percent of the forested plots sampled throughout the country, including Alaska and Hawaii. The survey included all 741 million acres of public and private forested land in the United States, not just lands managed by the U.S. Forest Service. Scientists with the Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) program studied ?-acre subplots within every 6,000 acres of forested land for evidence of non-native plants.

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Lawmakers ask USDA to increase timber production

SD & WY politicans want help to manage Black Hills National Forest
kotatv.com
January 15, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

RAPID CITY, S.D. –  Congressional members from two states in KOTA Territory are asking the USDA Forest Service to allow for increased production within national forests. All the senators and house representatives from Wyoming and South Dakota signed on to a letter to USDA Forest Service Chief Tom Tidwell asking to allow more trees to be cut down within the Black Hills National Forest. The move is designed to serve several purposes to help manage the forest and support the forest products industry. Forest Programs Manager for the Black Hills Forest Resource Association Ben Wudtke agrees that added production will be a huge benefit to the Black Hills for a number of reasons.

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Lake County’s Valley fire-damaged trees flood lumber market

The Press Democrat
January 14, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Singed logs are piled high in stacks throughout Cobb Mountain, evidence of the massive amount of damage inflicted last year on forests by wildfires that blackened more than 170,000 acres in Lake County. Hundreds of thousands of dead and dying conifers are slated to be turned into lumber but it’s unclear whether they’ll make the grade at a time when California’s market and sawmills are swamped with salvage logs, creating a glut and lowering their value. Most of the trees also are pine, which are less desirable and valuable than redwood or Douglas fir.

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Seneca companies hire former Washington Post communications expert

The Register-Guard
January 15, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

The Seneca Family of Companies, a Eugene wood products and energy firm, has hired a former Washington Post communications expert to lead its public relations efforts. Casey Roscoe was named to the new position of senior vice president, public relations, because “we want to be able to promote Seneca, its employees and our quality lumber products,” said Todd Payne, vice president and general manager. “We believe we have a great story based on the sustainable nature of our business.” Roscoe spent eight years with The Washington Post, where she worked in national sales and communications, Seneca said. Privately held Seneca, with about 400 employees, owns sawmills in Eugene and Noti, Seneca Jones Timber Co., and Seneca Sustainable Energy. The latter company built and operates an electricity generating plant next to the Eugene sawmill on Highway 99. The plant burns wood debris, including bark and slash from Seneca’s logging.

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Forest Service in ‘deliberation mode’ on Blue Mountains plan

The Blue Mountains Forest Plan Revision Team says it is still analyzing comments from last year’s public meetings.
East Oregonian
January 14, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Now that the latest round of public meetings has come to an end, the Forest Service says it is in “deliberation mode,” digesting feedback on the Blue Mountains Forest Plan Revision. A final environmental analysis of the plan is due by September, though local stakeholders are left wondering how and if their input will factor into any new alternatives. Nick Smith, executive director of Healthy Forests, Healthy Communities, said the current proposal leaves a lot to be desired in terms of active forest management. He wants to see more thinning of overgrown tree stands to make the landscape more resilient to fire, as well as create timber jobs. But, Smith said, it’s not entirely clear what the Forest Service is doing to address those concerns.

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Was 2015 a record year for wildfires? Dispute fans a debate over US forests.

Washington Post
January 17, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Wildfires scorched a vast swath of the American wilderness last year. But whether the 10 million acres that burned is a record, as the Obama administration recently announced, or an exaggeration, as some environmentalists claim, is a source of heated debate in a long-running fight over how to manage the nation’s forests. A network of about 30 small environmental groups that view wildfires as a natural part of the ecology — and think more should be allowed to burn — consider the U.S. Forest Service’s record declaration a scare tactic. These critics say the service suppresses too many fires as part of what Chad Hanson, a fire ecologist for the John Muir Project, calls “a 19th-century notion that they damage the ecology and are bad.”

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Forest service agencies exchange updates

Capital Press
January 17, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

SPOKANE — Representatives from state and federal agencies met with consulting foresters last week to update them about government programs that could impact their landowner clients. Representatives of the Washington Department of Natural Resources, Idaho Department of Lands, USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service, Washington State University Extension, University of Idaho Extension and the Washington Association of Conservation Districts met Jan. 14 for an information exchange. The group discusses updates to forest stewardship programs for landowners, and provides information to consulting foresters, said Andy Perleberg, Washington State University Extension forester in Wenatchee, Wash.

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Ranger’s memoir tells of decades in the Forest Service

Billings Gazette
January 16, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

When he retired in the late 1960s, pioneering Montana forester John B. Taylor recorded a memoir on tapes. Taylor’s engaging narrative was transcribed by journalist and editor John C. Frohlicher, a contemporary of Taylor’s who claimed that his hardest task was overcoming Taylor’s “incredible modesty.” The result is “A Job with Room & Board,” recently published by Mountain Press. Another well-known Montanan, John N. Maclean, provides a foreword. The memoir consists of usually short essays, arranged both chronologically and thematically, with groups of chapters devoted to subjects such as animal encounters, firefighting, and interactions with local interests. 

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USFS open house looks at Tongass transition to young-growth logging

KSTK
January 15, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

The U.S. Forest Service held an open house in Wrangell Wednesday about its plan to transition the Tongass National Forest from old-growth to young-growth logging in about 15 years. The Forest Service released its draft environmental impact statement for the Tongass Forest Plan Amendment in November. Open house events throughout Southeast Alaska are giving residents a chance to learn more about the plan, ask questions and submit formal comments. About a dozen Wrangell residents surveyed maps and charts at the open house and talked to Forest Service staff about the proposed transition to young-growth logging on the Tongass.

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Judge: Environmental assessment still needed for project near Lindbergh Lake

by Rob Chaney
The Missoulian
January 16, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

An effort to restart a logging project near Lindbergh Lake stalled after a federal judge ruled the U.S. Forest Service still hadn’t finished the paperwork needed to explain the project. Flathead National Forest officials had asked U.S. District Judge Donald Molloy to release the injunction blocking the Glacier-Loon Project because they had finished new studies of its impacts on bull trout, water howellia and grizzly bears. Molloy agreed the new material answered important questions, but added the agency still had to write an environmental assessment to document the results.

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Effort proposes restoring longleaf pines in SC forest

Associated Press in Island Packet
January 16, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

COLUMBIA, S.C.  – The federal government is proposing a program to help restore longleaf pine forest in the Congaree National Park southeast of Columbia. The State newspaper reports that a National Park Service plan now under review calls for using controlled fires, herbicide and equipment to clear unwanted underbrush along the park’s northern boundary allowing the trees to thrive. Longleaf pines used to dominate the landscape of the Southeast, but most were felled as the area was settled by colonists. Today less than 4 percent of the original longleaf pine forests remain in the region.

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City launches ‘Kick Ash’ campaign

The Star Press
January 16, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

The city is asking tree removal contractors to volunteer for a “Kick Ash Campaign” to help remove an overwhelming number of dead/infected ash trees on public property. Meanwhile, Ball State University says it has been able to save only 50 of the 625 ash trees on its campus. The “Kick Ash” event scheduled for Feb. 12 at McCulloch Park is also intended to educate the public about the hazards of dead ash trees on private property, which can be costly to remove. “It is important to cut down dead ash trees in our urbanized areas … because they can be a safety hazard in our parks and on our streets,” said Jason Donati, chair of the Muncie Urban Forestry Committee. “It’s different in rural areas and woods, where ash trees can be left for wildlife and could eventually rot and decay into the forest floor.”

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Total fire ban for Tasmania’s north as 80 blazes stretch resources and tax crews

ABC News, Australia
January 18, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: International

There will be a total fire ban in the north and north-west of Tasmania today, as 80 fires burn across the state. It is the highest number since firefighters battling the Dunalley blaze in 2013 were dealing with 50 blazes across Tasmania at once. Now, fire crews from the Tasmania Fire Service (TFS), Parks and Wildlife and Forestry Tasmania are dealing with 80 fires in total. Chief Officer Gavin Freeman said there would be a total fire ban in place for the north and north-west on Tuesday with temperatures predicted to hit upwards of 30 degrees Celsius. “We just can’t afford to have any more fire in our environment, it would just stretch our resources too much so we need the community to understand that,” he said.

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New Tasmanian forest battle looms as protesters join in last-ditch effort to save Lapoinya coupe

The Mercury
January 18, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: International

PROTESTERS will gather in a forest at Lapoinya today in a last-ditch and possibly landmark fight to save a coupe about to be logged. The protest will be the first action taken in a Tasmanian forest since the Hodgman Government introduced its controversial Protection from Protesters Bill in 2014. Under the legislation, demonstrators who “prevent, hinder, or obstruct the carrying out of a business activity” can face up to four years in jail. Forestry Tasmania machinery arrived on site yesterday and logging is expected to begin in two weeks when ­access roads have been built. The Lapoinya community, behind Wynyard in the state’s North-West, has been fighting Forestry Tasmania’s decision to log the area for more than 12 months.

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Is eco-certification the solution to forest destruction?

The Forest Stewardship Council is the world’s pre-eminent forest-products certification body, but companies selling FSC-certified products keep getting caught violating its standards.
Eco-Business
January 15, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: International

In September 2015, a Peruvian cargo ship dropped off 71 shipping containers of rainforest wood on the docks of Houston, Texas. At 3.8 million pounds, the shipment was an ample demonstration of the continued flow of lumber from tropical countries into the Northern Hemisphere; laid out end to end it would have covered “several football fields” and had a retail value of $300,000, the Houston Chronicle reported. And the wood’s fate shows the criminal practices that still haunt that trade: in early December, American customs officials blocked the import of the shipment, announcing that the wood had been cut illegally and shipped out of Peru on fraudulent permits. Peruvian police carried out further raids in the Amazonian port of Iquitos, resulting in the biggest bust of illegal wood in Peruvian history.

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Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy

BRIGHTON: URB hearing must wrestle with off-grid rules

Chronicle Herald
January 15, 2016
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: Canada East, Canada

The plan to allow Nova Scotians to buy renewable energy from suppliers other than Nova Scotia Power Inc. may fail to take hold in the short term. But it points toward a smaller role for the power utility in the future, as competitors chip away at the legal framework supporting the power utility. … This plan to bring behind-the-meter generation and sales within the meaning of the renewable-to-retail legislation raised questions from interveners in the pre-hearing process, including from the board-appointed advocates for small business and consumers, and from Port Hawkesbury Paper LP, which operates the mill in Point Tupper. Port Hawkesbury Paper’s position seems to be that a customer such as itself should be able to buy power from an off-grid producer without being caught up in the new system of tariffs and rules.

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White paper highlights critical areas in pellet making process

Biomass Magazine
January 13, 2016
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: United States

On Jan. 12, FutureMetrics LLC released a white paper author and senior consultant John Swaan said could be called “wood pellet making 101.” The paper highlights several critical areas in the process of making wood pellets. Although the process appears simple and straightforward, Swaan said the reality is far more complex. Swaan stated in the paper, “the apparent simplicity of the process has caused many project developers to fail to incorporate the knowledge, skills and, most importantly, the wisdom gained from experience into the plant designs and operations protocols.” The white paper provides a checklist with some of the more common areas that Swaan said turn into project show stoppers or margin minimizers.

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