Tree Frog Forestry News

Daily Archives: February 2, 2016

Business & Politics

Letter-writer was right to warn against trade deals

Letter by Marilyn Reid, member of the Council of Canadians and Citizens against CETA
The Telegram
February 2, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada

Bruno Marcocchio’s Jan. 19th letter, “Face it folks, it’s a corporate coup,” identifies the corporate challenge of government power as the real intent of trade agreements. He alludes, in particular, to NAFTA, CETA and the Trans-Pacific Partnership, a deal which includes 12 Pacific Rim countries and 40 per cent of the world’s economy. …CETA is going to cause job losses. So, too, according to a just-published study by researchers from Tufts University and the United Nations, will the TPP. These jobs won’t be easily recovered. According to Jim Balsillie, former BlackBerry CEO, “10 years from now, we’ll call (the TPP) the signature worst thing in policy that Canada’s ever done.”

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Men buried under lumber in New Westminster yard identified

CBC News
February 1, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

Two men killed at a New Westminster lumber yard earlier in January have been identified as Yun Zhao Yang, 60, of Surrey and Guiming Chen, 65, of New Westminster. The B.C. Coroners Service says Chen and Yang were working outside the United Gateway Logistics Inc. lumber yard on Duncan Street around 1 p.m. PT on Jan. 23, 2016, when “something went wrong.” Lumber fell on them both, burying the two workers.? Both Chen and Yang died at the scene. In a previous statement, WorkSafeBC’s Scott McCloy said no one witnessed the incident, but it appears, “the two work

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Resolute fined for 2014 worker injury

Northern Ontario Business
February 1, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada East, Canada

Resolute Forest Products has been fined $150,000 after a worker was burned at its Fort Francis mill in 2014. On Feb. 27, 2014, a maintenance worker had been checking on a blockage of material in a conveyor in the mill, which had been idled in preparation for permanent closure. Dry wood dust that had been dumped into the conveyor ignited, causing an explosion. The worker received burns to the body. The company was fined for not putting into place measures that deal with explosive hazards under Section 63 of the Regulation for Industrial Establishments.

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Tembec indefinitely suspends operations at Quebec sawmill; 148 jobs affected

Canadian Press in the Globe and Mail
February 1, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada East, Canada

Tembec Inc., citing weakness in the North American softwood lumber market and high wood costs, is indefinitely suspending operations at its sawmill in Senneterre, Que., putting 148 employees out of work. The Montreal-based company, which last week reported strong results in the first quarter but an adjusted EBITDA loss in the lumber segment, said the suspension will begin next Monday. The sawmill in the Temiscaming region in northwestern Quebec has an annual production capacity of 100 million board feet. Tembec CEO James Lopez said in a news release that the decision is necessary to minimize losses. “We continue to carefully assess the evolution of market conditions and to work with the Government of Quebec to find solutions to the high cost of fibre,” he said.

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Hornepayne, Ont., mill owners unable to strike deal with province, MPP says

CBC News
February 1, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada East, Canada

The MPP for Algoma-Manitoulin said there is no new deal between the provincial government and the owners of a lumber mill in Hornepayne, Ont.  Michael Mantha, a New Democrat, said the province met with officials from the Olav Haavaldsrud Timber Company 10 days ago and have failed to reach a new agreement. The company closed the mill in late November 2015, laying off 146 people, because it is seeking to resolve an issue around selling power to the provincial grid from its co-generation plant. 

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Lumber Liquidators to pay more than $13M for illegal imports

Atlanta Journal Constitution
February 1, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: US East, United States

NEW YORK — Lumber Liquidators will pay more than $13 million for illegally importing hardwood flooring, after the company pleaded guilty to environmental crimes last year. The Department of Justice said that Lumber Liquidators made hardwood floors in China from illegally cut Mongolian oak trees in Russia. Those trees are needed to protect endangered Siberian tigers and Amur leopards because their prey eats the acorns from them, the Justice Department said. Lumber Liquidators, which was sentenced Monday in federal court, will pay $7.8 million in criminal fines, more than $1.2 million in community service payments and nearly $970,000 in criminal forfeiture.

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Worker injured in Baileyville pulp mill accident

Bangor Daily News
February 1, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: US East, United States

BAILEYVILLE, Maine — A woman employed by a contractor working on the tissue expansion project at the Woodland Pulp mill in Baileyville was taken to the hospital Monday morning after she was injured in a workplace accident, a mill official confirmed Monday evening. The woman, whose name was not released, was taken to Calais Regional Hospital for treatment of leg injuries, mill spokesman Scott Beal said Monday night. Information about the woman’s medical condition was not available. Beal said the woman was struck in the legs by falling debris. He said that the Occupational Safety and Health Administration was informed of the accident and that the contractor and the mill are investigating.

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Interim report Q4/2015: UPM finished 2015 with a strong quarter, growth projects deliver earnings

Nasdaq
February 2, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: International

Earnings per share excluding special items were EUR 0.37 (0.32) and reported EUR 0.36 (0.01) · Operating profit excluding special items was EUR 225 million, 8.7% of sales (230 million, 9.1% of sales) · Growth projects began contributing to UPM’s earnings, with a strong start in the expanded UPM Kymi pulp mill and UPM Biofuels reaching break-even level. In addition, the speciality paper machine at the UPM Changshu mill in China started production in December · The profit improvement programme exceeded its target, reaching a cost reduction impact of EUR 41 million in Q4 2015 (annualised EUR 165 million)

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Wood, Paper & Green Building

First Nations artists use technology to carve out new business model

Corey Allen
University of British Columbia
February 1, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: Canada, Canada West

Local First Nations artists are working with the University of British Columbia in the hopes technology can help carve out a new niche for their work in the art market.

The B.C. Coast Aboriginal Doors Program is the brainchild of Chris Gaston, UBC forestry professor and university liaison at FPInnovations, and Brenda Crabtree, Aboriginal program manager at Emily Carr University of Art and Design. The program aims to promote Aboriginal artists and is supported by FPInnovations, a non-profit that supports scientific research and technology transfer in the Canadian forest industry.

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BC First Nations carving gets a technological update

Vancouver Sun
February 1, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: Canada, Canada West

For Squamish First Nations artist James Harry, learning traditional wood carving techniques from his father, master carver Rick Harry, and his time as a student at Emily Carr University of Art and Design was a great beginning to his career. The 26-year-old says he was thrilled to be given the opportunity, along with 10 other aboriginal artists, to bring modern technology to their woodwork, allowing their carving to be replicated by a computer controlling a router that cuts into the wood. …The project was a collaboration between Emily Carr University, the University of B.C. and Forest Products Innovations that allowed six artists to be selected by Emily Carr University and five artists from the Frieda Diesing School of Northwest Coast Art to each create original wooden door panels.

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Cross-Laminated Timber Structures

By George Havel
Fire Engineering
February 1, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: United States

Cross-laminated timber (CLT) technology was developed in Switzerland and Germany in the 1990s and is commonly used in Europe. It is becoming common in Canada and is already in use in the United States. This material is marketed as “green” and “sustainable,” since it uses a renewable resource (wood) rather than other materials (concrete and steel) that consume large amounts of energy and generate carbon dioxide during their manufacture. …CLT panels are promoted as fire resistive, comparable to those of noncombustible materials and heavy timber (Type IV) construction, because during fire exposure, the thick wood assemblies will char slowly at a predictable rate while maintaining most of their strength.

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2016 Wood Design Awards highlights outstanding timber construction

Gizmag
February 1, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: United States

WoodWorks has revealed its winners for the 2016 Wood Design Awards. Intended to promote the benefits of building from timber, this year’s 16 winners comprise a varied assortment, including a fire station, museum, library, and pavilion. The most eye-catching winner by far is Beauty of Wood – Innovation winner, China Pavilion Milan Expo 2015. Designed for last year’s Milan Expo by Tsinghua University’s Academy of Art and Design and New York’s Studio Link-Arc, the temporary structure measures 43,000 sq ft (3,994 sq m), and is defined by a very complex glulam (glued laminated timber) roof.

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Forestry

Industry Welcomes Conservation & Logging Agreement in the Great Bear Rainforest

from Coast Forest Conservation Initiative
Marketwired
February 1, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

VANCOUVER, BRITISH COLUMBIA–– Today’s announcement of the Great Bear Rainforest Land Use Order by the Government of BC and First Nations is being applauded by five BC forest product companies as a unique solution for a globally significant area. BC Timber Sales, Catalyst Paper Corp., Howe Sound Pulp & Paper Corp., Interfor Corp., and Western Forest Products Inc. formed the Coast Forest Conservation Initiative (CFCI) in 2000. … “It is collaboration not conflict that ultimately drove the solutions in the Great Bear Rainforest,” said Rick Jeffery, representing CFCI. “This agreement will deliver certainty for coastal forests, local communities and jobs for years to come.”

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Deal protects huge swath of central B.C. coast from logging

Associated Press in The Missoulian
February 1, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

VANCOUVER, British Columbia — British Columbia’s Great Bear Rainforest has been largely protected from logging in a landmark agreement between aboriginals, forest companies, environmental groups and the government. Premier Christy Clark announced the agreement Monday. The land-sharing deal, 20 years in the making, will protect 85 percent of the world’s largest intact temperate rainforest, located about 435 miles (700 kilometers) northwest of Vancouver. The Great Bear Rainforest, stretching from the Discovery Islands northwards to Alaska, is 6.4 million hectares (16 million acres), and more than half the region is covered by ancient forests.

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Great Bear Rainforest agreement ends 20-year war in the woods

By Gordon Hamilton
Business in Vancouver
February 1, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Deal involving the province, First Nations, the forestry industry and environmentalists protects 85% of world’s biggest intact temperate rainforest. As part of the agreement, First Nations will receive forest tenure as well as $15 million in financial assistance from the government to aid them in becoming involved in the region’s economy. This is in addition to a $120 million fund already established jointly by the federal and provincial governments and environmental organizations. Richard Brooks, forest campaigner for Greenpeace Canada, said 20 years ago, 95% of the rainforest was open to logging. Today it has been restricted to 15%. “It’s a model of new hope for our planet,” he said. Valerie Langer, one of the the environmental negotiators over the 15-year period, said she knows of no other place in North America that has such strict commercial logging regulations. First Nations described the agreement as bringing them into future decision-making as well as protecting the rainforest.

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Final agreement reached to protect B.C.’s Great Bear Rainforest

By Justine Hunter
Globe and Mail
February 1, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

The 20-year battle to protect the Great Bear Rainforest – the largest coastal temperate rainforest on the planet – is over, with the B.C. government announcement on Monday of an agreement with environmentalists, forest companies and First Nations. The deal, which will be enshrined in legislation this spring, applies to a stretch of 6.4 million hectares of the coast from the north of Vancouver Island to the Alaska Panhandle. It promises to protect 85 per cent of the region’s old-growth forests, with logging in the remaining 15 per cent subject to the most stringent commercial logging standards in North America. …Representatives for the four partners gathered for a ceremony in the Heiltsuk community of Bella Bella on Friday to mark the completion of an accord that reaches far beyond the original objectives of protecting ancient forests and the home of the unique white-furred black bear known as the Spirit Bear.

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TimberWest Celebrates Historic Great Bear Rainforest Agreement

TimberWest
February 1, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

TimberWest salutes the Great Bear Rainforest Land Use Order passing into law. This historic legal order is the result of more than 15 years of discussions between First Nations, Government, forest companies and environmental groups working together to find sustainable environmental, social and economic solutions within the Great Bear Rainforest. The Order sets forth new forest management requirements within the 6.4 million hectare (15.8 million acre) Great Bear Rainforest—an area larger than the provinces of Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island combined.  “TimberWest is proud to be a part of this historic Agreement,” says Jeff Zweig, President and CEO of TimberWest. “It is a wonderful example of what is possible when we work together as good neighbours and responsible stewards to resolve matters of social, environmental and economic importance for today, and for future generations.”

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British Columbia reaches agreement to protect vast coastal rainforest

February 2, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

British Columbia is set to announce a historic agreement to protect a vast swath of rainforest along its coastline, having reached a deal that marries the interests of First Nations, the logging industry and environmentalists after a decade of often-tense negotiations. The agreement to be announced on Monday will see roughly 85% of forest within the Great Bear rainforest protected, with the other 15% available for logging under the “most stringent” standards in North America, environmental groups involved in the talks said. The Great Bear rainforest is one of the world’s largest temperate rainforests and the habitat of the spirit bear, a rare subspecies of the black bear with white fur and claws. It is also home to 26 Aboriginal groups, known as First Nations.

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Coastal rainforest pact to be made law

By Tom Fletcher
BC Local News in Parksville Qualicum Beach News
February 1, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

The B.C. government is preparing legislation to formalize its 10-year project to protect and share logging management on a vast area of the B.C. coast with forest companies and 26 coastal First Nations. The agreement puts 85 per cent of the world’s largest intact temperate rainforest off limits to logging, and also makes permanent a ban on commercial grizzly bear hunting that was announced for much of the central and north coast region in 2009. Including Haida Gwaii, the Great Bear Rainforest agreement covers 6.4 million hectares on B.C.’s central and north coast, an area about twice the size of Vancouver Island.

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Logging banned in most of B.C.’s Great Bear Rainforest

By  Larry Pynn
The Province
February 1, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Industrial logging will be prohibited across 85 per cent of forested lands within B.C.’s Great Bear Rainforest, according to a long-awaited landmark agreement announced Monday in Vancouver by the province, First Nations, environmentalists and forest companies. In a ceremony at the University of B.C.’s Museum of Anthropology, the various stakeholders announced that logging will be allowed on only about 550,000 hectares of the 3.65 million hectares of forested lands on the central and north coast. In addition to 15 per cent to be labelled “managed forest,” 43 per cent is designated “natural forest” and 42 per cent protected areas. The annual rate of cut is set at 2.5 million cubic metres. All parties have committed to annual monitoring reports and five-year and 10-year reviews of the agreement.

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Accord expands Great Bear protection

by Les Leyne
Victoria Times Colonist
February 2, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

One week shy of 10 years after it was first unveiled, the final version of the Great Bear Rainforest management plan was signed Monday. It’s an overwhelming victory for preservationists that dramatically hikes the amount of wilderness originally protected from logging. It’s one of those hundred-year decisions, where you have to imagine what the consensus view will be a century from now. It’s likely to be overwhelmingly positive. …After 10 frustrating years of negotiations among First Nations, environmental groups and the provincial government, the final version puts 70 per cent of the land base (85 per cent of the actual forest) in the region off-limits to logging.,,,Despite all the lost opportunity, the industry is still counting the deal as a win. It takes the heat off them from international customers worried about environmental practices.

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‘Solutions Are Possible’: Great Bear Rainforest Land-Use Deal Reached

By Andrew MacLeod
The Tyee
February 1, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

…”It’s a very big deal, because we are demonstrating solutions are possible,” said Jens Wieting, forest and climate campaigner for the Sierra Club BC. “Eighty-five per cent of the forest will be off limits to logging.” Rick Jeffery, the president and CEO of the Coast Forest Products Association, said it’s been an intense three years nailing down the final details and carefully considering possible consequences. “It’s an incredibly complex agreement,” he said. “The work that’s ongoing right now is a freaking grind.” He adds, though, that, “The real story here is the collaborative process.”

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Key players in Great Bear Rainforest deal find common ground

By Justine Hunter
The Globe and Mail
February 1, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

A planeload carrying some of the key players in the agreement to preserve the Great Bear Rainforest touched down in Bella Bella, B.C., late last week for an unheralded ceremony marking the conclusion of the deal. The Globe and Mail’s Justine Hunter and John Lehmann followed the group representing the four partners responsible for the deal. …Premier Christy Clark has concluded the deal that was first embraced by NDP premier Ujjal Dosanjh 16 years ago, and then tentatively secured by Liberal premier Gordon Campbell in 2006. …Rick Jeffery is president and CEO of the Coast Forest Products Association. He’s been involved in the file since the market boycott was launched in 1997. He was then the president of the Truck Loggers Association. He has been the industry’s chief negotiator since 2012. He says it took a leap of faith to trust old adversaries, but the payoff – for all parties – will be immense.

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Canada protects ancient coastal forest from logging, hunting

AFP in Yahoo News
February 1, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Ottawa – Decades of protests and then negotiations that brought together loggers, natives and environmental activists resulted Monday in a landmark deal to protect a huge swath of forest on Canada’s Pacific coast. The agreement to ban logging in 85 percent of the Great Bear Rainforest and put an end to a commercial trophy hunt in the region for a rare white Kermode bear was announced by the government of British Columbia. The Great Bear Rainforest covers 6.4 million hectares from Quadra Island to Alaska. …The deal was also ratified by 26 aboriginal tribes that live along the Canadian province’s coast, several environmental groups, and five foresty companies.

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Landmark deal protects huge swath of central BC coast from logging

Canadian Press in Prince George Citizen
February 1, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Bitter opponents faced with the realities of economics and endless protests shook hands Monday on a truce 20 years in the making to protect much of British Columbia’s magnificent Great Bear Rainforest. The protections limiting logging and banning the commercial grizzly hunt were helped by the spiritual presence of the rare white bear that roams B.C.’s central coast forests amid 1,000-year-old cedars. “We kind of all grew up and understood we needed to work together to find solutions,” Rick Jeffery, the president of the Coast Forest Products Association, said Monday after the agreement was released. “One of the successes and magic about today is we’ve demonstrated to the world that collaboration and finding solutions can work.”

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Most of B.C.’s Great Bear Rainforest protected

Canadian Press in Victoria News
February 1, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

VANCOUVER – An agreement has been reached to protect 85 per cent British Columbia’s Great Bear Rainforest from logging, ending a decades-long battle to safeguard the central coast rainforest. The deal signed between First Nations, environmental groups and the British Columbia government covers 3.1-million hectares in the park that is the size of Nova Scotia. Jens Weiting of the Sierra Club said logging in the remaining part of the forest will be tightly controlled. “There is certainty for forestry, 15 per cent of the region’s rainforest will remain open for forestry under very stringent logging rules, the most stringent that you can find in North America.”

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Great Bear Rainforest agreement creates ‘a gift to the world’

CBC News
February 1, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

The protection of B.C.’s Great Bear Rainforest is now assured, after a decade of complex negotiations between the province, First Nations and industry.  Under terms of the agreement announced Monday morning by Premier Christy Clark, 85 per cent (3.1 million hectares) of the forested area of the northern wilderness will be completely — and permanently — protected from industrial logging. “We are stewards of this magnificent land, and today we celebrate what hard work, tenacity, and a strength of purpose will allow us to achieve if we decide to work together,” said Clark. Commercial logging will be permitted on the remaining 550,000 hectares, but only under conditions described as the most stringent in North America.

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BC Reaches landmark agreement protects large forests from logging

OYE! News from Canada
February 1, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

An agreement reached between the British Columbia, First Nations, environmentalists and forest companies in Vancouver on Monday has finally resolved that industrial logging will be banned in almost 85 per cent of forested lands within B.C.’s Great Bear Rainforest. The announcement was made at a ceremony at the University of B.C.’s Museum of Anthropology, where stakeholders agreed that logging will be allowed on only about 550,000 hectares of the 3.65 million hectares of forested lands on the central and north coast.

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Facts about the Great Bear Rainforest

Canadian Press in BC Local News
February 1, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

VANCOUVER – First Nations, environmentalists, logging firms and the British Columbia government signed an agreement Monday to protect a large part of the province’s central coast. Here are some key things you need to know about the Great Bear Rainforest and the deal to protect it: — It estimated at 6.4 million hectares with 3.6 million hectares of forest containing trees up to 1,000 years old. — The agreement puts an area the size of Nova Scotia under a new legal and scientific standard for maintaining forest and wildlife health.

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Proposed timber cutting could help Black Hills National Forest

Forest Service workers and surveyors agree on benefits of increased logging
kotatv.com
February 1, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

CUSTER, S.D. – The Black Hills National Forest has more than one and a quarter million acres of forest land, making itself a valuable resource for the area but now members of congress are asking the United States Department of Agriculture to expand logging in the forest to cash in on the resource while they still have a chance. Both members of the National Forest Service and independent forest surveyors say that the forest could handle the additional timber cutting, and could improve forest conditions for wildlife as well as ward of the mountain pine beetle while lowering fire risk.

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Your View: Tax inequity is root of Coos County budget woes

Coos Bay World
January 30, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Last year Weyerhaeuser merged with Plum Creek, absorbing 6.2 million acres in an $8.5 billion deal. A simple calculation estimates the average value of land in this merger at closer to $1,400 per acre or a potential of another $4.9 million in tax revenue, more than twice the present shortfall, for Coos County. The Seattle Times reported in 2008 that “Weyerhaeuser has transformed its model from a vertically integrated conglomerate to a real-estate investment trust that focuses mainly on selling timber.” The article goes on to explain that the company has “very important” customers in Asia for exported logs. …Put another way, those logs we see stacked along the water in North Bend and Coos Bay awaiting shipment to Asia represent 30 years of free taxes. That’s a lot of sugar.

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Douglas-fir: A tale of two trees

The Taos News
February 1, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

“Darkness, fear, oppression … the dark side are they!” My favorite line from “Star Wars” (1977), and it was spoken by Yoda. But the Yoda I’m referring to in this article was the oldest, accurately dated Rocky Mountain Douglas-fir tree in the state of New Mexico! Yoda was 1,275 years old and lived on the barren lava fields of El Malpais National Monument near Grants. Yes, that’s right. I said, “Lived on!” You see, Yoda succumbed to drought between March and August 1991. Yoda had been alive since the year 1406 and was maybe 7 feet tall … not exactly the giant you would have expected. But if you lived on a lava field, you would be grateful just to be alive, too.

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Two Forest Product Sales Awarded To TriStar Logging

Arizona Journal
January 29, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Two forest product sales were awarded after Apache-Sitgreaves National Forests officials identified additional “bridge” projects that would help continue a supply of wood within the White Mountain area. All of these bridge projects fall within the 4FRI footprint, but the contracts for implementation are separate from the Phase 1 Stewardship Contract (held by Good Earth Power, LLC). The contracts from the bridge projects were competitively advertised. The sales were awarded to TriStar Logging, which will provide saw timber and biomass to local industries.

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A. Bentz: Eastern Oregon must unshackle from ‘poverty promoters’

by Andy Bentz, managing member of a consulting group in Ontario.
East Oregonian
January 29, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

The West and the industries that created our communities have been under assault for more than 30 years. The federal land that historically made them prosperous has been managed under the influence of environmental and conservation “poverty promoters” for enough years to make no mistake in the results of their agenda: poverty. …Environmental interest groups see federal managed lands as their private playground. Monuments and wilderness areas are a thinly veiled land grab for only those with money. This does not meet the multiple use mandate that the land is supposed to be managed for all uses and people. They have paralyzed land management agencies with their litigation to the point that no management is occurring.

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‘Monster’ new species of Daddy Longlegs discovered in Oregon

The Oregonian
February 1, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Scientists have apparently discovered a new species of Daddy Longlegs that belong to an arachnid group known for being comparatively huge. The new species, named the Cryptomaster behemoth, was located in the mountainous and forested regions of southwest Oregon, according to Live Science. An article published in the journal ZooKeys, titled “A new monster from the southwest Oregon Forests,” explains how scientists came across the previously unknown creature. “This research highlights the importance of short-range endemic arachnids for understanding biodiversity, and further reveals mountainous southern Oregon as a hotspot for endemic animal species,” scientists wrote in the article.

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Tree clearing at Big Rock Park to help prevent fires

Associated in the Bristol Herald Courier
January 30, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

CUSTER, S.D. — South Dakota’s Wildland Fire Suppression Division is planning to clear tree overgrowth at Big Rock Park on Pageant Hill to help prevent forest fires. The work reducing the overgrowth of trees and prolific Ponderosa pine regeneration is expected to begin in early February and continue into the spring. Officials say the trees act as a ladder for fire to get into the upper levels of the trees, increasing the intensity of the fire and making it more difficult to suppress. Custer Mayor Jared Carson says Big Rock Park is an important recreation site, and the city is excited to work with the state to reduce the fire hazard and improve forest health.

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LETTER: Letter’s blast against Daines poorly aimed

from Keith Olson, Kalispell, executive director, Montana Logging Association
Daily Inter Lake
January 31, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Apparently, the author was upset that — in addition to providing a solution to how the U.S. Forest Service is forced to fund wildfire suppression — Sen. Daines is also committed to addressing the reason wildfire costs are spinning out of control. … It is, of course, absurd to think that any member of Congress would ignore the need for forest management reforms that strive to provide federal land management agencies with the tools necessary to reduce the threat of catastrophic wildfire.

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In East Texas, logging sees steady declines

Longview News-Journal
January 30, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

East Texas, home to the Lone Star State’s biggest forestry industry, has been seeing steady declines in the number of people employed and total economic impact of the sector in recent years. According to data from the Texas A&M Forest Service, forest sector employment fell 28 percent from 2007 to 2012, the latest year for which data was available. In 2012, the sector employed 18,950 people with a total payroll of $1.4 billion in East Texas. In 2007, it had employed more than 26,400 people with a payroll of $1.6 billion. Despite the decline, the forest sector is still a big part of the local economics in many of the 43 counties the Forest Service includes in its East Texas tally.

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Forestry incidents down but still work to be done

NewstalkZB
February 2, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: International

The forestry industry’s being told not to be complacent about a reduction in the number of workplace deaths and serious incidents. WorkSafe received 79 reports of people suffering serious harm last year, half as many as in 2013. The agency says three forestry workers died in workplace incidents last year, compared to 10 people in 2013. Forestry Industry Safety Council national safety director Fiona Ewing said the numbers are encouraging, but the industry shouldn’t be satisfied. “We’ve seen a reduction but we haven’t got to zero yet so that’s what we’re aiming for.” Ms Ewing said the council is “working hand in hand with Worksafe, ACC and also unions and employees.”

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Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy

U.S. Forest Service Releases Findings on the Effects of Drought for Forests and Rangelands

New Resource to Aid Land Managers in Adapting to Climate Change
USDA Forest Service
February 1, 2016
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: United States

WASHINGTON — The U.S. Forest Service today released a new report, Effects of Drought on Forests and Rangelands in the United States: A Comprehensive Science Synthesis, that provides a national assessment of peer-reviewed scientific research on the impacts of drought on U.S. forests and rangelands. This report will help the Forest Service better manage forests and grasslands impacted by climate change. “Our forests and rangelands are national treasures, and because they are threatened, we are threatened,” said Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack. “This report confirms what we are seeing, that every region of the country is impacted by the direct and indirect effects of drought conditions and volatile weather patterns.

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