Tree Frog Forestry News

Daily Archives: February 23, 2016

Business & Politics

Let’s make a deal: Trade agreements key in 2016

Wood Business
February 22, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

Between the expiry of the Softwood Lumber Agreement (SLA), the potential ratification of the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP), a surging U.S. dollar and staggeringly low oil prices, there are a lot of potential opportunities and challenges that lie ahead for Canada’s forestry sector in 2016. Although Canada’s forest industry has gone to great efforts to diversify the markets for its wood products across the globe, the largest market for Canada’s wood products is still, unsurprisingly, the United States. …Susan Yurkovich, president and CEO of the Council of Forest Industries (COFI) and president of the B.C. Lumber Trade Council, hopes the two countries and their industries will be able to find a way to move forward and iron out an agreement before October and remove some uncertainty from the market.

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Made in the grade

Wood Business
February 23, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

The Gorman Bros. operations have come a long way since the two brothers, John and Ross, opened up a factory to build fruit boxes out of sawmill scraps more than 60 years ago as a way to earn a living while their fruit orchards recovered from a harsh winter. Although the original office for that factory still stands proudly on display at the front of the Gorman Bros. sawmill and planer mill facility in Westbank, B.C., everything else related to the company’s operations has changed to adapt to the competitive pace of the forestry sector. The Westbank facility is a one-inch board mill that sells into 28 different countries worldwide. The mill produces 150 million bdft. predominantly out of spruce and lodgepole pine. Some lumber companies consider Gorman Bros. a “boutique mill” and that suits Doug Tracey, operations manager for Gorman Bros., just fine.

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Luxor Launches Marketing Campaign in the US for Architectural Wood Details Coated With Millennium Fire Protection

GlobeNewswire
February 22, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

VANCOUVER, British Columbia — Luxor Industrial Corporation is pleased to announce that it is launching a marketing campaign for Architectural Wood Details coated with Millennium Fire Coatings. Millennium’s coatings defend against fire, mold, moisture and damage from UV rays. The campaign includes sending samples to lumberyards throughout the US followed by an education course provided by Ron Blank and Associates.

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Workers barred from suing WorkSafeBC, agency says

Prince George Citizen
February 22, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

Employees affected by the explosions that destroyed the Lakeland and Babine sawmills three years ago are barred from bringing a class action lawsuit against WorkSafeBC, the agency says in a response filed last week. Workers must choose between accepting compensation or suing WorkSafeBC but “cannot do both,” according to the response, filed in B.C. Supreme Court in Vancouver. Moreover, WorkSafeBC says employees exceeded the two-year limit from the date the claims were discoverable to bring the action to court. Either way, WorkSafeBC is denying employees’ claim that the agency was “negligent or reckless” in both the inspection of the sawmills prior to the explosions and in the investigations that followed.

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Lumber Liquidators shares crater as CDC says tests underestimated cancer risk

MarketWatch
February 22, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: US East, United States

Shares of hardwood-flooring retailer Lumber Liquidators Holdings Inc. slumped more than 20% at their worst levels Monday, after the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said it had incorrectly assessed the cancer risk associated with the company’s flooring, and that it is much higher than from other products. The CDC said recent testing of the amount of formaldehyde in the company’s LL, +1.23% wood had used an incorrect value for ceiling height. Formaldehyde is a known carcinogen, causing myeloid leukemia and other cancers at high levels, as well as respiratory issues and eye, nose and throat irritation even at low levels.

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Alexandria wood pellet firm asks for bankruptcy court protection

The Advocate
February 22, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: US East, United States

The Alexandria subsidiary of one of the world’s largest wood pellet producers has filed for bankruptcy protection, the result of higher-than-expected costs and construction delays. Louisiana Pellets Inc., which has a production plant in Urania, asked the U.S. Bankruptcy Court for protection from its creditors while the company reorganizes. Wood pellets have been touted by European firms as a renewable energy source and a handful of wood pellet plants have popped up in Louisiana as well as a transit center at the Port of Greater Baton Rouge.

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Sulzer Signed Large-Scale Delivery Contract with Metsä Fibre

Hydrocarbons Technology
February 22, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: International

Sulzer has signed an order for a delivery contract of a large-scale process pump package to Metsä Group’s next-generation bio product mill in Äänekoski, Finland. The construction work of the mill is scheduled to be completed during the third quarter of 2017. Metsä Fibre, part of Metsä Group, is building a new bio product mill in Äänekoski. This investment of €1.2 billion is the largest ever in the wood-processing industry in Finland. The mill’s annual pulp production will be 1.3 million tonnes, of which 800,000 will be softwood pulp and 500,000 tons hardwood pulp.

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Tourism, forestry ‘big winners’ in TPP

Otago Daily Times
February 22, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: International

Trade Minister Todd McClay says tourism and forestry are just two of the big winners once the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) comes into force. Speaking at the Rotorua Chamber of Commerce today, Mr McClay said regional New Zealand would reap the benefits of TPP with economic growth and jobs. “New Zealand exported $1.5 billion in forestry products to TPP countries in 2015, 32 percent of total forestry product exports. “Once TPP is fully implemented, all tariffs will be eliminated across the 12 Parties, saving the forestry sector $11 million every year in tariffs. “And that is mostly on value-added timber,” he said. In Canada, all tariffs would disappear immediately once TPP enters into force.

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Cutting Edge Swedish Paper Mill Expands with PENETRON Technology

Benzinga
February 22, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: International

PENETRON ADMIX was a crucial element in the latest expansion of the Södra Cell Värö paper mill in Sweden. The large concrete structures of one of the world’s largest paper mills are now resistant to environmental influences and the acidity of the wood chips and pellets used in pulp production. The mill has undergone constant upgrades since it first opened in 1972, with a major 4 billion kronor (US$ 466.2 million) project concluded this month. The Södra Cell Värö facility currently produces 425,000 tons annually of high grade chlorine-free softwood pulp used mainly for tissue products.

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Wood, Paper & Green Building

Mainstream media catches onto Oregon CLT craze

Portland Business Journal
February 22, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: United States, US West

Cross-laminated timber panels may not yet be regular sights at commercial construction projects across the country, but the mainstream media is taking notice. Newsweek Saturday dedicated more than 1,500 words to CLT panels, advanced wood products strong enough to use as load-bearing walls and floors in high-rise buildings. For better or worse, CLT is making headlines. …But according to a presentation from Doug Heiken, Oregon Wild’s conservation and restoration coordinator, mature forests cannot be converted into young forests without losing most of the stored carbon into the atmosphere in the first place. …Environmentalists disagree with industry — heard this one before?

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Lumber Liquidators flooring has higher cancer risk, CDC says

Bangor Daily News
February 22, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: US East, United States

Lumber Liquidators Holdings Inc. flooring, tested for formaldehyde, was found to have a three times higher risk of causing cancer than previously stated, U.S. regulators said in reversing their own finding from earlier this month. A report released Feb. 10 used incorrect ceiling heights, lowering by about three times the airborne concentration that should have been examined and reducing the danger, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said in a statement on its website. The estimated risk of tumors is six cases to 30 cases per 100,000 people, the CDC said, above the two to nine cases in the earlier report. The company has three stores in Maine, in Brewer, Scarborough and Auburn, according to its website.

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Dead trees: How much are we consuming?

By Real Carpio So, Ramon V. del Rosario College of Business of De La Salle University
The Manila Times
February 22, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: International

These are facts. Approximately 324 liters of waters are used to produce 1 kilogram of paper. Average worldwide annual paper consumption is 48 kilograms per person; in North America, average is about 300 kilograms. The US approximately cuts more than 68 million trees each year to produce catalogues and direct mails. It continues to publish over 2 billion books, 359 million magazines, and 24 billion newspapers every year. And about 4 million tons of office paper are discarded per year. In China, 10,000 trees are cut down annually to make holiday cards. Each tree provides oxygen enough for three people to breathe. …According to the American Forest and Paper Association, one ream of uncoated free sheet (white bond paper, approximately 500 sheets) produces 4.25 kilograms of carbon dioxide gas.

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The time is now for CLT in Australia: developments, barriers and our first CLT house explored

Architecture and Design
February 23, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: International

We have it on good authority that cross-laminated timber (CLT) will be a major player in sustainable mid-rise building construction in the future. However, how far into the future that is, and how widespread its effect on Australia’s built environment will be is still a little up in the air, and according to some is much in the hands of the developer. …But while the environmental performance and structural strength of CLT has been well known in Australia for years now, its uptake as a viable alternative to concrete and steel in mid-rise building construction hasn’t been so obvious. In fact, since Australia’s first CLT building went up in 2012, promising a “new era in the future of sustainable development” in the process, less than a handful of projects using the material have been completed on our shores since.

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Vincent Callebaut’s hyperions is a sustainable ecosystem that resists climate change

Designboom
February 22, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: International

‘hyperions’ is a sustainable agro-ecosystem project that is capable of resisting climate change due to healthy economic and environmental systems. developed under vincent callebaut architectures, the study aims to combine archaeology and sustainable food systems, that grow up around wooden and timber towers in new delhi, india. ‘hyperions’ is made of six garden towers, each 36-story high containing residential and office spaces. the name comes from the tallest tree in the world ‘the hyperion’ – a sequoia semperviren found in northern california – whose size can reach 115.55 metres (close to 380 feet). the aim behind the project was to create a cultural hub that combines urban renaturation, small scale farming, environmental protection and biodiversity.

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Forestry

Forest certification in Canada: Trends and turbulence

Wood Business
February 22, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada

There are some unusual things going on in forest certification. The trend lines are heading in different directions. Figure 1 shows 2000 to 2015 year-end trend lines for the three certification programs used in Canada. The CSA Standard, developed specifically for use in Canada’s publicly owned forests, was an early leader but lost popularity starting in 2008 and has now dropped into third place with about 41 million hectares (ha) – mainly in Western Canada. It is also used by Corner Brook P&P in Newfoundland and Labrador and the Algonquin Forest Authority in Ontario. SFI has shown steady growth since its introduction in 2000. SFI is now the leader with 88 million ha of forestland certified to the requirements of the SFI Program.

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B.C. company helping fight wildfires in Indonesia

Vancouver Sun
February 22, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

One of the largest pulp-and-paper producers in the world has launched a major wildfire prevention initiative in the wake of large-scale forest fires in its home country of Indonesia last year. And the company is turning to its B.C. connections to do it. Asia Pulp and Paper has contracted Parksville-based TREK Wildland Services to provide 400 workers with training on a standardized, coordinated emergency response system, commonly known as ICS. TREK is one of two companies assisting Asia Pulp and Paper with the initiative — South Africa’s Working on Fire is the other. TREK president Phil Taudin-Chabot said he visited sites in Sumatra and East Kalimantan during a three-week tour earlier this year, and a team of his company’s experts are on the ground in Indonesia this month.

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Guelph Researchers Zero in On Dutch Elm Disease Genes

University of Guelph
February 23, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

A new study by University of Guelph biologists has brought researchers closer to the goal of restoring American elms resistant to Dutch elm disease (DED) in cities and forests across Canada and the United States. The new paper published today in Nature Scientific Reports offers a closer look at specific genes that allow elms to resist the most destructive shade tree disease in North America, says Prof. Praveen Saxena, Department of Plant Agriculture. “There’s nothing as beautiful as an American elm in landscaping,” said Saxena, director of U of G’s Gosling Research Institute for Plant Preservation (GRIPP).

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Save Broadback forest, Waswanipi Cree tell Quebec government

Montreal Gazette
February 22, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

QUEBEC — A coalition of First Nations and environmentalists asked Premier Philippe Couillard on Monday to spend as much energy protecting the Broadback forest in Northern Quebec as he is trying to save Anticosti Island. …Happyjack said about 90 per cent of the forest on his territory has already been logged. Today, he warns a project by the logging industry to build two access roads through the untouched portion of the Broadback forest is threatening not only rare old-growth trees and the woodland caribou, but the Cree community’s way of life, which revolves around hunting, fishing and trapping. …“Roads don’t go with caribou,” said Don Saganash, whose role as tallyman is to manage the traplines and safeguard the forest, rivers and lakes on the territory.

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Cree nation urges government to fight logging project

CTV News
February 22, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

The Cree nation is urging the Quebec government to take a stand against the logging industry. A project that involves building two access roads into a forest is causing concern among the Cree and several environmental groups. The two access roads would be built into the Broadback Forest, about 800 kilometres north of Montreal. The Cree claim the Broadback Forest is the last 10 per cent of intact boreal forest on their territory. They also say the area is vital for rare old growth trees and a last refuge for threatened species, including boreal woodland caribou. Proposed logging and clearcutting is currently under government review and threatens about 113 hectares of land.

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With ash borer looming, Bozeman commission approves new tree plan

The Bozeman Daily Chronicle
February 22, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

A plan to shore up management practices for city-owned trees in Bozeman — including preparations for the inevitable arrival of the invasive emerald ash borer — was approved unanimously Monday evening by Bozeman city commissioners. Among other provisions, it calls for expanding the city’s four-member forestry department, adding the equivalent of three employees to increase pruning frequency, complete an inventory of tree locations and proactively prepare for the ash borer’s arrival. The ash borer, a beetle native to eastern Asia, was first detected in the U.S. outside Detroit, Michigan, in 2002 and has since spread as far west as Colorado. It targets multiple species of ash trees, which constitute about 80 percent of Bozeman trees in the downtown area and half the urban forest citywide.

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Amid Warm Weather, Logging Operations Halting for Spring Break-Up

Temperatures in Kalispell have been 6.4 degrees warmer than the monthly average in February
Flathead Beacon
February 22, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Golf courses are already open and logging operations are already halted in Northwest Montana, where unseasonably warm weather has flipped the calendar by at least a month. Polson Bay Golf Course began accepting the first tee times of the year last week amid warm, sunny skies. The temperatures in Kalispell, on average, have been 6.4 degrees warmer than the historical norms for February, according to the National Weather Service. The mercury hit a monthly high of 51 degrees on Feb. 16 and surpassed 40 degrees all but once from Feb. 8 through Feb. 22….F.H. Stoltze Land & Lumber Co. in Columbia Falls temporarily laid off its night shift of 12 employees because of forest road conditions. The so-called spring break-up has lead to thawing roads that hamper logging trucks from traveling to and from harvest sites.

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Researchers seek donations to crack Joshua tree’s genetic code

Las Vegas Review-Journal
February 22, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

For about the price of a fancy coffee drink, you can help researchers learn more about — and maybe even save — the iconic plant of the Mojave Desert. A team of scientists led by a Joshua tree expert from Willamette University in Oregon wants to crack the plant’s genetic code, and they’re launching an online crowd-funding campaign to help pay for it. “We are proposing to sequence the Joshua tree genome,” said Willamette University project scientist Chris Smith. By analyzing the plant’s genes, researchers hope to learn how it adapts to harsh desert environments and how it might survive in a landscape altered by climate change. Once they know what makes some Joshua trees more resilient than others, biologists can identify and stockpile seeds from those plants best suited to live an even hotter, drier world.

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Wallowa-Whitman finalizes East Face logging project

Baker City Herald
February 19, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

The Wallowa-Whitman National Forest has released a revised version of a proposal for the Elkhorn Mountains that includes significant amounts of logging. The East Face project, as proposed, would be one of the bigger timber sales on the forest in the past quarter century. It covers about 48,000 acres of public land on the east slopes of the Elkhorns, mainly from the Anthony Lakes Highway north toward Ladd Canyon. On Thursday the Wallowa-Whitman released a final environmental assessment (EA) for the East Face project. Forest Supervisor Tom Montoya chose a strategy that includes minor changes from the draft EA unveiled in early October 2015. The proposed timber volume is about the same — 16 million board-feet of sawtimber and 6.6 million board-feet of trees too small or otherwise unsuitable for being sawed into boards.

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Temperature changes wreak ecological havoc in deforested areas, study finds

Phys.org
February 23, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

The newly-exposed edges of deforested areas are highly susceptible to drastic temperature changes, leading to hotter, drier and more variable conditions for the forest that remains, according to new research from the University of Colorado Boulder. The findings suggest that thermal biology—an emerging discipline that examines the effects of temperature on biological and ecological processes—could be an effective tool for understanding how temperature changes in fragmented habitats can potentially wreak havoc on species activity and other critical ecosystem functions. A study outlining a framework for applying thermal biology to deforestation research was recently published in the journal Ecology Letters.

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DNR releases update on health of Michigan’s forest land

Upper Michigan’s Source
February 22, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

The Michigan Department of Natural Resources has released its 2015 Forest Health Highlights report, an overview of Michigan’s forests, the insects and diseases that have threatened them over the past year, and details about what is being done to improve the state’s urban and rural forests. According to the DNR, the report breaks down forest health threats by examining insects and diseases, forest decline and ongoing forest health research. Photos and maps in the report illustrate the pests and show the effects they have had on Michigan’s forest system. Among the highlights in the report are the DNR’s efforts to control oak wilt, a serious disease that threatens Michigan’s extensive red oak resource. In cooperation with the U.S. Forest Service, tens of thousands of feet of root graft barriers have been created on state forest land. These barriers prevent oak wilt from moving to healthy oak trees.

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Increasing Drought Now Threatens Nearly All U.S. Forests

Duke University
February 22, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

DURHAM, N.C. — Forests nationwide are feeling the heat from increasing drought and climate change, according to a new study by scientists from 14 research institutions. “Over the last two decades, warming temperatures and variable precipitation have increased the severity of forest droughts across much of the continental United States,” said James S. Clark, lead author of the study and Nicholas Professor of Environmental Science at Duke University. “While the effects have been most pronounced in the West, our analysis shows virtually all U.S. forests are now experiencing change and are vulnerable to future declines,” he said. “Given the high degree of uncertainty in our understanding of how forest species and stands adapt to rapid change, it’s going to be difficult to anticipate the type of forests that will be here in 20 to 40 years.”

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Young leaders announced for MobileTECH 2016

MobileTECH
February 22, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: International

Young leaders in New Zealand’s primary industries are essential for increasing the future prosperity of the sector. One of the key highlights at the upcoming MobileTECH 2016 event is the ‘Meet the future leaders’ panel. This session focuses on the next generation of farmers, orchardists and foresters and what their views and big ideas are for the future. …Goetz Roth was awarded a Callaghan Forestry Innovation Scholarship in 2015 and will represent the forest industry at MobileTECH 2016. He has recently returned from Europe reviewing harvester system implementation and management throughout Finland, Germany and Sweden. …The ‘Meet the future leaders’ panel is one of 36 exciting presentations at MobileTECH 2016.

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Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy

Yukon government adopts biomass energy strategy

CBC News
February 22, 2016
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: Canada, Canada West

The Yukon Government has officially adopted a strategy to get Yukoners to heat their homes in a way that it says is cost-effective and environmentally sustainable. …Shane Andre with the Yukon Government’s Energy Solutions says creating and supporting a biomass industry in the Yukon makes more sense than trucking in fossil fuels. …Andre says burning wood would help promote a sustainable forest industry in the territory. He also says burning wood is considered carbon neutral. “As long as we are allowing the forest to regrow, the carbon monoxide emissions we release when we burn it will be returned to the tree and therefore is a neutral cycle.”

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‘Meaningful carbon price needed’ to reverse forest shrinkage

Voxy.co.nz
February 23, 2016
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: International

New Zealand’s third largest export industry, forestry, is steadily shrinking. Ministry for Primary Industries figures reveal that only 3000 hectares of new forest were planted in 2015 and that the total area of planted forest fell by 16,000 ha. Forest Owners Association technical manager Glen Mackie describes the figures as predictable and says the area of forest is likely to continue to fall, until the cost of land can be justified by the income it generates. From 1955 to 2000, the area of New Zealand’s plantation forests grew from 344,000 to 1,769,000 hectares, an increase of 31,667 ha a year. Since then the planted area has declined to 1,720,000 ha, a decline of 3267 ha a year. In addition, in 2015 there were 9300 ha of harvested forest lying fallow, awaiting a decision from the land owner whether or not to replant.

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