Tree Frog Forestry News

Daily Archives: March 16, 2016

Business & Politics

Public advised to avoid water near Canoe Forest Products

Salmon Arm Observer
March 15, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

A spill into Shuswap Lake, north-east of Canoe, near the shoreline of Canoe Forest Products on March 14 is under investigation by the Ministry of Environment and Interior Health. It is estimated that several thousands of litres of run-off water containing some glue and fuel products was washed into the lake. As a precaution, the City of Salmon Arm has stopped use of their Shuswap Lake water intake and is using an alternate water intake source. Interior Health says the municipal water supply is safe to use.

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Indian diplomat woos BC businesses

Vancouver Sun
March 15, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

India’s chief diplomat to Canada implored B.C. businesses on Tuesday to explore ways to invest or otherwise enter the Indian market, citing both India’s recent rise in international profile and rapidly warming Ottawa-New Delhi relations. …Rick Jeffery, CEO of the Coast Forest Products Association, told the Board of Trade panel that the fact India is much farther away than the East-Asian economies is a major reason preventing more Canada-India trade links. “What we are faced with now is the logistics,” said Jeffery as he compared B.C.’s forest industry’s small foothold in India to the trade with China and Japan. “It’s not easy to ship there; it’s halfway around the world. It’s not on the route we normally make when shipping to Japan or China. … That’s our challenge today: How we can build a better supply chain for our customers? We need friends, and we need lots of friends, not just one.”

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Lavington residents target pellet plant

Vernon Morning Star
March 16, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

The light and noise pollution that Lavington residents have been complaining about for months from their industrial neighbours is finally getting some attention. For the second time in five months, since the Pinnacle Pellet Plant opened in late September, neighbours have aired their concerns with the District of Coldstream. “Our home has been bombarded with an excess of noise pollution from Tolko as well as Pinnacle,” said Stephanie Hoffman, one of the representatives of LIFE (Lavington Is For Everyone). “And since our last presentation in October, there have been no light mitigation efforts taken.” Another resident, Rose Breitkreitz, is also fed up with the constant “clanging, buzzing and forklift noises,” as well as light.

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Finger pointed at industry

Castanet
March 15, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

Residents in Lavington worried about air quality due to the Pinnacle pellet plant complain that noise and light pollution are problems, too. “This is noise that is being generated by Tolko and Pinnacle,” said Stephanie Hoffman, spokesperson for Lavington LIFE, in a presentation to Coldstream council on Monday. “Under the current noise bylaw, there should be no exceptions for this disruption during the evening hours.” The pellet plant was built near Tolko’s planer mill. “The lighting was an issue brought up by our previous delegation (to council), for which we have had no follow up or relief provided,” Hoffman said.

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Softwood lumber deal, LNG top priorities: Clark

Prince George Citizen
March 15, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

Scoring some big natural resources goals and advancing aboriginal relations to unprecedented levels will be the primary focus of the provincial government in the coming year.  …The top of that priority list for her was the softwood lumber agreement. Canada and the United States do not have a current trade pact for selling B.C.’s most important commodity (primarily spruce, fir and pine). ….”The first thing I ever said to (Justin Trudeau) when he became prime minister was we need you to help us settle the softwood lumber deal, because we know it only gets settled by a prime minister and president talking to each other. We ship 50 per cent of the softwood from Canada, as you know, so it’s more important to British Columbia than anywhere else.

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NowNS: Nova Scotia’s top 10 exports

Chronicle Herald
March 15, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada East, Canada

What are Nova Scotia’s top exports? How much do they earn? And to whom do we sell? According to Industry Canada, Nova Scotia exported $5.4 billion of goods and services outside of Canada during 2015 – unchanged from the previous year. The U.S. remained by far our province’s most important trading partner, with Nova Scotia selling $3.8 billion to that country during 2015. …Rounding out the top 10 were paper products and chemical wood pulp ($241 million each), shellfish ($187 million), liquefied petroleum or hydrocarbon gases ($183 million), fresh fish ($116 million), non-cellular plastics ($108 million), frozen fruits and nuts ($104 million) and lumber ($88 million).

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Mill workers approved for federal TAA status

Pamplin Media Group
March 16, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States, US West

It’s a far cry from getting their jobs back, but former workers of the shuttered Newberg paper mill are eligible to receive reemployment and retraining services, a health coverage tax credit and other benefits following the Department of Labor’s determination last week that foreign trade played a part in the facility’s closure. Two weeks after SP Fiber Technologies finalized a sale to WestRock Co. in October, the new owner announced it would “indefinitely idle” the mill due to market conditions. In mid-November a majority of the facility’s more than 200 workers were laid off while the remaining employees worked to prepare the mill for dormancy. Shortly after the idling announcement the Association of Western Pulp and Paper Workers, the union that represents mill workers, filed a petition for the Trade Adjustment Assistance (TAA) program.

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Mary’s River Lumber closing

Grays Harbor Daily World
March 15, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States, US West

Mary’s River Lumber, based in Corvallis, Ore., with mill operations in Montesano and three other Northwest locations, announced Monday that it was closing, effective that day. Company officials were not available, but company president Brad D. Kirkbride issued the following news release: “After 42 years in the cedar lumber business, Mary’s River Lumber Company has made the very difficult decision to cease its operations effective March 14, 2016. Unfortunately, the extremely limited availability of suitable cedar logs has led us to this point, after a great deal of analysis and evaluation of alternatives. We are especially sad about the impact this will have on our employees, who are a core part of the Mary’s River Lumber Company family.

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An ‘economic crisis’ in Maine’s paper industry, mapped

Bangor Daily News
March 15, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: US East, United States

Madison Paper Industries announced it will shut its doors in May. And then there will be eight. The latest paper mill shutdown announcement will make for five major closures in the past three years, after East Millinocket, Lincoln, Old Town and Bucksport. …The losses reflect an economic harm to those areas broader than just the loss of thousands of jobs in recent years — the entire supply chain and communities where those relatively high wages would be spent have been hit hard. The Professional Logging Contractors of Maine on Monday called for legislative action to help the forest industry, saying the Madison closure “means the loss of the last major buyer of spruce-fir pulp in the state.” The numbers have been grim for the paper industry that built many of the towns where mills are now closing.

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AF&PA President and CEO Donna Harman Discusses Top Industry Advocacy Issues at Tissue World New Orleans

American Forest & Paper Association
March 15, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: US East, United States

WASHINGTON – American Forest & Paper Association (AF&PA) President & CEO Donna Harman spoke today at the senior management session at Tissue World New Orleans about public policy issues affecting the tissue industry. “Tissue products are at the forefront of new technologies and innovation, and tissue manufacturers are achieving increasingly sustainable production while improving quality and options for consumers,” said Harman. “By protecting the interests of tissue manufacturers against burdensome regulations and legislation, AF&PA is helping them to continue to provide products people use and need.”

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Madison workers, lawmakers consider uncertain future

Kennebec Journal & Morning Sentinel
March 15, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: US East, United States

MADISON — “We are done.” Those are the three words that Scott Daubenberger received from a co-worker in a text message Monday morning telling him that the Madison Paper Industries mill would be closing and they would both be losing their jobs. “We’ll all get through it, but it’s going to be tough,” said Daubenberger, 52, of Madison, who’s worked at the mill for 11 years. “We’ve lost our jobs and they were very good paying jobs.” The Madison paper mill, a subsidiary of parent company UPM-Kymmene Inc., announced Monday that it will be closing its doors in May and laying off all of its roughly 214 employees. The company cited dwindling demand for supercalendered paper, the glossy magazine paper made at the Madison mill.

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China accused of unfair play on forestry

Radio New Zealand News
March 16, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: International

China is getting all the advantages from the Free Trade Agreement (FTA) between it and New Zealand, according to the forestry industry – and it wants the government to step in. The Wood Council is looking for government support to challenge China at the World Trade Organisation if necessary. The council said, as far as its industry was concerned, there was no FTA because of the non-tariff barriers China placed on its products. Non-tariff barriers include regulations such as technical registrations and standards, price control measures, forest management certification and product labelling. The council was particularly concerned by the adoption of building codes and standards that did not consider New Zealand radiata pine.

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Non-tariff barriers to New Zealand forest products trade

By The Wood Council of NZ
Scoop Independent News
March 16, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: International

Even in markets where import tariffs are low or non-existent, non-tariff barriers (NTBs) can be a major impediment to trade. This is especially true of New Zealand’s exports of forest products, which face significant NTBs in many major markets Many of these barriers can easily be identified, but it is a great deal more difficult to calculate their precise impact on our export returns and what their removal might mean for our forest industry. One thing is certain, our forest products exports are not competing on a level playing field. NTBs are defined as government measures, other than tariffs, that distort international trade. Typically they either protect domestically produced products from the full weight of foreign competition or artificially stimulate exports of those products.

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Government probing non-tariff barriers as forestry industry accuses China of not playing fair in FTA

New Zealand Stuff
March 16, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: International

The Government says it is looking into non-tariff barriers to trade, after New Zealand’s forestry industry accused China of acting outside the spirit of the free trade agreement. The FTA comes up for review later this year, and Trade Minister Todd McClay said he had taken note of the Wood Council’s comments.  In a report released today, the council found a number of non-tariff barrier (NTBs) being applied in China were affecting New Zealand forest product manufacturers. The council said building codes and standards within China also appeared to favour North American wood product imports.  It also identified non-tariff barriers being an issue in a number of other countries, including Chile and Canada, but to less of an extent. 

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Australian Forest Growers National Conference 2016

PRWire
March 16, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: International

Private forest owners, farmers and land managers will be gathering in Launceston in October for Australia’s major National Forestry Conference run by Australian Forest Growers (AFG). Dr Kevin Harding, National President said, ‘The Conference helps landholders manage their forests for wood and, at the same time, achieve the wider environmental and social values the community demands. Now in its 32nd year, the Australian Forest Growers (AFG) conference will feature a keynote speech by Professor Barry Brook, Chair of Environmental Sustainability at the University of Tasmania.

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Real Policies, Not Token Gestures for the Forestry Industry

By New Zealand First Party
Scoop Independent News
March 16, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: International

When we look from the New Zealand First Parliamentary Office across to the Port of Wellington we see a vast swathe of logs stacked for export When National Ministers look out of their Beehive Offices they see that same scene too But For New Zealand First the sight of mass log exports is an opportunity lost – for New Zealand For the government it is a matter of indifference – they shrug their shoulders and say “leave it to the market.” New Zealand First considers that New Zealand’s forestry and wood processing sector is vital to our economic future and we can do far better by adding value and creating jobs for the NZ economy. Currently around 40% of the timber exported goes out as logs. Increased log processing is the obvious route for the sector to take.

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Wood, Paper & Green Building

Construction Concerns: Connecting Cross-Laminated Timber

Fire Engineering
March 15, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: United States

The use of cross-laminated timber (CLT) was recently incorporated into the 2015 edition of the International Building Code (IBC), with an unprotected fire resistance rating of up to two hours. It is likely to be incorporated into the next edition of National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) 5000, Building Construction and Safety Code. …It should be of concern to firefighters that a building of CLT construction will look like any other modern building (or older remodeled building) when it is finished. The CLT and their connections are likely to be concealed on the interior with gypsum drywall board, wood paneling, or other materials in common use in building interiors of all types.

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Forestry

Spruce beetle outbreak next threat to forests north and east of Prince George

By Derrick Penner
Vancouver Sun
March 15, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

An outbreak of the spruce beetle is threatening to deplete timber supplies in areas near Prince George that have already been hit hard by the mountain pine beetle infestation. The spruce beetle is common in B.C. forests, but timber companies noticed in 2013 it was starting to reach epidemic levels in valleys of the Omineca region to the north and east of Prince George that is experiencing warmer conditions brought by climate change. …Last week, Forests Minister Steve Thomson committed $1 million for increased detection and monitoring and named a resource manager to head up the so-called Omineca spruce beetle project. “Our goal is two-fold,” said Heather Wiebe, head of the Omineca project. “We’re trying to mitigate the impact to our midterm timber supply as well as maintain (forest ecosystems).”

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New B.C. park protects ‘Ancient Forest’ from loggers

‘It’s an unknown world on our doorstep’
CBC News
March 15, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

A new B.C. park will protect an ancient cedar forest believed to be the only inland temperate rainforest in the world. The northern park. known as the Ancient Forest, contains 1,000 year old trees as large as 16 metres around as well as rare lichens and mosses. “It’s an unknown world on our door step,” said Darwyn Coxson, a University of Northern B.C. ecosystems science professor who has been conducting research in the ancient forest for years. …Last year, more than 20,000 people strolled through the majestic forest on a hillside beneath towering trees just off Highway 16.

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Can we afford to be fickle about our forests?

250 News Prince George
March 15, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Forests are the lungs of our planet. They operate as vast reservoirs for capturing, storing, and releasing greenhouse gases into the atmosphere, as well as providing oxygen. They also provide wildlife habitat, landscape stability, water storage and filtering, and other important environmental functions. And they create a foundation for human activity and community, including manufacturing and processing, trade, scientific research, tourism, recreation and culture. In all these respects, British Columbia has a treasure in its vast, diverse and bountiful forests. At a time of rapid climate change, which, according to the prevailing view of the scientific community, has been dramatically accelerated by the proliferation of greenhouse gases (GHG) from human activity, the importance of this resource cannot be underestimated.

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Ancient Forest to become provincial park

My Prince George Now
March 15, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Premier Christy Clark was in Prince George today for an announcement at the Wood Innovation and Design Centre. The Ancient Forest/Chun T’oh Wudujut about 120 kilometres east of Prince George will be becoming a Class A Park. Legislation will be introduced tomorrow in Victoria that will protect 11,190 hectares of ancient cedar trees, which make up part of the only inland temperate rainforest in the world. “This is a forest that includes thousand year old trees some of which are 16 metres in diametre and those are some of the rarest red cedars that can be found anywhere on earth.” Clark told a crowd in the lobby of the WIDC. Clark says once the space becomes a park they will push to designate the park a UNESCO World Heritage Site. 

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Ancient Forest with some of the largest cedar trees in B.C. will be class A park

Canadian Press in the Vancouver Sun
March 15, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

PRINCE GEORGE — A unique rainforest comprised of some of the largest cedar trees in British Columbia is set to become a provincial park. Premier Christy Clark has announced that 119 square-kilometres of forest in northern B.C. will become a class A provincial park under legislation to be introduced Wednesday. The designation would protect the Ancient Forest, also known as Chun T’oh Wudujut to local First Nations, from timber harvesting and other commercial activity. Located about 120 kilometres east of Prince George, the forest is part of the only known inland temperate rainforest in the world, and is home to a many different plant and wildlife species.

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Ash tree project enlists Micmac youths to counter invasive borer

Bangor Daily News
March 15, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States

PRESQUE ISLE, Maine — The Aroostook Band of Micmacs are trying to grow a new, healthy generation of ash trees and show youngsters career paths in science. On one of the coldest days of the year in early March, second-grader Gitpu Paul joined other students and tribal members in a high-tunnel greenhouse near the Micmacs’ headquarters, planting hundreds of brown ash tree seedlings that they helped collect last fall. In the spring, Paul and his peers will be giving away ash saplings and planting them on tribal lands. It’s partly a science project for the kids and partly an investment, said Micmac planner and Maine historian Dena Winslow. “Ash trees are probably the most significant of any species to this tribe,” said Winslow.

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County climate change group talks forest management

East Oregonian
March 14, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Seated in a circle around the conference room at Blue Mountain Community College, about 30 people gathered Saturday afternoon to discuss the effects of climate change on local forests and what can be done to make the landscape more adaptable. Wildfire weighed particularly heavy on the group’s minds, which included forest landowners, loggers, ranchers and a multitude of agency officials. Together, they brainstormed conditions on the ground and what management is needed to maintain healthy, productive forests. The workshop was coordinated by the Umatilla County Climate Change Focus Group, and facilitated by employees from the Umatilla National Forest, Oregon Department of Forestry, Oregon State University Extension Service and Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation.

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Landowner seeks to prevent logging on parcel near Baxter State Park

Bangor Daily News
March 15, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

TOWNSHIP 4, RANGE 8, Maine — A part owner of a parcel of environmentally sensitive land near Baxter State Park is pursuing legal action to keep state foresters from harvesting wood on the property. Atkinson resident Charles Fitzgerald filed a petition to partition land near Wassataquoik Stream, a parcel north of acreage owned by entrepreneur Roxanne Quimby east of Baxter State Park, as a first step toward protecting trees and ecosystems on the property. The civil action was filed in Penobscot County Superior Court on March 7, said Fitzgerald’s attorney Bernard J. Kubetz of Bangor. Fitzgerald shares ownership with the state of about 2,500 acres of land adjoining the stream that the state plans to harvest later next year or in 2017.

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Modern management needed to keep our forests thriving

By Doug Tavella, SAF, a New Jersey-approved consulting forester
New Jersey Herald
March 16, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

The Sparta Mountain Wildlife Management Area (WMA) forest stewardship plan has been subject to acrimonious debate. On one side of the debate is a presentation of facts that address a decades-long trend of decreasing diversity of the region’s forests, due in large part to lack of disturbance which is critical to biological diversity and forest resilience. On the other side has been an emotional outpouring that to harvest a tree is tantamount to sacrilege. This argument has been accompanied by accusations that the plan is a conspiracy to enrich the logging industry, and that its implementation will result in a destruction of the forest. By now you’ve guessed which side of the argument I am on. I am a consulting forester with 31 years of experience managing northwestern New Jersey’s precious forest land. My professional accomplishments and legacy are rooted in them. My eyes and spirit revel in them. I love these forests.

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Nepal seeks to spread community forestry programme across SAsia

Kathmandu Post
March 15, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: International

Nepal has officially proposed to share its successful experience and expertise in community forestry management to the rest of South Asia during the ongoing 52nd programming committee meeting of the Saarc ministerial meeting. Nepal’s flagship community forestry management programme was widely acclaimed and well received by other member states and forwarded for consideration to the higher bodies to take a final call. The upcoming meeting of Saarc Standing Committee at foreign secretary level that will convene on Wednesday will further take up the matter, said Joint Secretary at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs Mani Sharma Bhattarai, who is leading the Nepali delegation at programming committee meeting.

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Logging conflict brewing again in NSW south east forests

ABC News Australia
March 16, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: International

The battle lines for a renewal of the logging wars in south east New South Wales are being drawn as environmental groups dispute the State Government’s commitment to protecting newly-created flora reserves. The Mumbulla, Murrah, and Tanja State Forests and half of the Bermagui State Forests have been gazetted as Flora Reserves, protecting koalas in those areas from logging, and putting the forests under management of the National Parks and Wildlife Service (NPWS). But Noel Plumb, convenor of the South East Forest Alliance (SEFA) said the forests should have been gazetted as national parks.

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Congo’s rain forests under logging threat

DRC may allow new industrial loggers into protected region.
Mother Nature Network
March 15, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: International

In 2002, the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) passed a moratorium against new commercial logging licenses, an attempt to protect millions of acres of valuable rain forest in the central African nation, The move was hailed by environmentalists. The Congo Basin is home to the second-largest tropical rain forest in the world (behind the Amazon). According to the World Wildlife Foundation, it covers an area bigger than the state of Alaska. Deforestation in the Basin (not all of which is in the DRC) is considered by many as a major cause of global climate change. Earlier this year, though, the DRC announced that it’s considering lifting the moratorium.

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Government welcomes Forest Safety Charter

Voxy.co.nz
March 16, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: International

Today’s launch of the Forest Industry Safety Council (FISC) Charter is an important milestone for improved health and safety outcomes and operational excellence in the forestry industry, says Workplace Relations and Safety Minister Michael Woodhouse. The Charter publicly commits the industry to a mission of ‘Together Towards Zero’ as the driver for achieving safe outcomes for all forestry industry workers. “This is a demonstration of a connected, collaborative approach to drive effective health and safety initiatives in the forestry industry, which will help contribute to the Government’s goal of at least a 25 per cent reduction in workplace fatalities and injuries by 2020,” says Mr Woodhouse.

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Forest burning continues in Lake Toba area

Jakarta Post
March 15, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: International

Deforestation around Lake Toba in North Sumatra continues despite the central government’s plan to turn Southeast Asia’s biggest lake into one of the country’s 10 major tourist destinations. Over 5 hectares of forest in Harian district, Sianjur Mula-Mula, Samosir regency, were reportedly razed by fire in recent days. Tumpal Sijabat of Samosir suspected that the fire may have been deliberately lit to clear land for plantation purposes. “The fire has been burning for a week but efforts to extinguish it were very slow, so the whole forest has already burned,” he said on Monday. Similarly, Marandus Sirait of Toba Samosir regency expressed concern over the condition of forests in the Lake Toba area, saying that most of the area had been damaged because of land clearing and illegal logging.

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Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy

Whitehorse biomass project makes debut at Yukon conference

CBC News
March 15, 2016
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: Canada, Canada West

A conference opening in Whitehorse Tuesday will show off the territory’s newest biomass heating project. Biomass energy uses organic matter to heat buildings and produce power. This new biomass project uses waste wood to generate heat at a Whitehorse recycling centre. “People had to drive brush and and add it to the dump and they have to deal with it so this way it can be shredded and used to heat buildings so there could be potentially a lot of biomass, a lot of clean wood used to displace fuel,” said Chris Schmidt, with ACS Mechanical of Whitehorse. Schmidt presented his idea to the Cold Climate Innovation branch at the Yukon Research Centre. Schmidt says the system uses all types of waste wood.

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Despite mill closures, Maine timber industry shows signs of evolving

University of Maine-Farmington heats with Maine wood chips
WMTW
March 15, 2016
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: US East, United States

FARMINGTON, Maine —A growing trend suggests Maine’s timber industry is evolving, and is giving hope that demand will exist in the future. At the University of Maine-Farmington’s Biomass Central Heating Plant, tons of locally sourced and sustainably harvested wood chips are used as fuel. The process itself is significantly automated, as the chips are delivered in a self-unloading truck and fed through a conveyor system. The chips are delivered down here in a self-unloading truck and fed up through a conveyor system. “It’s all programmed, how many chips it needs, how much air it needs for combustion,” said Jeff McKay, director of facilities management at the plant. The wood chips are also environmentally friendly, as the school has reduced carbon emissions for heating by half after it relied on oil for decades.

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