Tree Frog Forestry News

Daily Archives: March 22, 2016

Business & Politics

Time running out to renew softwood lumber treaty

Canadian Sailings
March 21, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada

The recent expiration of the Canada-U.S. Softwood Lumber Agreement (SLA) has come at pivotal time for the Canadian lumber industry. While the agreement’s terms will remain in force for a year after last October’s expiration, negotiating a new deal is going to pose a challenge for Canada, not the least because of the weak Canadian dollar. …Russ Taylor, President of the forest-industry consulting firm International Wood Markets Group Inc., said he’s not confident that the Liberal government has the wherewithal to negotiate a good deal for Canada’s lumber industry. “It just seems like this government is going to give everything away really quickly,” Mr. Taylor said. “I’d be nervous with the early signs I’ve seen with this government.” Mr. Taylor said he also suspects that the softwood lumber deal isn’t even “a blip on the radar” of outgoing U.S. President Barrack Obama, whose second and last term expires in January.

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Arson at PIR

Smithers Interior News
March 21, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

An act of arson at the Pacific Inland Resources mill was reported late Sunday night to Smithers RCMP. The superintendent for the West Fraser-owned mill reported the arson at 11:13 p.m. Smithers RCMP Staff Sgt. Rob Mitchell released a statement that said the fire was set “intentionally in the main structure using flammable liquids.” The fire was extinguished by night shift employees. There were no injuries. “[There was] no major damage,” said PIR general manager Dean McDonald. The Tatlow Road mill was able to be back up in operation by Monday afternoon. Investigators still had the affected area closed for further examination.

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Record year for Canfor’s seedling centre

Canfor CEO Blog
March 21, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

In Canada, Canfor’s operations source a significant proportion of our fibre from our forest tenures, where we are responsible for forest management. In the US, we buy logs from private landowners and don’t manage forests directly. In 2015, Canfor planted 78 million trees in BC and Alberta. In addition to purchasing seedling from local nurseries, an important part of our reforestation program in central BC includes our dedicated seedling nursery – the J.D. Little Forestry Centre in Prince George. J.D. Little Forest Centre had a phenomenal growing record last year with a total of 9.9 million spruce seedlings grown in 2015. This is the largest annual total grown in over 20 years. Since it was built in 1982, the nursery has grown over 270 million seedlings. There’s a lot that takes place in the different greenhouses from when the seeds are planted to when the seedling are sent out to be planted. 

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France: Worries against massive log exports to Asia

Global Wood Markets Info
March 22, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: International

The log exports from France gathers 15% of the national forest’s assets. Yet, it provides only 3% added value, according to Fédération Nationale du Bois (FNB). China alone accounts for 1 million m3 log exports and this represents € 800 million loss value and 40 million of tax and social security revenues lost for France, as FNB says. Another important issue is that exporting the unprocessed logs attracts jobs losses in France. In terms of added value, the ratio is 1 to 10 in favor of the industry. Thus, 10 000 m3 of logs exported create one job, while 10 000 m3 of logs processed in France create 10 jobs. According to FNB, exports of processed logs would cut terrestrial and maritime pollution in France by 2.3 times. 

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Wood, Paper & Green Building

New study finds insurance costs are more than six times greater for wood frame buildings than for concrete buildings

Concrete Council of Canada
March 21, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: Canada

A new study of the property insurance costs for wood frame and concrete mid-rise residential buildings conducted by GLOBE Advisors and released today by the Concrete Council of Canada reveals a substantial gap in the risks and insurance rates between the two building systems. The data for the study “Insurance Costs for Mid-Rise Wood Frame and Concrete Residential Buildings” was drawn from relevant published literature and consultations with brokers, underwriters and property managers. Interviews with three underwriters and data from the Canadian Wood Council (CWC) show that builders’ risk insurance rates per $100 monthly for comparable wood and concrete buildings are on average $0.008 for concrete and $0.053 for wood. When excluding the rate provided by CWC for wood frame insurance, which was significantly lower than the rates provided by the underwriters, the average rate for wood buildings rises to $0.06, a factor of 7.5 times greater than that for concrete buildings.

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Cellulosic fiberboard, laminated strand lumber EPDs released

American and Canadian Wood Councils
March 16, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: Canada, United States

LEESBURG, VA. – The American Wood Council (AWC) and the Canadian Wood Council (CWC) have announced the release of two new environmental product declarations (EPD) for cellulosic fiberboard and laminated strand lumber (LSL), bringing the available EPDs for North American wood products to 11. The cradle- to-gate, industry-wide EPDs are recognized by green building rating systems and are available for free download on the AWC or CWC websites. The North American Fiberboard Association (NAFA) partnered with AWC and CWC providing life cycle inventory data necessary to complete the cellulosic fiberboard EPD. …For more than 100 years, wood fiberboard has been an integral part of a wide variety of construction, industrial and commercial applications. The wood fiber industry possesses a longstanding reputation for producing environmentally friendly products.

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Insurance lagging behind wood innovation

Journal of Commerce
March 21, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: Canada, Canada West

An insurance expert is calling for his industry to take a second look at wood. Jeff McLellan, a vice-president with BLF Canada Insurance Services Inc., recently addressed the 2016 International Wood Symposium in Vancouver about the sluggish response of the insurance industry to new wood technologies. While new materials such as cross laminated timber (CLT) and glulam are changing the nature of wood construction, insurance companies are not keeping up, McLellan said. “Reinsurers drive the bus on this, and they say ‘wood’s wood’,” McLellan said. Wood has specific properties and a history that make it an easy target for advocacy groups from other industries, he added.

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The Hidden Carbon Benefits of Cross Laminated Timber

Triple Pundit
March 21, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: United States, US West

A new, engineered forest product called Cross Laminated Timber (CLT) has been a hot topic in the Oregon news lately. ll. …What may be less understood is that building with sustainably-harvested wood results in a significant amount of avoided greenhouse gas emissions. This is because the energy and raw material intensive production of conventional building materials, primarily concrete and steel, requires a massive amount of energy.

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Cluster of timber towers could take root in Bordeaux

Gizmag
March 21, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: International

Timber construction is on the rise. Following tall timber projects slated for Vancouver, Paris and London, Sou Fujimoto Architects and Laisné Roussel have proposed a new tall timber development for Bordeaux, France. Dubbed Canopia, it features a cluster of four mixed-use timber towers linked by rooftop walkways. Proposed for Bordeaux’s Gare Saint Jean neighborhood, Canopia would be located in a 17,000 sq m (182,986 sq ft) plot and comprise four buildings, with the tallest rising to 50 m (164 ft), making it one of the tallest modern wooden structures in the world….Canopia would be constructed using silver fir and spruce beams, with cross-laminated timber floors and glulam (glued laminated timber) beams supporting the structure – a method we’ve previously covered in detail.

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Timber lobby presses for Palace of Westminster to renew with wood

The Construction Index
March 22, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: International

The Confederation of Timber Industries (CTI) is backing a call from supportive MPs for the restoration of the Palace of Westminster to retain its extensive use of wood throughout. The new formed all party parliamentary group (APPG) on timber industries, which is funded by the CTI, want the Houses of Parliament to retain their traditional feel and appearance after the impending £3.5bn refurbishment.  Timber APPG chairman Ian Paisley MP has written to the leader of the House of Commons, Chris Grayling, urging him to consider replacing wooden structures within the House with the same material where at all possible.

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Waugh Thistleton reveals timber East London office

Architect’s Journal
March 22, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: International


Timber construction pioneer Waugh Thistleton has revealed plans for this 8,360m2 wooden structure on Leonard Circus in Shoredtich, East London. The project for the Ethical Property Company, will replace an existing 1970s office building on the site just off Old Street. With a structure entirely built from cross-laminated timber and glulam, the building features five quadrants separated by deep voids within the floor space. The building has been designed to be flexible allowing it to be let to a single tenant or split up into smaller commercial spaces. …Andrew Waugh, director of Waugh Thistleton, said: ‘Building in timber offers a number of advantages, including minimised time on site and associated sound and waste disturbance. This translates to less impact on adjacent occupiers, street users and surrounding community.’

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Middle East and Mena- important destinations for American softwoods

Global Wood Markets Info
March 21, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: International

American softwoods are needed more and more in the Middle East and North Africa (Mena region) as construction and the housing market are starting to develop rapidly, according to GDN Online. American Softwoods (AMSO) will be present at the Dubai WoodShow 2016, which will run from April 4 to 6 at the Dubai International Convention and Exhibition Center, and will bring out the importance of US softwoods. Three important US softwood trade associations will form the promotional partnership to be introduced at Dubai WoodShow. As GDN Online reported, in 2015, the total exports of US softwood to the Mena region summed $20 million. 

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Forestry

Minister Carr Celebrates International Day of Forests

CNW in Vancouver Sun
March 21, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada

The Honourable Jim Carr, Minister of Natural Resources Canada, made the following statement in recognition of the United Nations’ International Day of Forests, which this year focuses on the relationship between forests and freshwater. “I am pleased to join Canadians in celebrating the International Day of Forests?. Canada’s forests are an important part of our nation’s history, are vital to our environment, society and economy, and will continue to play an essential role in our future. …”Canada is proud of its record in sustainable forest management and the protection of our forest resources. Less than 0.2 percent of Canada’s forests are harvested annually, and all forests on public land must be successfully regenerated following harvest.

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Two Canadian sites join UNESCO biosphere network

Victoria Times Colonist
March 21, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Two Canadian regions have been singled out by a United Nations agency for how well they combine economic and environmental concerns. In an meeting in Lima, Peru, over the weekend, UNESCO welcomed Great Bear Lake in the Northwest Territories and the Beaver Hills east of Edmonton into its World Network of Biosphere Reserves. …The program recognizes regions that have maintained a healthy economy while hanging on to significant environmental values. It’s meant to encourage co-operation and innovative thinking. …The designation does not carry any legal protection for the land nor does it restrict local decision-makers. Its purpose, according to the Canadian Biosphere Reserves Association, is to share best practices and make it easier to conserve ecosystems without damaging residents’ ability to make a living on them. 

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Prescribed burns to restore Cariboo-Chilcotin grassland

Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations
BC Government
March 21, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

The Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations is planning to conduct a series of prescribed burns west of Williams Lake until April 30, 2016, weather conditions permitting. …Historically, grasslands in the Cariboo-Chilcotin were renewed through frequent, low-intensity ground fires. Such fires prevented tree encroachment, rejuvenated understory plants and helped maintain open grasslands and forests with large trees. The reintroduction of managed, low-intensity ground fires to these grasslands is intended to restore and maintain the grassland plant communities that are native to these areas.

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LETTER: Skepticism about logging warranted

Letter by H. McSwan
Nelson Star
March 21, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Kalesnikoff and Atco plan to log in the Glade watershed starting in 2017. They will be building roads to get into our watershed and then they will be cutting down the oldest and best trees, as stated in the public meeting of Feb. 17. Our watershed is the only source of water for 98 per cent of the community: it is the water that comes out of our taps. We have no other source. …….We are skeptical when she, Mr. Hodgkinson (Kalesnikoff) and Mr. Ozanne (Atco) reassure us that there is nothing to worry about. That is, if they do everything professionally, everything will be fine. (And of course, adhere to those incredibly lax and laughable government guidelines from forestry practices.)

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Port authority conducting audit after log boom breaks up

Nanaimo News Bulletin
March 21, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

The Nanaimo Port Authority is conducting an audit after logs broke loose from a boom near Protection Island during a recent storm. The port has four can buoys in the area with 90 bundles that broke loose and went into Mark Bay onto the shore on March 10 – they were recovered between March 11 and 12. It was a perfect-storm scenario with the big currents, big tides and big water volume, said David Mailloux, port authority spokesman. …“What you’re doing is you’re trying to shore up the booms, making sure that the integrity of the boom is going to be in place,” said Mailloux. “Maybe if there’s more volume than you think, I mean in calm conditions you might say [it’s] OK, but now if we’ve got winds or currents, maybe we need to alleviate some of the weight.

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Ontario and Anishinabek Nation Renew Commitments on Natural Resource Management

Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry
Government of Ontario
March 21, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

The Anishinabek Nation and Ontario are continuing to work together to strengthen collaboration on natural resource management. Today at a meeting, Minister of Natural Resources and Forestry Bill Mauro and Anishinabek Grand Council Chief Patrick Madahbee renewed a Letter of Commitment and signed the sixth multi-year Memorandum of Understanding regarding natural resources management issues including education, and enhanced elder and youth involvement. These agreements signify Ontario’s continuing support of the long-standing and productive relationship with the Anishinabek Nation, largely through the Anishinabek Ontario Resource Management Council.

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Band councils consider ministry proposal for sustainable forestry licence

Kenora Daiy Miner & News
March 21, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada


Grassy Narrows band and council in partnership with two other area First Nations are considering a Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry proposal to take an active role in forest management planning and operations in the Whiskey Jack Forest. Grassy Narrows Chief Roger Fobister met Monday, March 21, with representatives from Wabauskang and Whitefish Bay First Nations to discuss the possibility of the bands assuming responsibility for the Sustainable Forestry Licence. “The Minister (Bill Mauro) has offered to put a new forest management regime in place for the Whiskey Jack Forest and a new forest management licence will be given over to the new management group to take on the SFL,” Chief Fobister explained in a telephone interview. “We would be the forest managers and I think we would make good forest management planners.”

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Annual work plan available for review at Kenora district MNRF

Kenora Daiy Miner & News
March 21, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

The 2016-17 work plan for the Whiskey Jack Forest is now available for review at the Kenora district MNRF office. However, the one-year work plan doesn’t show designated cutting blocks in the Grassy Narrows First Nation area, which were previously included in the 10-year 2012-2012 WJF Management Plan. “There are no plans for forest management operations within the Grassy Narrows self-identified traditional land use area,” confirmed Kaitlin Moncrief, MNRF management forester. The one-year work plan designates 5,197 hectares of standing timber available for cutting in the Whiskey Jack for 2016. However, the forest management plan also provides additional allocations from the 2017-18 work plan for a total allowable harvest area extending over 8,054 ha to provide for operational contingencies.

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Fires, drought in changing climate affecting high-altitude forests

University of Colorado
March 21, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Large, severe fires in the West followed by increasing drought conditions as the planet warms are leading to lower tree densities and increased patchiness in high-elevation forests, according to a new study involving the University of Colorado Boulder. For the study the team looked at nearly 200 subalpine forest plots that had undergone severe fires between 1994 and 2003 in and around Yellowstone National Park and Glacier National Park in Wyoming and Montana, said CU-Boulder postdoctoral researcher Brian Harvey. Subalpine forest regions in the West are the dense forests just downslope from the alpine tundra, said Harvey of CU-Boulder’s geography department who led the study while a graduate student at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

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Timber Payments To Oregon Counties Dip To Record Low

Oregon Public Broadcasting
March 21, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Annual federal timber payments to Oregon counties continue to shrink, according to figures released Monday. In the 1990s, counties that had relied heavily on the timber industry saw tax revenue dry up as environmental laws and the Oregon economy changed. Congress responded by directing the U.S. Bureau of Land Management and the Forest Service to compensate rural counties with federal forestland.  Congress has extended and restructured these payments a few times, most recently a year ago. But they’re increasingly not paying the bills in rural parts of the state.  For the first time, the BLM and the Forest Service combined for less than $100 million in payments to Oregon counties.  

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Mendocino County sheriff talks ‘marijuana safety for loggers’

Daily Journal
March 18, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Mendocino County Sheriff Tom Allman emphasized “marijuana safety for loggers,” during one of many informational classes available to the timber industry in and out of the county during the 78th annual Redwood Region Logging Conference in Ukiah this week. On Friday, Allman spoke on the dangers to loggers if they stumble upon illegal marijuana grows, which are frequently becoming trespass grows on private property, including timber lands. …Allman said the biggest recommendation he could make to private land owners was to invest in a game, or wildlife camera, which is often attached to a tree and automatically takes photos when movements are detected.

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Guest Opinion: The Westside project is necessary

Hard work and high hopes from several local community collaborative groups went into the Westside Fire Recovery Project.
The Siskiyou Daily News
March 18, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Hard work and high hopes from several local community collaborative groups went into the Westside Fire Recovery Project. During the summer of 2014, catastrophic wildfires burned 183,000 acres on our Klamath National Forest. Many of our local citizens volunteered hundreds of hours spending much of that summer representing the needs of local communities with fire teams assigned to these fires. …Harvesting of dead and dying timber followed by proposed fuels treatments by private companies will help reduce the risk of future high severity wildfires in the burned land and in adjoining communities. In addition to supporting much-needed local jobs, payments to the government will offset the costs of the project to American taxpayers and forego expensive future tax-funded fuels treatments necessary for community protection if the work is not completed now.

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Federal land managers continue to shortchange rural timber counties

The Oregonian
March 21, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

…But what happens to a county when its largest property owner, one that controls as much as 75 percent of the land, neither pays its fair share nor contributes to the economy in a significant way? This is the situation facing much of rural Oregon, where the economic and social fabric of our communities is tied to natural resources. Rural counties are heading toward a fiscal cliff, in large part because the Bureau of Land Management is not managing its forestlands in a balanced way to provide revenue for local governments. The BLM’s failures were partially masked for years by safety-net payments, but Congress has now made it clear it has no appetite for continued “timber payment subsidies” to fill the void.

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U.S. Forest Service research center near Cottage Grove trying to fight pathogens that kills some pines, cedars

The Register-Guard
March 21, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Lisa Winn has given up counting the number of boxes, buckets and small earth-filled cones at the Dorena Genetic Resource Center near Cottage Grove, which contain thousands of tree seedlings grown from pine and cedar seeds collected throughout the Pacific Northwest. It’s not hard to see why Winn, the center manager, hesitates to provide a number. The vast array of tiny and not-so-tiny trees, contained in 13 greenhouses and on 150 acres of U.S. Bureau of Land Management land outside of Cottage Grove, is part of a venture that brings to the property thousands of new tree seeds every year. The center collects the seeds and nurtures them into seedlings in the hopes of identifying those most resistant to disease, in particular two specific pathogens that have wreaked havoc among certain pines and a type of cedar.

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Collaboration key to forest restoration project

by James Schroeder, Washington director of forest conservation and partnerships for The Nature Conservancy.
The Spokesman-Review
March 19, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

The Forest Service faces big challenges throughout the West, with record-breaking fires and severe funding shortages, as budget originally intended for forest management and restoration is instead used to battle these fires. These two circumstances have created a backlog of much-needed forest restoration work. Without changes, we will never be able to catch up. A study by the Forest Service and The Nature Conservancy found nearly 2.7 million acres of forest in Eastern Washington need restoration. One example is the Mill Creek Watershed on the Colville National Forest. This 50,000-acre landscape, which burned in 1927, has been widely used by people. We’ve logged, mined, grazed cattle, camped, hiked, fished, ridden mountain bikes and ATVs all over this forest.

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My Turn: A small sawmill operator’s perspective on the Tongass Land Management Plan Amendment

by Gordon Chew, owner of Tenakee Logging Company
Juneau Empire
March 21, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

As a small sawmill operator and builder, I’ve watched with great interest the debate over a new management plan for the Tongass National Forest. In a recent visit to Washington D.C., I spoke with lawmakers and agency officials about how the future of my family-run business, the Tenakee Logging Company, will be impacted. Many other small businesses in the region could be impacted by decisions they make in the coming months. Much of the debate has focused on the transition from old-growth clear-cutting to young growth timber and how long that transition should take. That’s the wrong conversation. From where I stand the right conversation would be about how we make the best use of our shared forest resources moving forward.

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Biggest tree in Lenawee County found, possibly state’s largest too

The Daily Telegram
March 21, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

There’s a tree in Madison Township that is one of the biggest in Michigan. So much so it earned 13-year-old Kindell Covey of Adrian the grand prize for the largest tree entered by a tree hunter 15 years old or younger in ReLeaf Michigan’s Big Tree Hunt. She and her family learned about the tree through a neighbor. Kindell first saw it when she was 10 years old. “I was thinking it would be really tall,” she said. “But when I saw it, I thought it was just really impressive.” According to ReLeaf Michigan, the tree is an American Sycamore 315 inches in circumference. Kindell also won a prize for the largest tree entered from Lenawee County and it qualified as a possible state champion tree. “It was exciting,” she said about her big tree hunt honor.

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Warmer Winter Brings Forest-Threatening Beetles North

The New York Times
March 18, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

This winter has been the warmest on record in much of New England. And while many people enjoyed the T-shirt weather, it made Claire E. Rutledge, a researcher with Connecticut’s Agricultural Experiment Station, more concerned about what next season may hold. Beginning in April, she will head to Wharton Brook and other state lands, setting traps for the southern pine beetle and checking them weekly through midsummer. The beetles, which can kill thousands of trees in epidemic attacks, had never been found beyond the pitch pine forests of the American South, because the winters were too cold. But they have migrated to New Jersey, where they have destroyed more than 30,000 acres of forest since 2002.

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Oklahoma Forestry Services conducting inventory in western and central counties

Edmond Sun
March 21, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

What type of forest or woodlands is present in western and central Oklahoma? What tree species are in Blaine, Canadian, Grant, Kingfisher, Major, Oklahoma and Woodward counties? Is our forest healthy? These and many other questions will be answered as a Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) crew from Oklahoma Forestry Services begins collecting data on plots in these counties Foresters began this important data collection in 2009. Each subsequent year, foresters continue gathering information about the amount of land under forest cover, the type of forests and tree species that are present, tree size, invasive species and forest health issues. …The analysis is conducted on randomly located plots across private, industrial, and public lands and includes both forested and non-forested areas.

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Setting record straight on forest stewardship plan

Letter by Tim Dunne, Belvidere
New Jersey Herald
March 20, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

As a natural resource manager in New Jersey for more than 35 years I feel obliged to set the record straight regarding Greg Gorman’s comments on Sparta Mountain. Misinformation began in his title: “State should abandon Sparta Mountain logging plan.” The plan is a forest stewardship plan, not a logging plan. The naysayers protesting this plan keep referring to it as a “logging plan.” They hope that by changing the name used, they can change public opinion so no one ever cuts a tree in New Jersey again. They live in wooden homes, on wooden chairs, reading newspapers all from forest products. Gorman would be happier if these products came from South America or Asia.

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Tropical Forestry Services opens $3.5 million Indian sandalwood nursery in Katherine

ABC News Australia
March 22, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: International

The world’s largest Indian sandalwood grower, Tropical Forestry Services (TFS), has opened a $3.5 million nursery in Katherine. At a little over one hectare in size, TFS claims it is the biggest of its type in Australia, with the capacity to hold about 1 million Indian sandalwood and host seedlings. Saplings from the nursery will supply TFS’s plantations in the Northern Territory, Western Australia and Queensland. Kirk Hutchinson was involved in the 10-month construction of the nursery and now manages the seedlings supply for the company. He said the location of the nursery in Katherine made it ideal to support TFS’s ambition for growth in the Northern Territory.

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Tasmanian logging: Consumers do not want wood from rainforests, environmentalists say

ABC News Australia
March 22, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: International

Demand for specialty timbers will drop off if customers know it comes from a Tasmanian rainforest, anti-logging group Markets for Change says. The group said storing specialty timbers to reducing wastage would cut the need for more harvesting in conservation areas. The State Government is assessing the availability of specialty trees in reserves and conservation areas after the UN rejected its plans to selectively log the species the World Heritage Area. Conservationists have vowed to fight plans to pursue logging in these areas, which include rainforest in the Tarkine region.

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Plans to log Tasmania’s world heritage forests dropped after UN criticism

March 22, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: International

Plans to allow logging inside Tasmanian world heritage forests have been abandoned after a United Nations report recommended against it. The UN also expressed concern about plans for expanded tourism in the area and called for a master plan that would detail what sorts of tourism would and wouldn’t be allowed. The recommendations were immediately accepted by the state and federal governments, although the Tasmanian state forestry minister said it was “very disappointing” that logging would not occur. Coalition governments at the state and federal levels have been trying to expand logging in and around the Tasmanian Wilderness World Heritage Area, which covers about a fifth of the state.

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NSW native forests worth more if left standing: Australia Institute report

ABC News, Australia
March 22, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: International

An economic analysis by The Australia Institute claims that native forest logging in NSW lost $78 million over the last seven years, but could be making a $40 million profit if left standing and allowed access to the Federal Government’s Emissions Reduction Fund (ERF). The Nature Conservation Council (NCC) and the National Parks Association of NSW, which jointly commissioned the report, has called upon the NSW government to cease “loss-making native forest logging” and to support a transition of wood supply from native forests to plantations. The CEO of NCC Kate Smolski said there was little prospect that Forestry Corporation could turn around sustained losses of their native forest harvesting operations.

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Forest report should not be accepted: MP

Australian Associated Press in News.com.au
March 22, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: International

State and federal governments are wrong to accept a report opposed to harvesting special species timber in Tasmania’s Wilderness World Heritage Area, breakaway Liberal MP Eric Hutchinson says. The report, released on Sunday and subsequently accepted by the Tasmanian government and federal environment minister Greg Hunt, contains deficient information and is “at best dubious”, Mr Hutchinson said. …”It is not a report of the World Heritage Committee, it is not a report of UNESCO,” Mr Hutchinson said on Tuesday of the document which will be tabled for consideration in June when the committee next meets. “I believe there are inaccuracies, there are deficiencies within this report that deserve clarification before the committee considers these in June.” And, in the meantime, the first-term MP thinks the state and federal government should reconsider their response.

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CIFOR’s DG wins Sweden’s ‘Golden Twig’ award

Center for International Forestry Research
March 21, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: International

CIFOR’s Director General, Peter Holmgren, has been awarded the ’Golden Twig’ by the Swedish Forestry Association, on the occasion of International Day of Forests 2016. The Golden Twig, one of the most prestigious awards within the Swedish forestry sectory, is awarded to individuals deemed, on a national or international level, to have made a valuable contribution to the development of forestry and the forests. Holmgren, who has been Director General of CIFOR since 2012, shares his thoughts on forestry in the DG’s Column on Forests News and on Twitter.

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Press on for forest peace

The Mercury
March 21, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: International

If one was to compile a list of the very last thing Tasmanians want, a return to the forestry wars of days past would surely be right at the top. So we would only hope that, given the events of the past few days, that is not where we are headed. The report of the Reactive Monitoring Mission to the Tasmanian Wilderness, Australia by the International Council on Monuments and Sites and the International Union for Conservation of Nature has put an end to the notion of logging or mining in the Tasmanian Wilderness World Heritage Area. However, to support the struggling special species timber industry, the State Government says it will look at taking timber from reserves.

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Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy

Carbon First an ‘enormous’ opportunity

by Derek Nighbor, CEO, Forest Products Association of Canada
Timmins Press
March 21, 2016
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: Canada

…Last week, an unprecedented group of executives and senior leaders representing forestry, transportation, renewable energy, building, climate and environmental groups issued an open letter to the prime minister, all premiers and environment ministers calling for a Carbon First principle for infrastructure spending and procurement policy decisions. The concept of Carbon First is intended to encourage public and private sectors to select the least carbon intensive option for any project. …The noted Vancouver architect Michael Green says that a single 100,000- square- foot building made of wood instead of competing materials such as concrete would have a total carbon benefit equal to 7,380 metric tons of CO2.

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