Tree Frog Forestry News

Daily Archives: March 23, 2016

Business & Politics

Forest industry welcomes budget support for innovation and climate change initiatives

CNW in Vancouver Sun
March 22, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada

The Forest Products Association of Canada (FPAC) is pleased to see today’s federal budget put strong emphasis on climate change initiatives, innovation and research and development. The budget tabled by the Minister of Finance, Bill Morneau, included a $1 billion fund over four years to support clean technology for the forest sector as well as other resource industries. The budget is also heavily investing in climate change and clean technology initiatives including $2 billion over two years for a Low Carbon Economy Fund and $40 million to integrate climate resilient changes to building codes. Minister Morneau said that forestry is a good example of a sector where the government can help to facilitate the shift to a cleaner economy and ensure good jobs in rural areas.

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Spill into Shuswap lake impacting tourism

Salmon Arm Observer
March 22, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

The results may not be in, but the region is already feeling the effects of last week’s spill of toxic glue and fuel into the lake at Canoe Forest Products. Robyn Cyr, Shuswap Tourism manager and Columbia Shuswap Regional District’s economic development officer, voiced her concerns in an email to the Observer on Monday. “We have had cancellations for summer visitation from our tourism operators just because of this spill,” she wrote. “I know that seems extreme, but people are always concerned about this type of thing.” Interior Health says its concerns are from a human health risk perspective because the glue used in the plywood plant contains phenol formaldehyde resin.

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Lumber Liquidators pays $2.5M to settle California case

Associated Press in the Idaho Statesman
March 22, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States

TOANO, Va. Beleaguered flooring retailer Lumber Liquidators is paying $2.5 million to settle allegations that some of its products violated California’s air-safety standards. The penalty announced Tuesday was the latest that Lumber Liquidators has absorbed for formerly selling laminate flooring made in China. In this case, Lumber Liquidators faced allegations that the imported flooring contained high levels of the carcinogen formaldehyde that violated California’s air-quality controls. The flooring was sold at Lumber Liquidators’ California stores from September 2013 until May 2015 when the retailer suspended sales of the products made in China. Lumber Liquidators currently operates 40 of its 375 stores in California.

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Boise Cascade gets antitrust clearance for engineered lumber acquisition

Woodworking Network
March 22, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States, US West

BOISE, Idaho – Boise Cascade Co. has received antitrust clearance from the United States Department of Justice to proceed with its previously announced acquisition of Georgia-Pacific LLC’s engineered lumber production facilities located at Thorsby, Alabama, and Roxboro, North Carolina. Boise Cascade plans to complete the acquisition by the end of March 2016. The Thorsby facility produces laminated veneer lumber (LVL).

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LePage discusses demise of Maine’s paper mills at Mexico town hall

Governor: Mills must convert machinery in order to survive
WMTW
March 22, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: US East, United States

MEXICO, Maine —Gov. Paul LePage discussed the state of Maine’s paper industry at his town hall meeting in Mexico Tuesday night. Mexico sits just across the Androscoggin River from Rumford’s Catalyst Paper Mill. The news of Madison’s paper mill shutting down in May has many area residents worried about the future of the industry. LePage said for the mills to survive, they have to convert machinery to produce more profitable paper products, such as tissue. “We have Verso in Jay, we have Catalyst here in the Rumford and Mexico area. I think they are phenomenal companies, and [it’s] important that we work with them and keep them here. We have to keep those mills alive, we have to keep those mills working.”

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Fairfield wood mill off the table

The State
March 22, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: US East, United States

COLUMBIA, SC An international energy corporation’s plan to build a wood pellet mill in Fairfield County suffered what might be a final blow to the fading project after months of opposition from area neighbors. A South Carolina business group bought the land where Abengoa Inc. had sought to locate the pellet mill, according to a local property owner involved in the deal and Fairfield County real estate records. Those following the Abengoa proposal said the land sale likely stops any chance the project will be built in the White Oak community between Columbia and Charlotte. Tom Patrick, an opponent who is among those who helped buy the land, said the new ownership group may sell the property near White Oak for another industrial use, but a pellet mill was not the right type of business for the area.

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Wood, Paper & Green Building

Green building means profits, wellness: CaGBC

Daily Commercial News
March 23, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: Canada

In a little over 10 years green building in Canada has come from being a notion promoted by a fledgling group of environmentalists to a growth industry and now, as revealed in a recent study from the Canada Green Building Council (CaGBC), it’s a powerful economic driver in which Canada is emerging as a world leader. But rather than being content with the conclusions revealed in its February report, titled Green Building in Canada: Assessing the Market Impacts and Opportunities, the CaGBC is already reaching further, aiming to prove that green building is a significant contributor to Canadians’ health and wellness too. …While Canadians have always been world leaders in such professions as engineering and architecture — prominence that has spread into the green building sector — and Canada has shown innovation developing building materials such as cross laminated timber, as a nation we rank low in R&D spending, said Mueller.

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Hardwood Manufacturers Association elects board, officers for 2016

Woodworking Network
March 22, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: United States

The Board of Directors of the Hardwood Manufacturers Association (HMA) has elected Richard Wilkerson of Anderson-Tully Co. to president of the HMA at its National Conference and Expo in Fort Worth, Texas, March 9. Other HMA officers for 2016 are first vice president: Bob Miller of Frank Miller Lumber Co., and executive vice president Linda Jovanovich, HMA. HMA Board of Directors also elected members to the executive committee. In addition to the officers, they are: Troy Brown, Kretz Lumber Co. Inc., Antigo, Wisc.; T. J. Rosengarth, Northwest Hardwoods Inc., Tacoma, Wa.; Trisha Thompson, T & S Hardwoods Inc., Milledgeville, Ga.; Nordeck Thompson, Thompson Appalachian Hardwoods Inc., Huntland, Tenn.; and past president Skipper Beal, Beal Lumber Co. Inc., Little Mountain, S.C.

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IDB Group supports construction of a pulp mill

Pulp and Paper News
March 22, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: International

The Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) has joined efforts with Klabin S.A. to finance the construction of a new state-of-the-art greenfield pulp production mill in the municipality of Ortigueira, one of the poorest cities of the state of Parana, Brazil. Through an A/B Loan of $300 million, the IDB Group has provided Klabin with long-term financing to develop Project Puma—the largest private investment in the history of Parana. Puma will have a significant development impact in neighboring communities and make Klabin one of the largest employers in the region. The project will create approximately 8,500 jobs during the construction phase and 1,400 once it becomes operational.

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The Canopia Timber Towers Are Proposed For Bordeaux

Trend Hunter
March 23, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: International

Canopia is a highly audacious and ambitious architectural project, proposed by Sou Fujimoto Architects in collaboration with Laisne Roussel for the French city of Bordeaux, that consists of four timber towers. These mixed-use structures will be linked by rooftop walkways.  These timber towers will be designed to accommodate a number of beautiful rooftop gardens. The interior of the towers themselves will include 199 homes, 3,770 square meters of office space and 5,381 square feet of retail space. The structures will be constructed using spruce wood and silver fir beams, with the main structure supported by cross-laminated tumber flooring and laminated timber. 

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Forestry

Tourism report urges transportation links to BC’s Great Bear Rainforest

Canadian Press in Vancouver Sun
March 22, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

VICTORIA — First Nations and tourism operators say better transportation links are needed for people to experience the Great Bear Rain Forest, described by the province as B.C.’s gift to the world. A report released Tuesday from aboriginal groups, businesses and communities in the central-coast region concludes transportation challenges in the area are hurting tourism opportunities at a time when First Nations tourism potential is exploding in other parts of B.C. “You have an iconic destination with the Great Bear Rainforest,” said Keith Henry, chairman of the Aboriginal Tourism Association of British Columbia. “We’ve got communities who want to share their cultures, but the question is how do we really take advantage of visitors from across Canada, the United States and the world.”

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Spruce beetle infestation raises more forestry alarms

By Gordon Hamilton
Business in Vancouver
March 22, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

An explosive outbreak of spruce beetles in northern B.C. forests is wreaking havoc on one of the key timber species remaining in the wake of the mountain pine beetle disaster. A recent provincial survey of spruce stands in the Omineca region north of Prince George shows spruce beetle populations have mushroomed from 2013, when they covered 76 square kilometres of timber, to 1,560 square kilometres today. That 20-fold increase has set off alarm bells for both the government and the forest industry. Climate change is one of the prime factors fuelling the outbreak of the new threat to the northern forests, said Allan Caroll, professor of entomology at the University of British Columbia’s faculty of forestry. 

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Public Input invited on Prince George Timber Supply Area

Government of British Columbia
March 22, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Comments are being accepted until May 24, 2016, on a discussion paper released today as part of a comprehensive timber supply review for the Prince George Timber Supply Area. Public feedback on the discussion paper will be considered by the chief forester before setting the new allowable annual cut. The discussion paper provides the results of the timber supply analysis, including a base-case harvest forecast. It also describes the geography, natural resources and current forest management practices in the Prince George Timber Supply Area. The Prince George Timber Supply Area, the largest in the Province, covers approximately 7.97 million hectares in the north-central portion of the province, with approximately 3.1 million hectares available for timber harvesting.

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Forester calls for better treatment of woodland

The Pictou Advocate
March 23, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

SCOTSBURN – People need to pressure government and industry to apply forest practises that yield more value from the wood that is harvested, Danny George says. George, who lives in Guysborough County and has a hardwood and firewood business, was guest speaker on Sunday in conjunction with the annual meeting of the Friends of Redtail Society in Scotsburn. He advocates adding value to hardwood through selective cutting methods. George described how current forest practices have favoured big consumers like pulp mills, at the expense of woodlot owners and saw mills, by reducing the amount of sawable logs that add value to the wood being cut. He said clear-cutting is still being done at an alarming rate, despite rule changes that were supposed to reduce it.

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Conservation versus Preservation?

USDA Blog
March 22, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States

Have you ever wondered why your favorite National Park is surrounded by a National Forest? Well, it didn’t happen by accident or guesswork. The fact is, it was all started over 100 years ago by two men I like to refer to as the founding fathers of America’s public lands. Back at the turn of the 20th Century Gifford Pinchot and John Muir had radically contrasting views of how to manage America’s wild lands and they worked tirelessly lobbying Congress and convincing Presidents to agree with them to start protecting open space. Muir promoted preservation and Pinchot advocated for conservation.

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Worsening droughts spell trouble for US forest fire recovery, study says

Christian Science Monitor
March 22, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Worsening droughts in the United States create a double threat for forest fires, according to climate researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and the Washington State Department of Natural Resources. With 14 percent of the contiguous US currently experiencing drought and climate change increasing the risk of severe forest fires, understanding the role drought plays in wildfire risk and forest recovery is becoming increasingly important.  Rocky Mountain forest fire sites are “the front lines of climate change,” lead author Brian Harvey, now a postdoctoral Smith Fellow at the University of Colorado-Boulder, said in a UCB press release. He and coauthor Daniel Donato, now a natural resource scientist for the state of Washington, hope their research will help inform future forest management.

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Bonner Commission violates open meeting law over N. Idaho timber plan

Forest Legacy program comes under fire in N. Idaho
Idaho Statesman
March 21, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

A real estate deal in Bonner County that would keep timberland in production, protect critical wildlife habitat and open the area to public access by hunters and others has come under attack from local lawmakers, county commissioners and even a group that purports to defend private property rights. Stimson Lumber Co., which employs 200 workers in the timber industry there, got approval from Bonner County in 2006 to develop 13,000 acres of timber, lakes and wetlands into 1,100 homes, condos and an 18-hole golf course known as Clagstone Meadows. But wildlife and state officials in 2014 offered instead to buy the development rights to the lands using a federally funded Forest Legacy program that would keep the property in private hands and taxes flowing to the county.

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Dying forests need local infrastructure

Calaveras Enterprise
March 21, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

…A formal appeal for inclusion in the task force would increase Amador and Calaveras counties’ abilities to reap the benefits of the emergency proclamation, including funding and tactical support. The Amador County and Calaveras County boards of supervisors recently declared local states of emergency and created county task forces. The emergency proclamations open the way to a variety of responses, including a requirement for increased support of woody biomass-processing infrastructure. Such infrastructure would provide the space, materials and equipment to deal with the large amount of woody material (otherwise forest fuels) that requires processing. The need for infrastructure is both tremendous and immediate, especially because the tree mortality volume is exacerbated by the fire-killed trees of the Butte Fire.

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Bitterroot Nat’l Forest will thin forest north of Lost Horse

KPAX
March 22, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

HAMILTON – Bitterroot National Forest officials believe that there will be no significant environmental impact from a project to thin the forest on over 2,300 acres of land north of Lost Horse. The “Westside Collaborative Vegetation Management Project” is the latest in a series of logging projects over the past few years as the U.S. Forest Service works to create a healthier forest along the Bitterroot Front. As with projects near Bass Creek, and most recently north of Lake Como, this latest effort will thin the forest by removing some trees, creating openings that leave the remaining trees healthier and more resilient to pine beetles and forest fire.

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‘New Conservationists’ Push for Logging to Prevent Wildfires

March 23, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

The Nature Conservancy’s Russ Hoeflich might not like the spotlight, but he’s among the vanguard of a new conservation movement hoping to move beyond conflicts with the timber industry to find common ground on forest management. Abandoning the long-time environmentalist focus on wilderness, “new conservationists” such as Hoeflich want to strike a balance between natural ecosystems and people by creating “working landscapes,” where only limited forms of extraction are allowed. ….However, not everyone’s on board with the new conservationists’ agenda. Some forest ecologists, hydrologists, and more traditional, wilderness-centric conservationists contend that groups like The Nature Conservancy aren’t helping the forest, but instead are doing the bidding of the timber and bioenergy industries by inflaming fears of natural wildfire and “greenwashing” logging as restoration.

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What we’ve learned from the deadly Oso, Washington landslide two years on

Joseph Wartman, Associate Professor of Geotechnical Engineering, University of Washington
The Conversation
March 21, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

On March 22, 2014, a hillside above Oso, Washington collapsed, unleashing a torrent of mud and debris that buried the community of Steelhead Haven. Forty-three people lost their lives, making it one of the single deadliest landslide disasters in U.S. history. Over the past two years, we’ve learned much about the specific geology of the Stillaguamish River Valley where Oso is located, and the weather that preceded this landslide….Yet it is clear that landslides bearing a striking resemblance to the 2014 event in Oso have occurred in the region for at least 2,000 years – long before large-scale timber harvesting began. Though indications are that logging can make some slopeside regions more susceptible to landslides, geologic evidence of earlier slides near Oso makes it unclear what role, if any, timber harvesting played in this event.

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‘New Conservationists’ Push for Logging to Prevent Wildfires

March 23, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

The Nature Conservancy’s Russ Hoeflich might not like the spotlight, but he’s among the vanguard of a new conservation movement hoping to move beyond conflicts with the timber industry to find common ground on forest management. Abandoning the long-time environmentalist focus on wilderness, “new conservationists” such as Hoeflich want to strike a balance between natural ecosystems and people by creating “working landscapes,” where only limited forms of extraction are allowed. ….However, not everyone’s on board with the new conservationists’ agenda. Some forest ecologists, hydrologists, and more traditional, wilderness-centric conservationists contend that groups like The Nature Conservancy aren’t helping the forest, but instead are doing the bidding of the timber and bioenergy industries by inflaming fears of natural wildfire and “greenwashing” logging as restoration.

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Slippery elm bark thefts spur more forest patrols

Associated Press in the Bristol Herald Courier
March 23, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

WINCHESTER, Ky. — An increase in the theft of slippery elm bark has led law enforcement officers to increase patrols in the Daniel Boone National Forest. A statement from the Forest Service in Winchester says officials are also asking the public to watch for and report the theft of slippery elm bark or any other natural resource from national lands. Daniel Boone National Forest botanist David Taylor says every year there’s an increase in the number of slippery elms that are stripped of their bark, killing the trees. He said some people use the bark as a medicinal herb.

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Poliquin: Executive order creating monument would be unfair to Mainers

Bangor Daily News
March 21, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

WASHINGTON, D.C. — U.S. Rep. Bruce Poliquin argued against a North Woods national monument proposed for east of Baxter State Park when he met with White House officials on Monday. Poliquin warned the White House that a presidential executive order creating a monument would threaten Maine’s forest products industries and was opposed by Mainers living near Baxter, he said. …Professional Logging Contractors of Maine Executive Director Dana Doran, Maine Snowmobile Association Executive Director Bob Meyers and Patrick Strauch, executive director of the Maine Forest Products Council, accompanied Poliquin, R-Maine, to his meeting with officials.

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Texas A&M Forest Service to simulate Riley Road Fire with 3D technology

Your Houston News
March 22, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

…“This new 3D Simtable technology is a projector that creates a virtual projection on a large sandbox,” said Stuart Coombs, wildland urban interface specialist. “At this event we will recreate a historic fire that has occurred in Texas and zoom in on it. We will also stop and explain what happened to the fire at certain points and explain the lessons we learned.” The technology uses geographic data and a variety of colorful and interactive features to project customized, realistic landscapes. This feature creates straining scenarios based on terrain, weather and existing infrastructure.

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Ash dieback and beetle attack likely to ‘wipe out’ ash trees in UK and Europe

A double whammy of an emerald borer beetle and the fungus causing ash dieback disease could kill millions of ash trees on the continent, study warns
The Guardian
March 23, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: International

Almost all the ash trees in the UK and across Europe are likely to be wiped out by a “double whammy” of a bright green borer beetle and the fungus that causes ash dieback, according to a comprehensive new academic analysis. The loss of the ash, one of the most abundant tree species in the UK, would mean losing even more trees than the 15 million elms killed by Dutch elm disease in the 1970s. Ash is the most common hedgerow tree, with 60,000 miles of tree lines. It is the second most common tree in woodland, after the oak, and there are many ash trees in towns and cities.

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Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy

Rocky Mountain Fires Provide Insight Into Climate Change Effects

The Utah People’s Post
March 22, 2016
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: United States, US West

Thanks to climate change and dry conditions, forests have caught on fire, and one of the most prominent examples for the extraordinary situation is found in the Rocky Mountain forests. After wildfires have broken out in them, the recovery of the thick, luxuriant green forests has been slow. A study featured in the journal Global Ecology and Biogeography found that dry conditions usually cause drought, particularly in the years after fires occurred. These conditions are also the ones responsible for hampering the growth of post-fire seedlings, which leads to an even longer and more arduous reforestation process.

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UCR Researcher to Receive Almost $1 Million to Study Biomass Burning

Projected increase in fires underscores need to study the impact on air quality and human health
University of California, Riverside
March 22, 2016
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: United States, US West

RIVERSIDE, Calif. (www.ucr.edu) — Fire activity in the Western United States and Canada has increased over the past 20 years, a trend that is expected to continue. To better understand the impact of biomass burning on the current and future climate system, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) plans to award two grants totaling nearly $1 million to Kelley Barsanti, an assistant professor of chemical and environmental engineering at the University of California, Riverside. The first project focuses on the nighttime chemistry of biomass burning, including wildfires, agricultural burning and prescribed fires.

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More varsities embrace climate-change education

Thailand’s The Nation
March 23, 2016
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: International

AS MANY AS 63 universities in the Asia-Pacific region, including Thailand, are rolling out climate-change education. The classes are based on the curriculum developed by the US Agency for International Development Lowering Emissions in Asia’s Forests (USAid LEAF) ut adjusted to local contexts. “Taking climate change to classrooms in the region today is a powerful way to ensure that tomorrow’s leaders are already thinking about forests and the environment,” said Beth Paige, director for USAid’s Regional Development Mission in Asia, on the occasion of the International Day of Forests. “We need the energy and drive |of intelligent, innovative youth to lock in climate change on national and regional agendas. That’s our collective hope for the future of our planet.”

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