Tree Frog Forestry News

Daily Archives: March 29, 2016

Opinion / Editorial

Forest sector trade mission to India highlights opportunities for Canadian wood

Forestry Innovation Investment
March 24, 2016
Category: Opinion / Editorial
Region: Canada

From February 21–29, 2016 Forestry Innovation Investment (FII) led a Canadian delegation of 22 senior industry and government representatives across India to explore the possibilities of expanding trade with India, a country with a deep cultural appreciation for wood products. The delegation included representatives from Canada’s largest lumber producing companies, representatives from industry trade associations including Coast Forest Products Association, and representatives from provincial and federal governments including Natural Resources Canada. …Mission participants took part in targeted market visits and outreach covering sites in Bengaluru and Mysore where participants engaged directly with manufacturers and toured local processing facilities.

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Business & Politics

Harmac worker dead after chip pile collapses

By Chris Bush
Nanaimo News Bulletin
March 28, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

One man died at Harmac Pacific pulp mill on the weekend when a wood chip pile he was working on collapsed. RCMP Cpl. Sarah Mattes, Nanaimo RCMP spokeswoman, said the RCMP were called to the mill site at 5:30 a.m. Friday. “We’re assisting the coroners service in their investigation,” Mattes said. Levi Sampson, Harmac Pacific president, confirmed the worker who died was Chris Fletcher, 37, of Nanaimo, who had worked at the mill for about four years. Fletcher was operating a bulldozer on top of a wood chip pile when he apparently stopped the machine, got out and was standing somewhere next to it when the chip pile gave way from under him.

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Millar Western cancels power deal with Sundance coal-fired plant

Company’s announcement follows similar notices from Capital Power and TransCanada Corporation
CBC News
March 28, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

An Edmonton-based forestry company is the latest firm to cancel an agreement to buy electricity from the Sundance C coal-fired power plant. Millar Western, which operates mills in Whitecourt and Fox Creek, says it expects to record a non-cash writeoff of $21 million. Capital Power and TransCanada Corporation have previously issued notice that it would terminate power purchase agreements from Sundance plants. 

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Oregon loggers’ exemption from 30-minute break extended to 2020, per FAST Act

Commercial Carrier Journal
March 28, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States, US West

The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration has extended the exemption granted to the Oregon Trucking Associations in March 2015 for certain Oregon-based timber operations from its previous March 18, 2017 expiration to March 18, 2020. The extension of the expiration date is in response to a provision in the December-passed FAST Act highway bill that extended exemptions in effect when the bill was enacted to five years from the date the exemptions were issued. The Oregon Trucking Associations’ exemption allows drivers transporting timber from Oregon forests to skip the mandated 30-minute break.

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Freres Lumber to take downtime in April

Lesprom
March 25, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States, US West

Freres Lumber Co., Inc. starts a dryer replacement project in their plywood plant in Mill City, Oregon, as Random Lengths reports. The project will take between 6-8 weeks, beginning April 2. The beginning of this project requires that the plywood plant be shut down from April 2-11. Freres Lumber Co., Inc. has been a family owned and operated business since 1922. The company specializes in creating the highest quality products across the wood products spectrum from raw log to finished products.

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Weyerhaeuser: The Stars Are Aligning

Seeking Alpha
March 28, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States, US West

This article is a little bit more high level than I usually write but Weyerhaeuser has been and will be inordinately impacted by macro conditions and the company has changed so much recently that a higher-level view is helpful. WY is a timberland REIT that also has lumber, oriented stranded board (osb), engineered woods and pulp businesses. On February 19, the company completed the acquisition of Plum Creek Timber, making WY the largest publicly traded timber REIT by far with 13.2 million acres of owned timberlands primarily in the United States. It pays a 4% dividend and is investment grade rated by both ratings agencies.

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H&M Logging takes top honor from Halifax chamber

The Gazette-Virginian
March 28, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: US East, United States

There’s more to the logging industry than simply logging, so much more, and Kenneth Hodges and H&M Logging are growing to keep pace with the challenges facing the industry. H&M Logging, which has grown from five employees in 1983 to almost 70 employees and to one of the top-four operations of its kind in the region, was honored as Business of the Year by the Halifax County Chamber of Commerce during the chamber’s annual meeting on Thursday at The Prizery. H&M Logging makes contributions to the Halifax County High School robotics program, to area fire departments, the Halifax County-South Boston YMCA, and The Prizery among many others, according to presenter Robert Smith, CEO and owner of Grand Springs, whose business won the award last year.

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Forestry worker hit by log dies

Otago Daily Times
March 29, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: International

A man has died after being struck by a large log while working in a forestry block north-west of Whangarei. Whangarei police said the man, believed to be in his 30s, was hit by a log while in a forestry block of Murchison Rd, Pakotai, about 48km north-west of the city, about 10.10am on Wednesday. Police said the log hit the man on the leg and pelvis and an ambulance from Dargaville attended before the man was airlifted to Whangarei Hospital. The man was working for a logging contractor when the accident happened, police said. The man was put on life support and died in the hospital’s intensive care unit on Thursday morning with family present, police said.

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Wood, Paper & Green Building

24 Sussex Redux: Student visions for PM’s home

Ottawa Magazine
March 28, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: Canada East, Canada

In a special series, Tony Atherton goes to some of our city’s top architects and designers to get a sense of what could be done with our PM’s former home. In addition to the three Ottawa designers/architects featured … we asked students in Carleton University’s School of Architecture to imagine what they would do with 24 Sussex. The following is their visions for the prime minister’s home: 1…The house is constructed of Cross Laminated Timber, orientated to the south for passive solar heating. The narrow volumes are cross-ventilated and capped with extensive green roofs. Solar panels are orientated for optimal solar collection. The house is a reflection of the modern Canadian home. It is embedded in the landscape, open and built to a sustainable future. 2…The house is vertically clad in digitally fabricated wood siding referencing Ottawa’s past timber industry, as well as presenting a new and sophisticated cladding for residential architecture.

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Formaldehyde in floors prompts health warning

24 Hours Vancouver
March 28, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: United States

Three U.S. health agencies have issued a report about laminate wood flooring manufactured in China and sold in North America between 2012 and 2014 that contains harmful levels of formaldehyde. In the report, the agencies concluded that “irritation and breathing problems could occur in everyone exposed to formaldehyde in the laminate flooring, not just sensitive groups and people with pre-existing conditions,” wrote the National Center for Environmental Health, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry. “Those symptoms include an increase in breathing problems and short-term eye, nose or throat irritation. These symptoms are more likely to occur at lower concentrations for people with pre-existing health conditions like asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.”

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Made In Eastern Iowa: Kendrick Forest Products, The Cutting Edge of Edgewood

KCRG-TV9
March 28, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: United States, US West

EDGEWOOD, Iowa (KCRG-TV9) — Set back from South Washington Street in Edgewood, the outside of Kendrick Forest Products may appear, to the unknowing eye, as just about sawmill. “People that drive by on the highway all day probably have no clue that we have all this going on back here,” said Greg Blomberg, general manager at Kendrick Forest Products. Logs from the outside fill the yard, with the end products eventually turning into graded wood, veneer logs, railroad ties, mulch in four colors and even custom cabinetry from Forever Cabinets by Kendrick, a growing part of the business. Blomberg said KFP employs about 60 people, many of whom handle the lumber that he said is almost all from within 100 miles of Edgewood.

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What is CLT?

by Russ Vaagen
The Forest Blog
March 26, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: United States, US West

It has been asked a few times recently, “So what is this CLT stuff people keep talking about?” It’s actually pretty simple, but it has some massive implications. Cross Laminated Timber or CLT is essentially construction grade lumber (2×4, 2×6, 2×8 etc.) that’s glued together to make a panel. The key part is that the middle layer is glued in a 90-degree cross layer. This gives the 3 layer panel strength in two directions, making it very strong. This also allows for the creation of large panels made up of relatively small pieces of wood. What starts out as 2×4’s can be cross-laminated to make panels 10 feet wide and in some cases 70 feet long.

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Forestry

RIP our beloved Robin Hood

It is with deep sadness that we acknowledge the passing of our friend and colleague.
BC Community Forests Association
March 18, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

On March 17th, with his family at his side, Robin died after a short battle with cancer. He is survived by his wife Darlene, daughters Carla and Laurie, and grandchildren Jenna and Dylan. Robin accomplished so much in his 56 years. He was one of a kind, a true maverick. Robin moved to Likely, BC in 1982. He soon became interested in forestry and went on to build a varied and interesting career. He owned and operated Sherwood Forest Contracting for many years, working on everything from tree spacing to riparian restoration. He was a master at accessing government programs and creating jobs for those on social assistance or employment insurance. 

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OPINION: Woodlot owners transform governance, productivity

by Kingsley Brown, president of the Nova Scotia Landowners and Forest Fibre Producers Association
Chronicle Herald
March 28, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

…I’m writing to say how thousands of woodlot owners are doing it every day through innovation. For all the abuse of our forests from indiscriminate clear cutting and biomass for an over-sized boiler, there’s no shortage of wood, although it’s thin in some places. There is misallocation in not directing wood to the highest end-use. A majority of woodlot owners won’t sell their wood because they don’t like clear cutting and heavy extraction equipment. There’s a shortage of cutting contractors for those who want to sell, particularly among smaller owners. Enter spirit and innovation. Eastern woodlot owners introduced provincial sustainability regulations. They convinced government to delegate its private land responsibilities to their association, arguably the most radical institutional change in the country: no more top-down technocratic and bureaucratic interference from politicians with little understanding of the issues.

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Esri, USDA Forest Service Introduce Interactive Trove of Maps

Forest Service Opens Data Stores, Improves Forest Management and Public Education
ESRI
March 24, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States

Redlands, California—Esri and the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) Forest Service announce the publication of Engagement Portfolio, a gallery of maps and apps that gives everyone access to US forestry data. The portfolio of maps and analysis tools opens the Forest Service’s rich content to a broad spectrum of users, engaging everyone from forestry professionals to conservation-minded laypeople. Engagement Portfolio opens up the Forestry Inventory and Analysis (FIA) database, a trove of detailed information on the nation’s forest ecosystems, which the Forest Service has maintained for almost a century.

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Supreme Court won’t hear Alaska’s challenge to Forest Service ‘roadless rule’

Alaska Dispatch News
March 28, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

WASHINGTON — The Supreme Court on Monday declined to hear a case brought by the state of Alaska over the so-called Forest Service “roadless rule,” ending a major long-running court battle over the state’s attempts to be exempt from the logging regulation. The state had asked the Supreme Court to consider reversing a lower-court decision that tossed Alaska’s “exemption” from a regulation barring road-building in protected forest areas. While the high court’s decision is a major setback for the state, a similar effort to overturn the rule is still brewing in another federal court. The roadless rule originally went into effect in 2001, at the end of the Clinton administration. It barred the Forest Service from building roads and cutting timber on 58.5 million acres nationwide. 

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Breaking up the beetles — University to remove 50 trees from arboretum to head off beetle infestation

The Argonaut
March 28, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

The University of Idaho has announced it will remove approximately 50 trees from the 106-year-old Shattuck Arboretum to prevent the further spread of mountain pine beetles. Arboretum Horticulturalist Paul Warnick said that the outbreak was positively identified last summer. Warnick said the university plans to begin removing the trees as soon as possible but is presently waiting for the weather to be dry enough for them to bring the necessary equipment into the arboretum. “The weather has not been our friend lately,” Warnick said. Warnick said as a native species, the mountain pine beetle can always be found in the region to some degree, though the number of beetles present in the area varies from year to year.

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Trees rebounding from drought, high mortality rates still expected

Chico Enterprise-Record
March 25, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Local trees could use a hug because they are stressed out from drought. Recent rain and snow is good for the vegetation, but experts say more is needed for the trees to fully recover and some of the timber will still die …After 50 years running McCoy’s Tree Service, Joe McCoy has seen the cycle of California droughts affect the trees in Oroville and the rest of Butte County. He said it is a natural occurrence for a percentage of trees to die. …“To tell you the truth, city governments need to think in terms of providing adequate water for the trees that they have instead of planting new trees,” he said.

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Whitefish Residents Weigh Proposal For Nearby Logging

Montana Public Radio
March 28, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

A logging proposal just north of Whitefish seems to have widespread local backing. It’s also raised a few quality-of-life related concerns. Whitefish residents will get a chance Tuesday to learn more and weigh in on the collaborative project. Its supporters say forests in the municipal watershed should get thinned out before a wildfire gets there first. The Flathead National Forest’s Deb Bond: “This is where the city of Whitefish gets its water.” Some believe wildfires would automatically contaminate the local water supply with ash and increased sediment from runoff. Bond says that’s not necessarily the case….Sarah Lundstrum of the National Parks Conservation Association says there’s a legitimate need to reduce the risk of catastrophic fire. But Lundstrum’s group wants it done right.

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US Supreme Court Denies Effort to Overturn Tongass National Forest Protections

By EarthJustice
YubaNet
March 28, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

WASHINGTON, D.C. – The U.S. Supreme Court today declined to hear a last-ditch effort by the State of Alaska to exempt America’s largest national forest from a national rule protecting undeveloped, road-free national forest areas from logging and road construction. The State sought to overturn a Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals ruling that kept the Roadless Area Conservation Rule in effect in the vast Tongass National Forest in Southeast Alaska. The Ninth Circuit agreed with a federal District Court in Alaska that the Bush administration improperly exempted the Tongass from that landmark conservation measure. A coalition including the Organized Village of Kake (a federally recognized Alaska Native tribe), tourism businesses, and conservationists joined the federal government in urging the Supreme Court to leave the lower court rulings intact.

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Don’t accept logging as cost of protecting wilderness

by George Wuerthner, an ecologist
The Missoulian
March 28, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

I wish to respond to the self-serving opinion piece in the March 16 Missoulian by Gordy Sanders and Loren Rose of Pyramid Lumber Company in Seeley Lake titled “Work together to pass Blackfoot Clearwater Stewardship Project.” The Blackfoot-Clearwater Stewardship Project is a good example of “PPSC” socialism: privatize the profits, socialize the costs. Nearly every timber sale on U.S. Forest Service lands around Seeley Lake loses money. Americans are padding the coffers of Pyramid Lumber by selling our public timber to them at a loss. But this is only the beginning of the socialism of costs promoted by Sanders and Rose. The proposal also calls for taxpayers to give $4.5 million dollars to Pyramid Lumber for a new boiler and co-generation facility. But there are costs to all of us beyond the direct subsidies to Sanders and Rose’s company.

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Arivaca firefighters help contain wildfire in forest

Green Valley News
March 28, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Arivaca Fire District personnel helped contain a wildfire Saturday afternoon at Dick’s Peak in Coronado National Forest near Bear Grass Tank, halfway between Arivaca and Tumacacori. As of this morning, a Forest Service crewman was headed to Nogales and, “according to him, (the fire) was pretty much squashed,” AFD Chief Stan Wagaman said. A Forest Service spokeswoman was not immediately available for comment. Forest officials are keeping watch on the site for flare-ups, hoping that predicted winds don’t fan hot embers, Wagaman said after meeting with one of the Forest Service crews this morning.

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Consider children’s future before selling Elliott State Forest

by Jim Givens
Statesman Journal
March 28, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

I’d like to express my opinion on the proposed sale of the Elliott State Forest between Reedsport and Coos Bay. The rationale for this sale seems to be that revenues from timber sales have been reduced to the point where they no longer support the Common School Fund, and therefore the land must be sold. So we’re to believe we have to sell this forest for the good of our children? Sorry, but I don’t believe it. What I think is behind this is the usual story of business interests looking for a bargain. If we could look at public land sales through the eyes of our children, what would we see?

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Op-ed: Blue Mountain forest plan will consider two new alternatives

By Steven K. Beverlin, Genevieve Masters and Thomas Montoya
East Oregonian
March 25, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

We are writing to share an update on the revision of the Blue Mountains Forest Plans, which will guide the management of approximately 5 million acres of the Malheur, Umatilla and Wallowa-Whitman national forests. To begin, we want to acknowledge those who have been involved in this forest plan revision process. We have been encouraged by how much you value your public lands, and we thank you for helping to shape how we manage these national forests on behalf of the American people. Over the past year, as part of a public re-engagement effort, we have visited with over 700 individuals in 24 public listening sessions held in communities across eastern Oregon, eastern Washington and western Idaho.

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Migrant workers get judgment against forestry companies

The Charlottesville Newsplex
March 28, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va. — A federal judge has ordered three forestry companies to pay nearly $1 million to a group of approximately 200 migrant workers. The suit, filed in federal court in Charlottesville, claims that a group of Guatemalans who came to the U.S. under guestworker visas were not paid minimum wage or overtime, and were sometimes not paid at all for their work planting pine seedlings for Star Forestry Service, Independent Labor Service, and White Pine Reforestation and Landscaping. The workers, who were employed across the southern United States, were represented by the Legal Aid Justice Center and the law firm of Covington and Burling, LLP.

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Restoring the American Chestnut

R&D Magazine
March 28, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

The American chestnut was once a mainstay in hardwood forests as far north as Maine and as far south as Georgia and Mississippi. A massive chestnut blight in the early part of the 20th century ended the mighty chestnut’s domination, wiping out billions of mature trees. Scientists are now working to restore the American chestnut’s place in U.S. forests. A study published in the February issue of HortScience provides new recommendations that can help increase the stock of blight-resistant trees. According to the authors, genetic engineering is now poised to offer a solution: blight-resistant American chestnut trees.

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Crandall cited in Morning Sentinel article on state’s forest products industry

University of Maine
March 28, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

Mindy Crandall, an assistant professor of forest landscape management and economics at the University of Maine, was cited in the Morning Sentinel article, “Maine’s forest products industry weathering paper industry woes.” Despite a recent series of paper mill closings, the forestry industry remains an important part of Maine’s economy, according to the article. Some area forest products manufacturers and experts are hopeful that the sector will continue to thrive, despite the recent hits to the paper industry, the article states. Maine also could benefit from expanding its markets for biomass and renewable energy, Crandall said. 

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Good News: A Clear-Cut Rain Forest Can Have a Second Life

Given a chance to regenerate, a razed forest in the Amazon can host almost as much life as a virgin one
Scientific American
March 28, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: International

Conservationists who work to save rain forests typically focus on pristine stands—the dwindling number of patches where the buzz of chainsaws has yet to echo. But even clear-cut land may warrant protection. Mounting evidence shows that, under the right circumstances, heavily logged tracts can regrow to host nearly as much biodiversity as unspoiled Amazonian wilderness. A study published in March in Tropical Conservation Science offers the latest look at the biological value of so-called secondary forests. An international team of ecologists and volunteers spent a year and a half identifying every bird, amphibian, reptile and medium-to-large mammal they could find on some 800 recovering hectares within Peru’s Manu Biosphere Reserve, a UNESCO World Heritage site.

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Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy

New study shows desert mangroves are major source of carbon storage

Phys.Org
March 28, 2016
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: United States, US West

Researchers found that short, stunted mangroves living along the coastal desert of Baja California store up to five times more carbon below ground than their lush, tropical counterparts. The new study led by researchers at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego estimates that coastal desert mangroves, which only account for one percent of the land area, store nearly 30 percent of the region’s belowground carbon. “Mangroves represent a thin layer between ocean and land, and yet we are seeing an ecosystem that is storing a lot of carbon in a very small area,” said Paula Ezcurra, lead author of the study and a former researcher at Scripps.

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