Tree Frog Forestry News

Daily Archives: April 4, 2016

Business & Politics

Canfor reverses decision and stays with City of Fort St. John fire protection

Energetic City
April 2, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

FORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – Only hours after dropping fire protection services from the City of Fort St. John for the Regional District, Canfor Forest Products has decided to continue to work with the City. Late Friday, the City of Fort St. John announced that negotiations between the City and Canfor had ended and Canfor requesting fire protection from the Charlie Lake Fire Department and the Peace River Regional District. The Canfor Mill is located outside City boundaries and since 1989, the City has provided fire services.

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Canfor, city to sign one-year fire protection deal

Alaska Highway News
April 2, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

The City of Fort St. John will continue to provide fire protection services to the Canfor Mill after all — at least for another year. City officials said Saturday that Canfor Forest Products asked the city “in an 11th hour decision” to agree to a one-year agreement to provide fire services to its mill on the Swanson Lumber Road, just outside city boundaries. “After vigorous consideration Canfor has requested professional fire services as the best option for the company,” the city said in a press release. “Canfor representatives will meet with the City early next week to finalize and ratify the formal and binding agreement. City Council has authorized immediate fire protection coverage to bridge the gap until the agreement is ratified.”

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Premier to talk wood

Castanet
April 1, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

Premier Christy Clark will be back in Kelowna next week to speak at the Council of Forest Industries convention. Clark will provide the closing keynote address April 8 at the Delta Grand Okanagan Resort. “Premier Clark’s attendance at the COFI convention demonstrates her understanding of the importance of the forest sector to the economy of B.C.,” said council president and CEO Susan Yurkovich. .. Minister of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations Steve Thomson (MLA for Kelowna-Mission) will open the convention. …“The industry directly and indirectly employs about 145,000 people across the province, from Fort St. John to Vancouver, with one in 16
jobs in the province being associated with forestry,” said Yurkovich.

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Oregon mills closing, cutting production

Natural Resource Report
April 4, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States, US West

Housing starts, home values, and lumber are climbing only slowly, mortgage interest rates are the lowest in 3 years, and log prices peaked in January, so far this year. One southern Oregon mill closed, another cut production, and forest health management is stalled. Recent trends of lumber, home construction, and housing markets, are compared to 2009 and 2005. …Yes, lumber prices, represented by studs are rising slowly, but are historically low. For perspective, February 2005 at $415 was an 11-year high. Weak lumber prices are one of several factors holding log prices $60-$70 below the winter highs of 2014 and 2015, which were some of the best winter log prices of the last 13 years. Also, the Canadian dollar is off a January dip in relation to the American dollar, but it remains historically weak.

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Wood products pioneer Arthur Pozzi dead at 84

Pozzi created Pozzi Windows in late 1970s
The Bend Bulletin
April 2, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States, US West

One of the giants of Central Oregon’s lumber industry, Arthur “Art” Pozzi, died March 26. He was 84. Born on Vancouver Island in British Columbia, Pozzi was a lumber broker in the Portland area when he first came to Central Oregon in 1968 to buy Lee Millworks. Pozzi renamed the company Bend Millwork Systems, and in 1978 Pozzi added a window manufacturing division, Pozzi Windows, which became one of the larger window companies on the West Coast. By the time Pozzi sold Bend Millwork Systems to Nortek Inc., in 1986 for $27 million, it employed more than 1,400 people in Bend and was the largest employer in the region. The sale to Nortek became contentious, with Pozzi and the new owners ending up in court. By 1992,

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Lawmakers oppose Maine biomass bailout, but leave an opening

Portland Press Herald
April 1, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: US East, United States

AUGUSTA — A majority of the Legislature’s Energy, Utilities and Technology Committee voted Friday to reject a proposal that would bail out the state’s six ailing biomass energy plants, but the panel left open the possibility that $10 million in taxpayer money could be used to rescue the industry. The vote followed lengthy private deliberations during which lawmakers contemplated amendments to a proposal introduced earlier this week that would effectively have Maine electric ratepayers subsidize biomass power generators. The plants have helped retain hundreds of jobs in the forest products industry but are costly and inefficient, and are having trouble competing amid low oil and natural gas prices. Lawmakers on the committee repeatedly expressed skepticism that the Legislature should rescue an industry that some consider increasingly outmoded. However, the prospect of job losses – in an election year – also weighed heavily on legislators’ minds.

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Wood, Paper & Green Building

Fort Calgary art installation evokes outlines of original fort

CBC News
April 2, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: Canada, Canada West

…But now, on the spot of the original fort, there’s a new art installation that outlines the exact dimensions of our city’s origin point. A different kind of wall. It’s called Marking — created by Vancouver-based artist Jill Anholt. Made of wood, carved images and lights, it is a symbolic interpretation of our past. Vertical wood slats reveal the outline of the original fort and show where its gates were located. It’s not really a square, given the lookouts which bulged at each of the four corners. The boards — which are the same height as the old fort walls — are topped with metal. In the wood and visible at just the right angle, there are shapes of 12 standing figures.

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Coming to a (small) screen near you!

Western Red Cedar Lumber Association
April 1, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: Canada, Canada West

To maintain and grow brand awareness and mitigate market erosion from competitive composite products, the Western Red Cedar Lumber Association has launched four new TV commercials under the Real Cedar brand. The four 15 second ads- each one highlighting a benefit of Western Red Cedar- are currently running on ESPN, HGTV and the DIY Network; all major stations with a high concentration of Real Cedar’s key demographic. It is the third consecutive year of Real Cedar TV, but new creative and a national US media buy will hit 26 million homes, versus 1.6 million in 2015. The markets targeted for 2016 are: Northern California, Michigan, Oklahoma State, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Colorado, Minnesota, Oregon, Connecticut, Vermont, Illinois, Missouri, Texas, Maine, Wisconsin, Ohio, Washington, and Rhode Island.

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Wood council gets federal cash

The Nugget
April 1, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: Canada East, Canada

The $907,875 contribution was announced Friday morning by Nipissing-Timiskaming MP Anthony Rota at the Metric Aid office on McIntyre Street W. in North Bay. “This is for work right across the country,” Rota explained. “It’s going to promote the local economy by creating jobs here, and (forestry) is something we know in this area.” The investment will support manufacturers, producers and communities in Northern Ontario that depend on forestry and the wood industry and create and maintain jobs in the forestry sector, Rota said, while helping to diversity the industry and boost awareness of the industry. “It promotes the use of wood in construction which in turn promotes the local economy.”

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84 Lumber hopes to tap into “tiny house” craze

Herald Standard
April 3, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: United States

Washington County-based 84 Lumber seeks to ride the wave of a new phenomenon, with four “Tiny Living” lines of “custom tiny houses” built at its millwork facility, not far from Canonsburg. In a recent press release 84 Lumber said the introduction of Tiny Living makes that company the first major retailer and only large building-materials firm to tap into a market and of competitively priced custom-built houses no bigger than 200 square feet. “This is a niche, and there is a demand for it,” said Scott Cavinee, a broker for SWC Properties in Uniontown. …“The tiny home movement lies perfectly at the intersection of 84 Lumber’s expertise in high-quality building materials and green building best practices,” Magerko was quoted for a recent company news release. “With our national footprint and commitment to the dedicated do-it-yourselfer, we are uniquely positioned to become a part of this new path to homeownership, and are excited to offer Tiny Living on a national scale.”

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New Integrated Design Building incorporates sustainability, resilience and aesthetic

The Massachusetts Daily Collegian
April 4, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: US East, United States

The Integrated Design Building at the University of Massachusetts is challenging structural norms, being made out of not only steel and concrete, but also wood. The building’s materials are not just unique, but also sustainable, and the building will have the largest installation of wood-concrete composite floors in North America, according to Tom Chung, principal of the Boston architectural firm Leers Weinzapfel Associates. …The key to the Integrated Design Building’s sustainability is due to wood called cross-laminated timber (CLT) also known as mass timber, according to Marc Rivard, a UMass alumnus. This type of wood is resilient, energy efficient and environmentally friendly. Incorporated into its resilience is its ability to last three hours in a fire, when building code only requires material to last for two hours. 

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A ‘tree-to-table’ business in Orient

Northforker
April 4, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: US East, United States

The buzz of saws and sanders, a soft dust coating the floor and the smell of freshly cut lumber make the senses come alive when you walk into the workshop of East End Wood Designs. There, co-owners Jeff Rogers and Mike Gillespie of Orient aim to create one-off, specialty furniture made from local wood. Whether it’s the large overgrown limbs from pruning, or trunks from cleared properties, the business repurposes, recycles, and gives new life to the felled trees that would otherwise be discarded or turned into firewood. “Everyone thinks you have to go to South America to get fancy grains,” Rogers said, referring to wood fibers. “But we have beautiful grains right here.”

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The eco guide to guitars

April 4, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: International

The tag “rock’n’roll royalty” should really belong to the instruments: the backstory of some of the world’s best acoustic guitars is frankly breathtaking. Take Bedell’s Antiquity Milagro Parlor guitar. It’s carved from a 400-year-old Brazilian rosewood tree. Wandering troubadours who possess one should make sure they have their “guitar passport” handy, otherwise their instrument could be confiscated by customs officials under trade-in-endangered-species laws. Many other guitars sold each year (nearly 3m in the US alone) are also made from rare timber. Thanks to musicians’ bias for tropical tonewoods – particularly mahogany, rosewood and ebony – this is a market in which the illegal timber trade can flourish. That’s anything but harmonious when you bear in mind that every two seconds an area of forest the size of a football field is clear-cut by illegal loggers.

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Dubai WoodShow 2016 goes green

Khaleej Times
April 4, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: International

The 11th edition of the annual Dubai WoodShow opened on Monday with a focus on green buildings and sustainablity. With over 250 exhibitors from 42 countries, the exhibition showcases both the latest wood products, as well as the latest manufacturing equipment. The 2016 edition of the show shed light on the region’s growing sustainability sector, as consumers and developers alike look towards incorporating the latest green techniques and reducing the UAE’s carbon emissions footprint.  “Sustainability is the future of this industry,” said T. Madhusudhan Rao, director of sales and marketing at Danube, which is exhibiting its green products at the exhibition.

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Transparent Wood Could Replace Glass in Windows

Product Design & Development
April 1, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: International

Researchers at KTH Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm have created a transparent wood that can be produced in bulk, the university announced Thursday. Transparent wood isn’t new. Lumber has been fashioned into translucent, minute pieces for the study of wood. However, the university’s efforts could lead to the mass production of the material—something that could bode well for a society that’s increasingly focused on renewable resources. KTH professor Lars Berglund said in the university’s announcement that an optimal application for transparent wood could be solar cells because the material is both inexpensive, easy to come upon, and a renewable resource.

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Wood skis? Yes, we would

Ozy
April 3, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: International

…Some cite being closer to nature versus intruding on it, or how the wood feels when they’re carving turns in soft powder, or how fast wooden skis are. The real reason, as copped to by wooden ski fan and Bergen, Norway, resident Liv Hylleseth, has everything to do with style. “Go into your average ski store and tell me if you can buy any of that crap off the rack,” she sniffs. “I couldn’t.” With a bespoke turn and about $800 in disposable income (it’s either that or a nearby forest and woodworking skills), you can snag yourself a pair of wooden skis from Rønning Treski, self-proclaimed as the only wooden ski manufacturer in Norway. 

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Forestry

Wildfire fines more than triple across B.C.

Fines more than tripled in effort to deter dangerous behaviour
CBC
April 1, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Dramatically increased fines for a variety of wildfire-related violations went into effect Friday across B.C. The penalty for ignoring a fire restriction is now more than triple what it was a year ago, up to $1,100 from $345. Failing to properly put out a burning substance, such as a cigarette, has jumped to $575. The fines apply to a total of 19 violations of the Wildfire Act and are among the steepest in Canada. “We encourage everyone to do the right thing this fire season by learning more about responsible fire use and making sure they follow the rules,” wrote B.C. Minister of Forests Steve Thomson in a news release.

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Park user groups oppose Garibaldi at Squamish resort

Petition garners more than 1,000 signatures in first 24 hours
The Squamish Chief
March 31, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

They believe they can stop it. One of the oldest and largest clubs at the University of British Columbia has taken up the cause of stopping the Garibaldi at Squamish resort project for environmental reasons. The Varsity Outdoor Club (VOC) formed an environmental committee of about 10 members in late December with the purpose of halting the $3.5-billion Brohm Ridge resort, which received its provincial environmental assessment certificate in January. “VOC has been using Garibaldi Park specifically for the entire time it has existed,” said the committee’s Devon Campbell. “Backcountry skiing, hiking, including at Brohm Ridge.

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The Vancouver Tree Book aims to make an arborist out of everyone

The Georgia Straight
April 3, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

…“Trees are a key player in how we’re going to survive the climate crisis,” says David Tracey, author of the Vancouver Tree Book. “They take carbon out of the atmosphere, they clean the air, and they’re our best ally in the fight against climate change. The simplest, quickest, most beautiful—and maybe cheapest—solution is to plant trees.” With his comprehensive new field guide, Tracey details more than a hundred locally-found trees, with hundreds of striking full-color photographs. Providing full coverage of both native and imported varieties, he offers up a hugely informative cross-section of Vancouver’s urban forest, as well as civic tree tour maps and a history of area trees from early logging efforts to today’s Greenest City campaign.

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B.C. grizzly bear hunt to include Great Bear Rainforest

By Wendy Stueck
Globe and Mail
April 3, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

B.C.’s spring grizzly bear hunt has opened for another year, with the government authorizing a limited number of bears to be killed in parts of the province – including the Great Bear Rainforest. That authorization exists despite an announcement in February in which the provincial government heralded a “globally significant” management pact for the Great Bear Rainforest and said, as part of the deal, that “the commercial grizzly bear hunt will cease in Coastal First Nations’ traditional territories.” But even with the Feb.1 announcement, there are still licensed guide outfitters who have operating agreements in the Great Bear Rainforest – which means their clients could be hunting in the region this month.

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McBride Logger’s Bonspiel won’t happen because of forestry industry troubles

CBC News
April 2, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

For the first time in almost four decades the community of McBride, B.C. will not hold its annual Logger’s Bonspiel. Secretary of the McBride Chamber of Commerce Linda Fry says the cancellation is indicative of the decline of the forestry industry in the community. “In 1996 we had a large forestry building that housed a number of employees … there were some large mills here, there was a lot of wood that was trucked out,” she told Radio West host Audrey McKinnon. “That’s sort of shrunk up. A number of those mills are no longer operating.” Fry says over the last 20 years, as the mills have gone so to have other jobs in support industries including garages and even government offices.

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Scientists spot underground fungus from space

UPI
April 1, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States

BLOOMINGTON, Ind., — Beneath a forest floor, vast communities of fungi stretch out for miles. Scientists at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory have developed a technique for mapping these fungal networks using satellite imagery. Mycorrhizal fungi have forged a unique symbiotic relationship with trees and their roots — collecting and trading soil nutrients for sugars trees generate during photosynthesis. Studying this symbiotic system may help scientists better predict how forests will respond to climate change. “Nearly all tree species associate with only one of two types of mycorrhizal fungi,” Richard Phillips, a biologist at Indiana University, Bloomington, explained in a news release.

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Mailbag: Agrees with lawsuit

by Dr. Keith Frome, LBCC Board Member
The Albany Democrat-Herald
April 1, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Mike McInally “got it right” regarding Linn County’s lawsuit against the state over management of state forest lands: the state’s management decisions have cost counties, like Linn and Benton, millions of dollars in lost revenue from timber harvests. However, it is not just the counties that have a stake in this outcome. Other community institutions, including Linn-Benton Community College and GAPS, depend on funding from activity on state forest lands. …Should Linn County’s move lead to an environment where our state forests are managed to the greatest permanent value, Linn and Benton counties, community institutions like LBCC, and the thousands of students and staff that depend on LBCC will all benefit.

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In Our View: Wildfires Need Long View

The Columbian
April 1, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

While we have properly taken the Legislature to task for diverting reserve funds from Clark County mental-health services (see Thursday’s “In Our View” in The Columbian), the supplemental budget passed this week deserves additional examination. Lawmakers managed to provide a $191 million budget to address shortcomings in last year’s $38.4 billion biennial budget. And they managed to do so without passing any general tax increases — which probably was predictable during an election year. And yet some commentary is necessary as the budget details get vetted. Of note was an agreement to use $190 million from the state’s emergency fund to pay for damage from last year’s wildfires across the state. While this might serve as an effective stopgap for this year, it should not be viewed as a long-term plan to pay for wildfires.

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Commission chimes in on J-Bar Salvage lawsuit

Idaho County Free Press
March 31, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

GRANGEVILLE — Friends of the Clearwater and Idaho Rivers United are suing the Forest Service over federal salvage logging east of Lowell, in the area scorched by the Johnson Bar Fire nearly two years ago, and the Idaho County Commission is chiming in. The federal district court recently ruled in the environmentalists’ favor on a separate lawsuit by IRU and Morgan Wright, which temporarily held up the state’s plans to log ground held by the Idaho Department of Lands. (Find the related story in print Wednesday.) The Forest Service has already advertised and sold two Johnson Bar Salvage sales, and delaying them would put Idaho County’s economic interests at risk, the commission declared last Tuesday.

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A scab, not a scar: AFR’s Lamb Saddle rehabilitation work begins

The Mail Tribune
April 1, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

ASHLAND — When hikers and mountain bikers return Saturday to a place called Lamb Saddle in the Ashland watershed, they won’t recognize it as the place they left last fall. … But for the past four months, it’s been a landing site for some of the commercial logging at the heart of the continuing Ashland Forest Resiliency Stewardship Project, and left behind is a rutted roadway, huge piles of slash and mounds of ground bark in which even Himalayan blackberries couldn’t take root. “It’s unsightly. It doesn’t look the greatest,” says Justin Cullumbine, co-director of the Lomakatsi Restoration Project, one of the AFR partners.  But this time, it’s just a scab. Forest crews Friday began rehabilitating the half-acre Lamb Saddle, recontouring, stabilizing and eventually replanting with native trees and grasses just as this area of the watershed off Ashland Loop Road reopens to the public.

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Local Christmas trees plagued by pests

The Appalachian
April 1, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

Christmas tree farmers’ crops across the High Country have come under recent attack from pests that originate overseas. Cryptomeria and elongate hemlock scale, Asian emigres that cause big problems for Christmas tree farmers in the form of discoloration and defoliation are spreading across the state’s stock of the seasonal favorite. A Frasier Fir Integrated Pest Management reboot program was held on March 22 at the Ashe County Agricultural Centers to help farmers make the right decisions to protect their crops. Jill Sidebottom, a specialist on Mountain Conifer Integrated Pest Management, hosted the event. Nearly 40 local farmers were in attendance.

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Beetle from Asia poses threat to Ireland’s ash trees

Irish Times
April 1, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: International

Ireland’s ash trees, even if they manage to escape the ash “dieback” fungal disease, face an alarming threat from a beetle that is slowly moving westwards across Europe. In the largest survey ever undertaken on the threats to ash trees, published by the Journal of Ecology, leading British researcher Dr Peter Thomas has warned that up to 95 per cent of them could be lost in coming years. The emerald ash borer beetle, Agrilus planipennis, was accidentally introduced to North America in 2002. It was found in Moscow in 2003, and has moved westwards since.

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Compliance centre stumbles on first illegal logging case

The Borneo Post
April 2, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: International

KANOWIT: The One-Stop Compliance Centre (OSCC) established by Sarawak Forestry Corporation (SFC) at Mapai near here was supposed to become operational yesterday. But success came early for OSCC Mapai when a team of SFC enforcement officers came across an illegal logging operation at Nanga Pedai yesterday while on a trial compliance patrol. “The illegal logging operation was being carried out at a closed logging coupe within a previous timber licence area where the licence had expired. “317 logs of various species and sizes were seized. The logs had been tagged with bogus identification marks,” said a press statement issued by SFC yesterday.

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Will no one stop Poland destroying Europe’s most precious forest?

The UK Guardian
April 3, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: International

Bia?owie?a is “the misty, brooding forest that loomed behind your eyelids when, as a child, someone read you the Grimm brothers’ fairytales”, in the words of American ecologist Alan Weisman. This unique place of towering hornbeam and fungi the size of dinner plates is Europe: 1,500 sq km of woodland on the border of Poland and Belarus is the last lowland remnant of what covered our continent after the ice age. It is home to 20,000 species, including 12 carnivores such as lynx and wolves, 120 species of breeding bird such as the three-toed woodpecker and rare insects and invertebrates that were lost to the rest of Europe a century or more ago.

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Forestry worker dies after four-hour delay to treat injury

New Zealand Herald
April 2, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: International

A Northland forestry worker didn’t get to hospital for more than four hours after he was struck by a log and his distraught mother wants to know why. Damian Lee Maungarongo Tai died from injuries suffered when working at a forestry block at Pakotai, northwest of Whangarei, on Wednesday last week. Severely injured, the 37-year-old father of four didn’t arrive at hospital until 2.30pm, about four hours after he was struck. His mother Karo Hikairo says she doesn’t want to blame anyone for the delay, but she wants answers. …An ambulance arrived on the scene about 40 minutes after Mr Tai was struck but St John Far North territory manager Ben Lockie said the injured man then needed to be carried up a steep 120m bank. He said the task was “very difficult” and there was an initial reluctance to move Mr Tai because of the severity of his injuries.

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General

The eco guide to guitars

April 4, 2016
Category: Uncategorised

The tag “rock’n’roll royalty” should really belong to the instruments: the backstory of some of the world’s best acoustic guitars is frankly breathtaking. Take Bedell’s Antiquity Milagro Parlor guitar. It’s carved from a 400-year-old Brazilian rosewood tree. Wandering troubadours who possess one should make sure they have their “guitar passport” handy, otherwise their instrument could be confiscated by customs officials under trade-in-endangered-species laws. Many other guitars sold each year (nearly 3m in the US alone) are also made from rare timber. Thanks to musicians’ bias for tropical tonewoods – particularly mahogany, rosewood and ebony – this is a market in which the illegal timber trade can flourish. That’s anything but harmonious when you bear in mind that every two seconds an area of forest the size of a football field is clear-cut by illegal loggers.

Read More