Tree Frog Forestry News

Daily Archives: April 5, 2016

Froggy Foibles

Black bear up from hibernation has a good back scratch in Anmore, BC

Watch male black bear scratching his back on a tree in Metro Vancouver this morning
CBC News
April 5, 2016
Category: Froggy Foibles
Region: Canada, Canada West

Back scratching is fairly common in bears — even cartoon ones, like Baloo in Disney’s Jungle Book — but it might have nothing to do with a hard-to-reach itch. A 2007 study on B.C. bears suggested rubbing on trees is actually a means of marking scent for communication.

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Business & Politics

Wood Products Prices in The U.S. & Canada

Global Wood
April 5, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, United States

Lower sawn hardwood imports at start of 2016 US imports of all sawn hardwood fell one third from December 2015 to January 2016. 53,221 cu.m. of sawn hardwood were imported in January worth US$33 million. Tropical sawnwood imports declined 30% in January to 14,524 cu.m. Tropical sawnwood accounted for 27% of all sawn hardwood imports in January, compared to 23% in 2015 for the entire year. The only tropical species to gain significantly in January was keruing. Keruing imports recovered from low volumes last December and reached 1,699 cu.m. in January.

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No further job cuts at Tolko from lowered AAC

The Merritt Herald
April 4, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

Merritt’s Tolko lumber mill isn’t expecting to have to make any more job cuts due to a lower allowable annual cut (AAC) now in effect for the Merritt Timber Supply Area. Last November, Tolko laid off 29 full-time employees and curtailed their small log production in response to expected reductions to the annual allowable cut. Last week B.C.’s chief forester Diane Nicholls announced the AAC is dropping it from 2.4 million cubic metres to 1.5 million effective immediately. By March 24, 2021 it will decrease to 1.2 million cubic metres. “There are no further reductions in manpower expected with the current announcement of 1.5 million AAC,” sawmill superintendent for Merritt, Dwayne Thiessen, told the Herald. So far, the full impact of this immediate 37 per cent reduction is yet to be determined.

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Once, Twice, Fair Warning…Final Call to Potential Buyers of the Lincoln Tissue Plant and Old Town Pulp Mill

PRNewswire
April 5, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: US East, United States

SAN FRANCISCO — A four-day public auction of the former Lincoln Paper & Tissue Company as well as the Expera Old Town Mill, will take place from April 19-22 at the Hilton Garden Inn, in Bangor, Maine. Prospective buyers from around the world will be bidding online and in person at the live auction. “We have approximately 4,000 lots tagged and cataloged, and that means we will be running 1,000 lots per day,” said Rich Reese, auctioneer and president of Rabin Worldwide, one of the joint venture partners in the purchase of both mills.

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Court throws out Willmott forestry scheme class-action settlement

The Sydney Morning Herald
April 5, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: International

The Federal Court has refused to approve a piecemeal class-action settlement for victims in the Willmott Forests managed investment schemes after finding it was not fair and that returns to investors did not match the millions they had paid to fund the law firm running the case. More than 3500 investors were caught up in the collapse of Willmott Forests which went under in 2010 owing its banks, most notably the Commonwealth Bank, about $200 million. Investors had ploughed $400 million into Willmott Forests schemes. The settlement offer was put forward by Macpherson and Kelley Lawyers (also known as M+K), which were representing some of the investors in the four separate class actions. The four class actions were heard together by Federal Court judge Bernard Murphy.

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Wood, Paper & Green Building

Log trials and tribulations?

Wood Business
April 5, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: Canada, Canada West

For decades True Shape 3D laser scanners have been used for scaling logs in sawmills around Europe, and this application has finally found a home on North American soil.
FPInnovations is working with Springer-Microtec to find ways to optimize log scaling operations, reducing costs for sawmills through the use of scanners in their log yards. These types of scanners are already used for optimizing log breakdown in various sawmills so the technology itself is not new to the sector. A pilot trial run is being performed right now at Interfor’s Acorn Sawmill in Delta, B.C., where a True Shape 3D laser scanner is being used for scaling for revenue. The scanner from Springer-Microtec is the first of its kind to be certified by Measurement Canada for this type of application.

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Timber Buildings Rise to Record Heights

Sourceable
April 5, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: Canada, Canada West

Engineered timber products are enabling buildings made from wood to rise to unprecedented heights in the 21st century. Toward the end of last year, construction commenced in the Canadian province of British Columbia on what is slated to be the world’s tallest timber building upon completion. The Brock Commons student residence at the University of British Columbia will stand 53 metres in height comprising a total of 18 storeys, making it the modern era’s tallest building made from wood. That will make it more than 21 metres taller that Melbourne’s 10-storey Forte apartment complex, which at 32 metres in height is believed to be the reigning title holder.

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Western Archrib manager sees strong resurgence in wood construction

Journal of Commerce
April 4, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: Canada, Canada West

Andre Lema, business development manager for Edmonton-based Western Archrib, says he’s seeing a resurgence of people building wood structures. “People like the look of wood and using wood is a cost-saving feature,” he says. “You don’t need dropped ceilings or other finishes. Wood looks good as is.” Western Archrib has a 60-year history in the structural wood systems industry. The company, which today has production facilities in Alberta and southwestern Manitoba, started out providing glue laminated beams for barns and community centres. In the 1960s, Western Archrib branched out into building storage facilities for the potash industry in western Canada.

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Wood associations can provide technical and product support

Journal of Commerce
April 4, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: Canada, Canada West


B.C. is home-base to some of the world’s foremost research and development facilities. Within that spectrum are two forest product research and marketing organizations providing Western Canadian contractors with expertise in wood construction while three others also provide strong support. …Brian Hawrysh, chief executive officer of BC Wood, says the key premise behind BC Wood is to connect “our industry with the end-users of our wood products.” The organization consists of 120 members ranging from primary breakdown mills to value-added manufacturers, doors and windows to cross laminated timber producers. ..  “The domestic market has really been a haven for wood producers,”
said Hawrysh, as the U.S. housing bubble burst in 2008 sales, plummeting
B.C.’s export of lumber, panel and value-added product from 50 per cent
to 25 per cent.

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Test Method will evaluate fire-resistant wood products.

ThomasNet News
March 30, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: US East, United States

A proposed ASTM test method will help determine the effects of high temperatures and humidity on fire-retardant-treated wood products. This test method will help product development labs with first steps in developing new products for wood-construction markets. Specifically, according to ASTM member Jerry Winandy, “this new standard will provide an accelerated test of structural composite panels at elevated temperatures and controlled humidity. This could eventually be used for wall and roof sheaths.” Winandy, an adjunct professor of wood science at the University of Minnesota, notes that the test method could help producers of engineered wood composites when developing additives to protect from fire or to enhance durability. 

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Hybrid construction is the subject of a groundbreaking new publication from TRADA

TRADA
March 29, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: International

A major new publication from TRADA – Hybrid Construction – explains the role that timber can play in conjunction with other materials to structural challenges.  Structural timber has been penetrating market sectors once dominated by structural steel or reinforced concrete thanks to increasing availability of high-quality engineered timbers such as cross-laminated timber, glued laminated timber and laminated veneer lumber. But it is perhaps the adoption of a more pragmatic approach to design and the combination of two or more structural materials to achieve the most effective solution that has elevated timber to its key role within hybrid construction methods.

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Forestry

‘Ambitious’ goal set for community forest harvest: mayor

Not-for-profit management society aims to cut 6,000 cubic metres
Whistler Question
April 4, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Officials are crossing their fingers in the hopes of harvesting less than half of their allowable cut from the Cheakamus Community Forest this spring. …The organization is allowed to harvest 20,000 cubic metres of wood per year, however previous weak lumber markets and hot weather leading to the threat of wildfires have prevented the society from reaching that number, Whistler Mayor Nancy Wilhelm-Morden said. “Last year because we had such a long, hot, dry summer, we didn’t harvest very much,” she said. “There has only been a couple of years where we have harvested 20,000 cubic metres.” The community forest society aims to cut 6,000 cubic metres of wood from Cheakamus 16 block — a swath of land southwest of Cheakamus

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Ranges pass forest practices audit

The Merritt Herald
April 4, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Five range areas around Merritt and Princeton have been branded with the stamp of compliance by the province’s forest practices watchdog. An audit report, released by the Forest Practices Board on March 31, examined four range agreement areas around Merritt, and a smaller range area just north of Princeton. Each area corresponds with an agreement signed by a rancher, who maintains the area for livestock grazing while protecting riparian areas, and managing for drought conditions among other responsibilities. In general, the report concluded that all five areas were in compliance with their range agreements, said Darlene Oman, communications director with the Forest Practices Board.

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Community names lake, trail after John Phare

Sunshine Coast Reporter
March 24, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

The District of Sechelt has been told it must wait one year from the death of faller John Phare to request the renaming of Wormy Lake after him, but the community doesn’t appear to want to wait. A carved sign reading John Phare Lake has already been erected at Wormy Lake, and while no one is taking credit for it, many have now started calling the lake by its new community-imposed name. …“By building this trail, it is my way of connecting with John as a forester and his friend. This trail was not built by me alone and I am truly humbled by the efforts of the great community of volunteers that came out to build and make this idea a reality. In honouring John’s logging spirit, this trail is our shared legacy for others to enjoy riding around the lake.” 

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Reader View: Santa Fe must address overgrown forests

by Tom Ribe – author of Inferno by Committee
Sante Fe New Mexican
April 2, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Big, intense forest fires are time-bombs waiting to go off. You need only drive or hike on the dirt roads and trails through the Tesuque Watershed to see thickets of sickly trees, heaps of sticks, needles and logs waiting for lighting or a careless person to set off a firestorm on a dry windy day.  …A local campaign by “Once a Forest,” a small, anti-technology group, has been spotted at public meetings and leafleting trailheads, campaigning against science-based forest management and for 1910-style wildfire suppression that was abandoned by conservationists and scientists more than 40 years ago. Their testimony and fliers utterly misrepresent the history of fires and forests in New Mexico and distort the intention and the reality of forest and fire management today.

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Foolish not to invest more in fire-season equipment, preparation

The Legislature should have spent more money to prevent wildfires, which would be a truly conservative investment that saves money.
Seattle Times
April 1, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

AFTER two nasty wildfire seasons that claimed lives and cost more than a quarter of a billion dollars to fight, the Legislature ignored the lessons learned. Lawmakers refused to look ahead and invested a relative pittance on fire prevention, better training, management and equipment for fire crews. Penny wise and pound foolish does not even begin to describe it. Lawmakers covered only the cost of last year’s fires on more than 1 million acres with $190 million from, ironically, the rainy day fund. The money literally went up in smoke. …. The Legislature can pinch pennies, but Mother Nature is not impressed. In response to the reality on the tinder-dry ground, Public Lands Commissioner Peter Goldmark had asked for $24.2 million to create and improve all the elements and layers of a safe, effective response to wildfires.

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Residents, environmentalists concerned about logging near Bozeman

Animals, views could be impacted
Bozeman Daily Chronicle
April 3, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

DNRC has marked for the Limestone West logging project, a project it is putting forward over the next few years to get value out of dying lodgepole pine trees and to meet DNRC’s legal obligation to make money for the trusts. Campbell said they anticipate a lot of the work happening on the slopes of that particular cut in the hills, which is blocked from view at the nearby Triple Tree subdivision. But they can’t yet say for sure that all the work would be done there. The project is in its infancy: An initial public comment period asked people to weigh in on what they care about in that area. Campbell and Barone are examining those comments and will offer a more detailed proposal later this year that will include a road they want to build and more. The logging project already has some who live and hike nearby concerned about the elk and mule deer that call the range home, not to mention the view.

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A modern lesson in Klamath forest from huge post-fire logging project

Plan calls for logging thousands of acres in Klamath National Forest
Sacramento Bee
April 2, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Once upon a time in forests across the West, the massive logging plan approved for the Klamath National Forest would have been the norm. Designed in response to the 2014 lightning-sparked wildfires that burned 183,000 acres, the project approved Feb. 29 has all the hallmarks of a last-century get-out-the-cut timber sale. The Westside Fire Recovery Project calls for removing scorched and green trees on 5,760 acres; logging in habitat set aside for the threatened northern spotted owl; and clear-cutting on steep slopes above streams federally designated to promote the long-term survival of coho salmon. …In her 96-page decision, Klamath Forest Supervisor Patricia Grantham justifies the size and location of the logging sites with the financial benefits to the local community. She chose them, she says, with “an eye toward economic viability.”

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Forest deal touts the obvious

Baker City Herald
April 1, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

We received a press release this week touting a collaboration between two Oregon agencies and the U.S. Forest Service that sounds logical and potentially quite useful in restoring some semblance of health to public forests in our state. And yet, as we slogged through the turgid prose typical of such missives, we realized that this new state-federal partnership is in fact so logical, and its potential benefits so obvious, that only government agencies would need to commemorate the occasion with a news release that implies the concept is a revelation. …Great idea. But it troubles us that state and federal officials, rather than simply employ such common sense strategies as a matter of course, do so rarely enough that when such an agreement is signed it warrants a major publicity campaign.

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Timber bill advances

Juneau Empire
April 5, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

A state timber bill envisioned as a helping hand for embattled Viking Lumber is advancing toward a final vote. On Monday afternoon, the House Resources Committee approved Senate Bill 32, which expands the ability of the Alaska Division of Forestry to offer negotiated timber sales in state forests. Existing law prohibits the division from selling large amounts of timber without a competitive bid process unless the forested area has a high unemployment rate. Speaking to the committee on Monday, State Forester Chris Maisch told lawmakers that the bill would improve the state’s ability to consider jobs, not just revenue. “It’s very important for Southeast Alaska,” he said. In Southeast Alaska, Viking Lumber is the last remaining mid-sized sawmill. The vast majority of timber in Southeast is cut for export to foreign sawmills, where lower labor costs result in cheaper lumber.

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Is more wilderness really the best option?

by Jose J. Varela Lopez, executive director, New Mexico Forest Industry Association
The Taos News
April 3, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

A recent “My Turn” opinion in The Taos News suggested that adding 120,000 acres to the Pecos Wilderness would protect our water supplies. Instead, it would jeopardize the values we are trying to protect, whether it’s the local water supply, firewood gathering, recreation and hunting, air quality or local economic development. There is no shortage of wilderness within the Santa Fe and Carson National Forests. The Pecos Wilderness already encompasses over 223,000 acres, and these lands cannot be managed for access, nor to reduce the risk of catastrophic wildfire, insects and disease. Expanding the wilderness area by another 120,000 acres is not a “modest” addition.

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Counties Turn To Little-Known Policy To Boost Say In Federal Land Management

Oregon Public Broadcasting
April 4, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Counties across Oregon are turning toward a little-known federal policy as a means to have more say in how federal lands in their backyards are managed. These counties are using “coordination,” an obscure provision in two federal environmental policy laws that require agencies to coordinate with local governments in land use planning.  Baker County Chair Bill Harvey describes coordination as putting local and federal governments on “equal footing.” …Harvey spearheaded an effort to revise Baker County’s existing natural resource plan and invoke the process of coordination last fall. The revised plan emphasizes logging, grazing and mining as resource priorities. Baker, like many eastern Oregon counties, is made up of more than 50 percent federal lands. 

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Expo gives students well-rounded view of forestry-related occupations

Philomath Express
April 4, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Most parents might not want to read this, but there just might be some value in their children playing video games. Climb into the cab of a $1.5 million forwarder, settle into its comfortable chair and take over the controls. With a joystick and high-tech control panel, the comparison will become obvious. “It’s pretty crazy up in there. There’s a whole computer screen and everything,” Philomath High School senior Gary Gossett said Friday morning during the annual Paul and Genie Mortenson Forestry Expo. “It’s insane, it measures out the diameter of each log, how long it goes and every log that you grab, you can measure how far out you want it to go and then it’ll cut it to a specific length and everything, it’s crazy.”

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As forest restoration plan reaches halfway mark, forum will address its progress and path ahead

Sante Fe New Mexican
April 4, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Since 2010, the U.S. Forest Service has been working, through human intervention, to return the Jemez Mountains and Valles Caldera National Preserve to the way they were centuries ago — before a different kind of human intervention, and a booming lumber industry, transformed the ecosystem into an unrecognizable and more dangerous landscape. Over the past century, the large, old ponderous trees were chopped down and the remaining ponderosas were engulfed in increasingly fast and devastating fires. Seedlings survived and were scattered unnaturally in the scorched soil, growing up into young, unhealthy thickets without enough water, light or nutrients for any one tree to thrive. “Thick as the hair on the back of dog” is how Bob Parmenter, chief of science and resource stewardship at the Valles Caldera National Preserve, described New Mexico’s overgrown forests.

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State project to evaluate whether prescribed burns help prevent wildfires

By Hal Bernton
Seattle Times
April 3, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

The state Department of Natural Resources will conduct a pilot project to evaluate the benefits of prescribed burns under legislation signed last week by Gov. Jay Inslee. The bill was introduced by Rep. Joel Kretz, R-Wauconda, who in the aftermath of last year’s record-setting wildfire season wanted to see more done to try to head off runaway blazes. It also includes stronger language directing the state to approve permits for these burns. “After the worst fire season on record in Okanoga County, I knew we needed to act this session to bring forward legislation to improve our forest health and reduce our risk of further catastrophic wildfires,” said Kretz in a written statement.

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Editorial: Agreement could help with federal forests

Bend Bulletin
April 2, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

The state of Oregon signed a new agreement this week that should bring more cooperation between the state and the federal government in managing national forests. Every summer as the wildfires race through the national forests and the air in Bend gets smoky, it’s tempting to throw up your hands and think the federal government is never going to get forest management right. But this agreement — officiously named Oregon Good Neighbor Authority Master Agreement — could make a bit of difference. The state and the federal government already work together on projects in Oregon. This will enable them to do more. What kinds of things do they do? Here are a few examples: Oregon has committed $7.9 million to help the federal government do projects on federal lands in the state.

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Our view: A forest plan we can live with

East Oregonian
April 1, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

The Blue Mountains Forest Plan is the overarching management document that guides decisions on millions of acres of public land in Eastern Oregon. Land managers on the Umatilla, Wallowa-Whitman and Malheur national forests have been working under that plan, which has not been updated since 1990. That was two Bush presidents ago, and about eight years before Google was founded. The plan is long overdue for an update, but the public and land owners (the federal government and we the people) have, as of yet, been unable to make headway on what that should look like. … This forest plan revision has been a long (too-long), expensive (too-expensive) complex (too-complex) process. But as we enter another stage, Oregonians have the opportunity to listen and learn. That is the best way to feel involved and invested.

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New alternatives proposed for Forest Plan

The U.S. Forest Service will analyze two new alternatives to the revised Blue Mountains Forest Plan.
East Oregonian
April 1, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

The U.S. Forest Service is crafting two new alternatives for its revised Blue Mountains Forest Plan, based on a year’s worth of feedback from the public. Details are sketchy, but supervisors on the Umatilla, Wallowa-Whitman and Malheur national forests say these alternatives will emphasize restoration in order to keep the woods healthy and lower the risk of potentially devastating wildfires. Each alternative will be fully analyzed in the agency’s final Environmental Impact Statement, due out later this fall. A draft EIS for the Forest Plan was released in 2014, which was so thoroughly criticized that the feds spent all of 2015 re-engaging with local communities on how to improve the documents. Tom Montoya, Wallowa-Whitman forest supervisor, said a recurring theme in those meetings was to adopt a more “hands-on” approach to land management that would make the forests safer, more resilient and productive.

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Sen. Crapo speaks on timber

Emphasizes using collaborative approach on issues
CDA Press
April 2, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

COEUR d’ALENE — Sen. Mike Crapo honored the Associated Logging Contractors on Friday by announcing he has issued a statement into the Congressional Record commemorating the group’s 50 years of existence in Idaho. … Crapo said the organization has been a driving force in natural resource protection since he was serving in the Idaho State Legislature more than 20 years ago. “I commend you for not only making Idaho so great for this industry, but for making Idaho great overall,” Crapo said. …Crapo has been working toward a collaborative approach to timber harvest. “I have put most of my focus on collaborative decision making,” he said after his speech. “I am trying to move the decision-making away from the centralized government agency making the decision and back to the collaborative groups.”

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Florida Forest Service restores Longleaf Pines in Point Washington State Forest

WJHG-TV
April 4, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

WALTON COUNTY, Fla.- It’s their effort to restore the Longleaf Pine ecosystem. For the next few weeks, the Florida Forest Service is having the Sand Pines removed from more than 120 acres at Point Washington State Forest. “[Sand Pines] don’t offer really any advantage to this forest,” said Mike Mathis, Forestry Operations Administrator for the Chipola District. Mathis says that Sand Pine timber will be harvested. A process that has been done before, since Mathis says Point Washington is a “working forest” “The objective is to remove the marketable Sand Pine and plant back, next year, during planting season, with native longleaf,” Mathis stated.

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Chinese Demand for Rosewood Has Turned Thailand’s Forests Into Virtual War Zones

Illegal loggers and forest rangers regularly do battle over the precious timber
Time
April 11, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: International

Richly hued, cherry-brown rosewood is one of the world’s most valuable timbers. Native across much of Indochina, a cubic meter can fetch $5,000 in Cambodia or 10 times that amount once smuggled into China, where the demand for Ming- and Qing-style rosewood furniture is enormous… However, voracious Chinese demand also means that Siamese rosewood is on the brink of extinction. When the species was finally listed on the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) list in 2013, experts thought that it was the Mekong region that was mostly affected. But the wholesale plunder of once protected forests in Cambodia and Vietnam, via government land concessions, has meant the loggers are increasingly moving west into Thailand.

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Could timber plantations boost forest conservation?

The benefits may extend well beyond increased production.
Center for International Forestry Research
April 5, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: International

Large-scale mono-culture plantations have been criticized for a bevy of reasons: land grabbing, forest destruction, poor environmental services, unfair distribution of benefits, and the list goes on. So it might sound counter-intuitive, and even provocative, to suggest timber plantations as a prime solution to promote forest conservation. Yet this forms the basis of a theory derived during the early 20th century, which this article will refer to as the ‘plantation conservation benefit’ theory. It stipulates that generating value out of wood production is actually an effective way to protect a given tract of forest. …To further test this theory, we reviewed evidence in a recently published study.

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Indonesia forests minister dams DiCaprio with faint praise

Canadian Press in the Chronicle Herald
April 5, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: International

JAKARTA, Indonesia — Indonesia’s environment and forestry minister says Oscar-winning actor Leonardo DiCaprio lacked complete information when he criticized the destruction of rainforests during a visit to a protected national park last month. His comments prompted immigration officials to warn that DiCaprio could be barred from re-entering Indonesia, but the minister, Siti Nurbaya, said Monday that she appreciates his good intentions and hopes to co-operate with him in the future. The Hollywood star made a one-day visit to Mount Leuser National Park in northern Sumatra and uploaded photos to his Instagram account, expressing concerns over species whose habitats are threatened by palm oil plantations.

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Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy

Social venture paves way for transition to circular economy

The Source
April 5, 2016
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: Canada, Canada West

Most of us have never given a second thought to wood waste but one organization is working to improve that. Uproot a zero-waste, wood-salvaging social venture was founded last year with the goal of making what is known as a “circular economy” more accessible, starting with re-purposing wood waste. What is the circular economy? Kevin Kimoto, one of the co-founders of Uproot, says that during an internship with CityStudio, his team began building “sharing libraries” made from pallet wood for the purpose of sharing sporting equipment. Today, the core team from this project is still working together at Uproot. After the internship, Kimoto realized that wood waste was a problem and wanted to do more in order to reduce our community’s ecological footprint.

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Paper use drives clear-cuts but biomass is far worse

Gary L. Saunders, forester, former Department of Natural Resources manager of education services. 
The Chronicle Herald
April 4, 2016
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: Canada East, Canada

Bob Bancroft’s critique of clear-cutting, Return the forests to the people (March 5), was fine as far as it went. But it stopped short of naming the real cause or offering a fix. Bob’s a wildlife biologist, not a trained forester. The best he could offer was “gentler” forestry and smaller cuts. So why is there large-scale clear-cutting? “Corporate greed,” we say. Yes, greed does play a part. But that’s too simple. Think about it. What company would build a costly paper mill without a sure long-term market? That’s us, avid readers of newspapers and magazines, still by far the best source of reliable, in-depth reporting. Which is why North Americans, blessed with cheap wood, have become the world’s worst paper hogs.

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Beware of biomass advocacy posing as science

National Alliance of Forest Owners
March 29, 2016
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: United States

As the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Congress continue to consider the path forward for biomass energy policy, both will rely on a substantial body of science to inform their decisions. Ideally they will use the contributions of science to develop a policy that is both scientifically sound and practical to implement. …To their credit, the scientists coalescing around these and other similar science fundamentals recognize that their conclusions can support a variety of policy approaches. Consistent with established norms they are careful to advocate science without advocating any specific policy approach.

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Forests Can Play an Essential Role in Reducing Climate Change Impacts of Aviation

The Nature Conservency
April 4, 2016
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: International

Utrecht, Netherlands / London, UK / Washington, DC | Today, leading international non-governmental organizations released a briefing paper, “Linking Flights and Forests,” which highlights the vital role forests can play in fighting climate change and recommends that countries include REDD+, a policy framework for reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation, as a means for the international aviation sector to meet its commitments to cap and reduce its carbon pollution. The briefing paper was released prior to a regional meeting in the Netherlands of the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO), the UN body responsible for setting the standards for international flights.

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General

Incoming: a look at Vancouver Island incomes

Nanaimo News Bulletin
April 4, 2016
Category: Uncategorised

There is a sharp economic divide on Vancouver Island between the haves and the have-nots, at least in terms of the size of their paycheques. … Income is a reflection of jobs, and communities that offer jobs in a variety of fields are less susceptible to the ups and downs of the economy. And while the economy has improved for forestry and tourism, it hasn’t improved enough. “The economy around Victoria is very different than the rest of the Island. Beyond Nanaimo lacks diversity,” Mowbray said. “The more diversified your economy is, the better.” …Contrast that with the West Coast, which is basically a two-horse town. One horse, tourism, doesn’t pay well, while the other, forestry, is not the job-generator it once was. “Based on the work we did in 2014-15 (the most depressed economy) was the Alberni area,” Mowbray said. “It’s so dependent on forestry and there’s not a large opportunity to expand. It’s looking at LNG, but there are a lot of obstacles.”

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