Tree Frog Forestry News

Daily Archives: April 13, 2016

Business & Politics

Conifex and Dunkley Make a Deal on Timber

250 News
April 13, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

Prince George, B.C.- Conifex has announced it has entered into a deal with Dunkley Lumber that will see the two companies “conduct coordinated joint timber harvesting operations” on some of Conifex’s harvest area in the Mackenzie Timber Supply Area. In a release issued late yesterday, Conifex says Dunkley has paid $20 million dollars for half of the shares of a Conifex subsidiary that holds a forest licence for harvesting 300,000 cubic metres of timber a year. According to the release Conifex believes the coordinated harvesting operations will “enhance fibre optimization between the two companies, improve supply chain efficiencies, and contribute to more stable harvest levels in the Mackenzie Timber Supply Area.”

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Company headed by Expo 86 site developer Li Ka-shing among those named in Panama Papers

Business in Vancouver
April 11, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

…Meanwhile, a former Port Alberni helicopter logging pilot who moved to Costa Rica with his family is also named in the database. Philip Jarman is the president of the June 2, 2000-incorporated Leber Action Corp. His wife, Mary Belle Jarman, is listed as a director and the secretary is Christian White Hernandez, the husband of the Jarmans’ daughter, Angela. Philip Jarman is also a director of Midnight Train Corp. and president of Vinculum S.A. and Alfa Trade Group Inc. All three were incorporated in 2001. In 2006, Jarman and Heli Tech Services (Canada) Ltd. sued nine companies, including Weyerhaeuser (NYSE:WY) and International Forest Products, for patent infringement over a system Jarman claimed to have developed for logging of old-growth trees.

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Heavy-industry tax break will hit Kamloops homeowners

Kamloops This Week
April 12, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

Heavy industry in Kamloops will get a $550,000 tax cut in 2016. At a budget meeting on Tuesday morning, city council voted to shift some of the city’s property-tax burden from Domtar, Lafarge and Tolko and onto residential ratepayers. The shift, coupled with other increases this year, will hike the tax bill for the average homeowner by $58 on a house worth $351,000. Heavy industries in the city have complained for years their tax rate is far too high compared to other communities in the province. While the city has frozen the mill rate (the amount of money per $1,000 of assessed property) paid by the three companies for several years, it is still above the provincial average.

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Conifex Announces Coordinated Harvesting Cooperation Agreement

Benzinga
April 12, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

VANCOUVER – Conifex Timber announced today that it has completed a timber harvesting cooperation agreement with Dunkley Lumber to conduct coordinated joint timber harvesting operations on certain portions of Conifex’s harvesting areas in the Mackenzie Timber Supply Area. Conifex believes that the coordinated harvesting operations will enhance fibre optimization between the two companies, improve supply chain efficiencies, and contribute to more stable harvest levels in the Mackenzie Timber Supply Area. Conifex also believes that this innovative arrangement with Dunkley can provide additional volumes of affordable feedstock to its power generation unit at Mackenzie through increased utilization of lower quality wood and harvest residuals. Pursuant to the agreement, Dunkley paid Conifex $20 million to acquire half of the shares of a Conifex subsidiary which holds a forest licence having a 300,000 cubic metre annual harvest of timber.

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Council shifts tax structure in favour of Canoe Forest Products

Salmon Arm Observer
April 12, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

It’s not nearly as much as Canoe Forest Products asked for, but Salmon Arm councillors are giving the company a tax break that will be picked up by property owners and businesses. On Monday, council approved the shift of $25,000 to general municipal taxes from Class 4 (Major Industry). Chief financial officer Monica Dalziel advised directors the shift is in keeping with the objective of maintaining tax stability among the various tax classes… Harrison explained the operation of Canoe Forest Products, the only company in Class 4 Major Industry category, has changed over time. The plywood mill continues to be in operation but the sawmill no longer runs.

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As MDF manufacturer celebrates 20 years, it examines the market forces that keep panel production primed

Sault Star
April 12, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada East, Canada

SAULT STE. MARIE – A low loonie isn’t something about which you’ll likely hear anyone at Arauco lament. In fact, the Sault Ste. Marie medium density fibreboard producer banks, in part, on the Canadian dollar remaining worth relatively less than the greenback for a continued competitive edge. “It’s been a positive thing,” says Anthony DiGasparro, Arauco’s northern business development manager. That’s an understatement; two-thirds of the outfit’s order file goes into the U.S. “We’re in good shape in that regard,” DiGasparro said. “We still have a strong Canadian market, but (the low Canadian dollar) is great for us right now.” And into the future.

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Resolute President and CEO Takes Strong Position in Support of Free Trade before Canadian House of Commons Committee

Stockhouse
April 12, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada East, Canada

MONTRÉAL – Resolute President and Chief Executive Officer Richard Garneau appeared today in Ottawa, Canada, before the Canadian Parliament’s Standing Committee on International Trade. Testifying in support of free, unencumbered access for softwood lumber exports from Central Canada (Quebec and Ontario) to the U.S. market, Mr. Garneau formally presented his perspective… Mr. Garneau challenged the claims by some that the previous 2006 Softwood Lumber Agreement between the United States and Canada produced predictability and stability. In his formal comments, and in the question and answer period that followed, Mr. Garneau made the case that managed trade increased volatility, creating an unpredictable and unstable trade environment between the two large trading partners.

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LP’s Hayward facility gets major investment

APG
April 13, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: US East, United States

Louisiana-Pacific (LP) Corporation out of Nashville, Tennessee, has informed the Record it is planning a large capital investment in its Hayward facility that will make the plant equipment more flexible and responsive to customers needs. “We are investing in Hayward,” said Mary Cohn, corporate affairs director. “Our capital plans call for revising our finishing process to process more lap siding and add trim capability.” Cohn said the amount of the investment is considerable but she did not provide an exact figure. The Hayward plant currently makes two products: siding and oriented strand board (OSB). In 2015 LP invested $95 million in its Swan River, Manitoba, plant to make siding panels, which previously had been made in Hayward.

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Madison millworkers to benefit from federal program

Kennebec Journal & Morning Sentinel
April 12, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: US East, United States

The U.S. Department of Labor has approved funding for a program that will help displaced employees at Madison Paper Industries acquire new skills and training after the mill closes in May, according to an announcement from U.S. Sens. Susan Collins and Angus King and U.S. Rep. Bruce Poliquin, R-2nd District. The federal Trade Adjustment Assistance program provides job training and worker assistance to workers who have been adversely affected by foreign competition. Last year Madison Paper filed a federal complaint against a Canadian paper mill alleging that unfair government subsidies to Port Hawkesbury Paper were hurting the U.S. market for supercalendered paper. In December the U.S. Department of Commerce ruled in Madison’s favor and ordered that duties of up to 20 percent be placed on supercalendered paper imported from Canada.

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Grown in Britain scheme launches North of England group at Barningham

Teesdale Mercury
April 13, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: International

A NEW scheme is hoping to tap into vast swathes of unmanaged woodland in Teesdale as new kit and growing demand makes timber a more viable resource. Up to 80 per cent of England’s wood is imported, but a new group wants to change that by encouraging farmers to get chopping. The Grown in Britain group scheme for the North of England was launched during an exhibition and demonstration of new small-scale forestry machinery at Barningham last month. Farmers can get up to 40 per cent of their capital investment returned when they become involved in managing timber on their land. Hosted by Pennines Biomass and the Forestry Commission, the event was aimed at farmers across the dale. 

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Wood, Paper & Green Building

Is an 80 storey plyscraper too much of a wood thing?

By Lloyd Alter
TreeHugger
April 12, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: Canada

Given our name it should be no surprise that we love wood, particularly if it is sustainably harvested and is displacing carbon-intensive concrete and steel. We love sustainably grown chocolate too, but know that one can have too much of a good thing. And I wonder, if perhaps a 984 foot tower that would be the second tallest in London, is too much of a wood thing… So why not show us better ways and better places to achieve density instead of building an 80 storey toothpick. Give us some new aesthetics, methodologies and experiences (bring back the Euroloaf!). I have no doubt that this tower can be solved technologically and that there is not much more fire risk than there might be in a steel building. But why would you? Why not make the form suit the material instead of vice versa?

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Construction Concerns: Insulation of Exterior Walls in Cross-Laminated Timber

Fire Engineering
April 12, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: United States

Heat loss through the building envelope has long been a concern of architects, builders, and engineers. “R-Value” is “the measure of resistance to the flow of heat through a given thickness of material, with higher numbers indicating better insulation properties.”1 (www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary) The R-value can be calculated using formulas for several different systems of measurement. The R-values of the different materials making up a wall or ceiling-roof assembly can be added together to show the R-value of the complete assembly. Because of the energy crisis in the 1970s and 1980s, the required insulating values in building and heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) codes significantly increased. Today’s R-value requirements for different geographic areas are shown in the IBC; NFPA 5000, Building Construction and Safety Code; and the HVAC codes on maps and charts. 

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Hancock Lumber and Robbins Lumber join American Wood Council

Lesprom.com
April 12, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: United States

The American Wood Council (AWC) has two new members: Hancock Lumber and Robbins Lumber, both headquartered in Maine. ”Wood products manufacturers make products that are essential to everyday life from a renewable resource that absorbs and sequesters carbon,” AWC President and CEO Robert Glowinski said. “Our members are committed to sustainability in their products and their use. Hancock Lumber and Robbins Lumber are a key industry companies with great people and facilities. We are excited to have them join over 50 other wood products companies supporting AWC’s efforts on behalf of wood products.

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NRMCA Launches Build with Strength; Coordinated Industry Campaign to Educate the Design / Build Community about the Benefits of Concrete Construction

PR Newswire
April 12, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: United States

SAN DIEGO — Using their 2016 National Convention as a launching pad, the National Ready Mixed Concrete Association (NRMCA) has unveiled Build with Strength, a multi-million dollar coordinated industry campaign to better educate the design / build and code communities about the benefits of concrete construction in the low to mid-rise sector, and in general.  “We are proud to launch a first of its kind program for the concrete industry,” said outgoing NRMCA Chairman Allen Hamblen, President and CEO of CalPortland. “It’s not only going to support our members, their businesses, and the hard-working men and women of the concrete industry, but I firmly believe that the education campaign we are embarking on will lead to stronger, more durable construction that will save lives while cutting cost over time.”

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In homelessness crisis, Hawaii eyes thatched ‘hale’ homes

Atlanta Journal Constitution
April 13, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: United States, US West

…Anthony, lawmakers and community members are pushing to revive the Hawaiian tradition of living in hale (pronounced hah-lay), thatched homes made from local trees and plants as a way to provide more affordable housing. Though a bill to ease restrictions on building hale died after critics brought up safety concerns, advocates are trying to bring attention to a type of housing that celebrates culture and uses environmentally sustainable techniques to house the homeless. …Hale builders gather ironwood, eucalyptus or other trees for the frame and pili grass, sugar cane or ti leaves for the thatched roofs and walls. But while sleeping in hale is allowed in some Hawaii counties, no cooking, open flames, electricity, extension cords or generators are permitted, and obtaining building a permit can be difficult.

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Furniture designer Tom Moser introduces new design and new book in D.C.

The Washington Post
April 12, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: US East, United States

Tom Moser, the furniture designer and founder of Thos. Moser Handmade American Furniture, will be at his Georgetown showroom April 23 from 1 to 4 p.m. to sign his latest book “Legacy in Wood” and to present his most recently designed wood chair. The book offers Moser’s thoughts on his decades-long career as a craftsman and on creativity, inspiration and his design aesthetic. The new Auburn chair, named for the Maine location of the Thos. Moser workshop, was inspired by a cafeteria chair made of steel and plastic that Tom Moser and his wife Mary saw on a ferry from Maine to Nova Scotia. The curved back of the chair, called an “anticlastic curve” supports the lumbar in two directions.

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Brown-Forman introducing new brand: Coopers’ Craft bourbon

Lexington Herald Leader
April 12, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: US East, United States

Brown-Forman, the Louisville-based parent of Jack Daniel’s Tennessee Whiskey and Woodford Reserve premium bourbon, is adding the first new bourbon to its permanent lineup in 20 years. The company announced Monday the upcoming release of Coopers’ Craft, which will be available this summer …The name honors the importance of barrel makers, or coopers. Brown-Forman is the only whiskey-maker with its own cooperages. “Coopers’ Craft is the result of decades of experience in mastering barrel-making and maturation techniquest to create truly unique bourbons,” Lawson Whiting, executive vice president and chief brands and strategy officer for Brown-Forman Brands, said in a statement. “Owning our cooperage is a testament to this expertise and brings to life the notion that what matters most, we do ourselves.” 

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Op-Ed: Tall timber – London’s wooden skyscraper plan presented to mayor

By Paul Wallis
Digital Journal
April 13, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: International

You have to like any headline which says “Seeds planted for London’s first wooden skyscraper” for so many reasons. The Greenwood Strikes Back, perhaps? Actually, it’s a very good, very challenging, and potentially very valuable, idea. The question is whether a 300-metre-tall wooden skyscraper can actually be built. The wooden skyscraper idea germinated at Cambridge University, a project by Cambridge University’s Department of Architecture, PLP Architecture and engineering firm Smith and Wallwork. The building can deliver about 1 million square feet of residential space for London’s “tensely cozy” urban sprawl. Plans were presented to London Mayor Boris Johnson this week. The current tallest residential wooden building is only 32 metres, in Melbourne Australia, a 10 storey residential building in the Docklands development in central Melbourne. The Cambridge tall timber is nearly 10 times bigger.

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Forestry

David Suzuki: Nature calms the brain and heals the body

Georgia Straight
April 12, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

For the most part, our brains didn’t evolve in cities. But in a few decades, almost 70 percent of the world’s people will live in urban environments. Despite the prosperity we associate with cities, urbanization presents a major health challenge. Cities, with their accelerated pace of life, can be stressful. The results are seen in the brains and behaviour of those raised in cities or currently living in one. …A study published in Nature links city living with sensitivity to social stress. MRI scans show greater exposure to urban environments can increase activity in the amygdala, a brain structure involved in emotions such as fear and the release of stress-related hormones. …How do we slow things down? Nature seems to be the answer. Cognitive psychologist David Strayer’s hypothesis is that “being in nature allows the prefrontal cortex, the brain’s command centre, to dial down and rest, like an overused muscle”.

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With three kids, Island logging community’s school to close

By Jack Knox
Victoria Times Colonist
April 12, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

…Next fall’s projected number: just three kids rattling around in a school that was built to hold 265 back in 1961. So, it was no surprise Monday when the Vancouver Island North school board found itself looking at pulling the plug on Woss at the end of June. In truth, the school has been on borrowed time for years. It has been like watching a good dog grow old, knowing that one day you’re going to have to take Shep for that last car ride to the vet’s. Still, it’s bad news for Woss, a tiny outpost of maybe 250 souls that sits smack dab in the middle of the loneliest stretch of highway on Vancouver Island, 67 kilometres south of Port McNeill and 74 north of Sayward. …Woss is in a tough spot, though. 

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Diversifying the industry’s workforce – with more women

Logging and Sawmilling Journal
April 1, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Melinda Morben knows all about saying “yes” to opportunity in the forest industry—and she is encouraging other women to look at employment opportunities in Canada’s forest industry. This past January, Morben made a presentation at the Truck Loggers Association convention in Victoria, where she spoke on the topic of the industry employing more women, as a way of expanding the workforce. Based on her own positive experiences, she is encouraging more women to look at working in the forest industry. “I think the industry has been accepting of women,” she says. “People have been respectful and I’ve had really supportive people that have helped me.”

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Wildfire almost contained

Castanet Kelowna
April 12, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

A wildfire burning three kilometres south of Nazko is now 60 per cent contained and is expected to be fully contained by tonight, if the weather continues to co-operate. The Nazko fire was mapped on April 10 at 398 hectares. Nazko is a small community 100 km from Quesnel. Sixty-five firefighters, with the support of heavy equipment and a helicopter, are on site today. Forestry officials now say the fire was caused by industrial activity, with strong winds contributing to its spread.

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Vacancy Announcement – Executive Director Forest Enhancement Society of BC

Forest Enhancement Society of BC
April 13, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

The Forest Enhancement Society of BC is seeking an Executive Director to build the Society into an efficient organization which delivers cost-effective and impactful programs to improve BC communities’ resilience to wildfire while improving forest conditions and wildlife habitat.  The Society is a new organization which has been provided an initial contribution of $85 million from the province to help rehabilitate land damaged by fire or fire control activities, abate fire hazards on Crown land and engage in fire prevention and fire preparedness in respect of land in order to reduce the impact and cost associated with wildfire and improve public safety, re-establish sustainable ecosystems that support the broad range of benefits British Columbians receive from their forests and increase the restocking of those forests affected by wildfire to further a sustainable and reliable timber supply. 

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Truck Loggers back members at board event

Alberni Valley News
April 12, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

During the Truck Loggers Association (TLA) board of directors meeting in Port Alberni on April 7, frustration and concern was apparent from coastal logging contractors towards the industry’s major tenure holders. “It’s a challenging environment to be in,” said David Elstone, executive director of the TLA. “You have the contractor that is having to go through challenges with the company which resulted in the crews being laid-off since December.” Last month, Western Forest Products sent home mill workers due to a log shortage which the TLA said was caused by the company’s disregard for coastal logging contractors and the ongoing rate dispute. The United Steelworkers have since moved towards legal proceedings against Western.

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New Brunswick deer herd down 70% in 30 years, DNR numbers show

CBC News
April 13, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

The New Brunswick whitetail deer herd has declined more than 70 per cent since the mid-1980s, according to population estimates obtained by CBC News. The figures received through a Right to Information request show the deer herd was estimated to be about 270,532 animals in 1985. The latest estimate of the province’s deer population, taken in 2014, indicates there are approximately 74,338 animals remaining.  The department cites heavy snowfall amounts and coyotes as factors in the decline. “We know that winters are very, very influential on deer numbers,” said Joe Kennedy, the deer biologist for the Department of Natural Resources.

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LETTER: Post-fire logging won’t help forest

By Keith Hammer, Kalispell
Daily Inter Lake
April 13, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

As impressive as forest fire smoke columns can be, research shows that only 5 percent of the carbon in big trees is released by fire. That’s because it is the needles, some branches and bark that is actually burned. Most of the carbon remains stored in the unburned tree trunks. Ground surface fuels account for the vast majority of the carbon released. Grasses and shrubs often begin sprouting and re-storing carbon in the same season. Not only do unburned tree trunks continue to store vast amounts of carbon, they provide essential habitats for a wide variety of birds and other cavity-nesting wildlife. As trees fall to the ground, they help stabilize the soil and begin to replenish it with organic material and nutrients in addition to nutrients released in the ash. Fallen trees are key for many ground- and log-denning species of wildlife.

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New book looks at Mount St. Helens’ deadly volcanic eruption

USA Today
April 12, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

History’s ashes have fallen so heavily and with such variety since 1980 that, for many Americans, the eruption of Mount St. Helens — a long-slumbering volcano among the peaks of the Cascade Mountains — seems about as close to us as the lava that buried Pompeii. But, as Steve Olson reminds us in his vividly reported new history, Eruption: The Untold Story of Mount St. Helens, what happened on May 18, 1980, in the primordial thickets of the Pacific Northwest, was an enormous, multi-faceted event…  At the cultural epicenter of the story lies George Weyerhaeuser, scion of the lumber dynasty that dominated the region, and CEO of the Weyerhaeuser Company in 1980. His firm was not only Washington state’s largest, but had a higher market valuation than Ford or Mobil at the time.

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Federal plan for O&C lands would double timber revenue, protect old growth

Oregon Live.com
April 12, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Counties that depend upon timber revenue and environmentalists fighting to keep trees standing can agree on one thing: They both hate the federal Bureau of Land Management’s new plan for managing timberlands in western Oregon. Hours after the federal agency released its plan to balance logging, environmental protections and recreation opportunities on a swath of forestland that’s seen big fights over animal habitats since the 1980s, 17 Oregon counties that benefit from logging on the land announced plans to sue.  Environmentalists, meanwhile, released statement after statement decrying the management plan as insufficient to protect sensitive species — including the Northern spotted owl — and drinking water.

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BLM releases plan to boost timber harvest in western Oregon

Mail Tribune
April 12, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

PORTLAND — The U.S. Bureau of Land Management released its long-awaited plan for managing roughly 2.5 million acres of federal forestland in Western Oregon, and counties that rely on timber for revenue quickly threatened legal action. The agency has spent years working to update the Northwest Forest Plan, trying to strike a balance between the interests of the timber industry and environmentalists. The original plan developed in the mid-1990s failed to deliver promised yields of timber, in part because of federal laws to protect species like salmon and the northern spotted owl. The proposal released Tuesday and still months from being formally adopted calls for three-quarters of the land to be locked up in reserves for fish, water and wildlife. 

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Maine volunteers sought for spruce budworm tracking project

Bangor Daily News
April 12, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

State officials have warned that a spruce budworm outbreak in Maine is likely within the next several years, and response plans have been formulated as the forest products industry prepares for the worst. With that reality in mind, the Budworm Tracker program is seeking volunteers in northern Maine to assist in its citizen science program, according to a recent press release from the Maine Department of Agriculture, Conservation and Forestry. The program, part of the Healthy Forest Partnership, will provide a better understanding of how budworm populations increase and spread.

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A Bold New Platform for Forest Action

By  Paula Caballero – Senior Director for Environment & Natural Resources Global Practice, World Bank
Huffington Post
April 12, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: International

Every day, the attention towards forest and trees seems to grow and make headlines around the world. Why?

First, there’s a sense of urgency that we must protect the world’s remaining standing forests so that people, animals and plants can continue to access basic resources to survive. From Pope Francis’s encyclical on “care for our common home” to E.O. Wilson’s recent call to preserve “half the earth, for the rest of life”, there is growing public awareness that conservation is critical.

Climate change, in particular, with its severe impacts on lives, yields and ecosystems, has helped focus people’s attention on the planet and its health. Mudslides, floods, water depletion, and soil erosion connected with deforestation are having impacts too dramatic to ignore.

Second, the narrative has changed.

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IUFRO-IFSA project: Global Outlook on Forest Education

International Forestry Students’ Assocation
April 12, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: International

Forests and forest education are undergoing changes. To investigate new challenges and to call for improvements in the educational environment, a Joint IUFRO-IFSA Task Force on Forest Education has been established by the IUFRO and IFSA Board last year. One of the objectives of the joint project is to bring together perspectives and knowledge of students, educators and other stakeholders. At the same time the project aims to identify, compile and communicate the gaps and challenges in forest education. 

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Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy

Conference hears now’s the time for ‘proactive adaptation’ to climate impacts

Canadian Press in Alberni Valley News
April 12, 2016
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: Canada, Canada West

OTTAWA — Adapting to a changing climate used to be considered a “cop-out” or admission of defeat for policy makers and advocates when it came to addressing carbon emissions. But the twin goals of stopping climate change before its most devastating impacts are fully felt and adapting to the changes already underway must now be considered together, a former White House climate adviser told an Ottawa adaptation conference Tuesday. Adaptation Canada 2016 is a three-day national symposium that’s examining everything from energy sector risks and opportunities to municipal infrastructure, forest management, shoreline erosion, public health and biodiversity.

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Quebec’s Energy Policy: Ambitious Energy Goals for 2030

JDSupra Business Advisor
April 12, 2016
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: Canada East, Canada

After extensive public consultations, the Government of Quebec announced Quebec’s energy policy for 2016–2030 (Policy) on April 7, 2016. By focusing on energy efficiency, innovation and renewable energy, the Policy aims to transition towards a low-carbon economy that will help fight climate change. Environmental organizations, businesses and First Nations thus far seem to be in favour of the Policy… True to its goal of reducing the use of fossil energy, the provincial government is encouraging the production of biofuels such as ethanol and biomass fuels like diesel, renewable natural gas and wood pellets. The Policy aims to support the development of the forest biomass supply chain for production companies and the implementation of production centres for wood fibre bioenergy.

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Biomass plant closures likely, despite proposed state bailout

Portland Press Herald
April 13, 2016
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: US East, United States

No more than three of Maine’s six biomass energy plants are likely to keep operating in the near term, even if a bill to help subsidize the struggling plants and save hundreds of logging jobs is approved by the Legislature and signed by Gov. Paul LePage. Two of the plants — in West Enfield and Jonesboro — already have shut down. James Regan, a spokesman for their owner, Covanta Holding Corp., said Monday that details in the proposed law “make it unlikely” they will resume operations. “We believe that the draft law will primarily benefit larger facilities,” he said. The future of one or two of the four biomass plants owned by ReEnergy Holdings also is at risk, according to Sarah Boggess, a company spokeswoman.

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Rolling Stones keyboardist, sustainable forester Chuck Leavell joins European visitors at Pickens County tree farm

Greenville Online
April 12, 2016
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: US East, United States

More than 50 visitors from European Union nations, and a conservationist who is better known as the keyboard player for The Rolling Stones, rolled into Pickens County on Tuesday to take a look at Mill Pine Plantation as part of a Bioenergy Study Tour organized by the U.S. Department of Energy. The group visited the tree farm of local industrialist Tom O’Hanlan to learn about how Southeastern forests are managed, as their countries look to buy wood pellets from American growers to use in European coal-fired power plants that are being converted to reduce their carbon footprint. Chuck Leavell said he was happy to take part in the Bioenergy Study Tour… “We both have the same ethic. We believe that trees are a true renewable resource. We think long term. We’re very excited about the prospect of biomass,” Leavell told The Greenville News.

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Misconceptions aren’t helping the debate over biomass

By Dana Doran
Bangor Daily News
April 12, 2016
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: US East, United States

Over the past eight months, the state has lost 1,000 direct jobs and an equal number in associated businesses, such as logging, because of the shutdown of three pulp and paper facilities, four pellet mills and two biomass electric facilities. As Sen. Angus King described it recently, Maine is in the midst of an “economic hurricane.” Now, as a result of the warmest winter on record, the lowest fossil fuel prices in six years and a glut of natural gas, another hit to Maine’s forest products industry is right around the corner. This will potentially eliminate $300 million in annual economic investment and create a multimillion-dollar waste wood disposal problem for which no one has a solution.

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Forests synchronize their growth in response to climate change

Phy.org
April 13, 2016
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: International

A new study, with the participation of UPM, has revealed a growing synchrony in ring-width patterns of trees in response to global warming. A multidisciplinary research team consisting of Russian and Spanish researchers, with the participation of a female researcher from School of Forestry Engineering and Natural Resources at Universidad Politécnica de Madrid (UPM), has assessed the tree-ring width patterns of diverse conifer species in Spain and Siberia. This study shows the existence of an increase of spatial synchrony of ring width patterns in both regions. These findings are a warning of the global warming impact on forest ecosystems at subcontinent scale.

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Scientists to explore Amazon rainforest’s link with climate

British Telecommunications
April 13, 2016
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: International

A £4 million science project is being launched to understand the links between the world’s largest rainforest and the climate. The three-year programme funded by the Government’s Newton Fund will bring together scientists and organisations from the UK and Brazil to examine the relationship between the Amazon rainforest and climate change. Professor Stephen Belcher, director of the Met Office Hadley Centre which is leading the UK’s contribution to the project, said: “The Amazon has a fascinating two-way relationship with the world’s climate. “The forest helps to regulate our climate by absorbing carbon dioxide, but it is also widely anticipated to be affected by increasing climate change.

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General

Forestry Corporation fights to protect Eden from potential wildfires

Bega District News
April 12, 2016
Category: Uncategorised

It might come as a surprised to some that Forestry Corporation has its own fire fighters to conduct hazard reduction burns or combat blazes in South East NSW.  On Monday, April 11, 10 of the corporation’s fire fighters were conducting a 1200ha hazard reduction burn in Nullica State Forest, west of Eden.  “Most of the blokes on today’s hazard reduction burn have 20-years plus of experience in the industry,” protection planner for the South Coast protection area Rob Young said. …Setting up a hazard reduction burn is no simple task as Mr Young, who has a Bachelor of Science Forestry degree from the Australian National University, had spent six months planning for the burn. This area of the forest had been “intensively surveyed”, he said, taking into account the region’s flora and fauna, cultural heritage as well how much fine fuel was on the ground.  

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