Tree Frog Forestry News

Daily Archives: April 28, 2016

Business & Politics

Stella-Jones Reports 2016 First Quarter Results

Marketwired
April 28, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada

MONTREAL, QUEBEC- – Stella-Jones Inc. (TSX:SJ) (“Stella-Jones” or the “Company”) today announced financial results for its first quarter ended March 31, 2016. “Stella-Jones generated solid operating results in the first quarter. This performance reflects healthy demand from regular replacement and maintenance programs in our core railway tie and utility pole markets, our expanded reach in the residential lumber category, as well as our focus on optimizing network efficiency,” said Brian McManus, President and Chief Executive Officer.

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Canfor and Prince George Nechako Aboriginal Employment and Training Association sign employment agreement

Prince George Citizen
April 27, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

The Prince George Nechako Aboriginal Employment and Training Association signed an agreement with Canfor Wednesday to better match aboriginal residents with career options. “This partnership will provide career opportunities for First Nations applicants, and help Canfor increase our workforce diversity,” said David Calabrigo, Canfor’s senior vice president, in a press release. “We welcome the chance to help our first nations friends succeed and strengthen our relationship with them.” Because Canfor has long been dedicated to helping aboriginal people in forestry occupations, PGNAETA offered its first Spirit of Unity Award to them earlier this year.

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Domtar tops 1Q profit forecasts

Associated Press in The Money Morning
April 28, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States

FORT MILL, S.C. _ Domtar Corp. (UFS) on Thursday reported first-quarter earnings of $4 million. The Fort Mill, South Carolina-based company said it had net income of 6 cents per share. Earnings, adjusted for non-recurring costs, came to 35 cents per share. The results beat Wall Street expectations. The average estimate of five analysts surveyed by Zacks Investment Research was for earnings of 25 cents per share. The paper and packaging maker posted revenue of $1.29 billion in the period, meeting Street forecasts. Domtar shares have increased 13 percent since the beginning of the year. The stock has fallen 3 percent in the last 12 months.

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Composite panel plants awarded for safety records

Woodworking Network
April 27, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States, US West

TUCSON, Ariz. – Fourteen composite panel facilities and one corporation as a whole were recognized for their safety achievements during the Composite Panel Association’s annual spring meeting held last week in Tucson, Arizona. Louisiana-Pacific Corp. received the Safety Innovation Award for its Behavior-Based Safety Observation Program. Awards were also given to participating manufacturing plants with exemplary safety records, including acknowledgments for long-term, annual, safety improvement, and safety achievement. Awards were given to plants with low/less than 277,000 worker-hours per year (Class I) and high/more than 277,000 worker-hours per year (Class II).

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Interfor to demolish Simpson Lumber mill, build warehouses

Business Examiner
April 27, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States, US West

The Simpson Lumber mill in Tacoma, which was built in 2000, could soon be demolished. According to a public notice released by the City of Tacoma Development Services, Interfor is planning to demolish existing buildings at East 11th Street to make way for 1.2 million square feet of office, warehouse and industrial use space split up between two buildings. Building A will be approximately 320,000 square feet with five percent office space and 95 percent warehouse space, and Building B will be 935,000 square feet with three percent office space and 97 percent warehouse space.

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Rise in forestry industry exports observed in Latvia in January-February

The Baltic Course
April 27, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: International

After several months of decline, Latvian forestry industry exports saw an increase in February 2016 with EUR 347.43 million worth of forestry industry products exported during the first two months of 2016 compared to EUR 318.94 million in January-February 2015, informs LETA, according to the information from the Latvian Agriculture Ministry. In January-February 2016, Latvia exported EUR 299.81 million worth of timber and timber products, up 11% year-on-year. During the first two months of 2016, Latvia supplied its forestry products mainly to the UK (17.9%), Sweden (11.8%) and Germany (9.6%). Exports to the UK amounted to EUR 62.07 million, exports to Sweden reached EUR 41.10 million, and exports to Germany were EUR 33.51 million.

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Australian Solar Timbers sheds staff in NSW amid problems with supply

ABC News Australia
April 28, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: International

Hardwood manufacturer Australian Solar Timbers (AST) is letting go of workers at Kempsey on the New South Wales mid-north coast because it cannot secure the timber it needs. Company director Douglas Head said NSW timber contracts gave favourable treatment to competitor, Boral. He said that had created a very difficult business climate for others in the hardwood industry. “This is much wider than AST, this is really about the hardwood industry,” Mr Head said. “It has been divided up into Boral [that] is a corporate, [that] has this contract and every other company including ours does not.

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Foreign Investment Review Board thresholds challenged

The Weekly Times, Australia
April 27, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: International

AUSTRALIA’S forestry sector could be at risk if review thresholds for foreign investment are not returned to their previous levels, the sector warns. The Australian Forest Products Association fears the growing $22 billion industry, which relies heavily on foreign investment, could see future investors put off by recent regulatory changes. AFPA is calling on the Federal Government to revert the Foreign Investment Review Board threshold for agriculture and forestry land, and ­agribusinesses, to $252 million. …AFPA chief executive officer Ross Hampton said the changes could deter
more investment in Australian plantations, 75 per cent of which are
foreign-owned.

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Solution for logs looming as Hobart port considered for export operations

The Mercury
April 27, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: International

NEW log export operations on the Hobart waterfront are being considered as an altern­ative to carting woodchips from southern forest operat­ions to northern ports. It has been 10 months since the Government invited the private sector to come up with a solution to the lack of a woodchip export port in southern Tasmania. Initially, 19 proponents came forward as a result of an expressions of interest process, with 15 invited to submit det­ailed proposals and 10 choosing to submit proposals. Options in the mix included log exports from Macquarie wharf in Hobart, wood products processing and biomass. In State Parliament, Forestry Minister Peter Gutwein said contractual negotiations had begun with four prop­onents offering solutions that could be up and running “within a matter of months”.

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Wood, Paper & Green Building

Paper straw revival: Plastic straws are an endangered species

Vancouver Sun
April 22, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: Canada, Canada West

On March 1, the town of Tofino began a campaign called “Straws Suck” with the intention of getting all local businesses to ban plastic straws by Earth Day, April 22. A couple of days before the deadline, all but three businesses were on board, and even the stragglers were well on their way to complying in time. …Straws are a significant part of the 20 million tonnes of single-use plastics that end up in the ocean each year, according to Surfrider. They are not just unsightly; they are a hazard to sea life, and worse, they introduce toxins into the food chain. …But wasn’t a new development in straw technology until 1888 when an American inventor named Marvin C. Stone was unhappy about the way the grassy taste of his rye straw was affecting the bourbon in his mint julep. He wound a strip of paper around a pencil to make a tube, glued it together, and coated it with wax so the glue wouldn’t dissolve in his drink. And so the paper straw was born.

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The affordable housing dilemma: wood or concrete

Vancouver Sun
April 27, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: Canada, Canada West

One of the arguments for more highrise towers in Vancouver is that it would provide more affordable housing. But there’s a catch: highrises made out of concrete are much more expensive to build than low-rises made out of wood. So building any concrete highrise might make it unaffordable. “It depends on the finish and complexities of construction, but usually a 40-per-cent increase (with concrete) is a safe bet,” said University if B.C. landscape architecture professor Patrick Condon. “I don’t think anybody would debate that one.” ….Stovell said wood is “ideally suited” for four-storey developments. But he said the high price of land downtown forces developers to go as high as they can.

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See-Through Wood to Brighten Buildings

Durability + Design
April 27, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: International

Buildings of the future may utilize a material capable of providing interior spaces with ample amounts of daylighting. Hint: It’s not glass. It’s something called “transparent wood.” Swedish scientists report that they have developed a wood material that allows light to pass through. Potential applications of the technology include solar cells, windows and semi-transparent facades. …“When the lignin is removed, the wood becomes beautifully white,” explained Lars Berglund. “But because wood isn’t naturally transparent, we achieve that effect with some nanoscale tailoring.” To allow light to pass through the wood more directly, the team incorporated a transparent polymer, often known as Plexiglass.

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Forestry

Northern St’at’imc sign “historic” forestry deal

Bridge River Lillooet News
April 27, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

STH Biomass LP (STH) and Stuwix Resources Ltd (Stuwix) have signed a Forest Management Agreement of cooperation that both companies describe as “historic.” The Forest Management Agreement allows Stuwix to help STH manage their forest licences and build capacity within their communities. Stuwix operates within parts of Nlaka’pamux and Silyx territories in the Merritt Timber Supply Area (TSA) and STH Biomass is located within the northern part of the St’at’imc Territory in the Lillooet TSA. Stuwix is a partnership of six Nlaka’pamux and two Sylix communities and has been in operation since 2005. This marks the first time these Nations have come together to address challenges in the local forest industry. The agreement was signed Apr. 20 at T’it’q’et.

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BCIT cherry tree sale is an effort to revive rare varieties

CBC News
April 27, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

It’s a plant sale that has been in the works for six years. A program to save a few rare varieties of cherry trees — put on by the University of British Columbia and the British Columbia Institute of Technology— is culminating on Friday, as more than 300 seedlings are made available to the public. “The one thing about these trees, is you won’t get these types of trees anywhere else,” said BCIT instructor Keith Turner. …”The four that we have are Ojochin, Ito-kukuri, Fudan Zakura, and another one called ‘Pink Perfection,'” said Turner. “I’m not sure these trees actually produce cherries.”

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Alberta’s hot, dry forests face major threat from miniature bugs

Global News
April 27, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

EDMONTON – The battle to protect Alberta’s drought-stricken forests isn’t always being fought where the wildfires burn. Throughout much of the province, the warmer and drier than normal conditions have allowed bug infestations that threaten huge amounts of trees. Many stands of poplar trees stretching from Edmonton to Saskatoon look injured. Large holes in the bark, with sap bleeding out of the wounds are common in especially dry areas. “This is caused by a wood boring insect called saperda, and we’ve seen a lot more of that following these severe droughts,” explained Ted Hogg, a research scientist with Natural Resources Canada. …Saperda are just one of the many tiny, but mighty threats to our dry and weak trees. Increasing average temperatures have helped other bugs as well – and about 25 per cent of Alberta’s forests have been impacted by mountain pine beetles.

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Grant provides new trees to Nanaimo neighbourhoods

Nanaimo News Bulletin
April 27, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

The Nanaimo Old City Association volunteers, with assistance from the City of Nanaimo, planted 50 ornamental plum, cherry, red maple and Katsura trees last weekend. The planting was made possible through a B.C. Hydro re-greening grant awarded to the City of Nanaimo. This will be the fifth grant awarded to the city and neighbourhood groups. The result of these grants has been the addition of more than 200 street trees to south end and Old City neighbourhoods. “Boulevard and street tree plantings enhance the esthetics of a neighbourhood and create an increased sense of community and cohesion,” said Alan Kemp, the city’s urban forestry coordinator, in a press release. END OF STORY

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Nova Scotia home to oldest known pine tree fossils

‘It’s generally not a eureka moment, where you look at it and you know what it is,’ paleontologist says
CBC News
April 27, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

Nova Scotia can lay claim to the oldest known pine tree fossils, which date back to the time of the dinosaurs. The fossils, which measure between seven and 20 millimetres and are approximately 140 million years old, were discovered in a gypsum quarry near Windsor that is operated by Fundy Gypsum. Paleontologist Howard Falcon-Lang of Royal Holloway University of London discovered the fossils in Nova Scotia and brought some back to his office in the U.K. The fossils sat for five years while Falcon-Long worked on other projects. …Falcon-Lang said the fossils, known as Pinus mundayi, are the ancestor of modern pines and may help show why today’s tree is so well adapted to fire.

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Ghost cougar of Nova Scotia still a mystery to Kejimkujik researcher

CBC News
April 27, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada, US West

After 10 years of patiently waiting for Nova Scotia’s ghost cougar to appear, a determined researcher working in the dark forests of Kejimkujik National Park is calling it quits. The elusive cougar has long been a source of intrigue and myth in Nova Scotia, and even inspired an episode of the Trailer Park Boys. But Chris McCarthy’s decade-long quest has failed to turn up any evidence that eastern cougar still roams the big park in western Nova Scotia. “We haven’t had any success in detecting any, and so after a decade we think we’ve put enough effort into it for now,” said McCarthy, the park’s manager of resource conservation.

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Mendocino Redwood Company explains forest practices

by John Anderson, Mendocino Redwood Company
Daily Journal
April 27, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

…With the purchase of LP lands in 1998, MRC ended the use of clearcutting and reduced the harvest rate to below 2.3 percent of standing inventory (see our website for detailed harvest rates at www.hrcllc.com/key?policies/landscapeplanning/. This legacy includes tens of thousands of acres of redwood and Douglas fir forest that are now dominated by tanoak. MRC is committed to restoring these forestlands to the natural balance of conifer and hardwood. …Treating tan oak involves using herbicide (about two cups per acre) that is injected directly into the trunk of tan oak trees, following a cut made in the bark. …Since the inception of MRC, approximately 65,000 acres have been restored to a natural conifer balance by controlling tanoak and planting 8.8 million redwood and Douglas fir seedlings.

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Rim Fire Reforestation Decision

My Mother Lode
April 26, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Sonora, CA — The U.S. Forest Service will post the Final Environmental Impact Statement and Draft Record of Decision (ROD) for Reforestation of the Rim Fire on Friday. The proposed Rim Reforestation project involves treatment for about 42,000 acres within the 2013 Rim Fire area, located on the Groveland and Mi-Wuk Ranger Districts. …“There is going to be reforestation on 21,000 acres, natural regeneration on 4,000 existing acres, plantation thinning on 12,000 acres, nearly 4,000 acres of deer habitat enhancement and noxious weed eradication treatments on nearly 6,000 acres.” She adds that the plan has changed considerably from the draft as the alternatives proposed considerable differences in numbers per acre and different planting patterns.

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Timber execs, county officials slam BLM plan

The News-Review
April 22, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Adopting the latest plan from the Bureau of Land Management could lead to the financial ruin of Douglas County, timber executives and a county official said Thursday. …A rash of layoffs at mills in Josephine and south Douglas County point to the path that the timber industry is on, as well as the communities that rely on that industry, said Steve Swanson, who runs the Glendale-based lumber company Swanson Group. “You’re beating your head against the wall trying to compete for wood outside of your region and hauling it past other existing mills,” he said….Jim Dudley, an executive with Swanson Group who said he has watched the
two sides be at logger heads for 22 of his 25 years of experience in the
industry, said that logging economies along the West Coast have wilted —
and the communities around them have deteriorated without those family
wage jobs.

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Thank you trees: New Hampshire’s growing forests may make winters more mild

Eagle-Tribune
April 28, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

By meteorological standards, weather conditions over the last few winters have been mild. Seasons without harsh temperatures and blankets of snow have become an unexpected reality. But while some experts have looked to global warming for answers, researchers at the University of New Hampshire have another idea. Elizabeth Burakowski, a UNH postdoctoral research associate and visiting scientist at the National Center for Atmospheric Research, has found that reforestation also plays a role in the unseasonable conditions. The study was a years-long effort, and was recently selected for publication in the Journal of Climate. Burakowski and her team found that when a landscape is reforested, it changes the way energy is exchanged between the surface and the atmosphere.

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Forestry criticism unfounded

by a Local forester
Gisborne Herald
April 28, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: International

Re: District needs forestry reduction plan, April 23 letter. This letter was so full of errors that it should be laughable. However I am concerned that some Maori decision-makers (eg, the Waiapu Joint Management Group) might listen to it. Jason says forestry is unsustainable on our roads but it has the opposite effect — hundreds of kilometres of third-rate roads have been upgraded to handle the logging traffic. He says our “rivers cannot sustain this intrusion into the future”. Really? Try reading mpi.govt.nz/document-vault/4064, a 2012 report which says in the Waiapu catchment: “Afforestation has been the most effective mechanism to stabilise actively eroding gullies and to reduce sediment production.”

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Inquest into teen’s forestry death under way

New Zealand Herald
April 28, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: International

An inquest into the forestry death of 19-year-old Eramiha Pairama has begun at Te Uru Taumatua in Taneatua.  The forestry worker was killed in January 2013 when he was struck by a tree while working near Whakatane. Coroner Wallace Bain is seated in front of a priceless Colin McCahon painting that stretches over a wall in Tuhoe’s “living building”. …On January 11, 2013, Mr Pairama had attached approximately 50 stems as part of his job in a forestry block in Sisam’s Valley. He attached what was to be the second to last log of the day and signalled to his hauler driver to pull it up. The log collided with a stump and snapped, striking Mr Pairama in the face and chest.

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Forest Fires

North Shore prepares as B.C. reaches 167 wildfires this year

Global News
April 21, 2016
Category: Forest Fires
Region: Canada, Canada West

With 167 fires already in the 2016 wildfire season, the North Shore Interface Wildfire Working Group showcased how they are preparing themselves in case of a fire. The group showcased some of the equipment such as response vehicles and fire sprinklers. “On the North Shore we actually have an interface wildfire risk, and we every year prepare to be able to respond to that risk,” says Dorit Mason, director of North Shore Emergency Management. A fire is defined as “interface” when it has the potential to involve buildings and wildland or vegetation at the same time.

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APNewsBreak: 2016 wildfire season expected to be less severe

Associated Press in Bonner County Daily Bee
April 27, 2016
Category: Forest Fires
Region: United States

DENVER — The upcoming wildfire season across the U.S. isn’t expected to be as bad as last year’s infernos, when a record 15,800 square miles burned, the nation’s top wildland firefighting official said Wednesday. But parts of the nation should expect a rough season after a warm, dry winter or because of long-term drought, U.S. Forest Service Chief Tom Tidwell said. Southern California, other parts of the Southwest, Alaska and Montana are all vulnerable, he said. “So where we anticipate the severity of the fire season will not be at the same level as last year, we still expect to have some areas that will be really active,” Tidwell said.

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Shenandoah Wildfire Consumes More Than 10,000 Acres

Firefighters from 33 states, Washington, D.C. and Puerto Rico were battling the forest fire
NBC4 Washington
April 27, 2016
Category: Forest Fires
Region: US East, United States

The fire in Virginia’s Shenandoah National Park was still burning 10 days after it began and had spread across more than 10,000 acres by Monday, officials said. More than 350 firefighters from as far as Puerto Rico were working to contain the blaze, the National Park Service said. Hundreds of personnel were using aircraft and ground vehicles to extinguish the fire, which closed portions of the Appalachian Trail and Skyline Drive. The fire was reported around 1:15 p.m. April 16 and had scorched some 70 acres when firefighters first arrived. Flames had consumed more than 2,000 acres by Monday and had doubled in size 24 hours later. The National Park Service said Monday night the fire had spread across 10,376 acres.

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Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy

Your daily coffee habit could contribute to a carbon neutral fuel

Treehugger
April 27, 2016
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: International

50,000 tonnes of coffee grounds will be turned into clean-burning and carbon neutral biomass pellets in the UK this year by the startup Bio-Bean. And founder Arthur Kay dreams of the day when he can power every bus in London with London’s own coffee grounds. Those few spoonfuls of coffee grounds that go into your morning brew don’t seem like much, but when added together with the grounds of all the other people in the city, there’s a virtual mountain of this leftover material created every single day. And while gardeners, worm farmers, and composters are already very receptive to this brown gold, it may soon also catch the eye of those looking for a clean fuel source for a variety of other industries, thanks to the work of companies like Bio-Bean, which is turning this ‘waste’ material into a valuable resource.

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Carbon dioxide fertilization greening Earth, study finds

Press Release from the Goddard Space Flight Center 
Space Ref
April 27, 2016
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: International

From a quarter to half of Earth’s vegetated lands has shown significant greening over the last 35 years largely due to rising levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide, according to a new study published in the journal Nature Climate Change on April 25. An international team of 32 authors from 24 institutions in eight countries led the effort, which involved using satellite data from NASA’s Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer instruments to help determine the leaf area index, or amount of leaf cover, over the planet’s vegetated regions. The greening represents an increase in leaves on plants and trees equivalent in area to two times the continental United States.

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Labor bold on climate change action but meek on forestry

Australian Forest Products Association
April 27, 2016
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: International

The significant role forest, wood and paper product industries can play in achieving emissions reduction targets is seemingly missing from Labor’s Climate Change Action Plan. Chief Executive Officer of the Australian Forest Products Association (AFPA), Mr Ross Hampton said, “As expected Labor’s Climate Change Action Plan sets ambitious climate change targets. This comes as no surprise to us as forest industries have been involved in ongoing conversations with ALP policy makers. What does come as a surprise therefore is the silence thus far from the ALP regarding the huge carbon emission reductions that can be achieved by the forest industries of this country.”

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