Tree Frog Forestry News

Monthly Archives: May 2016

Business & Politics

No word of progress at Canada-U.S. softwood lumber talks in Ottawa

By: Ross Marowits
Canadian Press in the Winnipeg Free Press
May 27, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, United States

MONTREAL – Canadian softwood lumber negotiators held a one-day meeting with their U.S. counterparts in Ottawa this week but there was no report of progress on the contentious trade issue. Alex Lawrence, a spokesman for International Trade Minister Chrystia Freeland, described the meeting, held Thursday, as “an informative exchange.” Officials said they expect talks to resume shortly, but no date has yet been set. The two sides are under pressure to reach a deal before October, a one-year period since the previous agreement expired in which neither side can take punitive actions. …However, CIBC forestry analyst Hamir Patel says time is running out to a deal, noting that the Americans believe a framework has to be found by around June 18 for an agreement to be in place by October, while Canada views June as “more of a checking in” date.

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Canfor Pulp Products Inc. and Licella Fibre Fuels Pty. Ltd. enter into a biofuels-biochemicals joint venture agreement

Canada Newswire press release
May 27, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

VANCOUVER – Licella Fibre Fuels Pty Ltd.  and Canfor Pulp Products Inc. (TSX: CFX), through its subsidiary Canfor Pulp Ltd., have signed an agreement to form a joint-venture under the name “Licella Pulp Joint Venture”. Licella Pulp Joint Venture is a strategic relationship between the two companies that will investigate opportunities to integrate Licella’s unique Catalytic Hydrothermal Reactor (Cat-HTR) upgrading platform into Canfor Pulp’s kraft and mechanical pulp mills to economically convert biomass, including wood residues from Canfor Pulp’s kraft pulping processes, into biocrude oil, to produce next generation biofuels and biochemicals. This additional residue stream refining would allow Canfor Pulp to further optimise their pulp production capacity.

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Locals hope Prince Albert pulp mill will reopen in 2020

Paper Excellence says changes in market conditions could derail plans for opening
CBC News
May 27, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

People in Prince Albert are still hoping their pulp mill will reopen. Ten years ago, Weyerhaeuser closed the Prince Albert Pulp and Paper Mill, costing 700 people their jobs. In 2011, current owner Paper Excellence stepped in and bought the plant, proposing to reopen the pulp side of the mill, while shuttering the paper facility. In a speech to the Prince Albert and District Chamber of Commerce this week, Paper Excellence reiterated its plans to reopen the mill by 2020. However, that will only happen if market conditions are favourable. …Meanwhile, people in Prince Albert say it would be a huge blow if the mill doesn’t reopen.  “It would be a disaster for us,” said Deputy Mayor Don Cody. “We are in negotiations presently with taxes, which is a confidential thing, but it would be devastating if it totally closed and was torn down.”

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Domtar’s award-winning Windsor mill examines the sources of error

MRO Magazine
May 30, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada East, Canada

A worker is tasked to cut some failed bolts on a pressure vessel door. In the process, he cuts his finger and takes five stiches. An investigation determines that this accident was just waiting to happen. In a new approach to understanding the cause of incidents like this, Domtar’s pulp and paper mill in Windsor, Que. is improving its safety programs by adopting a more correct way of understanding the nature of errors. Adapting an approach developed to reduce the number of incidents in the nuclear power industry, called Human Performance Improvement (HPI), the Windsor mill is focusing less on how an incident happens, and more on why. Behind this tactic lies the dawning awareness that individual errors contribute far less to incidents than do organizational weaknesses.

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Resolute FP fined for 2014 workplace injury in Iroquois Falls, Ont.

CBC News
May 27, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada East, Canada

A workplace injury, at the now closed-down paper mill in Iroquois Falls, Ont. has left Resolute Forest Products with a $55,000 fine. It was in October 2014 when an employee suffered hand fractures while working on the winder of a paper machine. The case was before the courts in Timmins, Ont. on Thursday. The Ontario Ministry of Labour investigation found the machine did not have the proper guard in place. Investigators said two other areas on the equipment had pinch points or moving parts, which were also unguarded. Resolute Forest Products pleaded guilty and was fined $55,000 for the workplace accident.

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Indian company offers to buy parent firm of Rumford mill

Kejriwal Group International offers to buy British Columbia-based Catalyst Paper
Portland Press Herald
May 27, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: US East, United States

A paper recycling company from India has expressed interest in buying Catalyst Paper Corp., including its mill in Rumford. Kejriwal Group International, based in Mumbai, has sent a letter to the majority owners of Catalyst, saying it would offer $6 per share for the British Columbia-based company. Kejriwal is affiliated with the company that expressed interest in buying Verso Paper’s Bucksport mill in January 2015. That mill ultimately was closed and sold for scrap. Catalyst’s board of directors said Monday it would evaluate the offer. “(We are) encouraged by KGI’s proposal, which could provide the company with a significant amount of capital, which further enhances and accelerates Catalyst’s planned growth initiatives,” the board said in a statement.

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Power from pellets Drax facilities boost timber industry in Louisiana and Mississippi, port in Baton Rouge

The Advocate
May 27, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: US East, United States

Reducing dependence on fossil fuels has been one of the great issues of the 21st century for businesses and governments. Officials with a British power company think they have an answer to reducing carbon emissions, thanks to wood produced in Louisiana and Mississippi. Officials with Drax Group recently held an open house for their Amite BioEnergy wood pellet plant in Gloster, Mississippi, a little over an hour north of Baton Rouge. The event drew a range of officials, from local county commissioners and legislators, to state forestry leaders. The plant has been in production for several months, and on average, 57 truckloads of wood pellets are heading down the highway, bound for the Port of Greater Baton Rouge. At the port, the pellets are placed in large storage domes until they are transported by ship to the United Kingdom. There, they are used as fuel in power plants, instead of coal.

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Maine Voices: Biomass plays vital role in Maine’s forestry industry

by Josiah Pierce, former president of the Small Woodland Owners of Maine
Portland Press Herald
May 28, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: US East, United States

BALDWIN — When the U.S. Senate passed an energy bill last month, most commentators praised it as an example of compromise between the major parties. But a handful of critics have blasted the bill because of a bipartisan biomass amendment sponsored by Maine’s Susan Collins, a Republican, and co-sponsored by Maine independent Angus King and several of their colleagues. They want it deleted in the upcoming House-Senate conference committee. These critics don’t seem to understand the basics of today’s forest-based economy. …Today, we need to leverage all the potential market opportunities for Maine wood if we are going to preserve our industry and maintain our forestland. This is where biomass and Sens. Collins’ and King’s amendment comes in.

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Pellet prices fall to lowest level since August 2012

EUWID
May 31, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: International

At an average of €228.18/t, end-user prices for A1 pellets in Germany fell in May to their lowest level since August 2012. Year on year, the current level is down by roughly 4.9%, while the decline since the beginning of 2016 is roughly 5.6%. According to the price survey conducted by the Deutscher Energieholz- und Pellet-Verband (DEPV – German Energy Wood and Pellet Association), the price for 6 t of A1 goods, at €224.02/t, is currently lowest in southern Ger-many. The price in central Germany is at €227.42/t and in northern and eastern Germany at €235.32/t.

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Wood, Paper & Green Building

This Canadian passive house factory was built from its own prefab wood panels

Inhabitat
May 27, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: Canada

The Passive House Factory in British Columbia is the functioning embodiment of the very ideals that it is promoting. The factory was made from the same prefabricated wood it produces for other eco-friendly buildings. This meta maneuver was brought to life by Hemsworth Architecture, whose expert design helped to create the first facility of its kind in North America. Screens made from two-by-fours make up the building’s facade, with each side featuring unique spacing between the wood to accommodate its relation to the sun. The firm stated, “The two-by-fours were prefabbed into screens and left unfinished to naturally weather over time.”

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Is steel, wood or concrete the most ‘green’ building material?

TVO.org
May 30, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: Canada East, Canada

If the fairy tale of the Three Little Pigs were written today, the pigs’ homes would likely be built not out of straw, branches and bricks, but instead out of wood, steel and concrete. And the porky trio would be imperiled not by a big bad wolf, but by environmental cataclysm. Any child reading the original story could tell you immediately that sticks and straw wouldn’t ever offer lupine stopping power, and that bricks were the obvious choice from the get-go. But it gets more complicated for modern builders trying to select materials based on what might save their ecological bacon. Advocates for all three major construction materials lay claim to certain environmental merits.

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Downtown Eugene’s next big office building to rise this summer

The Register-Guard
May 29, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: United States, US West

Architects Greg Brokaw and John Rowell and business owner Kaz Oveissi are close to breaking ground on a significant new building in downtown Eugene. But this isn’t the controversial on-hold proposal to build an apartment and retail building on Broadway Plaza, the city-owned public space known better as Kesey Square. …The building’s exterior will be made of traditional metal and cement. But the group plans to build the floors with cross-laminated timber beams, a growing trend in construction. The beams are made from layers of wood glued together, similar to traditional laminated beams but larger and stronger. It’s the same material Springfield officials hope to use for a proposed city-owned parking garage in the Glenwood area. “We’ll be the first (cross-laminated timber) building, I believe, in Eugene-Springfield,” Brokaw said.

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$1.5 million tall timber buildings research grant awarded

Manufacturers’ Monthly
May 31, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: International

Hyne Timber, in partnership with the University of Queensland, has welcomed the announcement of more than $1.5 million funding for tall timber buildings research. The funding announcement by the Australian Research Council is particularly timely given the recent changes to the National Construction Code enabling timber construction up to eight storeys in height. Hyne Timber’s CEO Jon Kleinschmidt said the benefits of using timber in tall building construction is well known in other parts of the world and social barriers in Australia need to be addressed, “Further to the significant sustainable resource benefit, enhanced performance, ease, speed and reduced costs associated with timber construction makes timber an obvious construction material of first choice.

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Wooden Skyscrapers? A New Market Rising In Eiffel’s Iron Shadow

France has long been an innovator in building materials, from the steel spledor of the Eiffel Tower to concrete to suprisingly resistant wood.
World Crunch
May 27, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: International


PARIS — Canadian architect Michael Green thinks the sky’s the limit for buildings made with wood. And it was in Paris, with a project called the Baobab Tower, that the “high priest” of wooden high-rises hoped to prove it. Controversy surrounding the Tour Triangle (Triangle Tower), a conventional skyscraper planned for the French capital, ended up killing Green’s 35-story (120-meter) project — at least for now. Paul Jarquin of the company REI France, which collaborated on the Baobab Tower plan along with an architecture firm called DVVD, insists the project has only been postponed. Even if the Baobab blueprints don’t, in the end, amount to anything, the idea behind them — that wood can be used instead of steel and concrete to construct multi-story structures — is making serious inroads around the world.

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Forestry

Forest industry joins CCFM on skills award for Aboriginal youth

Forest Products Association of Canada
May 30, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada

The Forest Products Association of Canada (FPAC) is proud to join the Canadian Council of Forest Ministers (CCFM) to open up nominations for two Skills Awards for Aboriginal Youth as part of an effort to encourage more Aboriginal workers to consider careers in the forest sector. FPAC started handing out an annual skills award to a young Aboriginal person in 2012. In 2015, thanks to a new partnership with the CCFM, two awards were handed out and that will continue this year. …“The forest products industry has been working with Aboriginal communities as our neighbours and partners for many years, and we intend to work even more closely in the coming years,” said Derek Nighbor, CEO of FPAC. “I think we all recognize the importance of our sector and our forests to the environment and to our communities.”

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Huge forest along Manitoba-Ontario border moves closer to UNESCO recognition

Canadian Press in The Coast Reporter
May 27, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada

WINNIPEG – A vast stretch of boreal forest along the Manitoba-Ontario boundary moved one step closer to international recognition Friday, as two UNESCO advisory bodies recommended Pimachiowin Aki be deemed a world heritage site. The federal, Manitoba and Ontario governments have put up millions of dollars over the past decade in the attempt to secure the designation for Pimachiowin Aki — an Ojibwa phrase that translates as “the land that gives life.” The effort was dealt a setback in 2013, when the same UNESCO advisory groups said it was unclear whether the area — a relatively untouched stretch of forest half the size of New Brunswick — is unique. The governments submitted a reworked bid with more information about the ties between the area’s indigenous inhabitants and the land, and the advisory groups have recommended the bid be given final approval at a meeting of the UNESCO world heritage committee in Turkey in July.

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5 things to know about forest tent caterpillars

Entomologist Taz Stuart says 500M moths may emerge in July
CBC News
May 31, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Forest tent caterpillars are munching their way through Winnipeg, feeding on the leafy canopy of trees. Forest tent caterpillars typically infest the city once every 10 to 15 years, but when an infestation hits, it can last two to three years. City crews started spraying against the caterpillars two weeks ago. There are likely more of the wriggling insect around the city than most people would expect, Taz Stuart, entomologist and director of technical operations at Poulin’s Pest Control Services, said. He Tweeted on Monday that if each tree has 100 forest tent caterpillars and there are 5 million trees, 500 million adult moths will emerge in July.

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‘Very dry’ drought rating for Vancouver Island; reservoir cushions Victoria

By Amy Smart
Victoria Times Colonist
May 30, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

The province is urging Vancouver Islanders and Gulf Islanders to conserve water, as most rivers and streams are experiencing very low flows, although Greater Victoria’s large reservoir puts the region in better shape. Wth a “very dry” Level 3 drought declared, the province is calling for a voluntary water-use reduction of 30 per cent by all municipal, agricultural and industrial users, except those supported by reservoirs or lake storage. The region will experience significant water supply shortages this year, unless there is substantial rainfall in June, the Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations said. Vancouver Island and the Gulf Islands were the driest regions in the province Monday.

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Protected B.C. caribou herd welcomes 11 new calves

First Nations conservation program brings herd back from the brink
CBC News
May 27, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Once hundreds of animals strong, the Klinse-Za caribou herd of northeastern B.C. had only 16 members in 2013. Now, thanks to the conservation efforts of local First Nations, the birth of 11 new calves brings that number up to 61. Now in its third year, a program spearheaded by the West Moberly and Saulteau First Nations captures pregnant female caribou and allows them to raise their calves in a protected environment free of predators before eventually releasing them. …The herd has historically spent its winters high in the mountains, where wolves have trouble getting to them. But new logging roads now give wolves easy access to the caribou’s former sanctuary. He said the program’s success is encouraging but not enough on its own — and neither is the province’s wolf cull program. He says the only long-term solution is habitat protection.

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New community forest award honours life of Robin Hood

Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations
BC Government
May 28, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Robin Hood from Likely, B.C. may not have been from Nottingham but his legend for those involved in the province’s community forests is as big as the heart he had for the communities in which he worked. Last night, Minister of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations Steve Thomson announced the creation of a new $10,000 grant to be given annually to the community forest that best exemplifies the values exhibited by the late Robin Hood and the community forest program. These values include community leadership, providing local and social economic opportunity and passion for community forestry. Thomson made the announcement at the 14th annual BC Community Forests Association convention.

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Pest that kills Hemlock trees on its way

Simcoe Reformer
May 27, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

A bug that sucks the sap out of trees and leaves them dead is the latest threat to Norfolk County’s forests, warns a biologist.  The Hemlock wooly adelgid is in the Niagara Region and is probably headed this way, said Gregor Beck, director of Ontario programs for Bird Studies Canada. The pest is capable of killing off large swaths of Hemlock trees – the type of tree that lines streams and ravines in Norfolk and provides habitat for a variety of threatened birds, said Beck. “These Hemlocks are really a critical part of the Carolinian habitat,” he said. “We are watching for this one. We know it’s close.” If Norfolk loses its Hemlock trees, it will add to the growing problem of habitat loss for birds in Canada. A report released earlier this month following a study of bird populations in North America concludes that more than one-third of species are at risk of extinction.

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Mercury contamination at Grassy Narrows First Nation can be cleaned up, scientists tell government, again

Evidence points to new sources of contamination of fish and water, research scientist John Rudd says
CBC News
May 30, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

It is feasible to clean up some of the decades-old mercury contamination in Ontario’s English-Wabigoon River system near Grassy Narrows First Nation, according to new research by three experts in the field. Reed Paper in Dryden, Ont., dumped chemicals in the river in the 1960s and early 1970s, resulting in mercury poisoning among First Nations people who ate fish caught in the area. The possibility of remediation was first studied in the 1980s by a government research team that included John Rudd. He’s the lead author of the new research commissioned by Grassy Narrows First Nation and released on Monday. “It has been frustrating,” Rudd said. “We made these recommendations in the 1980s and our report was put on the shelf.”

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County leading in managing sustainable forests

The Daily Observer
May 27, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

Renfrew County is taking the lead when it comes to managing sustainable forests, an industry expert reaffirmed Wednesday. Rob Keen, chief executive officer of Forests Ontario, credited the county with its support of the forestry sector but readily admitted most residents around the province do not appreciate how critical logging is to Ontario. “We have a lack of knowledge of how well we manage our forests,” said Keen revealing that a recent poll showed that 62 per cent of Ontarians either were unaware or had no opinion about the forest industry. Forests Ontario, a non-profit charity that act as voice for the province’s forests by supporting forest restoration, stewardship, education and awareness, is leading an initiative called “It Takes A Forest.”

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The Trees are Growing Every Day

by Paul R. McKenzie, lands and resource manager at F.H. Stoltze Land & Lumber Co
Flathead Beacon
May 26, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West


To borrow the words of a good friend, our National Forests are like a big sandbox and we all need to figure out how to play together in it. Finding a balance between protecting the ecological functions of our forests and the ever growing demands placed on them by a burgeoning human population requires hard work and hard decisions. That is the difficult role of the conservationist. That is the challenging work that local collaboratives in Montana and many other states are not shying away from. I truly believe it is not the ownership of the land that is the problem, but rather the quagmire of conflicting bureaucratic processes we have established over the last 100 years that is to blame for the condition of benign neglect we see on so many of our public lands today. The process problem likely has no local solution.

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Recreating forests of the past isn’t enough to fix our wildfire problems

Stephen Pyne, Regents Professor in the School of Life Sciences, Arizona State University
The Conversation
May 27, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

There is general agreement that America’s landscapes, certainly its wildlands, are out of whack with their fires. Wildfires are bigger, hotter, more savage and more expensive than in the past. There is wide agreement, too, that America’s deeper fire problem is not that malignant megafires are crashing into our communities. Instead, it’s that we’ve lost the older benign versions of fire that once washed over and benefited our ecosystems. Surely, the thinking goes, restoring fire’s former regimes would quell the outbursts and bolster forests’ ecological resilience to multiple threats. But active restoration has proved trickier, more controversial, and more limited than advocates assumed. It works, but not everywhere, and not everyone wants it.

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Oregon Timber Grower Complains Of Helicopter Herbicide Spraying

Oregon Public Broadcasting
May 27, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Peter and Pam Hayes’s claim about herbicide exposure in the forest of the Oregon Coast Range begins the same way as most from the news in recent years. On May 17, they and two others were out tending their property. They heard a helicopter in the distance and thought little of it. Then, they say, they began to smell and taste chemicals. “The helicopter was not over me. It was not droplets. It was just a super strong, strong taste,” Pam said. Both are familiar with the idea of aerial spraying. Pam and her husband, Peter Hayes, are fifth generation loggers and the owners of Hyla Woods in Washington County. Peter is a former member of the Oregon Board of Forestry. He’s also become an advocate for more environmentally friendly logging practices, including the elimination of herbicides.

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Working forests need balanced management

Letter by Michael D. Jackson
The Olympian
May 27, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Voters should keep in mind the importance of temperance and balance with the next elected lands commissioner. I would like to remind our community of the importance of working forests and how important striking a balance between the economy and environment is when it comes to forest management. I work as a forester for Professional Forestry Services, Inc., which manages forestland for private timber landowners. These landowners provide sustainable and environmentally sensitive forest management, certified in many cases by American Tree Farm. …As the economic driver in rural communities, private forest management not only protects the environment but also provides economic
opportunity for many rural families.

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A cut above: For Sandhills logging crews, business is booming

The Fayetteville Observer
May 27, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

A”perfect storm” of weather, economy and consumer demand has sparked a logging boom in the Cape Fear region. “If you’ve been driving out in the country lately, you know there’s been an increase in logging activity,” said Harnett County Forestry Service ranger Buren Fulmer. “It’s been busier in our county than in the past few years, for a bunch of reasons. I imagine you’ll see the same thing elsewhere.” In Cumberland County, forestry ranger Craig Gottfried said “we’ve been busy all winter, and it hasn’t slowed down yet.” A gap-toothed landscape across the region indicates logging has seen a notable uptick this year. From the swamp loggers sloshing through the remnants of winter’s excess rain in Bladen and Columbus counties to crews clearing a path for what will be Interstate 295, it’s a tough time to be a tree in the Cape Fear region.

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Maine’s forest products industry is in freefall, but there’s another use for these woods

by Richard Jagels, emeritus professor of forest resources at the University of Maine
Bangor Daily News
May 30, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

…Coal may be the perishing enterprise in states such as West Virginia and Kentucky, but Maine has its own declining industry. The raft of paper mill closures we have seen in the past few years are the latest signs of a long-suffering wood products industry in Maine. When I began my career as a forest biologist and wood scientist at the University of Maine more than 35 years ago, Maine still had a healthy diversified wood products industry, and this was reflected in a robust enrollment of students in our forestry and wood products programs. …I grieve for the loss of much of Maine’s wood products industry, as well
as the loss of the wood science program that was an integral part of my
professional career. But hoping for a return to the past will not
improve our future. While the wood science program was declining at
UMaine, the forest recreation program was expanding — a portent of the
future.

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Is This the Future of Small-Scale Forestry in Maine?

Bangor Daily News
May 28, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

…While browsing videos of harvests online, I kept coming across these strange logging systems utilizing ATVs with a forwarding trailer equipped with a hydraulic crane. Conspicuously, almost all of these videos were coming out of Sweden, Finland, and the Czech Republic. I viewed the system at first with great skepticism, seeing it as a set-up that would have severe operational limitations, but the more I watched, the more impressed and fascinated I became. Able to be fitted to wheeled or tracked ATVs, tractors, or bulldozers, these trailers are extremely modular and adaptable to whatever conditions the forest may present. Indeed, a trove of videos and images exist of these systems harvesting in snow and on hillsides and performing a variety of different silvicultural operations ranging from commercial thinnings of plantations to the harvesting of higher-grade hardwood.

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Coalition funds for forestry research

AAP in 9News.com.au
May 31, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: International

A re-elected coalition government will pour money into research underpinning the forestry industry, with a $4 million pledge for centres at Launceston and Mount Gambier. The Tasmanian government has already stumped up its dollar-for-dollar commitment to the deal which also requires an investment by industry to form the $12 million National Institute for Forest Products Innovation. “Each research hub will investigate innovation in areas such as forest management, timber processing, wood fibre recovery, advanced manufacturing and the bio-economy,” assistant agriculture minister Senator Anne Ruston said on Tuesday while visiting Tasmania. END OF STORY

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Illegal Logging Is Bigger Than You Think

Bangor Daily News
May 30, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: International

Illegal logging is definitely bigger than I thought, at least. When I wrote last December about the outsourcing of Maine’s paper industry, I mentioned that some illegal timber is making its way into China’s paper mills from places like Burma and the Democratic Republic of the Congo. What I didn’t get into, however, was how pervasive the illegal timber trade is worldwide. Looking at the kind of illegal logging that happens in Maine—where every once in a while someone cuts down the wrong trees and has to pay a fine—it might be hard to imagine how it could be such a major problem. It turns out that, according to Interpol, the illegal logging industry was worth an estimated $30 billion globally in 2012. That was slightly more than a quarter of the legitimate global logging industry’s value of around $115 billion that year.

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Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy

Emissions change promises to spur forestry

New Zealand Herald
May 28, 2016
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: International

The price of a tonne of New Zealand carbon in the emissions trading scheme has pushed through $15, in theory creating break-even conditions for forestry planting based on carbon farming. In the Budget this week, Climate Change Minister Paula Bennett confirmed a widely expected cancellation of subsidies to major emitters over the next three years. The cancellation immediately improves the prospects of a higher carbon price. A price from $15 a tonne starts to make carbon capture through forest planting commercially viable. The carbon price collapsed from a high point of $21 in 2011 to trade as low as 35c a tonne in 2014 as cheap eastern European carbon units flooded global markets which were already reducing emissions due to lower industrial activity after the 2008 global financial crisis.

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Forest Fires

Crews gain ground on Fort McMurray wildfire, just days before re-entry

660 News
May 30, 2016
Category: Forest Fires
Region: Canada, Canada West

Many Fort McMurray evacuees are packing their bags and loading up on enough groceries to last at least two weeks. They’re just days away from Mounties opening the barriers to the city for the phased re-entry. Meanwhile, it appears crews are gaining some ground against the raging wildfire that forced residents out. There’s moisture in the air and more back-up crews coming to help douse the flames. The province expects firefighting conditions to improve with cooler temperatures and rain in the forecast. The blaze slightly decreased in size over the weekend, it’s now covering 579,946 hectares. With the first phase of re-entry slated for Wednesday, local government says it’s on track to welcome back evacuees. In a message posted Sunday night, the Regional Municipality of Wood Buffalo also confirmed the wildfire-ravaged areas on the community’s west side are being closely monitored.

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Wet weather dampens forest fire situation

TB Newswatch
May 30, 2016
Category: Forest Fires
Region: Canada East, Canada


THUNDER BAY – The restricted fire zone that covers much of Northwestern Ontario remains, but that may be re-evaluated following a damp and cool weekend. No new forest fires were reported Sunday in the Northwest region. The wet and cool weather also allowed the forest fire hazard rating to drop to low in many areas. Despite that, a major wild fire near Red Lake remains out of control and 40 firefighters from British Columbia have been brought in to help battle the blaze. Meanwhile, a fire burning near Geraldton airport is now listed as being held.

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One fire still active in North Bay area

The forest fire hazard is low to high across the region.
Bay Today
May 30, 2016
Category: Forest Fires
Region: Canada East, Canada

There is one active fire in the North Bay region as the the Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry reports North Bay 8 is considered under control at 0.8 of a hectare. There were no new fires in the Northeast Region by the afternoon of May 29. The forest fire hazard is low to high across the region. …Ontario provides firefighting resources outside of the province, and when needed brings in resources from other provinces, the territories or the United States. Firefighting resources in Canada, including personnel, aircraft and equipment, are shared through formal agreement and coordinated by the Canadian Interagency Forest Fire Center in Winnipeg.

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Northwestern Ontario continues to be restricted fire zone

CBC News
May 30, 2016
Category: Forest Fires
Region: Canada East, Canada

A restricted fire zone remains in effect across much of northwestern Ontario, but the Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry will reassess the situation on May 30 to examine the potential for lifting the ban.  There were no new fires confirmed by the afternoon of May 29 in the Northwest Region. Widespread rain fell across the area May 28 and 29, which helped to keep all the ongoing forest fires in check. The fire hazard is now considered low across the region.

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Time to replace P.E.I.’s aging fleet of forest fire trucks?

Oldest vehicle still in use dates from disco era, all trucks will soon qualify as antiques
CBC News
May 31, 2016
Category: Forest Fires
Region: Canada East, Canada

…But here’s something from 1979 that never went away: it’s a three-axle Chevrolet tanker truck still called upon to help workers with the P.E.I. forestry department put out forest fires. The ’79 Chevy is the oldest of a fleet of six vehicles with an average age of 30. That’s old enough to qualify as an antique under P.E.I.’s Highway Traffic Act. The newest truck in P.E.I.’s forest-fire fleet is a 1991 model. The other four trucks date from the 1980s. Most of the vehicles are four-wheel drive tanker trucks, designed to be able to go places conventional fire trucks can’t. According to officials, they’re called upon an average of about 25 times a year.

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Douglas County Residents Tour Stouts Creek 9 Months After Devastating Fire

KEZI.com
May 26, 2016
Category: Forest Fires
Region: United States, US West

STOUTS CREEK, Ore. — Concerned citizens and some current and former land management workers toured the Stouts Creek area on Thursday, just 9 months after a fire wiped out over 26,000 acres of forest land in the area. Javier Goirigolzarri, the Executive Director of Communities for Healthy Forests, says, “We wanted to bring folks out that were interested in seeing what happened here last year, to see what the plans are for the land management agencies and the companies going forward from here; what they expect to accomplish here in the future, and to have the discussion about what we ought to be doing.”  Those discussions flowed once the group got to the burned area. County Commissioner Chris Boice and some of the land management officials talked about harvesting public lands and using that money to benefit the county.

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General

Wood first policy in Tasmanian the first of its kind in Australia

Architecture and Design
May 29, 2016
Category: Uncategorized

Tasmania is developing a new policy that will require wood to be considered as the first-choice construction material during the initial stages of public building projects. Making this announcement, State Treasurer Peter Gutwein said that Tasmania will be the first state in Australia to develop a wood encouragement policy, following recent changes to the National Construction Code that allow for timber products such as CLT to be utilised in more construction projects. The policy requires responsibly sourced wood to be considered, where feasible, in all new-build and refurbishment projects. Welcoming the announcement, Planet Ark CEO Paul Klymenko commented that responsibly sourced, certified wood delivered significant positive environmental outcomes to the building project…

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