Tree Frog Forestry News

Daily Archives: May 2, 2016

Special Feature

Forest products industry launches “30 by 30” climate change challenge

Forest Products Association of Canada
May 2, 2016
Category: Special Feature
Region: Canada

May 2, 2016-OTTAWA: The Canadian forest products industry is pledging to help Canada move to a low-carbon economy by removing 30 megatonnes (MT) of CO2 per year by 2030 — more than 13% of the Canadian government’s emissions target. The “30 by 30” Climate Change Challenge was issued today by the Forest Products Association of Canada (FPAC), making the forest sector the first to voluntarily contribute to the federal government’s climate goals. Canada has signed the Paris agreement on climate change and is now promising to reduce emissions by 30%, the equivalent of cutting 225 MT of CO2 a year by 2030. The forest sector has a solid record of reducing greenhouse gases from its manufacturing processes. Since 1990 for example, Canada’s pulp and paper industry has reduced GHG emissions by about 66%. “Our industry is uniquely positioned to be a crucial part of the solution to climate change because our renewable forests and forest products all store carbon,” says Derek Nighbor, the CEO of FPAC.

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Business & Politics

Growing industry shows at Interior Logging Association

Vernon Morning Star
May 1, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

Forestry’s critical role in the economy will be on display for the entire region to see. The Interior Logging Association’s 58th annual conference and trade show runs Thursday to Saturday. “This is one of the largest conventions we’ve had since the downturn six years ago,” said Wayne Lintott, general manager. Large crowds are expected for the inside and outside displays at Kal Tire Place Friday from 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Saturday from 9:30 a.m. to 4:30 a.m. “We are over and above what we had last year,” said Lintott of the 36 companies, including 12 new ones, covering one to eight spaces. “Finning has gone from six to eight spots and Southstar Equipment has gone from four to eight. Dealer participation is strong.”

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International Paper to buy Weyerhaeuser’s pulp unit for $2.2-billion

Reuters in Globe and Mail
May 2, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States

Pulp and paper company International Paper Co will buy the pulp business of real estate investment trust Weyerhaeuser Co for $2.2-billion (U.S.) in cash. International Paper said it would buy five pulp mills in Mississippi, Georgia, North Carolina, and Canada’s Alberta and two converting facilities in Mississippi and Poland. The mills produce pulp for a number of consumer products including diapers, hygiene products, tissue and textiles. The deal is part of a strategic review announced by Weyerhaeuser in November when it said it would buy Plum Creek Timber Co Inc to create the largest timber, land and forest products company in the United States. International Paper said on Monday that the deal includes a tax benefit with an estimated net present value of about $300-million from the purchase of assets.

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Weyerhaeuser to sell Cellulose Fibers pulp mills to International Paper for $2.2 billion in cash

Strategic review of liquid packaging and publishing papers facilities is ongoing
PR Newswire
May 2, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States

FEDERAL WAY, Wash., — Weyerhaeuser Company (NYSE: WY) today announced an agreement to sell its Cellulose Fibers pulp mills to International Paper for $2.2 billion in cash. Weyerhaeuser expects to use a substantial portion of the estimated $1.6 billion after-tax proceeds for repayment of term loans issued in conjunction with the company’s previously announced $2.5 billion share repurchase program. The transaction includes five pulp mills located in Columbus, Miss.; Flint River, Ga.; New Bern, N.C., Port Wentworth, Ga. and Grande Prairie, Alberta, with a combined total capacity of nearly 1.9 million metric tons. The sale also includes two modified fiber mills in Columbus, Miss. and Gdansk, Poland. The announcement completes the first phase of the company’s strategic review of the Cellulose Fibers business.

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BLM Sells Over 13,000 Board Feet of Timber in Linn County

The Salem News
April 29, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States, US West

(SALEM, Ore.) – Approximately 13,308 board feet (MBF) of timber was offered for sale at oral auction by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM), Salem District, on Wednesday, April 27, 2016. The Bent Beekman Timber Sale (4,495 MBF), located 20 miles southeast of the town of Scio, in Linn County, was purchased by Freres Lumber Company Inc. for the bid price of $1,739,348. There were three other bidders on the parcel. The Roaring Toads Timber Sale (8,813 MBF), located 16 miles southeast of the town of Scio, in Linn County, was purchased by Freres Lumber Company Inc, for the bid price of $2,031,858. There were no other bidders on this sale. END OF STORY

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New Industry: Complaints about Chinese-owned pulp mill are off the mark

Texarkana Gazette
April 28, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: US East, United States

Big news just about an hour away from the Twin Cities. This week, Sun Paper announced plans for a $1 billion mill to be built in Arkadelphia, Ark., just up Interstate 30 from here. As always, though, there are those with something negative to say. Especially in online comments on news stories and in social media. The biggest complaint is that Sun Paper is a Chinese company. Why wasn’t this an American company, some ask. Also, the new plant comes with a nice package of tax incentives, grants and loans. Why isn’t that money going to an American company, the same folks grumble. The fact is any new business, American-owned or otherwise, can get incentives. That’s just the way business is done these days. And why a Chinese company? Because they are the ones who wanted to build a new plant. Simple as that.

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Pulp mill for Clark County a long time coming, took a lot of work

Northwest Arkansas Democrat Gazette
May 1, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: US East, United States

That second side was added to Hughes’ business cards as part of a nearly five-year effort to attract Shandong Sun Paper Industry Joint Stock Co. to Clark County. Sun Paper announced plans last week to build a $1 billion pulp mill near Arkadelphia. The announcement came during a news conference with Gov. Asa Hutchinson, Arkansas Economic Development Commission Executive Director Mike Preston and others. Depending on who is laying out the timeline, efforts to draw Sun Paper to the state began as far back as 2011. Hughes began serving as head of the economic development organization’s board too late to make a trip with then-Gov. Mike Beebe and a delegation from the state and county. Still, Hughes was what he describes as “intimately” involved in securing a project that will provide 250 jobs at the plant, plus another 2,000 construction jobs over the nearly three years it will take to build the mill.

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Oji, Sumitomo Forestry complete Myanmar sawmill

Nikkei Asian Review
April 30, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: International

MAWLAMYINE, Myanmar — Oji Holdings and Sumitomo Forestry held a ceremony Friday to mark the completion of a lumber mill here, reportedly the first investment in Myanmar’s lumber industry by a Japanese company since the country started undergoing democratic reforms in 2011. The mill in southeastern Myanmar can process 8,000 cu. meters of lumber annually. It will convert locally grown rubber trees into products for making furniture and construction materials, with those products to be exported to Japan and China. The plan is to double capacity in or after fiscal 2017, Oji Forest & Products President Hironobu Ohara said at the ceremony.

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Wood, Paper & Green Building

Wood Skyscrapers Are the Gorgeous, World-Saving Future of Urban Skylines

The construction industry desperately needs a natural-look makeover.
Inverse
April 30, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: United States

The skyscrapers that populate the world’s cityscapes are iconically, indelibly, and undeniably built from concrete and steel. But what if they weren’t? Some architects are leading the charge to get back to nature and embrace the best construction material on Earth: wood. Proponents argue that wood skyscrapers will be safer and more beautiful than their forebears. More importantly, they could save the world. Concrete and steel are staples of architecture rooted in cheap oil. They are enormously energy-intensive to produce, accounting for nearly 11 percent of greenhouse gas emissions and a carbon footprint essentially equal in size to that of all cars and trucks. Runaway climate change is the unintended (but now well understood) consequence of building cities with concrete and steel, and time is running out to radically change how we construct our environments, or face a crisis of unimaginable magnitude.

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MAD’s sinuous Harbin Opera House photographed in the snow by Iwan Baan

DeZeen
April 28, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: International

These new images by Dutch photographer Iwan Baan offer a look at the MAD-designed Harbin Opera House in China after heavy snowfall (+ slideshow). The huge cultural building features a three-petalled plan that encompasses two concert halls and a large public plaza. Externally, it boasts sinuous curves created from smooth white aluminium panels and glass, while its interior features a towering block of sculpted Manchurian ash wood and undulating concrete surfaces. Harbin Opera House is the first and largest building that Beijing-based MAD has designed as part of Harbin Cultural Island, a major new arts complex among the wetlands of the Songhua River.

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Forestry

Ecoforestry Institute Society seeks to close deal for Wildwood Ecoforest

Nanaimo News Bulletin
April 29, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Ecoforestry Institute Society is close to gaining possession of Wildwood Ecoforest. The 31-hectare site in Cedar was sold by late sustainable logging pioneer Merve Wilkinson to The Land Conservancy in 2000 with the expectation it would remain in the public domain, but the conservancy is looking to sell, due to multimillion-dollar debt. The non-profit society reached a deal with the conservancy in November for close to $900,000, which will require B.C. Supreme Court approval. Kathy Code, society spokeswoman, said that could come on June 16.

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OSU library offers forests exhibit

Corvallis Gazette-Times
April 29, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Oregon State has opened a forests exhibit at the Valley Library. The exhibit, called “Heartwood” Inquiry and Engagement with Pacific Northwest Forests,” is showing on the fifth floor in the Special Collections and Archives Gallery through October. Two threads run through the exhibit. One features the ways that people engage with forests: as habitat, provider, sanctuary, studio, laboratory and classroom. The other is how those engagements have evolved over time. The exhibit features historic forest policy and management documents and maps, photographs, art and poetry as well as other materials.

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Forest Service Approves Habitat Destruction in Sierra Nevada Roadless Area

Decision Allows Post-fire Logging in Habitat Occupied by Rare West Coast Fishers
Center for Biological Diversity
April 29, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

FRESNO, Calif.— The U.S. Forest Service this week issued a decision approving more than 1,000 acres of post-fire logging in a roadless area in the Sierra National Forest that U.S. Forest Service surveys, conducted post-fire, show to be occupied by rare West Coast fishers (Pekania pennanti). The Forest Service’s decision to log the area comes just weeks after the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service denied protections to West Coast fisher populations under the Endangered Species Act. Instead of listing the species, the Fish and Wildlife Service bowed to pressure from the timber industry and withdrew its 2014 proposal — a proposal that had recommended protecting fishers on the basis of overwhelming scientific evidence showing threats to their survival from logging, toxic chemicals used by illegal marijuana growers and other factors such as climate change. 

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Why is state selling a forest without competitive bids?

The 82,450 acres of timberland being sold in the Elliott may be worth $300 million to more than $400 million, but no one knows.
Statesman Journal
April 30, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

In August 2015, the Oregon Land Board — Gov. Kate Brown, Secretary of State Jeanne Atkins and Treasurer Ted Wheeler — voted to sell roughly 82,450 acres of “Common School Trust Lands” within the Elliott State Forest because the state was losing money on those lands. Under Oregon law, School Trust Lands are supposed to make money for schools. Given the ongoing losses, the board reached the correct decision. Unfortunately, the sale protocol adopted by the Board is bizarre. The board will establish a price for the land based on appraisals, and that will be the only price accepted. If you dare to offer $1 more, your offer will be declared “non-responsive.” How can this make sense when Trust Lands serve an as an endowment for public schools?

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Officials raise concerns about threats to Iowa trees

Associated Press in The Eagle
April 30, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

BURLINGTON, Iowa (AP) — City officials in Burlington are concerned about the city’s trees following a wave of plant diseases and unusually wet weather in recent years that has loosened the soil’s grip on root systems. Many of the trees have no natural immunity to the diseases. City crews and Burlington’s nine private tree services are busy removing trees that have succumbed to disease or fallen because of storms, according to the Hawk Eye in Burlington. Parks Superintendent Ryan Gourley said he believes ash trees will eventually disappear from the area because of diseases. The city had 54 mature ash trees in its parks before the ash disease hit, and now has only 17.

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Lt. Gov. Mallott talks mines, Tongass timber, budget

KRBD
April 29, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Lt. Gov. Byron Mallott visited Prince of Wales Island and Ketchikan this week. He stopped in at KRBD to talk about his visit to the big island, issues facing the state and what he called his “weird” job. …Among the concerns he heard from POW residents was the issue of timber availability, and the recent announcement that Viking Lumber might close in the next year. Mallott said the state can only do so much to make its own land available for logging. The problem, he said, is litigation that delays or stops federal timber sales and other projects, such as the Shelter Cove Road. That’s a state project, but it requires a federal easement that recently was challenged in court by five environmental groups. Mallott said the constant litigation from national groups is “unconscionable” because it keeps small communities from having a viable economy.

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We should celebrate Arbor Day every day of the year

By Kurt S. Pregitzer, Dean of the College of Natural Resources at the University of Idaho
Idaho Statesman
April 29, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Around this time each year we celebrate our outdoor world and natural environment. From Arbor Day to Earth Day, I am reminded why Idaho’s natural resources are a keystone to our history and our future. Our forests are important not just this time of year, but to us all at any given moment in time. They provide clean water we drink and clean air we breathe. They sequester carbon in our atmosphere and provide building materials that store carbon over time. They provide habitat for our fish and wildlife and recreational opportunities from hiking to hunting and biking to bird-watching.

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Emerald ash borer leaving its mark

My Citizens News
May 2, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

PROSPECT — When Mayor Robert Chatfield peeled away the bark of a stately ash tree on Old Log Town Road on Friday, a 5-foot section fell, revealing a network of squiggly lines across the hardwood. The network of soft trails covering the wood was the work of the emerald ash borer, an invasive beetle that promises to devastate Connecticut’s ash trees over the next decade. For Prospect, the first town in the state to discover the insect in 2012, the ash borer’s mark is already impacting the landscape, and the budget. A number of trees along the town’s roads are marked with an orange “x,” indicating they’re ready to be cut down. …Chatfield said Prospect has spent $125,000 to remove dead ash trees since 2012. The town transferred an extra $25,000 from the ice and snow account to the tree removal account last week to keep up with demand.

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The Timber Industry

May 2, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

South Carolina’s most valuable agricultural crop isn’t baled, spun into fabric or served up with a pat of butter. The state’s top crop is timber, and it supports hundreds of companies and tens of thousands of jobs. Forest product industries now have an estimated economic impact of more than $18 billion in the state, according to the South Carolina Forestry Commission. That’s a huge number, but it could grow, according to State Forester Gene Kodama, especially if more landowners actively manage their timber lands for better ecological and economic growth. “The opportunities are tremendous,” he says. …This huge economic impact might seem invisible to many folks who assume not much is going on out in the quiet of the woods. “Most people don’t understand what forestry is,” Gene says.

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The Timber Industry

May 2, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

South Carolina’s most valuable agricultural crop isn’t baled, spun into fabric or served up with a pat of butter. The state’s top crop is timber, and it supports hundreds of companies and tens of thousands of jobs. Forest product industries now have an estimated economic impact of more than $18 billion in the state, according to the South Carolina Forestry Commission. That’s a huge number, but it could grow, according to State Forester Gene Kodama, especially if more landowners actively manage their timber lands for better ecological and economic growth. “The opportunities are tremendous,” he says. …This huge economic impact might seem invisible to many folks who assume not much is going on out in the quiet of the woods. “Most people don’t understand what forestry is,” Gene says.

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Britain to go green with 64m trees to be planted in 10 years

The Mirror
May 1, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: International

A tree will be planted for each of the 64 million people in Britain over the next decade in a bid to make this a green and pleasant land again. The Woodland Trust is leading the project and aims to plant 20 million trees on farmland to restore hedgerows and 15 million in and around towns and cities. The remaining 29 million trees will be planted to create new woods and forests. There has been a steady decline in the number of species of tree as popular varieties, such as ash and elm, have been damaged by pests and diseases. Austin Brady, the Woodland Trust’s director of conservation, said: “In parts of the country, the ecosystem is on the brink of collapse.”

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Cambodia to add 1m hectares of protected forest Gulf Today

Gulf Today
May 1, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: International

PHNOM PENH: Cambodia’s prime minister has ordered a million hectares of forest be included in protected zones as the country faces one of the world’s fastest deforestation rates. The move, which covers five new areas of forest, will bump Cambodia’s conservation zones up by a fifth, bringing more than a quarter of the country’s land under protection. “The Ministry of Environment must list the five forests as protected areas,” said the order signed by Prime Minister Hun Sen, which was seen by AFP on Saturday. The new conservation areas will include parts of Prey Lang — a forest where activists have long been risking their lives to expose the illegal logging that has eviscerated Cambodia’s forest cover.

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Forest Fires

Wildfire continues to threaten Fort McMurray neighbourhood

Edmonton Journal
May 2, 2016
Category: Forest Fires
Region: Canada, Canada West

Environment Canada issues a special air quality statement for the Fort McMurray-Fort McKay area. Smoke from a wildfire southwest of Fort McMurray is producing poor air quality and reduced visibilities in some areas. Smoke near the ground is expected to cause high health risk conditions. Stay inside if you have breathing difficulties. Find an indoor place that’s cool and ventilated. Using an air conditioner that cools and filters air may help. If you open the windows you may let in more polluted air. If your home isn’t air-conditioned, consider going to a public place (library, shopping mall, recreation centre) that is air-conditioned.

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Fire burning on outskirts of Fort McMurray

CBC News
April 30, 2016
Category: Forest Fires
Region: Canada, Canada West

A fire is burning right on the outskirts of Fort McMurray. The fire started around 4 p.m. Saturday and is burning in a ravine near the Abasand area. It’s being described as under control.  Jody Butz, the assistant deputy chief of operations for the regional emergency services, said the reason the fire is worrisome is it’s proximity to the town.  “It’s a few hundred yards down in the river valley, that’s the concern, it has a chance of climbing up the hill,” Butz said. “It’s near some structures and houses, but we’ve got a defensive line in between the fire and the houses. We’re not really worried about it, it’s just going to time to get it under control.” Butz said the response to the fire has been large, including bringing out water bombers to create the defensive line. “Now we have ground crews going around trying to get the perimeter of it supported by some helicopters and their drop buckets,” said Butz.

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Above-average fire year ahead in Hawaii, Alaska, Southwest

Associated Press in The Washington Post
May 1, 2016
Category: Forest Fires
Region: United States, US West

Hawaii, Alaska and the Southwest face an above-average threat of wildfires this summer, but most of the country should see normal or below-normal problems, forecasters said Sunday. The National Interagency Fire Center’s outlook for the spring and summer shows the potential for significant fires will be below average for much of Texas, the South and the southern Midwest. But some regions will face active fire seasons. Here’s a look at specific areas with increased danger this season: HAWAII Hawaii could face a long, dry summer, with above-average wildfire potential from May through August after a drought intensified last month, the fire center said.

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California seeks $90 million from utility over wildfire

Associated Press in The Washington Post
April 29, 2016
Category: Forest Fires
Region: United States, US West

SAN FRANCISCO — California officials say they will seek more than $90 million in firefighting costs from Pacific Gas & Electric Co. after finding that a deadly 2015 fire was sparked by a tree that came into contact with a power line. The utility said it accepts the cause but says it is not clear that it was to blame for the tree failing. The $90 million is the largest recovery sought by the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection, which released a report Thursday detailing the cause of the fire that scorched remote Calaveras and Amador counties, about 125 miles east of San Francisco. The blaze that started Sept. 9 burned for three weeks, killing two people and destroying more than 900 structures, including about 550 homes. The 110-square-mile fire caused an estimated $300 million in insured losses and is the seventh-most destructive wildfire in state history.

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Cameras new tool in fighting forest fires SFGate

San Francisco Gate
April 30, 2016
Category: Forest Fires
Region: United States, US West

As California forests face another dry summer, firefighters around Lake Tahoe are deploying high-tech mountaintop cameras to spot lightning strikes and the first wisps of smoke before wildfires blaze out of control. By summer, a network of at least 10 automated cameras will be scanning the heavily forested mountains of the Tahoe Basin and sending back steady streams of images in both the visible and infrared frequencies. And more cameras are coming, said Graham Kent, director of the Nevada Seismological Laboratory at the University of Nevada, Reno, where the camera network was developed.

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Pinelands fires: A menace and a necessity

Philly.com
April 28, 2016
Category: Forest Fires
Region: US East, United States

…Fire is a fact of life in the Pine Barrens, 1.1 million acres of prized forestland reaching from lower central Jersey into the southern part of the state. The flames pose a threat, particularly as development as crept up to the woods, but they’re also an integral part of the Pinelands’ natural ecosystem process. And spring, with higher temperatures, longer days, wind, and dry conditions, is historically a prime time for wildfires. Each year, the state Forest Fire Service responds to more than 1,500 wildfires statewide. This year from Jan. 1 to April 25, there have been 520 fires, burning 1,212 acres, compared to 324 fires and almost 443 acres during the same time last year – a reflection, in part, of weather differences between the two periods.

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Forest Service to begin rehab efforts with wildfire 90 percent contained

Asheville Citizen-Times
April 29, 2016
Category: Forest Fires
Region: US East, United States

HOT SPRINGS – Firefighters have battled a wildfire that has spread to more than 5,000 acres in the Pisgah National Forest causing the closure of multiple trails along the Appalachian Trail for more than a week, but Friday the fire was 90 percent contained and officials started to shift their attention toward repair and rehabilitation efforts. The Silver Mine Fire, located 1 mile east of Hot Springs in Madison County, began April 21 and quickly grew to 2,500 acres. Rain moved into the area the next day, but fire activity continued to pick up and crews were unable to fully extinguish the flames over the weekend. Firefighters started burnout operations Monday, which have led the fire to increase in size and containment, officials say. By Tuesday containment efforts reached 40 percent and by Wednesday the fire was 60 percent contained.

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Uttarakhand loses 1,900 hectares of forests to fire; role of timber mafia being investigated

Daily News & Analysis India
May 2, 2016
Category: Forest Fires
Region: International

Why is the hill-state of Uttarakhand so prone to forest fires? In the last one month itself, the state has seen 1,233 incidents of forest fires. While saying that all forests see fires during summer, Union minister for environment, forest and climate change Prakash Javadekar admitted that there has been a spurt in the incidents this year. “The pine trees across Uttarakhand forests catch fire quickly and even a cigarette or beedi can start one,” he said. Ashwani Kumar, director general of the Indian Council of Forestry Research and Education, offered a scientific explanation. “There is accumulation of biomass from trees on the forest floor and they catch fire immediately. Factors such as above-normal temperature, lack of moisture, high wind speeds and a long dry spell have also contributed,” he said.

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?Uttarakhand fire: Centre rushes help to stop political damage

Economic Times of India
May 2, 2016
Category: Forest Fires
Region: International

DEHRADUN: A month after the imposition of President’s rule in Uttarakhand, the Centre faced the challenge of extinguishing fires that engulfed vast tracts of the state’s forests, which now appear to be abating. The forest fires, now being described as “unprecedented,” came just ahead of the Char Dham Yatra (Badrinath, Kedarnath, Gangotri and Yamunotri) season scheduled to start from May 9. The state is still recovering from the damage inflicted during the 2013 floods. The Centre deployed two Indian Air Force choppers (MI-17) to spray water to douse the flames and sent three teams of the National Disaster Response Force. All leave for forest department officials in the hill state has been cancelled.

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Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy

Not Just Climate Change: Study Finds Human Activity Is a Major Factor Driving Wildfires

UC Berkeley
April 28, 2016
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: United States, US West

A new study examining wildfires in California found that human activity explains as much about their frequency and location as climate influences. The researchers systematically looked at human behaviors and climate change together, which is unique and rarely attempted on an area of land this large. The findings suggest many models of wildfire predictions do not accurately account for human factors and may therefore be misleading when identifying the main causes or drivers of wildfires. The newest model proportionately accounts for climate change and human behavioral threats and allows experts to more accurately predict how much land is at risk of burning in California through 2050, which is estimated at more than 7 million acres in the next 25 years.

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Sustainability at heart of Maryville College

Knoxville News Sentinel
May 1, 2016
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: US East, United States

The answer lay in discarded trees. In 1982, Maryville College responded to a nation-wide energy crisis by becoming the first college in the state to create steam with wood chips, heating campus buildings at a fraction of the cost of fuel oil while producing almost no pollution. It was the first of many steps the private, liberal arts college has taken toward student and environmental sustainability. “If we’re going to prepare our students to be in business or to be out in the world, sustainability has got to be a huge and important thing,” said Bruce Guillaume, founder and director of the college’s Mountain Challenge program and creator of the sustainability tour. “It also turns out that the metro Knoxville area is one of the fastest-growing green economies in the country.

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