Tree Frog Forestry News

Daily Archives: May 3, 2016

Business & Politics

Women of the Natural Resource Sector to Share Stories of Success and Inspiration at SheTalks Resources

Business Wire
May 3, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada West

The firstever female president of the Truck Loggers Association and a professional field hockey player turned environmental consultant are just two of 16 inspiring speakers at the latest in the SheTalks Global (SheTalks) event series, SheTalks Resources. SheTalks is a platform that allows women to create impact through eight minutes of sharing their real, rare and authentic stories not speeches. SheTalks Resources, powered by Resource Works, will highlight the stories of women in B.C.’s natural resource sector. It will showcase how women are leading the way in ensuring resource development is taking place in environmentally, socially and economically responsible ways.

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Weyerhaeuser pulp mill sold Alberta

Daily Herald Tribune
May 2, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

Grande Prairie’s Weyerhaeuser pulp mill will soon be under new ownership. Weyerhaeuser recently announced a $2.2 billion deal with International Paper for its cellulose fibers mills, which includes the mill in Grande Prairie. Wayne Roznowsky, public affairs manager for Weyerhaeuser Canada, said the sale came out of a recent strategic review of the company’s cellulose fibers business. “That (was a) strategic review that was announced by the board of directors in November and this basically is the result of that review,” said Roznowsky. When the review was initially announced, the public affairs manager said that the company had discussions with multiple companies interested in purchasing the pulp mills. 

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Walk marks two years since sawmill shooting

Nanaimo News Bulletin
May 2, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

Saturday marked a sombre anniversary in Nanaimo as it was two years to the day that a shooting occurred at the now-closed Western Forest Products mill. Tony Sudar and Earl Kelly were injured in the April 30 incident, while Michael John Lunn and Fred James McEachern were killed. Lorraine McEachern, Fred’s wife, said her family is doing as well as can be expected. …The alleged shooter is scheduled to stand trial in September. McEachern said she is as prepared as can be for the trial. …In the wake of the shooting, Marlene and Marcy Lunn and a group of friends formed the Red Shirt Foundation – after Michael’s love of red T-shirts – which has a goal of raising awareness of workplace violence.

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Tembec reports financial results for its second fiscal quarter ended March 26, 2016

Canada Newswire press release
May 3, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada East, Canada

MONTREAL; – Consolidated sales for the three-month period ended March 26, 2016, were $380 million, as compared to $348 million in the same quarter a year ago. The Company generated net earnings of $27 million or $0.27 per share in the March 2016 quarter compared to a net loss of $40 million or $0.40 per share in the March 2015 quarter. The current quarter results include a non-cash gain of $27 million related to the translation of US dollar denominated debt. The comparable quarter of the prior year included a non-cash loss of $37 million related to the translation of US dollar denominated debt.

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Former Sino-Forest executives didn’t deceive: lawyer tells hearing

By Alexandra Posadzki
Canadian Business
May 2, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada East, Canada

TORONTO – Four former Sino-Forest executives accused of fraud did not deceive anyone or shirk responsibility for their actions while they worked for the forestry company, a securities tribunal heard Monday. To the contrary, Albert Ip, one of the four accused, agreed to be examined by law firm Bennett Jones while he was hospitalized in critical condition, said his lawyer Markus Koehnen. Two people from Bennett Jones came to the hospital and examined Ip for three hours, despite the fact that he was having trouble breathing and had suffered internal bleeding, Koehnen said. “That’s not running away from responsibility,” Koehnen said. “Mr. Ip could have kept his mouth shut and said, ‘Go away.’ He didn’t.”

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Boise Cascade Company Reports 2016 First Quarter Net Income of $5.0 Million on Sales of $880.7 Million

Nasdaq
May 3, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States, US West

BOISE, Idaho – Boise Cascade Company (Boise Cascade or Company) (NYSE:BCC) today reported net income of $5.0 million, or $0.13 per share, on sales of $880.7 million for the first quarter ended March 31, 2016. First quarter results included $3.5 million of pre-tax acquisition related expenses, or a $0.06 per share after-tax impact. … “We completed the previously announced acquisition of the Thorsby and Roxboro engineered lumber facilities on the last day of the quarter. I am pleased to welcome the new employees to Boise Cascade. The acquisition represents a major step forward in supporting the ongoing growth of our EWP customers. We are focused on successfully integrating the new operations into our manufacturing system and distribution networks,” stated Tom Corrick

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Potlatch sells timberlands near McCall, Idaho

The Spokesman-Review
April 26, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States, US West

Potlatch Corp. has sold 172,000 acres of timberland near the resort town of McCall, Idaho, citing a sluggish market for second-home sales. The land was sold to Southern Pine Plantations of Macon, Georgia, for $114 million, Potlatch reported Tuesday in its first-quarter earnings results. Spokane-based Potlatch purchased the acreage in 2007, intending to sell parcels for rural recreational use, said Mike Covey, the company’s chairman and chief executive officer. But the bankruptcy of Tamarack Resort near McCall and the national recession affected demand for second homes, and that market hasn’t picked up again, he said in a news release.

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New Bern’s Weyerhaeuser pulp mill part of sale to International Paper

Plant employs 300 people
New Bern Sun Journal
May 2, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: US East, United States

Weyerhaeuser announced Monday it is selling its New Bern pulp mill along with several other cellulose fibers pulp mills across the country to International Paper for $2.2 billion in cash. Nancy Thompson, public affairs manager for Weyerhaeuser, said the sale does not include the entire Weyerhaeuser company, just the pulp mills. The Weyerhaeuser pulp mill in New Bern makes absorbent pulp for manufacturers globally that uses the product in diapers and wipes. The mill employs 300 people, Thompson said. … The sale will now undergo a federal review until the end of the year, and nothing should change in that time, Thompson said.

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Materials prices rise for first time in nine months

Grand Rapids Business Journal
April 29, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: US East, United States

Construction input prices rose on a monthly basis in March for the first time in nine months, according to an analysis of the Bureau of Labor Statistics Producer Price Index by Associated Builders and Contractors. … Nonresidential construction input prices behaved similarly, expanding 1 percent for the month but down 3.5 percent from a year ago. … Despite the rather profound percentage gain in oil prices and the overall nonresidential construction material price increase, rapid material price inflation remains unlikely going forward. …Softwood lumber prices were up 2.8 percent for the month, but have fallen 1.6 percent from the same time last year.

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Wood, Paper & Green Building

Daines backs bill encouraging timber in tall buildings

By Vincent McDermott and Janet French
The Missoulian
May 3, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: United States

Sen. Steve Daines has co-sponsored a bill to push more research and development on using wood for tall building construction. The Timber Innovation Act, S. 2892, was authored by Sen. Debbie Stabenow, D-Michigan. It will be heard by the Senate Committee on Agriculture, Nutrition and Forestry. Fellow Republican Sen. Mike Crapo of Idaho and Democratic senators Amy Klobuchar of Minnesota and Maria Cantwell of Washington also co-sponsored the bill. The bill would look for ways to use timber framing in buildings more than 85 feet or seven stories high. State and federal building codes typically call for concrete or metal framing for structures that tall. The National Forest Products Lab and several U.S. colleges and universities would be asked to explore methods of designing wood beams and designs that could meet those codes.

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Wood products, forestry endorse Timber Innovation Act

LBM Journal
May 2, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: United States

WASHINGTON – The American Wood Council (AWC), American Forest Foundation (AFF), Binational Softwood Lumber Council (BSLC) and Southeastern Lumber Manufacturers Association (SLMA) today announced their strong support for the “Timber Innovation Act” (S. 2892), introduced by lead sponsors Sens. Debbie Stabenow (MI) and Mike Crapo (ID). Sens. Amy Klobuchar (MN), Steve Daines (MT) and Maria Cantwell (WA) are also original co-sponsors. …Buildings have been built out of wood for centuries. Up until recently, however, most wood buildings did not exceed six stories and were constructed of lightweight materials. Recent advances in technology, engineering and safety have now made it possible to build taller wood buildings using newly-developed mass timber products. In the last five years, 17 buildings between seven and 14 stories have been built using heavy timber construction globally.

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Forestry

Eradication of ‘sudden oak death’ no longer possible in California

By Louis Sahagun
Los Angeles Times
May 2, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Over the last two decades, California and the federal government have faced harsh criticism for failing to take stronger actions to stop a highly contagious disease that has killed millions of trees along coastal regions from Big Sur to portions of Oregon. Now, a new computer modeling study suggests that the “sudden oak death” epidemic, which emerged in 1995, has grown too big and is spreading too fast to eradicate statewide. The analysis is the first to integrate knowledge of the pathogen with topography, weather and resources like government budgets to predict the likely effects of various management strategies over such a large area — in this case, California’s 163,707 square miles of land.

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UM forestry major the best in the West for college timbersports

Helena Independent Record
May 2, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

MISSOULA — In the track and field meets axes and chainsaws world of college timbersports, John Parcell can now be called the best in the West. The 20-year-old forestry major from Condon represented the University of Montana’s Woodsman Team during the Western Collegiate Stihl Timbersports Qualifier on Friday, a competition that included four different events that tested athletes ability to chop, cut and chainsaw. Although Parcell is a junior, this is the second time he’s been the school’s participant in the challenge. He placed fifth last year. Team co-captain Kate Page said while it’s slightly unusual for the same person to compete twice, Parcell was the obvious choice this year.

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What’s needed in the next state lands commissioner: temperance

Protecting the environment is a top priority for Washingtonians. It can be accomplished by the next lands commissioner without extreme measures.
The Seattle Times
May 2, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

AN unsung success of Washington state government is its careful management of trust lands across the state. For more than a century, state forests, farmland and waters have quietly and consistently generated billions of dollars to fund schools and other essential services. Managing these lands — while protecting the environment and regulating logging — is the primary responsibility of the state Department of Natural Resources’ boss, the commissioner of public land …There’s always need for improvement and change. But lands commissioner is not a job for an extremist hoping to clear-cut hard-fought policy agreements, including forest-protection rules that are among the strictest in the nation.

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Hack-and-squirt foes challenge industry technique

Willits News
April 29, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Proponents of a June 7 ballot measure to eliminate the use of so-called “hack-and-squirt” deforestation methods spoke out against the technique they said could potentially be disastrous. …The hack-and-squirt practice involves “hacking” a notch into unwanted trees, such as tanoaks, and then “squirting” the notch with an herbicide to kill the tree. Concerns have been raised about the herbicides being used and the dry standing trees left behind. Some firefighters argue those trees may increase fire risk. …The fire chief said dead standing trees left behind when timber companies and others use the hack-and-squirt procedure “enhance fire behavior because there are more surface fuels, which create faster fires and are harder to contain.”

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A Young Logger With Deep Roots in the California Timberlands

The New York Times
April 30, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Dennis Webb, 22, is a forestry technician at Big Creek Lumber in Davenport, Calif. Q. You work in the family business. What is that like for you? A. My grandfather and his brother and their father and uncle started this company 70 years ago, and I like the sense of continuity. My family takes a lot of pride in working here. Besides this company, my father owns a cattle farm. At one point I wanted to be a cattle farmer. …What have you learned from working in the woods? If you pay attention, you can learn something new every day. It’s really remarkable. Certain plants will thrive in some environments and not others. For example, as trees grow, they create more shade, so shade-tolerant plants will grow and others won’t. Sometimes plants
compete with each other, too, for water, light and soil nutrients.

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Harvest reduced, not ‘boosted,’ in BLM plan

Chris Cadwell, a consultant to the Association of O&C Counties, is a retired Bureau of Land Management forester and natural resource analyst.
The Register-Guard
May 2, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Some information disseminated about the Bureau of Land Management’s new management plan for western Oregon has been misleading. According to the BLM, the plan “will be able to provide 278 million board feet per year in total timber harvest once the plan is fully implemented. This is 75 million board feet (37 percent) more than what the BLM is currently offering.” This has been widely portrayed as “boosting” the harvest. The BLM’s proposed plan has a smaller land base allocated to sustainable timber production, and is also proposing a much lighter-touch style of management than the Northwest Forest Plan, which its new plan would replace. The non-sustainable harvest associated with management in reserves is also less than the Northwest Forest Plan. The reserve land allocations have been increased over those in the Northwest Forest Plan.

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New life emerging from the Rough Fire

The Californian
April 29, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Though the skies over the northern end of the Sequoia National Forest are no longer filled with smoke blocking the sun and irritating eyes and lungs, there are many stark reminders of what happened last summer. An outlook off Highway 180 in the forest that once offered a breathtaking view of the Mill Creek Flat Basin in Sequoia National Park now offers a view that’s breathtaking for a different reason – scorched earth interspersed with black trees that, from a distance, resemble burnt match sticks, bereft of their needles or leaves. …Amid all this devastation is something surprising – life. Even in areas where fires burned hot enough to scorch tree roots, new growth is emerging in patches on the ash-covered ground. And even in areas where flames tore through forests, some islands of still-living tees and brush can be found.

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Foresters say logging project would accelerate forest recovery

Bill Snyder, chairman of the Northern California Society of American Foresters
The Sacramento Bee
April 30, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

The article “A modern lesson from huge post-fire logging project” (Forum, April 3), was critical of the decision by the U.S. Forest Service to undertake salvage logging as part of the Westside Recovery Project and the science used to support project evaluation. …After reviewing the record of decision for the Westside Fire Recovery Project it is the opinion of the Society of American Foresters that the article does not provide a fair or balanced picture of environmental review conducted by the Forest Service. The analysis of potential impacts conducted by the Forest Service did include extensive analysis of potential impacts to water, wildlife, soils and public safety.

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This disease has killed a million trees in California, and scientists say it’s basically unstoppable

By Chris Mooney
Washington Post
May 2, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Healthy forests are especially important at a time of climate change — they’re an incredible tool to remove carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. Dead forests, on the other hand, can light the spark for wildfires, which are already showing a long-predicted uptick in activity. In California’s coastal forests, health is anything but good. Since 1995, a fungal pathogen that causes a phenomenon dubbed ‘sudden oak death’ (a far catchier name than that of the pathogen itself, Phytophthora ramorum) has taken out millions of oak and tanoak trees, particularly along the coast extending northward from Monterey County. That includes areas of Marin County, Sonoma County and Big Sur. The pathogen is a fungus that affects different trees differently, and not all are susceptible. It will tear through a forest and kill some trees while leaving others standing.

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State agencies launch multi-year hemlock restoration effort

Associated Press in Washington Post
May 3, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

HALETHORPE, Md. — Two state agencies are launching a multi-year effort to restore hemlock trees after massive losses caused by an invasive insect. Officials of the departments of agriculture and natural resources are introducing the program Tuesday afternoon by helping plant 220 hemlocks in Patapsco Valley State Park near Halethorpe. The Maryland Conservation Corps is joining the effort. The corps is a youth program geared toward natural resource management and park conservation projects. The trees have been hurt by the hemlock wooly adelgid. The insect is native to Japan but has spread along the East Coast since it was discovered in Virginia in 1951.

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Forest Fires

Fort McMurray braces for high winds in battle with wildfire

By Wallis Snowdon
CBC News
May 2, 2016
Category: Forest Fires
Region: Canada, Canada West

Firefighters battling a blaze just 1,200 metres outside Fort McMurray say they’re now bracing for the worst. Wind that dropped off overnight, giving crews a short reprieve from the approaching flames, is once again picking up, blowing from the southeast as scorching temperatures return this afternoon. The blaze, which is estimated to cover between 500 and 750 hectares of boreal forest, is only 1.2 km from the western edge of Alberta’s oilsands city. Fire chief Darby Allen said there had been “no significant change” to the fire overnight. “The fire didn’t really extend in size,” he said. “It didn’t gain ferocity. In fact, in calmed down quite a bit overnight.”

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Western Canada wildfires: This year could be worse than last, say experts

Global News
May 2, 2016
Category: Forest Fires
Region: Canada, Canada West

Wildfires have led to evacuation notices for hundreds in Alberta and B.C., as crews continue to battle several blazes and experts say the dry temperatures could make for a long and brutal fire season. A wildfire raging in Fort McMurray prompted mandatory evacuation orders for Prairie Creek and Centennial Trailer Park and a voluntary evacuation is being encouraged in Gregoire. While fires in B.C., have led to evacuation notices for several communities. The premature start to the wildfire season has already led to 296 fires in Alberta, according to the province’s Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry. There has been approximately 181 fires in B.C.

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Heat and high winds leave BC with 40 active wildfires burning

By Karen Graham
Digital Journal
May 2, 2016
Category: Forest Fires
Region: Canada, Canada West

Vancouver – A deadly combination of high winds, elevated temperatures and little snow this past winter has resulted in an early start to the wildfire season in British Columbia, Canada. As CBC Canada noted back on April 20, when the temperature in Vancouver hit 25 degrees C (77 degrees F), it felt more like the middle of summer. But even then, there were 37 active fires burning in the province. B.C.’s forest minister, Steve Thomson said at the time, “It’s a concern to have it start this early.” But it looks like Thomson’s worst fears has come to pass. Unseasonable heat and gusting winds in the northeastern part of the province are fueling wildfires that have prompted evacuation alerts for two communities.

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Evacuation lifted for some in Fort McMurray; kept in place for trailer park

Canadian Press in Victoria Times Colonist
May 2, 2016
Category: Forest Fires
Region: Canada, Canada West

FORT MCMURRAY, Alta. – About 500 residents have been allowed to return home in northern Alberta after a wildfire forced them out on the weekend. Melissa Blake, mayor of the Regional Municipality of Wood Buffalo, said Monday evening the mandatory evacuation order was lifted for residents in the Prairie Creek neighbourhoods just south of Fort McMurray. However, Blake said residents must shelter in place and be ready to evacuate again if necessary. About 200 residents of the Centennial Trailer Park remain on mandatory evacuation and another 500 people in the Gregoire area were told to be ready to leave. Blake and the fire chief pleaded with people to take personal responsibility to prevent fires because conditions are extreme.

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Fire danger extreme in parts of Saskatchewan, Alberta

Canadian Press in Global News
May 1, 2016
Category: Forest Fires
Region: Canada, Canada West

REGINA – Large swaths of red — meaning extreme risk — cover Alberta and Saskatchewan on the latest fire danger map from Natural Resources Canada. Many other areas are considered high or very high risk in the two Prairie provinces, where there’s been below average snowfall and above normal temperatures in much of Western Canada. erry Anderson, a fire research scientist with Natural Resources Canada, says that’s due to a weather pattern known as El Nino. “So now here we are in April, those unusually warm temperatures have melted the snow away faster than normal and now we’ve got a relatively dry, tinder forest out there just waiting to burn,” Anderson said in a phone interview from Edmonton. Anderson says it’s unusual to see the fire danger risk this high, this early.

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Pine beetle infestations reduce wildfire severity, study suggests

By Gavin Fisher
CBC News
May 1, 2016
Category: Forest Fires
Region: Canada, Canada West

Study examined more than 80 fires over the last 25 years in the Pacific Northwest region of the U.S….”In general forests that had insect damage had a lower level of burn severity,” said Garrett Meigs, the lead author in the study led by the University of Vermont. …Meigs said research found that the mountain pine beetle and western spruce budworm affected the forests differently, and the way the fires behaved was also different depending on the time since the infestations occurred. “In fact the two insects had sort of the opposite pattern, where over time [for] the mountain pine beetle, the effect on burn severity got lower and lower, and the spruce budworm actually initially had very low severity fire, but then it increased over time,” he said.

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Understanding a burning issue for India’s forests

Over 4,500 hectares have been affected in Himachal Pradesh, some 40% more than the 3,185 hectares in Uttarakhand.
The Indian Express
May 3, 2016
Category: Forest Fires
Region: International

…A report titled Forest Fire Disaster Management, prepared by the National Institute of Disaster Management, a body under the Ministry of Home Affairs, in 2012, said about half of India’s forests were prone to fires. 43% were prone to occasional fires and 5% to frequent fires, and 1% were at high or very high risk, the report said, quoting data from Forest Survey of India’s State Forest Report, 1995, a compilation of 25 years of observations and analyses. More than 95% of wildfires in India were man-made, the FSI report said. On Monday, three people were arrested from Pithoragarh and Nainital in Uttarakhand for causing fires by burning dry chir leaves. Villagers reportedly burn leaves and grass in order to get better growth of grass the following year.

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Nepal, northern India battle worst forest fires in years

Reuters
May 2, 2016
Category: Forest Fires
Region: International

Nepal and parts of northern India are battling their worst forest fires in years that have devastated thousands of hectares of woodland, killed at least 18 people and sent a pall of smoke across the southern Himalayas that can been seen from space. In Nepal, 11 people have died while trying to fight fires that have razed 280,000 hectares (692,000 acres) of forest across the country, the worst in six years. “This year we have experienced a longer spell of dry weather and the temperatures have risen significantly, contributing to the disaster,” Forest Ministry official Krishna Prasad Acharya told Reuters. The worst forest fires in four years in India’s northern Uttarakhand state have killed at least seven people and disrupted the lives of thousands, an emergency official said on Monday. The Uttarakhand fires have intensified in the past week, torching more than 2,000 hectares (4,900 acres) of forest.

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Forest fires sweep across north India

The National
May 2, 2016
Category: Forest Fires
Region: International

LUCKNOW, INDIA // Massive forest fires that have killed at least seven people in recent weeks were sweeping across the north Indian state of Uttarakhand on Monday, threatening two tiger reserves. With dense black smoke billowing in the skies for kilometres, authorities were urging villagers to be on alert and tourists to avoid travelling to the Himalayan foothills, popular during the summer for their cooler temperatures. Dozens of fires were spreading in the states of Uttarakhand and neighbouring Himachal Pradesh, officials said. “We are struggling to bring the situation under control,” said Bhanu Prasad Gupta, a forest officer in the state of Uttarakhand.

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Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy

Climate Change Challenge to Support a Low-Carbon Economy

FPInnovations
May 2, 2016
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: Canada

FPInnovations today announced its strong support of the “30 by 30 Climate Change Challenge” launched by the Forest Products Association of Canada. FPAC has challenged the Canadian forest sector to reduce CO2 emissions by an additional 30 megatonnes per year by 2030. Launching this challenge once again places the forest products sector in the leadership role of reducing greenhouse gases following Canada’s commitment at the UN Climate Change Conference in Paris in 2015.

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Canadian forestry group pledges to cut greenhouse gas emissions

By Shawn McCarthy
The Globe and Mail
May 2, 2016
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: Canada

Canada’s forest products industry is aiming to be a major contributor to Canada’s 2030 climate goal, but is touting better forest management and increased use of wood products – rather than emissions reductions at its operations – as the key strategies. …Half of the promised reductions will come from improved forest practices, including the use of the entire harvested tree rather than burning the brush or letting it rot and emit methane. The industry is also targeting expanded use of wood products – which sequester carbon and can displace high-carbon materials – to account for most of the rest of the reductions. It is urging provincial governments to change building codes to allow more wood construction, including in high-rise structures. …Chief executive officer Derek Nighbor said it is important that the revenue generated by the pricing be recycled to support innovation in the industry. 

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Forest industry vows to cut emissions, seeks government help on R&D, procurement

By Bruce Cheadie
Canadian Press in Canadian Business
May 2, 2016
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: Canada

OTTAWA – Canada’s forest products industry is committing to cut its emissions of greenhouse gases by 30 million tonnes a year by 2030. The industry association says about half the promised reductions will come from improved forest practices, including using the slash from downed trees rather than burning it or letting it rot and emit methane. Improved and expanded use of carbon-sequestering wood products, plus efficiencies in mill operations will make up the balance of the emission cuts. Derek Nighbor, the new CEO of the Forest Products Association of Canada, says the federal government’s Canadian Forest Service estimated how much the forestry sector could contribute to reducing emissions and the industry bettered that estimate.

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Forest sector vows to cut Canada’s carbon emissions 30 megatonnes by 2030

by Derrick Penner
Vancouver Sun
May 2, 2016
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: Canada

Canada’s forests are carbon sinks, and the forest-products industry argues it can use the land its companies manage to contribute the equivalent of 13 per cent of the federal government’s goals to reduce carbon emissions. The argument itself isn’t new, but on Monday the Forest Products Association of Canada launched a new campaign quantifying its goal to reduce emissions by 30 megatonnes per year from the industry by 2030. “I think compared to previous work that we’ve done, (this campaign) is a clear call to the benefits of wood building and wood products, and a call to action to governments to consider a carbon-first principle when they’re considering procurement,” FPAC CEO Derek Nighbor said.

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Warming industry cries wolf, again

By Tom Fletcher
BC Local News in Merritt Herald
May 2, 2016
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: Canada, Canada West

…Many B.C. residents don’t appreciate that the northeast corner is on the other side of the Rockies. It’s a different place economically, geologically and climatically. You see sudden chinooks in winter, like the one that confused actor and climate alarmist Leonardo DiCaprio in Alberta. You see snowfalls in August, dry spells, and temperatures plunging to –50. Premier Christy Clark happened to be in Fort St. John to speak at a rally calling for the federal government to approve liquefied natural gas export projects, soon after the fires broke out. She immediately claimed this as proof that forest fire seasons are starting earlier every year, a human-caused disaster that could be eased by selling gas to China to replace coal. Last year’s forest fire season started early, and the now-familiar claims were made that it would be the worst, the hottest, etc. It also ended early and was nowhere near the worst, a point mentioned by nobody except me.

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Does Biomass Still Have A Place In Humboldt County’s Energy Future?

Jefferson Public Radio
May 2, 2016
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: United States, US West

Humboldt County, California is facing an energy crisis. It’s also facing an energy opportunity. Traditionally, one-third of the county’s energy production has come from converting woody biomass to energy. But local biomass power plants are closing, just as the county is trying to join the likes of Sonoma and Marin counties in taking over its own energy rates and encourage more locally-sourced power. In this first of two stories, we take a closer look at a biomass industry in jeopardy. Ben Campbell, manager of Mad River Lumber in Arcata, looks over a load of what’s known as “hog fuel” going up a conveyor belt at the lumber mill.  When it comes to wood products, hog fuel is the bottom of the barrel. But it’s still valuable. It can be sold to power plants and burned to drive turbines and create energy.

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Why forests will make or break the climate fight

By Vaidehi Shah
Eco-Business
May 3, 2016
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: International

Forests are huge carbon sinks that can help fight climate change, but are rapidly being cleared due to economic and social pressures for land and agricultural commodities. How can the global community balance the economic value of forests with their climate benefits? …Experts say that avoiding deforestation has multiple benefits beyond reducing emissions. Nancy Harris, research manager, Global Forests Watch—an initiative by Washington-based non-profit World Resources Institute (WRI)—notes that “unlike the energy and transport sectors, forests can also actively sequester carbon dioxide”. WRI data shows that deforestation currently accounts for about 10 per cent of annual emissions, almost as much as the total output of all cars and trucks on the planet. Protecting forests could eliminate these emissions entirely and reduce them by at least another 2 per cent through carbon sequestration.

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