Tree Frog Forestry News

Daily Archives: May 19, 2016

Business & Politics

Top Industry Leaders Recognized for Improving Energy Efficiency

Natural Resources Canada
May 18, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada

Excellence in energy efficiency was celebrated yesterday in Niagara Falls, with the announcement of Canadian Industry Program for Energy Conservation (CIPEC) Leadership Award winners. The awards, which were presented at the annual Energy Summit co-hosted by Natural Resources Canada and CIPEC, highlight the exceptional achievements of CIPEC member companies in promoting and improving energy efficiency, cutting costs and improving productivity through sustainable energy use. Award recipients included Energy Performance Management: Catalyst Paper Corporation – Powell River Facility and Employee Awareness and Training: Canfor Pulp

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Logging dispute keeps 120 workers off the job in Port Alberni

Rate dispute between Western Forest Products and Island Pacific Logging keeps workers at home and logs on the ground.
Chek News
May 18, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

“We’re going to have a long dry summer, I mean just look, it’s a fire waiting to happen.” That was how NDP MLA Scott Fraser described what he was seeing as he toured a cut block between Port Alberni and Lake Cowichan Wednesday. It is where massive, valuable logs have been sitting untouched for up to two years in some places in tenures held by Western Forest Products. “It’s rotting. It’s a fire hazard in what could be another bad fire season and there’s over a hundred workers who should be at work and they’re not so it’s impacting the local economy,” Fraser told CHEK News. The mayor of Port Alberni Mike Ruttan is also concerned. “When I see this wood lying on the ground here I see jobs. I see economic activity that isn’t happening that could be happening,” said Ruttan. … The union says the issue is a rate dispute between Western Forest Products and its contractor Island Pacific Logging.

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Northeast Wood Products ready, waiting to ramp up production

Biomass Magazine
May 18, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: US East, United States

Northeast Wood Products LLC commenced pellet production in December at its retrofitted 120,000-ton-per-year pellet plant located in the Jasper Industrial Park in Jasper, Tennessee. Now, poised for ramp up, the company is waiting on the sidelines until the market rebounds. Guy Mozzicato, president of NWP, said some modifications are being done to the feed system at the Jasper plant to fix dust issues, as well as some adjustments are underway to contain fugitive fiber. “Aside from that, the plant is ready to function at its designed capacity of 120,000 tons per year,” Mozzicato said.

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US softwood lumber exports to Mena down 40pc

Gulf Digital News
May 19, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: International

The total exports of US softwood lumber to the Middle East and North Africa (Mena) region plunged to $20 million in 2015, down 40 per cent over the previous year, said a report. However, markets around the globe continue to demand strong, high-quality lumber, particularly Southern Yellow Pine from the US, which suits a wide variety of applications, according to American Softwoods (Amso), the promotional partnership formed by three major US softwood trade associations. Global exports of Southern Yellow Pine from the US reached a record $375 million in 2015, up seven per cent over the same period last year, stated the Amso report. The wood is favourite among interior decorators and designers worldwide have discovered the appeal of using these wood indoors.

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Wood, Paper & Green Building

World’s tallest timber tower underway in Vancouver

Architecture and Design
May 19, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: Canada, Canada West

A new hybrid building under construction in Vancouver to house University of British Columbia students will become the world’s tallest timber tower when completed in 2017. Designed by Acton Ostry Architects with Architekten Hermann Kaufmann of Austria as tall wood advisors, the $51.5 million project will rise to a height of 53 metres to accommodate 404 students. …The hybrid construction includes a one-storey concrete podium, two freestanding concrete cores for lateral stability, and 17 storeys of mass timber topped with a prefabricated steel beam and metal deck roof. …The successful completion of Brock Commons is expected to increase the acceptability of tall timber constructions as well as bring about revisions in British Columbia’s building codes for tall wood structures.

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Can Timber Skyscrapers Really Help Save The Planet?

By Kelsey Campbell-Dollaghan
Co.Design
May 18, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: United States

Cities are shaped by fire. From Chicago to San Francisco, enormous swathes of urban fabric were wiped away by accident in the 19th century. These horrific disasters did more than just clear the way for new development, though. They also helped spur building codes that outlawed the use of one particularly dangerous building material: timber. More than a century later, a massive reversal is taking place. An 80-story timber skyscraper is being proposed by British architects. Architects in the U.S. are racing to clinch the title of the tallest wood building in the country. Elsewhere in the world, architecture students are enrolling in programs focused solely on timber construction technology. The federal government is now funneling money into promoting timber in tall urban buildings.

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Forestry

Conservation officers promote bear awareness and calm in the wake of attack

By Shannon Waters
My Prince George Now
May 18, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

While it seems that the jogger attacked by a bear yesterday may have been saved by his dog, Conservation Service Inspector for the Omineca Region Mark West says people taking their pets into parks like Forest for the World should keep them on a leash. “That is an area where people will typically see bears at this time of year and that’s why we encourage them to keep their dogs under control – by leashing them or a dog that can respond to commands. You’re not in control of your dog so you don’t know what your dog is doing in front of you if you don’t have eyesight contact. If the dog that you’re walking or running with is now in an encounter with a bear and you come into that situation, the bear’s going to protect itself and protect its young.” 

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Mountain pine beetle research helping forests recover

By Chris Eakin
Fairview Post
May 18, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

When the Mountain Pine Beetle (MPB) arrived in Alberta some nine or 10 years ago it hit hard. Whole areas of pine trees were red with dead or dying trees, and people everywhere were losing trees on private property, golf courses were losing trees, towns were losing trees from boulevards as the beetles which had dug in under the bark, spreading the fungus that killed pine trees. Now, the MPB has faded from the news but the effect is still here. Some mills decided they would take the dead pine trees but only up to three years after death. However, some have continued to take the trees, in spite of the difficulties. The trees are very brittle and shatter easily being loaded, being moved, going through the saws. The sawdust produced cutting them is much more flammable and is blamed for the destruction of two sawmills. While all of this is interesting, some important research has been going on into how to help the forest recover from the MPB infestation.

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Collaboration leads to solutions for threatened woodland caribou and jobs

By CPAWS Wildlands League
Canada News Wire
May 18, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

THUNDER BAY, ON  – Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society (CPAWS) and Tembec are showcasing their joint innovative solutions aimed at achieving woodland caribou habitat conservation and a healthy forest industry in Ontario and Quebec at a special event at the Victoria Inn today in Thunder Bay, Ontario. This special side event is happening at the same venue and time as the city is hosting the 16th North American Caribou Workshop (NACW). The NACW is described as “the foremost conference of its kind addressing caribou biology, research and management” and both CPAWS and Tembec are participating. 

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Springer receives recognition for policy work in forestry

The Philomath Express
May 18, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Over a lifetime in the forestry profession, Philomath-area resident Gary Springer has always enjoyed putting in a good, hard day’s work. For three decades, Springer worked alongside his father as part of a small contract logging operation. “I enjoyed the physical work of the logging more than anything else,” Springer, 67, said last week. “I do sort of miss those days, the satisfaction at the end of the day of being tired but being able to turn around and see what you got accomplished.” Following his father’s retirement, Springer transitioned into policy and public outreach work with Starker Forests while increasing his volunteer commitments with various forestry-related boards and committees. … Springer said. Earlier this month, the Oregon Society of American Foresters presented Springer with its Tough Tree Award, an honor designated to that organization’s members who have “demonstrated sustained, excellent professional performance in an extremely adverse work climate.”

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Big win for small mammal

Kitsap Sun
May 17, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Efforts to revive the Olympic Peninsula’s fisher population have helped the furry mammal narrowly avoid listing under the Endangered Species Act. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service recently determined that the distinct population of West Coast fisher is not at risk for extinction and does not require ESA protections. The service praised the “proactive fisher conservation efforts” led by the state Department of Fish and Wildlife, which began a fisher reintroduction program on the peninsula in 2008 and is now expanding it to the Cascade Range. “In the Olympics, (fishers) are widening their territory and they’re reproducing,” Fish and Wildlife’s Jeff Lewis said. “There are some really positive things we’re learned from Olympics, and we have high hopes for the Cascades.”

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Spate of clearcuts on horizon for Whidbey Island: Permits OK’d for 90 acres, pending for additional 44

Whibey News-Times
May 18, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

An influx of clearcuts is coming to Whidbey Island, according to recent Department of Natural Resources decisions analyzed by a local environmental-protection group. In April alone, that state agency, often known as DNR, approved 90.75 acres for clearcutting, and left pending applications to clearcut another 44 acres, said Marianne Edain, a coordinator with Whidbey Environment Action Network, or WEAN. Another 38.5 acres were approved for thinning. “We are anti-clearcutting, not anti-logging,” Edain said, addressing a meeting of the county’s Planning Commission on May 9. “Clearcutting is a disastrous form of logging, and there are many examples of very successful selective logging. If you take two percent of a forest per year, you can do that forever.”

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Tipton hits back against BLM’S Planning 2.0

The Daily Sentinel
May 17, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Small Western communities need more time to evaluate the Bureau of Land Management’s proposed new land-planning approach, U.S. Rep. Scott Tipton, R-Colo., said in a letter to the agency. The existing May 25 deadline for public comment on the agency’s Planning 2.0 rule should be extended 30 days, Tipton said. That will ensure that local governments with “limited financial and staffing resources” have time to digest and respond to the rule, Tipton wrote in the letter, which was signed by 24 other House members. The Planning 2.0 rule would change existing requirements that now give weight to local officials. ..Simply providing public notice and comment alone does not achieve the required ‘meaningful public involvement’ for local governments directed by FLPMA,” the letter says. “Yet public notice and comment is all that has been provided.”

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County joins lawsuit against BLM timber plan

The Chief
May 17, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Columbia County is joining a lawsuit with 16 Oregon counties against the Federal Bureau of Land Management over its plan to manage timberlands. The lands in question belonged to the defunct Oregon and California Railroad, but returned to federal ownership. The lands, commonly referred to as O&C lands are managed by BLM. The suit comes after BLM released its plan to balance timber production, environmental and recreational uses of the lands it manages in western Oregon. …“We have no choice but to litigate, and we are on firm legal ground in doing so,” Columbia County Commissioner Tony Hyde said in a statement. “The BLM refused to even consider revenues for counties as an objective in developing its plan.”

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Pine beetle infestation prompts North Georgia forest thinning

By Dan Champan
Atlanta Journal Constitution
May 18, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

The U.S. Forest Service is targeting a large portion of North Georgia forest to combat the infestation of the destructive Southern pine beetle. Loggers will likely thin 1,500 acres of mostly pine trees as part of the Armuchee Healthy Forest Project. Large tracts of National Forest land in Floyd, Chattooga, Walker and Whitfield counties are targeted. The pine beetle is considered the most harmful native insect for Southern timber. About the size of a grain of rice, the beetle gets underneath the bark and chokes off a tree’s nourishment. And, due partly to climate change, pine beetle outbreaks have become more frequent over the last 40 years. Thinning is scheduled to begin in 2017 and last three to five years. Most of the pine targeted for thinning is “over-stocked” and has been planted since 1970. More indigenous oaks or pines will be replanted on site.

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Timber industry welcomes research funding into forestry on farms

ABC News, Australia
May 19, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: International

Timber industry representatives say a new plan for research into agroforestry will not be a repeat of failed managed investment schemes. On Thursday, Deputy Prime Minister Barnaby Joyce announced $520,000 in funding for a research and development project to look into growing trees for harvest on farmland. Forest and Wood Products Australia (FWPA) would coordinate the research to investigate the tree varieties, soil types and planning needed to introduce timber plantations on farm. Minister Joyce said the research would seek to allow farmers to diversify into planting trees for harvest and give farmers another source of on-farm revenue.

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Pakistan’s plan for tackling deforestation: A billion trees

The Washington Post
May 18, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: International

It’s a rough life in Pakistan, even for a tree. The country’s hills were once home to endless stretches of pine and fir, but these days Pakistan’s forest cover is somewhere below 2 percent. In the United States, that number is roughly 33 percent and in India 23 percent. In an ambitious plan to counter this deforestation, which ecologists say is a major cause of deadly landslides, the government of a province along Pakistan’s restive border with Afghanistan says it is a quarter of the way to a goal announced last year: planting 1 billion saplings. The so-called Billion Tree Tsunami campaign was recognized by the Bonn Challenge, a global partnership of forestry ministries to regain green cover.

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Forest Fires

Cities should stop building in disaster-prone areas, says insurance bureau head

Canadian Press in Canadian Business
May 18, 2016
Category: Forest Fires
Region: Canada

OTTAWA – Decision-makers across the country need to start saying no to proposed developments on flood plains or near fire-prone boreal forests like those around Fort McMurray to prevent widespread damage from future natural disasters, says the head of the Insurance Bureau of Canada. Too many cities have allowed homes and facilities to be built in areas where they could be destroyed by floods or fire, said Don Forgeron, the organization’s president and CEO. It’s that kind of planning that put parts of Fort McMurray at risk when a raging wildfire swept through parts of the town earlier this month. The fire continues to burn, affecting communities and oilsands operations. The fire will be the costliest natural disaster in Canadian history, costing insurers somewhere between $3 billion and $9 billion, Forgeron said. 

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Fire edges closer to Saskatchewan border Saskatoon

By Andrea Hill
Saskatoon StarPhoenix
May 18, 2016
Category: Forest Fires
Region: Canada, Canada West

Saskatchewan crews remain on “high alert” as a massive forest fire in northern Alberta edges closer to the Saskatchewan border. By Tuesday evening, the fire was within five kilometres of the border, said Steve Roberts, executive director of Saskatchewan wildfire management. It remains more than 40 kilometres from La Loche, the largest community in the vicinity of the flames. The fire could move east if dry conditions persist, but Roberts said it would eventually hit swamp complexes and previously burned areas, which would slow it down. As of Tuesday morning, seven fires were burning in the province, bringing the total number of Saskatchewan wildfires to burn this year to 146. By this time last year, 135 fires had started in Saskatchewan.

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Opposition wants to see a forest fire budget for this season

$130M spent on fighting fires in 2015
CBC News
May 18, 2016
Category: Forest Fires
Region: Canada, Canada West

The Opposition says it wants to know how much money the government has set aside to fight forest fires this season. The NDP says without a spring budget, it wonders how prepared the government is to deal with what could be another bad year. “We’re fully prepared to support and make sure that the resources are available,” said Opposition leader Trent Wotherspoon, after the first question period of the new legislative session. “We don’t have a budget here right now, so we don’t know what the allocation is this year. So we’d like to see what that actual budget is and how it’s being spent.” Environment minister, Herb Cox, says last year the government spent $130 million to fight forest fires in the province’s north. The government’s average wildfire budget in recent years is about $56 million.

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Return to Fort McMurray could start June 1 — if it’s safe

Canadian Press in Whistler Question
May 18, 2016
Category: Forest Fires
Region: Canada, Canada West

EDMONTON – The Alberta government says people from the fire-ravaged city of Fort McMurray could start going home starting June 1 if conditions are safe, but warned there will only be basic services and a partially open hospital. “Remember, many hazards remain in Fort McMurray,” Premier Rachel Notley said Wednesday. “We need to address all of them before it is safe for residents to begin to return.” Notley said the re-entry will be done in stages over two weeks. The city will not be suitable for everyone, including people with breathing problems, late-term pregnant women and those undergoing cancer treatment. “We anticipate that many people will not return as early as June 1,” she said.

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Fort McMurray fire grows to 423,000 hectares, continues to threaten oilsands sites

Wildfire stalls near Saskatchewan border but continues spread north to oilsands facilities
CBC News
May 18, 2016
Category: Forest Fires
Region: Canada, Canada West

The Fort McMurray wildfire in northern Alberta is carving a new path of destruction, destroying an oilsands camp while racing eastward toward more industry sites. The fire, which has become known as “the beast,” has grown by a staggering 57,000 hectares in the last 24 hours, consuming 423,000 hectares of boreal forest as of Wednesday morning. Wildfire information officer Travis Fairweather attributes the “pretty significant” growth to “extreme fire conditions.” “It’s really being burning intensely and the winds have been carrying it,” he said Wednesday. The fire forced 8,000 non-essential workers to flee the area Monday night, and a mandatory evacuation order remains in place for all work camps north of the city. The majority were sent by ground to work camps near Fort MacKay, about 53 kilometres to the north. But some were also bused, or later flown, south to Edmonton and Calgary.

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B.C. forests minister says campers can expect more camp fire bans this summer

Canadian Press in BC Local News
May 18, 2016
Category: Forest Fires
Region: Canada, Canada West

VICTORIA — Forests Minister Steve Thomson says he’s preparing to take swift action this summer when it comes to issuing camp fire bans, with this long weekend being one of the few holidays where the fires are allowed across British Columbia. Thomson says his ministry is lowering the threshold for the criteria it uses to impose camp fire bans in an effort to prevent forest fires in an already dry season. He says camp fires are permitted across the province for the Victoria Day weekend, which traditionally marks the start of camping season, but people should be prepared for more bans as the summer progresses.

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Gray Creek wildfire extinguished

Nelson Star
May 17, 2016
Category: Forest Fires
Region: Canada, Canada West

The Riondel fire department put out a wildfire in Gray Creek before it raged out of control Monday evening. Although the fire was out of the department’s jurisdiction, seven volunteers raced to put out the one-acre blaze which was growing quickly by the time the crew arrived. “We were able to contain the fire, and essentially put it out before forestry personnel arrived,” Riondel fire Chief Cory Medhurst said in a news release. Firefighters used their wildland truck, which was acquired last year for wildfires.

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Wildfires see Alberta logging zones go up in smoke

660 News
May 18, 2016
Category: Forest Fires
Region: Canada, Canada West

Wildfires menacing Fort McMurray for the past two weeks have carved a new path of destruction, levelling an oilsands work camp to the north of the city. Two others were still under threat as of Tuesday night. The fire continues to grow, spreading to more than 355,000 hectares, and it’s not just oil and gas operations which are being effected. The forestry industry is being hit too; since there are several logging and mill operations in the areas which have seen loses from the wildfire. Vic Lieffers, Chair of the Department of Renewable Resources at the University of Alberta, says if the fires are burning mature timber, a lot of that can still be harvested. “But if it’s immature timber, if it’s half grown, it’s particularly problematic because it’s the future timber and it’s completely unsalvageable for producing wood products,” he explains.

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B.C. premier says climate change is sparking need for national forest fire plan

By Bruce Cheadle
Canadian Press in the Victoria Times Colonist
May 18, 2016
Category: Forest Fires
Region: Canada, Canada West

OTTAWA – Climate change is leading to more wildfires and the country needs a national forest firefighting strategy, says B.C. Premier Christy Clark. While the country has been transfixed by the raging fires around Fort McMurray in northern Alberta, British Columbia’s interior is experiencing similar fire conditions this spring that have received far less attention. “The federal government has to help us to come together and come up with a national forest fire-fighting strategy,” Clark said in an interview with The Canadian Press. “We’ve got a lot of experience with this in British Columbia.” The labour-intensive job of clearing flammable debris on the forest floor is just one aspect of controlling wildfires, she said, as is pooling national fire-fighting resources among provinces to attack the country’s hot spots.

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B.C. crews fighting fire near Puntzi Lake

Kelowna Now
May 18, 2016
Category: Forest Fires
Region: Canada, Canada West

A fire, seven kilometres north of Puntzi Lake, has BC Wildfire Service urging people to stay safe by staying far away from the area. At last estimate, the fire was at 182 hectares and is being fought by 49 firefighter and two helicopters. The wildfire was reported on May 16, and the cause is under investigation. While the fire isn’t growing significantly, firefighters worked to establish a perimeter. According to the BC Wildfire Service, the wildfire is not currently an immediate threat to public safety or property at this time.

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Wildfire near Dawson City quadruples in size overnight

Fire near Hunker Creek, 24 km from Dawson City, now an estimated 302 hectares
CBC News
May 17, 2016
Category: Forest Fires
Region: Canada, Canada West

A wildfire burning near Hunker Creek, outside Dawson City, has grown to about 302 hectares in size — a sizeable jump since Monday, when it was estimated at about 75 hectares. “From time to time, you will see fires jump in size. In this case, it was drier and we did get some wind so that’s what saw the fire grow the way it did,” said Yukon fire information officer George Maratos. He said there is no immediate threat to any buildings or properties. There is a mining operation about four kilometres away, but Maratos said it is not currently at risk. 21 firefighters are now at work in the Hunker Creek area, with three helicopters and other heavy equipment also battling the blaze. It’s currently the only active wildfire in the territory.

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Editorial: Congress fails to fix wildfire issue

Albany Democrat Herald
May 18, 2016
Category: Forest Fires
Region: United States

The U.S. Forest Service’s top officials met this week in Washington to take a look at prospects for this year’s wildfire season. Just stop us if any of this seems familiar. You might recall that 2015’s wildfires roared through a record-breaking year — and, frankly, these are the types of records that you hope don’t get broken. …Forest Service officials on Tuesday said 2016 could be worse. …….  What Congress has failed to do, however, is move forward with a common-sense legislative fix that would go a long ways toward permanently solving the funding issue: A bipartisan proposal, pushed by Oregon Sen. Ron Wyden and Idaho Sen. Mike Crapo, would designate the very largest fires as natural disasters, and would allow agencies to pay for firefighting expenses through a new Wildfire Disaster Relief Fund, which would be funded by the same mechanism that pays for federal response to other natural disasters.

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Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy

Nishnawbe Aski Nation condemns Ontario’s climate change bill

Thunder Bay News Watch
May 18, 2016
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: Canada East, Canada

TIMMINS, Ont. — Nishnawbe Aski Nation (NAN) has condemned the passing of climate change legislation by the Government of Ontario today as a misleading and misguided approach to a green economy that will have significant and far-reaching effects across NAN territory. …The boreal forest in NAN territory is one of the largest potential carbon sinks to mitigate global climate change, but this legislation does not identify how these benefits will be allocated to NAN First Nations as Ontario moves towards a cap and trade economy. “First Nations have the right to free, prior and informed consent on any legislation that impacts Aboriginal and Treaty rights and we are shocked that this government has turned its back on international conventions like the United Nations Declaration of Indigenous Peoples that respect and uphold these rights,” said Fox.

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Spontaneous forest regrowth a low-cost way of restoring trees and reducing carbon

By Michaelle Bradford
Woodworking Network
May 18, 2016
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: United States

According to a recent study, sponteneous regrowth of land devastated by deforestration is proving to be a low-cost way of restoring forestland and reducing carbon without replanting trees. Ten countries account for 95 percent of this carbon storage potential, led by Brazil, Colombia, Venezuela and Mexico. University of Connecticut ecologist and evolutionary biologist Robin Chazdon and her colleagues, an international team of 60 scientists working for 2ndFOR Network, published the article “Carbon sequestration potential of second-growth forest regeneration in the Latin American tropics,” in the journal Science Advances and it reports a series of new findings.

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Can Airlines Save the World From Deforestation?

By Katie Gilbert
Institutional Investor
May 19, 2016
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: International

The prospect that the aviation industry will help to preserve forests by purchasing carbon offsets has left environmentalists divided. As global deforestation continues, threatening biodiversity and spewing carbon into the atmosphere, an unlikely potential savior has emerged. Fearing that governments aren’t moving fast enough, environmental nonprofits and project development firms hope the aviation industry will fly to the rescue by purchasing carbon credits. …If the aviation industry were its own country, it would be a top=ten emitter of carbon dioxide, according to the Paris-based International Energy Agency.

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Forestry emissions and the EU’s risky LULUCF debate

EurActiv
May 18, 2016
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: International

This means the request from 10 member states presented at the informal agriculture council this week asking for removals from the forest sector to count towards – and therefore water down – the Effort Sharing Decision, that covers 60% of the EU’s emissions, is scientifically flawed. Heeding it would risk overshooting our carbon budget, causing runaway climate change. At the heart of this debacle is not a scientific debate, but a political one. The countries that have made this request are reacting to a rumour that the European Commission may not allow credits from forests. If this were true, it would be a sensible move, given the flawed accounting rules that these same countries support. Forestry emissions and removals are measured against a business as usual projection, so as long as countries harvest less than they project, they get credits, even if the sink decreases.

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