Tree Frog Forestry News

Daily Archives: June 1, 2016

Business & Politics

Resolute Files Racketeering Suit Against Greenpeace in U.S. Federal Court

Canada Newswire press release
May 31, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, United States

MONTRÉAL,  – Resolute Forest Products Inc. (NYSE: RFP) (TSX: RFP) today announced a federal lawsuit in the United States District Court for the Southern District of Georgia against Greenpeace International, Greenpeace USA, Greenpeace Fund, Inc., STAND (formerly ForestEthics) and a number of their associates. The complaint included federal racketeering claims and racketeering, trademark, defamation and tortious interference claims under Georgia law. These alleged claims arise from, among other things, Greenpeace’s self-described “Resolute: Forest Destroyer” campaign falsely accusing Resolute of, among other things: (a) “destroying endangered forests,” and “operating and sourcing wood . . . in violation of law”; (b) causing the “destruction of endangered species” and “critical caribou habitat” and risking a “Caribou Herd Death Spiral,” “extirpation” and “extinction;” (c) “abandoning” and “impoverishing” the Boreal’s indigenous communities; and (d) impairing the Boreal’s ability to mitigate climate change.

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Pinnacle Pellet announces immediate operations curtailment

Quesnel Cariboo Observer
May 31, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

Pinnacle Renewable Energy Inc. announced today (May 31) that it will curtail operations at its Quesnel pellet plant effective immediately. There are a number of factors that have gone into the decision. Key among them are that the plant, first opened in 1988, was designed to process a diet of dry residuals from the local sawmills. “That source of fibre is no longer available,” said Leroy Reitsma, President of Pinnacle. “As a result, there is currently no secure, sustainable, economically available fibre to support the operation of the Quesnel mill.” The Mountain Pine Beetle infestation has created an inventory of standing timber that, while useless as sawlog, is suitable for wood pellet manufacturing. So Pinnacle will continue to work with tenure holders and the provincial government to determine whether secure access to non-sawlog standing timber can be achieved within an economically viable framework.

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No peace for Greenpeace

by Jonathan H. Adler –  Case Western University School of Law
The Washington Post
May 31, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States

In December, Greenpeace urged the federal government to investigate oil companies and organizations that dispute the risks of climate change under the federal Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations (RICO) Act. …Earlier today, Resolute Forest Products filed a civil RICO suit in a federal district court in Georgia, alleging a pattern of defamatory and fraudulent behavior by Greenpeace and allied organizations. According to the 100-plus-page complaint (and appendix), Greenpeace and its affiliates are a RICO “enterprise” that have waged a deliberately defamatory campaign against Resolute, misrepresenting the company’s practices and environmental record in order to raise funds and promote Greenpeace’s environmentalist agenda.

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Timber market improves amid concerns

California Farm Bureau Federation
June 1, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States, US West

With U.S. new home sales rising 23 percent compared to the annual pace of 2015, California timber operators say they’re guardedly optimistic about improving markets for harvested logs and lumber products. But they note the outlook can vary greatly, depending on the type of wood, where it’s grown, forest health and market conditions. “The timber market is better than 2008 when the recession hit, but it’s not breaking any records,” said logger Mike Anderson of Fort Bragg. “Margins now are exceptionally tight because of exorbitant costs of regulation, transportation and manufacturing.” There are many wild cards that can impact lumber prices, Wood Markets analyst Gerry Van Leeuwen said.

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Up from the ashes: Swanson mill in Springfield running again

The Register Guard
May 29, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States, US West

SPRINGFIELD — Destroyed by a massive fire almost two years ago, the nearly rebuilt ­Swanson Group plywood and veneer mill is gearing up with plans to become an industry leader. Earlier this month, the first 40 employees started working in the new mill southeast of downtown Springfield. “We are mainly in a startup and test mode,” said Steve Swanson, president and chief executive officer of the company based in the Douglas County town of Glendale. After the July 2014 fire, Swanson pondered whether to leave Springfield or to build a new mill. He decided to stay and open an even larger mill on its former site, on South F Street. Much of the new mill is built. When construction is finished later this year, it will cover 345,000 square feet, or nearly 8 acres, about one-third larger than the old mill, Swanson said.

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Suppliers announce new increase for softwood pulp in Western Europe

EUWID Pulp and Paper
May 31, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: International

Although the implementation of the April hike for softwood pulp was still underway in May, suppliers announced new increases. From mid-May, suppliers of softwood pulp announced they were increasing softwood pulp prices with immediate effect or from 1 June. However, in May most suppliers were still busy implementing the April hikes in full.

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Wood, Paper & Green Building

Of wood and glass

By Kelly Taylor
Chronicle Herald
May 31, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: Canada, International

Let’s imagine the perfect office building of the future. …It might even be made from wood. …For decades, steelworkers would craft the superstructures of tall buildings with I-beams, angle iron, rivets, bolts and welds. Steel and concrete became so ingrained in commercial real estate, it seemed we would never go back. Yet wood, in all its forms, is making a comeback in mid- and high-rise buildings. …Engineered wood takes small wood fibres and manufacturers them into beams and joists and studs far stronger than whole wood. But aside from that added strength, the wood used can be harvested from diseased wood. Clearing forest floors of such wood removes an excellent source of kindling to fuel raging forest fires.

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Leers Weinzapfel Associates designs timber multidisciplinary design building for UMass Amherst

The Architects Newspaper
May 31, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: US East, United States

The University of Massachusetts (UMass) Amherst, about 100 miles west of Boston, will get a new addition this fall. Boston-based Leers Weinzapfel Associates designed the UMass Design Building, set to open November 2016 in time for winter classes. It will unite the architecture, landscape architecture, regional planning, and building technology departments into one facility. When the project opens, it will be one of the largest mass timber structures in the United States. The building’s interior will feature Cross Laminated Timber (CLT), an engineered wood known for its durability and lightness. Projects can use CLT to replace materials with higher embodied energy such as steel, concrete, and masonry. While it has been popular in Europe and Canada for some time, CLT is gaining traction in the United States, mostly on the west coast (one notable project is the Bullitt Center in Seattle).

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Forestry

B.C. national park faces opposition as debate continues over land protection

By Mark Hume
Globe and Mail
May 30, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Public support for a new national park in the South Okanagan continues to grow, but some influential organizations remain opposed to the proposal, which has been the subject of debate for several years. A new report by the B.C. Ministry of Environment shows agreement is widespread that additional protection is needed for the “pocket desert” landscape near Osoyoos, but not on how that should be achieved. The area, in a dry belt recognized as Canada’s only desert, is renowned for its sweeping grasslands and forested mountains. Last summer, the provincial government released an intentions paper proposing ways to protect the land. Two areas were proposed for potential inclusion in a national park reserve, and another one was suggested as a provincial conservancy.

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B.C. Chamber of Commerce hugs old-growth trees

By Amy Smart
Victoria Times Colonist
June 1, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

The largest business-advocacy organization in B.C. has voted to protect old-growth forests while still also supporting loggers’ access to valuable resources. In a move environmentalists are calling a “historic shift,” the B.C. Chamber of Commerce voted this week in favour of a motion calling on the province to expand protection of old-growth forests in areas where they have, or likely would have, greater economic value if left standing. “It’s a huge, huge tectonic shift in the politics of land use in B.C.,” said Ken Wu, executive director for the Ancient Forest Alliance. “It changes the narrative for a lot of the province, especially rural B.C., where the traditional belief has been that if you protect old-growth forests, you undermine the economy. But the opposite is being shown to be true now.”

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Upper Clearwater residents raise questions about logging plans

By Keith McNeill
Clearwater Times
May 31, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Upper Clearwater residents might disagree about the Upper Clearwater Hall but they seem to be more in agreement about their unhappiness with Canfor’s plans to log in the area. More than 30 residents of the area met in the Black Horse Saloon at Wells Gray Ranch on Friday evening, May 27, to talk about the forest company’s plans. Nearly all of them signed forms indicating that they did not think Canfor’s logging plans respect Upper Clearwater’s guiding principles document, which had been negotiated with the forests ministry several years ago. Mike Mueller seemed to reflect the thinking of many of those present, saying that while area residents should respect the forest industry for all that it has done for the local economy, the forest industry also needs to respect tourism.

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Residents who live near Englishman River seeking strict standards for logging

By Auren Ruvinsky 
Parksville Qualicum Beach News
May 31, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Logging on the riverbank just downstream from Englishman River Falls Provincial Park has some local residents calling for stronger regulation. Biologist and Errington resident Jessica Snider said that Timberwest clear-cut forest on the southeast side of the river near two popular swimming holes, which she said was inappropriate for a river that has been listed as one of the most endangered in the province by the Outdoor Recreation Council. “The Englishman River watershed serves as a source of drinking water for residents of the City of Parksville and provides critical habitat for many important wildlife species, including Roosevelt elk and bald eagles,” she said by e-mail.

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COLUMN: Managing fire and water requires careful balance

By Valerie Warmington
Nelson Star
May 31, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Nelson has been revelling in the rain, relieved that reservoirs are full and wildfire risk reduced for the moment. Yet despite the reprieve, interface wildfire and water shortage fuelled by rising temperatures continue to present real and growing threats. A century ago, vast swaths of forest surrounding Nelson and other communities were burned such that the risk of interface fire was virtually eliminated. Since that time, fire suppression has allowed dense re-growth providing abundant wildfire fuel. At present, the combination of plentiful fuel and excessive dryness due to high temperatures is prompting calls for more intensive logging in local interface and watershed areas.

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Evans Lake Forest Education Society is seeking a Volunteer Coordinator

Evans Lake Forest Education Society
May 31, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

The Volunteer Coordinator is primary person in charge of overseeing our Summer’s Volunteer programs. Through the summer we have approximately twenty volunteers who are at camp to supplement our program, facilities, and food services staff. The Volunteer Coordinator liaises with the mangers of those three areas leading up to summer to assess needs for volunteers for particular projects or re-occurring support and then design a schedule for volunteers around those needs. The Volunteer Coordinator will participate in the general Pre-Camp Training for Program Staff, but will also conduct their own day of training with summer volunteers. Given that all staff and campers stay onsite at the Evans Lake Forest Education Centre while camp is in session, the action never stops and, accordingly, applicants should enjoy working in ever-changing and dynamic work environments. Very strong organizational and interpersonal skills are a must.

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Resilient Federal Forests Act attached to Senate energy bill

Times Record
May 28, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States

The Resilient Federal Forests Act of 2016, a bill introduced by U.S. Rep. Bruce Westerman of Arkansas to combat “fire borrowing,” has been included in the new Energy Policy Modernization Act and is headed for Senate discussion after a conference. “Fire borrowing” is a term that described the U.S. Forest Service process of tapping into funds from nonfire programs when the agency exhausts its appropriated suppression funding. “Over 10 million acres of federal land went up in smoke last year,” Westerman said in a news release. “It is clear that the policies of the last several decades failed.”

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University of Montana announces new dean of College of Forestry and Conservation

By Keila Szpaller
Missoulian
May 31, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

A former faculty member of the University of Montana College of Forestry and Conservation will serve as its new dean. In a news release Tuesday, UM announced that Tom DeLuca will take the helm of the college starting Jan. 1, 2017. DeLuca is a soil scientist and 12-year veteran of UM who currently directs the University of Washington School of Environmental and Forest Sciences. “I am thrilled to be taking on responsibility as dean of one of the best natural resource programs in the nation, and I am very happy to be coming home to Montana,” DeLuca said in a statement.

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Good news: Trees and other foliage have regrown, despite drought

Los Angeles Times
May 28, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Over the past year, scientists have studied California’s trees from the air, the ground and even using X-ray technology. Each time, they have arrived at some version of a similar dreary conclusion: The state’s ongoing drought is wreaking havoc on forests, killing millions more trees at each check. But a study published recently online in the Open Journal of Forestry offered a refreshing and counterintuitive piece of good news. A NASA research scientist found the drought did not stop trees, shrubs and other foliage from regenerating in areas ravaged by wildfires.

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Forces are working to wean us off timber

The World Newspaper
May 28, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

The evidence is piling up. You can see it in recent federal policies and the inaction in Congress. The Bureau of Land Management reveals a land management plan for Western Oregon that shifts timber harvests around and gives new emphasis to alternative uses of the forests. A recent study by the Pew Charitable Trusts emphasizes the economic value of “quiet recreation” on BLM lands, estimating $2.8 billion in overall spending impact, $1.8 billion in total direct spending within 50 miles of sites and $800 million in generated personal income to individuals involved in quiet recreation on BLM lands. …Whether it’s a clear and methodical process going on or a coincidence, actions are converging that are bringing alternative forest economics in and, at least for counties like ours still beholden to them, pushing timber-based economics out.

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Timber is not Dead

By Chis Boice
Commissioner Boice’s Courthouse Corner
May 31, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

There are people in Douglas County who seem to be frustrated that County Commissioners keep “beating the timber drum” when “the timber industry is dead”. They wonder why we are not focused on “economic development” and recruiting “alternative industries”. “Why put all of your eggs in the timber basket?”, they say. I think it is important for people to understand why Commissioners continue to beat that drum. … It is true, that there has been much job loss in the timber industry and not all of that is related to the number of trees being cut. …So is timber dead? Only if you believe it. There are more trees out there than ever and still a market to sell them into. The only reason that the timber industry could be dead is if we all accept the notion that what we are doing in the forests today is better than what we’ve done in the past.

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Editorial: The failure to meet the forest challenge

The Bend Bulletin
May 31, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Both Sen. Ron Wyden, D-Ore., and Rep. Greg Walden, R-Hood River, have backed legislation to better manage Oregon’s federal forests. With their leadership, what could possibly go wrong? They are both skilled politicians and undeniably influential, but getting forest legislation passed has proved challenging — to put it nicely. Wyden has draft legislation titled “Wildfire Budgeting, Response, and Forest Management Act.” It’s aimed at improving forest management and wildfire budgeting. It’s bipartisan. …There is a snag. Wyden has tried to pass similar legislation before. It didn’t happen. Why should we think it will happen this time? His office said in a statement that Wyden “is optimistic the bipartisan draft legislation announced this week builds on those years of work with additional key allies from both parties to take a positive step toward resolving this issue once and for all.”

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Annual list of potential timber harvest sites available for review

Pilot Independent
May 27, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

The annual list of potential timber harvest sites on state-administered forest land is now available for public review, according to the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources. Comments will be accepted until June 22. The list of potential harvest sites is for fiscal year 2017, which begins July 1 and ends June 30, 2017. DNR field staff will examine 2,700 forest stands on nearly 60,000 acres for potential timber sales during the year. The DNR estimates that 45,000 of the 60,000 acres of forest land will be suitable for timber sales. “If you have a house, cabin or favorite recreation spot near state forest land, you can check the list of potential timber harvests, see what is planned nearby and provide input,” said Jon Nelson, DNR forest planning supervisor.

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Forest Fires

Alberta wildfire underlines need for national talks on disaster mitigation

Canadian Press in Victoria Times Colonist
May 31, 2016
Category: Forest Fires
Region: Canada

CALGARY – Alberta Premier Rachel Notley says the devastating fire in Fort McMurray underlines the need for a national discussion on disaster mitigation. Notley said Tuesday she has already asked that the subject be added to the agenda for July’s premiers meeting in Whitehorse, Yukon. “We’re not the first jurisdiction that’s been struggling with this problem. It’s happening all over the country, which is one of the reasons why we’re wanting to look at a broader conversation, because we’re frankly not the only province with a lot of boreal forest,” Notley said. “We have a federal disaster relief program but we also need to look at whether there’s the opportunity for potentially more federal support on mitigation efforts.”

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What the Alberta fire says about our attitudes toward climate change

By Blayne Haggart – assistant professor of political science at Brock University in St. Catharines, Ont
Globe and Mail
May 31, 2016
Category: Forest Fires
Region: Canada, Canada West

Attempts to link the Fort McMurray fire to climate change, most prominently by Elizabeth May, have been swatted down hard by ordinary Canadians, and many politicians and pundits. When I posted an article on the fire and climate change to Facebook, I was taken aback by the intensity of the discussion. …With a wildfire, where human culpability lies deep in the background (climate change, poor forestry-management practices), the debate is even more lopsided. …The Fort McMurray fire was a potential focusing event. Climate scientists and government experts agree that such extreme weather events are made more likely by climate change. Sure, you cannot link one event to climate change, but this is exactly what we expected to see more of based on what we know about climate change.

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N.W.T. fire season: no fires to fight after quiet, moist May

Area burned so far is a fraction of 2014 and 2015 equivalents, but drier weather is on the way
CBC News
May 30, 2016
Category: Forest Fires
Region: Canada, Canada West

After two punishing wildfire seasons, the 2016 Northwest Territories fire season has started in unusually calm fashion. Updating reporters on Monday, Richard Olsen — the territory’s fire operations manager — said 2016 had been “quite quiet” to date. Two wildfires have been recorded so far this year in the territory. The most recent was a small fire reported Saturday near Kakisa — apparently caused by a roadside campfire that was abandoned. It has been extinguished. A fire near Madeline Lake 25 kilometres north of Yellowknife earlier this month burned eight hectares before being declared out. That fire was believed to be a holdover from last year’s fire season that smouldered underground all winter.

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Fire ban under review

By Carl Clutchey
The Chronicle Journal
May 31, 2016
Category: Forest Fires
Region: Canada East, Canada

Moderate and heavy rainfall across much of Northwestern Ontario over the past few days has allowed provincial crews to get a better foot-hold against the region’s seven active forest fires, the province said Monday. “Rain by itself isn’t enough to put out a fire, but it does give our crews an advantage because they can set out hose lines and stop it from spreading,” said Dryden-based fire information officer Debbie MacLean. Of the seven fires still burning in the region, the largest remains Red Lake Fire No. 3, which is burning mostly inside Woodland Caribou Provincial Park. That fire, which is also burning inside Manitoba, is currently pegged at about 86,000 hectares, about one-sixth the size of the massive fire burning near Fort McMurray.

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Climate Change Intensifying Wildfire on National Forests

USDA Blog
May 31, 2016
Category: Forest Fires
Region: United States

You don’t have to be a rocket scientist to know that wildfires are more common during hot, dry summers. The area burned in the United States in 2015, over 10 million acres, according to the National Interagency Fire Center, occurred during a record temperature year for the Earth, plus record low snowpack and rainfall in some areas of the West. The sizzling weather of 2015 was similar to what global climate models project for the year 2060. Last year’s weather and fire may become the new normal later in the 21st century. A warmer climate is expected to increase the frequency and severity of fires. Historically, fires most often occur in the western U.S., as well as the boreal forest and tundra of Alaska. Current models predict that two to three times more area will burn annually in the West by 2050.  

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Fire Near Pine Grows To 3700 Acres

Payson Roundup
May 31, 2016
Category: Forest Fires
Region: United States, US West

On Tuesday evening, the Coconino National Forest issued the following update on fires still burning: Daily update for wildfires on Coconino NF. Fire managers with the Coconino National Forest continue to utilize lightning-caused wildfires to reduce forest fuels, while actively protecting values in the area such as power lines, communities, archaeological sites and sensitive habitats. This will be the last update for the Cowboy Fire, as fire managers have decided to completely suppress the fire, minimizing smoke impacts to the interstate and surrounding communities. 

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Wildfires Still Growing

By Alexis Bechman
Payson Roundup
May 31, 2016
Category: Forest Fires
Region: United States, US West

The Juniper Fire near Young grew to more than 6,620 acres over the weekend, casting a pass of smoke over Rim Country. Some 358 firefighters continued to monitor and direct the blaze, relying on five aircraft, a masticator, three dozers and 15 engines with five Hotshot crews to make sure the low-intensity ground fire remained within a boundary of some 80,000 acres. Meanwhile, the 3,708-acre Pivot Rock Fire north of Pine also sent a thick column of smoke into the sky throughout the holiday weekend. …Meanwhile, the Forest Service struggles to cope with a host of abandoned campfires, any one of which could start a blaze that would overwhelm the already heavily taxed firefighting resources. On Saturday, rangers in the Coconino National Forest responded to 42 abandoned campfires. Last year throughout the three-day weekend, they found 600 abandoned fires.

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Northwest Georgia notes increasing wildfire risk

WTVC
May 31, 2016
Category: Forest Fires
Region: US East, United States

The Georgia Forestry Commission is urging northwest Georgia residents to use extreme caution with outdoor fires because of a recent increase in wildfire activity and a growing potential for wildfire risk. According to the Georgia Forestry Commission, local dry conditions have made the fires more difficult to control, and in some cases required extended operations to contain. …The Georgia Forestry Commission has responded to numerous fires in northwest Georgia over the last two weeks. Several required extended operations and additional staffing to control and keep them contained. In Polk and Whitfield Counties, two fires have burned more than 50 acres each, and continue to be monitored for flare-ups and breakouts. Wildfires that start and spread in rough and steep terrain are especially difficult and require additional resources.

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Forestry officials battling Taylor County wildfire

Tallahassee Democrat
May 31, 2016
Category: Forest Fires
Region: US East, United States

Forestry officials are battling a 1,000-acre wildfire in Taylor County. The blaze started Sunday when a bolt of lightning struck in the Big Bend Wildlife Management Area north of Steinhatchee. A passerby called in the fire around 3:30 p.m. On Tuesday, Florida Forest Service and Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission officials worked to establish containment lines to prevent it from spreading to nearby private land, said FFS spokeswoman Ludie Bond. Officials also used burnout techniques — intentionally set controlled burns that ignite fuel ahead of the wildfire — to slow its progress.

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Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy

BC VIEWS: ‘Climate action’ charade continues

By Tom Fletcher
BC Local News in Victoria News
May 31, 2016
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: Canada, Canada West

The moving deadline for B.C.’s latest bold plan to control Earth’s weather with taxes has slid from March into June. Now that Premier Christy Clark has jetted back from her latest liquefied natural gas sales trip to Korea and Japan, brace yourself for the big reveal of Climate Action 2.0, as the second stage of B.C.’s strategy has been termed. The pending LNG industry is just one problem for this reality-challenged scheme to maintain B.C.’s self-declared global climate leadership. Clark’s “Climate Leadership Team,” a mix of industry, academic, environmental and aboriginal representatives, was appointed a year ago to make recommendations for the next step. It concluded that B.C. isn’t going to reach its 2020 emissions reduction target, even if the government implements the team’s recommendation to resume steep increases in the carbon tax starting in 2018.

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What’s Bugging Our Forests?

Emergency and Disaster Management Digest
May 31, 2016
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: US East, United States

Yes, it’s global warming again–but don’t hit ‘delete’ quite yet. One of the many, MANY impacts that global warming is bringing to bear on us in the near term is that of providing more suitable habitat for insects. The most damaging possibility is that insects that thrive in forests expand their ranges, have less significant die-off in winter, and find no particular constraints that would prevent them from munching down entire forests. So they will. We’ve explored impacts partially caused by insects before, although we may not have adequately made the connection between the bug and the disaster. …There’s no reason, really, to not understand what’s going on. The environment is warming; therefore, insects are doing better; therefore, they’re killing more trees throughout our forests; therefore, those forests are more likely to go up in flames — threatening those that we serve and protect.

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Multimillion-dollar funding for commercial waste-to-biofuel plant

By the University of Sydney
EurekAlert
May 31, 2016
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: International

It’s been a busy few days for Australian start-up Licella, whose innovative technology, developed in partnership with the University of Sydney, is the subject of new contracts with global investors that allow the re-imagining of the huge pulp and paper industry as biorefineries and the upgrading of end-of-life, difficult-to-recycle plastics – turning waste into renewable or recycled fuel blend-stocks. At the weekend, leading Canadian pulp and paper producer CanFor revealed it will invest funds sufficient for a full-scale commercial operation that will transform the resource-intensive pulp and paper industry by turning biomass waste into a petroleum substitute, biocrude. 

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