Tree Frog Forestry News

Daily Archives: June 2, 2016

Special Feature

B.C.s own Robin Hood remembered throughout forests of province

By David Bell
MetroNews Canada
June 1, 2016
Category: Special Feature
Region: Canada, Canada West

British Columbia’s government has created a $10,000 annual award in memory of Robin Hood of Sherwood Forest. You read that right. The Likely, B.C. resident who spent his life in forestry — founding the town’s locally managed 20,000-hectare community forest — had a sense of humour about his unlikely name, naming his own company Sherwood Forest Contracting Ltd.  This week the province announced it has established an award in Hood’s name, nearly three months after the 55-year-old died after a short battle with cancer. “Anyone who knows him knows he’s a big guy, with a personality to match and a huge heart,” said Jennifer Gunter, executive director of the B.C. Community Forest Association, in a phone interview. “He saw that ecologically, socially, culturally and economically sustainable forest management was possible — and that he could really leverage that to create jobs and economic opportunities for his community.”

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Business & Politics

Peter Foster: Resolute Forest Products uses mafia laws to go after the eco ‘mob’

The Financial Post
June 1, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, United States

All too often, corporations, concerned about the potential damage to their bottom lines from any “controversy,” kowtow to media-savvy radical environmentalists. Thus the lawsuit brought three years ago by Montreal-based Resolute Forest Products against Greenpeace for “defamation, malicious falsehood and intentional interference with economic relations” represented a rare display of business backbone. Greenpeace is still trying desperately to avoid its day in Canadian court, but now Resolute, under its arrow-straight CEO Richard Garneau, has upped the ante. On Tuesday, the company launched another suit — against Greenpeace and STAND (the environmental NGO formerly known as ForestEthics) — under U.S. anti-racketeering laws. …Greenpeace meanwhile is hardly in a position to complain about any misuse of RICO since it recently recommended that oil giant ExxonMobil be charged with racketeering for “sowing doubt” about climate change.

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Hopes high to keep idled mill

Chronicle Journal
June 2, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada East, Canada

Hornepayne Mayor Morley Forster said he hopes his town’s idled lumber mill won’t go the way of the wrecking ball like some other recession-ravaged Northern Ontario forestry mills have done. “My concern at the moment is that some raider will come in and scrap it,” Forster said Tuesday. Haavaldsrud Timber, which was idled in December, has been under the control of a receiver — PricewaterhouseCoopers (PWC) — since April 11. The deadline for firm bids from potential buyers is June 30. According to documents posted on PWC’s website, Haavaldsrud had nearly $22 million in assets and owed about $40 million to creditors at the time it was placed in receivership. Of the total debt, nearly $7 million is owed to the provincial government, which is among the secured and unsecured creditors. Of the $7 million, $1.3 million is for unpaid stumpage.

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Casey raises softwood lumber issue in House of Commons

By Darrell Cole
Cumberland News Now
June 2, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada East, Canada

OTTAWA – Softwood lumber agreements between Canada and the United States have come and gone, but one thing should remain the same, says the MP for Cumberland-Colchester. “The softwood lumber industry in Atlantic Canada is different from the industry in the rest of Canada, and it’s essentially the same as the industry in New England, with which it competes,” said Bill Casey, who raised the issue in the House of Commons on Tuesday. “The border is almost not there, when you consider the Canadian firms that own mills and timberland in Maine and vice versa.” In some provinces in western and central Canada, much of the timber is harvested from Crown land. It is the stumpage fees, controlled by provincial governments, that have long been scrutinized by U.S. lumber producers, who have claimed these fees are set artificially low.

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New lumber operation coming to Meridian

Idaho Statesman
June 1, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States, US West

IdaPine Mills, an Idaho lumber company, bought equipment and property in Meridian in May to start a new mill, a lending agency said. The mill will operate in four existing buildings on 17 acres at 240 W. Taylor Ave. and will create at least 35 jobs, according to the Idaho Housing and Finance Association. The association financed the deal by issuing a $10 million tax-exempt economic-development bond sold to Banner Bank. IdaPine Mills is a subsidiary of Evergreen Forest Products, which is based in New Meadows. Bond proceeds paid for the property, planer and related equipment and fixtures. IHFA said it issues about 70 percent of all bonds in Idaho.

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Resolute Forest files lawsuit against Greenpeace, alleges group is a ‘global fraud’

By Bertrand Marotte
Globe and Mail
June 1, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, US West

Newsprint giant Resolute Forest Products Inc. is ratcheting up its campaign against what it claims is a smear campaign by Greenpeace with the filing of a lawsuit in U.S. federal court alleging that the environmental group is a “global fraud” out to line its pockets with money from donors. In a suit filed in federal court in Georgia, Montreal-based Resolute alleges that “maximizing donations, not saving the environment, is Greenpeace’s true objective.” Also named in the suit is Stand, formerly ForestEthics, a group that Resolute alleges is closely allied to Greenpeace. …“We have not yet been served with any papers, but look forward to the opportunity to refute the allegations of this classic attempt to silence critics. Greenpeace will not be intimidated,” said Jasper Teulings, general counsel for Greenpeace International.

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The Lost Secret Sign Language of Sawmill Workers

In the 1970s, sawmill workers could talk about technical matters or insult each other in their own special sign language.
Atlas Obscura
June 1, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States, US West

When the linguists Martin Meissner and Stuart Philpott first started visiting sawmills in British Columbia in the 1970s, they thought they’d find workers communicating without speaking, probably with some simple gestures that contained technical information. There was a long history of such communication in the face of extreme noise: For centuries, American mill workers had used systems of hand signals to tell each other, across the unending roar of the saws, how to cut wood. What they discovered, though, floored them. The researchers witnessed a sign language system complete enough that workers could call each other “you crazy old farmer,” tell a colleague that he was “full of crap,” or tell each other when the foreman was “fucking around over there.”

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Stora Enso sells Finnish timber housing arm

Timber Trades Journal
June 2, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: International

Stora Enso is to sell its Finnish pre-fabricated timber housing business at Hartola to wood products company Pyhännän Rakennustuote Oy. In addition to the divestment agreement, Stora Enso and Pyhännän Rakennustuote have signed a partnership agreement, which aims to further increase the use of wood in construction. “This transaction supports the growth of both companies,” said Jari Suominen, head of Stora Enso’s wood products division. “We will continue providing Pyhännän Rakennustuote with massive wooden construction materials from classic sawn goods to elements such as cross laminated timber (CLT) and laminated veneer lumber (LVL). “We will create a strong partner network to provide competitive offerings and to promote the use of wood in construction.”

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Booming timber trade boosts forestry returns

Fund Strategy
June 1, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: International

Commercial forestry’s unique return characteristics have caught the attention of fund managers attempting to generate superior risk-adjusted performance. Over the 10 years to 31 December 2014, UK commercial forestry, as measured by the IPD Forestry index, has generated annualised returns of 18.8 per cent, with no years of negative returns. It has outperformed all other traditional and alternative asset classes. Furthermore, these returns have been achieved with an annual standard deviation of less than 10 per cent. Unsurprisingly, this kind of performance has piqued the interest of both institutional and private investors. Performance has been driven by a combination of factors, including: the biological growth of the trees, the rising timber price, the increase in land values and the higher and better usage of land as an alternative energy source.

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Growth of 7% in Germany’s softwood lumber exports

EUWID Wood Products and Panels
June 1, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: International

At a total of around 1.35m m³, German sawmills exported roughly 7% more rough-sawn softwood lumber in the first quarter than they did a year earlier. Pro-visional figures from Destatis, the German statis-tics office, in Wiesbaden, show that in doing so 972,990 m³ were delivered to buyers within Europe, which equates to an increase of 5% against the year before and a 71.9% share of the total exports. Exports to buyers outside Europe amounted to 380,066 m³, roughly 15% more than in the first quarter of 2015. Their share of the total exports thus rose by around two percentage points to 28.1%. 

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Wood, Paper & Green Building

WoodWorks Issues ‘Call for Nominations’ for its 2017 U.S. Wood Design Awards

Businesswire Press Release
June 1, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: United States

WASHINGTON—-WoodWorks, an educational initiative that provides free technical support and resources related to the design and construction of non-residential and multi-family wood buildings, is now accepting nominations for its 2017 U.S. Wood Design Awards. The awards recognize excellence in wood design, engineering, and construction, as well as innovative projects that showcase attributes of wood such as strength, beauty, versatility, cost effectiveness, and sustainability. The deadline for nominations is September 30, 2016. “We’re seeing real momentum toward the use of wood in buildings,” said Jennifer Cover, PE, Executive Director of WoodWorks. “Reasons range from cost and schedule savings, to wood’s design flexibility, renewability and reduced carbon footprint, even studies linking the use of exposed wood to occupant wellbeing.

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Wood components to boost quality of food products

By the Technical Research Centre of Finland
Science Daily
June 2, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: International

Xylan, fibrillated cellulose and lignin are wood-derived polymers that could be used for improving the texture and reducing the energy content of food products. According to VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, wood-derived ingredients could be utilised in the manufacture of products such as yoghurt, baked goods and meat products. The food industry is continuously looking for new, natural ingredients that improve the quality of food products and promote consumers’ health. Studies conducted by VTT have shown that xylan, fibrillated cellulose and lignin have properties that make them stand out from traditionally used ingredients.

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Contemporary cottage opens wide with a wall full of shutters

By Kimberley Mok
TreeHugger
May 31, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: International

Sheds, backyard offices and garden houses all add an extra bit of comfort and enjoyment to our natural spaces; sometimes they are almost like an extension of our homes. They come in all shapes and sizes, from the oddball to the futuristic. In Utrecht, this fetching new garden house was built out of wood, on top of the foundation of an old structure, and features a full wall of shutters that can open up to an peaceful outdoor view.

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Forestry

Editorial: Good ecology is good economics

Victoria Times Colonist
June 2, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

What’s good for the environment is good for the economy. That’s a concept most British Columbians embrace and it’s what the B.C. Chamber of Commerce appears to have decided in seeking protection for some old-growth forests. The chamber voted this week to ask the province to expand protection of old-growth forests in areas where they have, or likely would have, greater economic value if left standing. The resolution also called on the province to enact new regulations — incorporating such strategies as an old-growth management area, wildlife-habitat area or land-use order — with an eye on eventually legislating permanent protection through provincial-park or conservancy status. The doesn’t mean the chamber of commerce has suddenly become an environmental-advocacy group — it still has its eye firmly on the economy.

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Environmental group ramps up protection effort for western toads threatened by West Kootenay logging

By Larry Pynn
Vancouver Sun
June 1, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

The Wilderness Committee is seeking immediate protection for 700 hectares of forest land in the West Kootenay following a new video showing countless western toads — a species of concern — crawling around logging equipment in the Summit Lake area near Nakusp. “The toads are everywhere,” campaigner Gwen Barlee said in an interview Wednesday. “They’re in the cutblocks, on the road … under the tires of logging equipment. There’s no way in a million years that you can log in this habitat without killing toads left, right and centre.” The B.C. government spent almost $200,000 to build a toad tunnel underneath Highway 6. More than a million toadlets migrate at once, moving en mass from the lake across the highway to forested habitat where they live for four or five years before returning to the lake to breed.

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Environmental action has consequences

Letter from Larry Barnes
Prince George Citizen
June 1, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Mr. Giesinger’s letter referring to the man/bear encounter in the Forest of the World shows he believes in the dogma of environmentalism that only humans will encroach into the habitat of other species, indicating that no other species would commit such crimes against nature. The truth, even though it is deemed offensive in today’s society, as it will trample on someone’s belief, in this instance the truth is that every species that has been or ever will be will encroach into another’s habitat in its struggle to survive. There are those who do not accept this truth and will do whatever is necessary to prevent this evolutionary practice, regardless of the damage to the natural environment.

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Recommendation of boreal forest for World Heritage status

Radio Canada International
June 1, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Two distinctly different areas in Canada have joined 15 other sites around the world as recommended for World Heritage status for 2016. The International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) and the International Commission on Monuments and Sites have forwarded their recommendation to UNESCO’s World Heritage Committee. One of the sites in Canada is a huge area bigger than Belgium. The area lies east of Lake Winnipeg straddles the boundary between the provinces of Manitoba and Ontario. The area of boreal forest is called ‘Pimachiowin Aki’, which in the Asnishinaabe (Ojibway) language means, ‘land that gives life’,

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Five-month wait for logging plan has Sierra Club crying foul on the north Island

By John McKinley
Nanaimo News Bulletin
June 1, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

The provincial government is rejecting an environmental watchdog’s claim that a north Island logging firm is effectively engaging in “covert” logging of an old growth forest on the northwest coast. And it plans to take no action at this time in response to a Sierra Club request that the operation be put on hold until Lemare Lake Logging shares its plan for harvesting in the East Creek area adjacent Brooks Peninsula. Provincial laws require that such plans be made available to anyone who asks and Sierra Club campaigner Mark Worthing said logging site plans are routinely requested and routinely provided by most logging firms, often by email. “It’s pretty regular. Most of the bigger outfits just post their plans online,” he said.

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Demo 2016 technical conference coming to Vancouver!

By Peter Robichaud
Wood Business
June 1, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

The organizers of the Demo International 2016 technical conference would like to cordially invite you and your colleagues to Vancouver to attend the Demo International 2016 Conference. The two-day conference entitled, “Canada’s Forest Sector: Adapting to a new reality. Technology and innovation as a catalyst for success,” is scheduled for September 19 to 21, 2016 and is co-hosted by the Faculty of Forestry, UBC, and the Canadian Woodlands Forum in association with FPInnovations, the Council on Forest Engineering (COFE) and the Canadian Institute of Forestry. In addition to the diverse technical program, the event will also host the 108th Annual General Meetings of CIF/IFC and the 2016 AGM of COFE, along with interesting and informative pre and post conference field trips, as well as an opportunity to attend Demo International 2016.

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‘City of Stately Elms’ working on a fix for Dutch elm disease

There is hope that within the next couple of years there will be a strain of disease-resistant elm trees
CBC News
June 2, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

In an area once known for its canopy of elm trees, Dale Simpson presses a needle into a small, drilled hole in the crutch of a skinny white elm tree. He is injecting it with spores that carry Dutch elm disease, which ravaged the elm tree population throughout North America. Simpson, the manager of the National Tree Seed Centre in Fredericton, will inject 90 trees this spring and then watch closely over the next couple of months for signs of the disease. Simpson said he hopes within a couple of years there will be disease-resistant elm trees. “That would provide two options: leave the ones that are tolerant to the disease to produce seed, or go back to these trees and collect cuttings and use those cuttings to produce stock that could be used for planting around the city or elsewhere,” said Simpson.

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Urban forests in Greater Toronto area increasingly stressed, new report says

Development, climate change, invasive pests, violent storms are wreaking havoc on trees in region
CBC News
June 2, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

A new report says urban forests in the Greater Toronto Area are increasingly stressed and governments must invest in “living, green infrastructure” to protect this greenery. The report, “State of the Urban Forest in the Greater Toronto Area,” says that development, climate change, invasive pests and violent storms are wreaking havoc on urban forests in the Toronto area. The coalition is an alliance of organizations concerned about Ontario’s forests. …The report says only four species, maple, cedar, ash and buckthorn, make up 54 per cent of the tree population in the GTA, which means the urban forest is vulnerable to pests and disease. Violent storms, such as the ice storm of December 2013, have caused tree loss in many municipalities. Development is also taking its toll.

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Erickson to Support Alaska Forestry Research

Nasdaq
June 1, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

PORTLAND, Ore. — Erickson Incorporated, a leading global provider of aviation services, has been contracted to provide helicopter transport in support of the Alaska Department of Natural Resources (DNR) Forest Inventory Analysis project. Under the five-year contract, Erickson will deliver one exclusive-use, light lift helicopter for charter services to an interagency field crew led by the Alaska DNR Division of Forestry, United States Department of Agricultural and United States Forest Service. The crew will establish forestry field plots to analyze and monitor over several years as part of a national program.

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Poll: Growing number of Montanans believe public lands help jobs

by Rob Chaney
The Missoulian
June 1, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Montanans across the political spectrum think federal public lands benefit the state’s economy and quality of life, according to a new poll released by the University of Montana. “We found that support for national parks and conservation is about as popular and bipartisan an issue as you can find these days,” UM geography professor Rick Graetz said Wednesday. “There’s agreement in the state, on all sectors of politics.” ….Respondents believed parks and public lands had positive impacts both as national treasures and personal income. When asked the same question in 2014, 62 percent said national parks produced a positive impact on jobs. That number jumped to 77 percent in 2016. Those saying protecting public lands had a negative impact fell from 14 percent in 2014 to 6 percent this year.

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Stop aerial herbicide spraying in Lane County

by Marshall Gause, an organic farmer
The Register Guard
June 1, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

I and others are concerned for the health of Oregonians, especially those in the Highway 36 community — including Sandy Newman, who revealed in her May 18 guest viewpoint that she found 2,4-D in her urine. We shouldn’t have any levels of herbicides in our urine. Newman, who is coordinating with Oregonians for Food and Shelter — a lobbying group with board members from chemical companies such as Dow, Syngenta, Monsanto and Dupont — is confused about the science and health ramifications of aerial herbicide spraying, as well as the facts of the Highway 36 exposure. In 2011, Weyerhaeuser planned the aerial spraying of herbicides near Triangle Lake. In January 2011, before spraying, 41 area residents had urine samples collected at PeaceHealth in Eugene. Within 24 hours of spraying in March, the same residents had their urine collected at PeaceHealth. …The state’s report says residents who were tested “showed elevated levels of atrazine and 2,4-D in their urine.”

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Water yields from southern Appalachian watersheds in decline since the 1970s

from USDA Forest Service ? Southern Research Station
EurekAlert!
June 1, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

In the densely populated southeastern U.S., forested watersheds are particularly important to drinking water supplies. Recent estimates show that forests in the Southeast deliver surface drinking water to an estimated 48.7 million people, with streams from the mountainous Southern Appalachian region alone providing water supplies to 10 million people, many of them living in major cities such as Atlanta, Georgia. Newly published research from the U.S. Forest Service shows water yields from unmanaged forested watersheds in the southern Appalachian Mountains declining by up to 22 percent a year since the 1970s. Changes in water yield were largely related to changes in climate, but disturbance-related shifts in forest species composition and structure over time also played a role. The study findings have implications for managing the forest composition of watersheds to ensure water supply under future climate change.

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Tasmania’s Derby worries about tourism economy as logging encroaches on mountain bike trails

ABC News, Australia
June 2, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: International

Derby locals have expressed concern about logging near mountain bike trails, after their town was saved by tourism the popular sport brought them. Mountain bike tourism rejuvenated the small Tasmanian town, which had been struggling after a downturn in the forest industry. Almost 500 forestry jobs in the region were lost when sawmills closed and logging slowed. In a bid to create new jobs in tourism, the Federal Government spent more than $2.4 million building mountain bike trails in Derby. And the plan worked — Derby Mayor Greg Howard said the town had just had its best tourism season yet.

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Learn how to make Black Forest cake at the German resort where Marie Antoinette once lay her head

By Pat Brennan
National Post
June 1, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: International

BLACK FOREST VILLAGE — Start with 3.5 pounds of whipped cream. That’s a vital ingredient when building a Black Forest cake, especially here in the heart of Germany’s Black Forest. Most visitors to the Hofgut Sternen resort learn how to make Black Forest cake and get the opportunity to taste their achievement. Although Marie Antoinette likely didn’t have to build her own cake when she stopped here in 1770 on her way from Vienna to Paris to marry French King Louis XVI. She had 21 state coaches and 36 carriages in her entourage, pulled by 450 horses. Today, Hofgut Sternen is a popular resort hotel that features some famous Black Forest artifacts – such as Black Forest cake and cuckoo clocks.

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Forestry contractors focused on new safety laws

Forest Industry Contractors Association
Scoop Independent News
June 2, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: International

Leading forestry contractors are moving fast to ensure they understand and implement systems for meeting new health and safety laws brought in last month. Under the guidance of their industry association – the Forest Industry Contractors Association (FICA) – forest contractors are being encouraged to attend special workshops on the new legislation around health and safety in forestry workplaces. They have responded in greater numbers than ever before. Ross Davis, President of FICA, says has they’ve seen a surge in contractor numbers attending new health and safety legislation workshops in Gisborne and Tokoroa. More are expected when the series of regional workshops goes to Balclutha on 16 June and up to Whangarei on 14 July. Contractors are turning out in droves for these events.

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Identifying ancient trees from their amber

Analyses of a yellowish fossil may point to a previously unknown type of tree
Science News for Students
June 1, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: International

PHOENIX, Ariz. — A small lump of amber dug up in Southeast Asia may have come from a previously unknown type of ancient tree. That’s what a Swedish teen concluded after analyzing the fossilized tree resin. Her discovery may shed new light on ecosystems that existed millions of years ago. …The amber clues she has focused on relate to the original resin’s chemical bonds. These are the electrical forces that hold atoms together in the amber. Researchers can map those bonds and compare them to the ones that form in modern tree resins under heat and pressure. Those bonds can differ from one tree species to another. In this way, scientists can sometimes identify the type of tree that produced the resin.

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Forest Fires

Southwest Oregon’s fire season starts Friday

By Ryan Pfeil
Mail Tribune
June 1, 2016
Category: Forest Fires
Region: Canada, Canada West

A looming forecast of scorching temperatures, some in the triple digits, for later this week has prompted Oregon Department of Forestry officials to declare the start of the 2016 summer fire season in southwest Oregon. ODF officials said the season will kick off a minute after midnight Friday, June 3. After that, burn piles and burn barrels will not be allowed on the 1.8 million acres of lands protected by the department’s southwest Oregon district. That includes state, private, county, city and Bureau of Land Management forestlands in Jackson and Josephine counties. “We’re in for some pretty warmer-than-normal sunny weather,” said ODF spokesman Brian Ballou. “That’s going to cure the grass pretty quick down at the valley floor.”

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A timeline of a wildfire that consumed parts of Fort McMurray and the recovery

Canadian Press in the Chronicle Herald
June 1, 2016
Category: Forest Fires
Region: Canada, Canada West

FORT MCMURRAY, Alta. — As people head back to Fort McMurray after the wildfire, here is a look back at the events of the last month: May 1 — A fire starts in a remote part of forest southwest of Fort McMurray. Investigators don’t know how it started, but have noted that most spring wildfires are caused by people. A dry, warm spring and trees that are still greening make for lots of fuel. …May 3, 6:31 p.m. — All of Fort McMurray is placed under a mandatory evacuation order. …May 9 — Notley says 2,400 buildings were lost in the fire, but she praises firefighters for saving 25,000 more. Reporters are taken on a tour of devastated neighbourhoods.

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Spike in Alaska wildfires is worsening global warming, US says

By Suzanne Goldenberg
The Guardian
June 1, 2016
Category: Forest Fires
Region: United States, US West

The devastating rise in Alaska’s wildfires is making global warming even worse than scientists expected, US government researchers said on Wednesday. The sharp spike in Alaska’s wildfires, where more than 5 million acres burned last year, are destroying a main buffer against climate change: the carbon-rich boreal forests, tundra and permafrost that have served as an enormous carbon sink. Northern wildfires must now be recognised as a significant driver of climate change – and not just a side-effect, according to the report from the US Geological Survey.

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Northwest Georgia under high risk for wildfires

WDEF News 12
June 1, 2016
Category: Forest Fires
Region: US East, United States

LOOKOUT MOUNTAIN, Ga. – Northwest Georgia residents are being told to use extreme caution with outdoor fires because of a recent increase in wildfire activity. According to Georgia Forestry Commission officials, human actions combined with dry weather is keeping fire crews busy throughout Walker, Polk and Whitfield Counties. Georgia Forestry Commission Incident Commander Tommy Hawkins and his crew of firefighters along with a helicopter crew have been battling a 32-acre brush fire near Highway 157 on Lookout Mountain since Monday night; a fire that is believed to have been the result of a negligent camper. “It’s believed to be a campfire left unattended. We had investigators in this morning and they started looking into it. We found a spot where a camp fire was so that’s what we’re suspecting at this time, Hawkins said.

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