Tree Frog Forestry News

Daily Archives: June 6, 2016

Business & Politics

Softwood lumber deal would betray Canada’s free trade values

By Barrie McKenna
Globe and Mail
June 5, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada

Canada is a trading nation. Trade accounts for more than half of gross domestic product. The country’s future prosperity depends heavily on opening new markets and protecting traditional ones in a competitive global marketplace. Canada already has free-trade deals in place with 11 countries, plus agreements in the works with nearly 40 more. And yet, the federal government is working diligently behind closed doors on a pact with the United States that is the antithesis of all that – an agreement that would inhibit billions of dollars’ worth of Canadian exports, perhaps for years. In essence, Ottawa is ready to commit to self-imposed protectionism. Why would Justin Trudeau & Co. do that? Because the export in question is softwood lumber.

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Greenpeace says won’t bow to Resolute’s ‘bullying’

Radio Canada International
June 3, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, United States

A multimillion-dollar lawsuit by forestry giant Resolute Forest Products Inc. will not deter it from continuing its mission of “investigating, exposing and confronting environmental abuse by corporations,” Greenpeace said on Friday. “Our work to create a green and peaceful world will continue, and we will not back down in the face of intimidation and bullying,” Annie Leonard, Greenpeace USA executive director, said in emailed statement. …Greenpeace shot back, saying Resolute has tried for years to silence critics of its environmental practices with “threats, defamatory attacks, and baseless lawsuits.” “Instead of focusing on real solutions for forests, communities and its business, Resolute is once again wasting resources on a case with no merit,” said Leonard, who is also named in the lawsuit.

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COFI Announces Winners in 2016 Lumber Grading Competition

Council of Forest Industries News Release
June 3, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

Kelowna, BC – The Council of Forest Industries (COFI) today announced the winners of the 48th BC Lumber Grading Championship held in Kelowna on May 28, 2016 where top lumber graders from around the province gathered to demonstrate their skills. …“This annual lumber grading competition is an opportunity for lumber graders to showcase their skills and the quality of their work,” said Gary Desrosier, Quality Control Manager for the Council of Forest Industries. Pacific Lumber Inspection Bureau will host next year’s event in Kamloops. COFI is accredited by the Canadian Lumber Standards Accreditation Board (CLSAB) and the American Lumber Standards Committee (ALSC) among other organizations, to provide lumber inspection, certification and grade marking.

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Williams Lake lumber graders top notch at competition

Williams Lake Tribune
June 3, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

Jagdev Dhaliwal of Williams Lake has emerged B.C.’s top lumber grader for 2016 in the 48th annual B.C. lumber grading championship held in Kelowna on May 28. Dhaliwal works at Tolko’s Lakeview division. Coming in a close second was Kamaldip Sandhu of Tolko’s Soda Cr. Division, also in Williams Lake. Each year top lumber graders from around the province gather to demonstrate their skills, said the Council of Forest Industries as it announced the results of this year’s competition. Brian Marsh of Comact, Prince George, scored the highest practical mark in the entire event and won the Champion of Champions Division, the toughest competition which is open only to past winners. The first year division with lumber graders attending the competition for the first time, was won by Lily Zhou of West Fraser – Quesnel Division, with Raymond Wium of Canfor – PG Sawmill in second place.

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Johnson Brothers Lumber completes expansion in Canastota

The Central New York Business Journal
June 3, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: US East, United States

CANASTOTA, N.Y. — Johnson Brothers Lumber Company has finished work on a 20,000-square-foot lumber-production facility in Canastota. The company invested more than $1.7 million and exceeded its commitment to create at least 10 new jobs, Empire State Development said in a Friday news release announcing completion of the company expansion. Johnson Brothers Lumber is a Cazenovia–based supplier of hardwood for the furniture industry. The company’s expansion is a “priority” project that the Central New York Regional Economic Development Council (CNYREDC) endorsed, according to ESD. As a result, ESD awarded Johnson Brothers Lumber a capital grant of $150,000 for the nearly $2 million project.

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Finland’s consumption of forest chips decreased by 3% in 2015

Lesprom\
June 6, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: International

The main solid wood fuel used in the Finnish plants was forest chips, the consumption of which decreased by 3% year-on-year to 7.3 million cubic metres. Finland’s consumption fell by 9% in the combined heat and power production, but increased by 12% in the generation of heat. Together with the forest chips burned in small-scale housing, total consumption reached 8 million cubic metres, as Natural Resources Institute Finland (Luke) said in the press release received by Lesprom Network. “More than half, or 3.9 million cubic metres, of the forest chips consumed by the plants were manufactured from small-sized trees, that is pruned small-diameter stems and unpruned small-sized trees.

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Wood, Paper & Green Building

Selkirk woodworking students see visions come to life

By Bill Metcalfe
Nelson Star
June 1, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: Canada, Canada West

Students in the Fine Woodworking program at Selkirk College had their year-end show last weekend at the Trading Company mall on Baker Street. As usual, it was one of the artistic highlights of the year in Nelson, with large crowds attending the opening reception. The Star talked with four of the students about their work.

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Tree-ring expert uses attic beams to date historic Sackville homes

By Vanessa Blanch
CBC News
June 5, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: Canada East, Canada

Conservation biologist Ben Phillips has been spending a lot of time lately in dusty attics and dank basements in the Sackville area. “I just climbed out of the attic of the Bell Inn — it is one of the many buildings in the Tantramar region that we’re trying to date,” he told CBC’s Shift. Phillips is working with the Tantramar Heritage Trust to determine the age of some of the oldest homes in the Maritimes, including the Bell Inn in Dorchester, by taking core samples or “tree cookies” from wooden beams.

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“Timber Is the New Concrete:” 8 Projects Pioneering Laminated Wood Framework

Architizer
May 3, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: United States

As one of the most elemental building materials, timber has come a long way from the world’s oldest examples of wooden architecture, early Neolithic water wells. With this year being deemed the “beginning of the timber age,” wood has taken the place of concrete and steel to become the 21st-century material of choice for many. Praising its sustainability, quality and speed of construction, architects have fully embraced new types of engineered timber that are markedly hardy, steadfast and malleable. This material fixation is largely due to one particular technology: cross-laminated timber. Usually referred to as CLT, new types of engineered wood consisting of laminated timber sections allow architects to build an amalgam of curved configurations that weren’t previously possible. 

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The Wonders of Wood Buildings

By William Shoutis – Bozeman Ranger District
USDA Blog
June 3, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: United States

Trees do plenty of work to sequester carbon on their own, but many forests are not as healthy as they should be due to fire suppression and climate change. This can leave trees vulnerable to large scale insect damage, fire or drought, and much of the carbon stored by forests is lost to the atmosphere as trees die. The U.S. Forest Service is committed to the storage of carbon using wood products through the green building and wood products strategy. This strategy involves putting people to work in rural communities, enhancing resiliency of our ecosystems, and sequestering carbon by promoting the use of wood products in large building construction.

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Tuscaloosa factory will make dome building parts, will double as storm shelter

By Angel Coker
Tuscaloosa News
June 4, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: US East, United States

A company that specializes in dome-shaped houses built to withstand heavy winds is building a new factory in Tuscaloosa that will double as a storm shelter. New Age Dome Construction will begin construction of a wooden dome factory in Tuscaloosa this week, where residential, commercial and storm shelter dome building components will be made. Company owner John Johnson said he expects the building to be completed in August. The 2,796 square-foot, 28 foot-tall factory that will be located on Southside Drive can hold between 500 and 900 people in the event of a tornado, and Johnson said he plans to open it up to the public during tornadic weather.

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Liquid by-products from wood and forest industry find use in wood-plastic composites

Science Daily
June 3, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: International

A novel method for adding liquid by-products from the wood industry into wood-plastic composites (WPCs) prior to manufacturing was developed in a new study from the University of Eastern Finland. The study also discovered that proton-transfer-reaction mass-spectrometry (PTR-MS) is a suitable method for measuring the amounts of volatile organic compounds, VOCs, released from WPCs. …Putting waste to good use — liquids separated from wood as additives in WPCs. In the study, liquid by-products generated from biochar production and heat treatment of wood were added to WPCs, and the effects of the additions on the composite properties were analysed. The findings have relevance for two different industries as the wood industry by-products are more extensively used in the WPC industry.

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Forestry

‘Which tree would you like to be?’: Biodegradable coffins could turn cemeteries into forests

By John-Michael Schnieider
National Post
June 3, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

[Frog Comment: This isn’t the first time this story’s been in the Frog, but it’s newsworthy in that it was picked up by the National Post!] “Which tree would you like to be?” That is the question being asked by Italian designers Anna Citelli and Raoul Bretzel, who have created a coffin allowing people to be buried in egg-shaped capsules attached to the roots of trees. Citelli and Bretzel, see the new coffin as an alternative to most typical burials, which are expensive and consume natural resources. By placing what they call the “Capsula Mundi” underneath a tree of the person’s choosing, the designers hope to change how we think about traditional coffins. “Capsula Mundi is made of biodegradable materials,” Citelli explained. “Inside, the body is placed in a fetal position, and a tree is planted above the burial. The plant will grow, indicating where it took place.”

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Vancouver Island growing away from old growth logging?

By John McKinley
BC Local News
June 3, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

…Citing the power of old growth trees as a tourism resource, Vancouver Island communities voted in April to seek a total ban on old growth harvesting on the Island’s Crown land. …“It just boils down to basic math. This is not a comment about logging. It’s about economics and marketing,” he said. “Port Renfrew now has a product people can’t get anywhere else.” …According to David Elstone, executive director of Truck Loggers Association, a ban on old growth logging would devastate the industry. Elstone was caught off guard by both motions and unclear why there has been a shift in thinking from organizations that have traditionally been in the industry’s corner.

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Forest Practices Board reviews timber sales

By Richard Rolke
Vernon Morning Star
June 5, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Cherryville residents hope a review will lead to changes within a government agency. The Forest Practices Board will examine the activities of the B.C. Timber Sales program in the Okanagan-Shuswap starting Monday. “I hope rural communities will have some influence on forest management in watersheds next to communities,” said Hank Cameron, Cherryville director. Cherryville has had a long-standing conflict with BCTS over the agency’s plans to allow harvesting on Cherry Ridge. The community says logging could trigger slides, which would negatively impact the watershed and private property.

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Cowichan landmark celebrates 50 years

By Lexi Bainas
Cowichan Valley Citizen
June 3, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

“Take a ride back in time aboard the authentic steam train as the BC Forest Discovery Centre celebrates ‘50 Years, 100 Acres’ beginning Saturday, June 4.” So says the BC Forest Discovery Centre as it prepares to mark half a century in Duncan. And the centre knows how to throw a party. “We wanted to have some fun with retro pricing,” said the centre’s curator Jenna Charles. “Part of our exhibit is looking at old maps, old tickets. But while we can’t go as low as $1.50 to get in, we are offering $5 admission for everyone and then 50-cent hot dogs and five-cent popcorn to really bring back that retro vibe.”

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Northwest leaders push value of forestry on Queen’s Park

By Ian Ross
Northern Ontario Business
June 6, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

With the northwestern Ontario’s forestry industry on the rebound, municipal leaders vow to continue lobbying the provincial government to keep up the flow of wood fibre to this region’s sawmills. The looming spectre of the Endangered Species Act (ESA), and coming changes to the province’s forest management planning manual, has mayors of forestry towns worried that an ideologically-based agenda at work to protect the habitat of woodland caribou may threaten the availability of Crown wood supply to industry. “The Endangered Species Act could kill us,” said Kenora Mayor Dave Canfield, president of the Northwestern Ontario Municipal Association (NOMA), which held its annual conference in Thunder Bay, April 27-29, attracting more than 250 delegates, including Premier Kathleen Wynne and six cabinet ministers.

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And you thought June bugs were bad! Meet the Japanese beetle

CBC News
June 3, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

June bugs, shmoon bugs. An invasive pest called the Japanese beetle is what’s keeping some P.E.I. garden experts up at night this season. As spring arrives on P.E.I. and gardeners get busy outdoors, wildlife officials are asking Islanders to keep an eye out for the Japanese beetle. “It’s closely related to the June bug, which is plentiful this time of year, but thankfully, far less common,” said P.E.I. landscape technician David Carmichael. So far, P.E.I.’s Japanese beetle infestation seems to be mainly in the Charlottetown region and in areas west of the city.

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State should scrap Elliott forest privatization

By Rod Sando
The Register-Guard
June 5, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Defying the will of most Oregonians, our elected leaders in Salem are deep into a process to privatize the 93,000-acre Elliott State Forest northeast of Coos Bay. More than likely, this treasured rain forest will be snatched up by equity investors looking to maximize revenue, which will mean more clear-cuts, muddied rivers and “private property” signs, and less access to some of the finest public lands in Western Oregon. The disposal process should be jettisoned immediately and replaced by one that embraces values Oregonians hold closely. The State Land Board, made up of Gov. Kate Brown, Secretary of State Jeanne Atkins and Treasurer Ted Wheeler, needs a fresh approach that recognizes the many important public values Elliott supports while generating income for the school trust fund.

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UM forges relationship between Montana and Zambia

By Kurt Wilson
The Missoulian
June 5, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

One day, a doctoral student at the University of Montana brought Wayne Freimund a proposal to review for an experimental forest in Zambia. The idea was to build a $6 million fence to enclose lions, and the College of Forestry and Conservation student told Freimund the project was for her father, Emmanuel Chunda. At the time, Chunda was dean of the forestry college at Copperbelt University in Zambia, and Freimund, now interim dean of the same college at UM, saw parallels between the schools – two forestry programs working on similar issues, an emphasis on field work, both with experimental forests.

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Georgia team to test treatment for bat-killing fungus

By Kathleen Foody
Associated Press Wichita Eagle
June 6, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

ATLANTA – Georgia’s hibernating bat population appears headed for the same decimation of the animals experienced by eastern states. Georgia researchers, though, could produce a treatment that helps other states avoid the same result. The bat die-offs have been blamed on a deadly fungal disease spreading across the country, known as white-nose syndrome. Survey totals released last month in Georgia found the number of bats hibernating in caves and other sites dropped 92 percent during the last six years. “There are really two options: You can count dead bats and watch white-nose spread across the country, hoping some populations develop a tolerance,” Chris Cornelison, a research associate at Georgia State University, said. “Or you can work like crazy to intervene.”

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Expert Explains White Tree Coating Caused by Caterpillars

By Caitlin Burchill
WABI TV5
June 3, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

White silk coating trees. They’re from a particular type of caterpillar, which seems to have thrived during this mild winter. Some viewers have written to us about the webbing and to UMaine’s Cooperative Extensition as well. This video is of a bush on Eastern Avenue in Brewer. An expert we spoke to says it’s from the euonymous caterpillar. They feed on trees like spindle and burning bush then spin lines of silk to get to the ground before they pupate. We’re told every couple of years, tens of thousands of these caterpillars end up in trees.

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Global experts assess Poland’s threatened pristine forest

Associated Press in Idaho Statesman
June 5, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: International

WARSAW, POLAND – Poland’s Environment Ministry says that global forestry experts are checking the condition of the ancient Bialowieza Forest where the ministry has begun extensive logging to stop the spread of a harmful beetle. Environmentalists have protested the logging to the European Commission, saying it threatens the forest’s existence while giving no guarantee of success in fighting the bark beetle. The ministry said on its website that it has invited experts from the International Union for Conservation of Nature who started inspecting the forest on Sunday and will give an opinion on the ministry’s plans to protect it.

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Forest Fires

Action by Nelson area landowners key to wildfire safety, expert says

By Bill Metcalfe
Nelson Star
June 3, 2016
Category: Forest Fires
Region: Canada, Canada West

A forester with expertise in wildfire and fuel management says Nelson sits between seven and 10 on the provincial government’s 10-point scale that measures wildfire threat to communities. “Nelson is a fairly high risk area,” says Bruce Blackwell, who is working for a local government partnership on a new wildfire management plan for the Nelson area. “Fort Mac was a game changer because it woke everybody up,” he says. “I don’t want everybody to go back to sleep if we have a rainy fire season. This [wildfire management plan] is a 20-year project to get to a point where we can protect Nelson to the best of our ability. But if we don’t get on this train we are going to see communities in BC burn. I don’t know where and when, but I know it will happen.”

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The Beast of Fort McMurray most likely man-made, says forestry manager

By David Staples
Edmonton Journal
June 4, 2016
Category: Forest Fires
Region: Canada, Canada West

The Fort McMurray wildfire was most likely man-made, says Chad Morrison, senior manager of Alberta wildfire investigations. The exact reason it ignited is still under investigation, with the final report due in one month, Morrison says. No doubt the larger debate about origins of the fire will rage much longer. As soon as the wildfire burned through Fort McMurray, a heated debate flared about what caused it. Was the fire man-made or caused by Mother Nature? Was it simply the boreal forest doing what it does every 50 to 200 years, burning down as part of its natural regeneration cycle? Or was it caused by man-made climate change? Or perhaps it was more related to a natural El Nino weather event. The answers are clearer now. It’s evident that numerous factors combined to create the wildfire that would grow into the Beast, destroying more than 1,600 structures and 580,000 hectares to date.

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Guest opinion: Why thinning doesn’t prevent forest fires

By George Wuerthner
Billings Gazette
June 4, 2016
Category: Forest Fires
Region: United States, US West

In a recent review article about forest thinning and its effectiveness to reduce wildfire severity and spread in Forest Ecology and Management, researchers concluded that on reducing fire risk “thinning alone had either less of an effect or none at all, compared to untreated sites.” The study did conclude that thinning followed by at least one, (but better two) prescribed burn treatments is generally effective at reducing fire risk. And if you can only do one thing, prescribed burning is more cost-effective at reducing fires than thinning/logging alone. Ironically, the Forest Service emphasizes logging/thinning over burning. But there are other reasons to question the entire fuels reduction program.

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Smoky Skies

By Alexis Bechman
Payson Roundup
June 3, 2016
Category: Forest Fires
Region: United States, US West

Fires spread but firefighters happy. With above-normal temperatures expected this weekend, fire managers are closely watching several lightning-sparked forest fires. Crews are so far pleased with how the fire south of Payson and several on the Mogollon Rim are burning. Officials are letting the fires burn within contained areas to help eliminate low-level fuels, which should help prevent future larger blazes and benefit the health of the forest. The biggest fire in the area is the Juniper Fire 10 miles south of Young. That fire started May 17 and was at 12,682 acres as of Thursday afternoon. There are 403 crew members working the fire, including several firefighters from Payson, Houston Mesa and Christopher Creek fire departments.

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Floyd County forestry workers talk about hot, dirty job of fighting area wildfires

By Spencer Lahr
Rome News Tribune
June 4, 2016
Category: Forest Fires
Region: US East, United States

….In 2004, after 20 years in the Air Force, Oakes needed a job. With his love for the outdoors trumping the forewarning of his childhood memories, Oakes began a career fighting fires.Stacy Cantrell had a safer relationship with fire growing up, starting prescribed burns on his family’s farm. His upbringing and involvement with the outdoors attracted him to becoming a ranger in Floyd County. Even with a lack of precipitation in May, only two wildfires have broken out in Floyd County. The fires burned a total of four acres on Banks Mountain, south of Cave Spring. Floyd’s wildfire numbers, to date, may be low but that doesn’t mean Oakes and Cantrell haven’t been busy. The two were dispatched to separate wildfires May 28 and June 2 in Whitfield and Walker counties.

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Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy

Here’s what the science really says about Fort McMurray and climate change

By Mike De Souza 
National Observer
June 3, 2016
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: Canada, Canada West

…Those unusual weather conditions have been widely attributed to El Nino, a naturally-occurring phenomenon linked to warm ocean water that disrupts the weather. But Flannigan, a professor of wildland fire from the University of Alberta, and many other climate change scientists agree that while the Fort McMurray fires cannot be directly linked to the carbon pollution produced by humans, Canadian wildfire activity of the past few years is well above average. And it’s connected to the warming climate. In terms of the total areas destroyed by fires, there’s an unmistakable escalation, they say. They see these fires as vivid markers of dangers to come for the forests and for the people and wildlife that live in them and around them.

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Raising the profile of biomass

By Roopa Rakshit – Ph.D. candidate, Faculty of Natural Resources Management, Lakehead University.
The Chronicle Journal
June 5, 2016
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: Canada East, Canada

Biomass inventory, supply-chain logistics, standards and technological applications, emerging markets, technical and regulatory hurdles were highlights of two bio-economy workshops held recently in Thunder Bay. Hosted by the Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry (MNRF), the take-home messages were positive and promising. The province has organic material from forest wood and agriculture residues that complements with forestry-based expertise to be at the forefront of an old-but-new alternative form of energy. Thus, generating electricity and heat through renewable biomass products has tremendous potential.

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Empowering Community Forests in the Fight Against Climate Change

By Greg Watson and Ben Hodgdon
Huffington Post
June 3, 2016
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: United States

When most people think about climate change, the first thing that comes to mind is the burning of fossil fuels for energy or transport. Rarely are forests considered. But they must be. The deal struck at the Paris climate change summit (COP 21) in December 2015 confirmed this. Forests and forestry, long a side note to larger conversations about reduction of emissions from energy supply and use, were topics of increased focus and discussion. The reason is clear: If the world is going to limit global warming to 2 degrees Celsius, the focus cannot solely be on fossil fuels. We must also reduce emissions from the land sector—above all by stemming deforestation. 

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Working on making willow the energy crop of the future

WRVO
June 6, 2016
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: US East, United States

While most central and northern New York crops are being planted right now, there’s one that’s being harvested. SUNY ESF researchers are harvesting willow, as part of a project that continues to find the best way to use the woody plant as an alternative energy source. When most people hear the word willow, an image of a weeping willow tree comes to mind. But that’s not what SUNY ESF researchers are working on in the Willow Project, a program that’s developing a biomass energy source. “They are in the same genus, but different species, and the species we are targeting here are in shrub form,” said Justin Heavey, who manages the SUNY ESF willow crops. “It more or less just grows on its own. I maintain areas the fields to maintain access.

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Time running out for Maine to cash in on ‘biobased’ products, advocates say

By Craig Anderson
Press Herald
June 4, 2016
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: US East, United States

As Maine’s forest products industry continues to falter, global demand is skyrocketing for new products created from breaking down wood and other plant matter into their constituent sugars and fibers. Maine should be fighting hard to secure its place in the plant-based, or “biobased,” products industry, but fear, complacency and a lack of political will are holding back any meaningful progress, advocates say. Time is of the essence, because Maine’s existing forest-products infrastructure helps bolster the business case for bringing new biobased products companies and investment to the state. That infrastructure, including pulp and paper mills, is shrinking fast.

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Sir William Wakeham Award 2016 winners Patrizia Marchetti and Agi Brandt-Talbot

By Mikhail Menezes and Michael Panagopulos
Imperial College London
June 4, 2016
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: International

This year the prize will be shared between two outstanding researchers from the Department of Chemical Engineering. Please join us in congratulating Dr Patrizia Marchetti and Dr Agnieszka Brandt-Talbot on winning this year’s Sir William Wakeham award, an excellent achievement! …Dr Agnieszka Brandt-Talbot joined Imperial College in 2007 on a Porter Institute funded PhD scholarship. As a PhD student, she laid the foundations for her later work in the ionoSolv process, a unique method to produce renewable fuels and chemical feedstocks from woody biomass (lignocellulose).

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Enviva Partners, LP signs long-term off-take contract to supply wood pellets to the UK

Lesprom
June 3, 2016
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: International

Enviva Partners, LP announced the execution of a new take-or-pay off-take contract to supply wood pellets to Lynemouth Power Limited, a subsidiary of Energetický apr?myslový holding (EPH). Lynemouth Power plans to convert its 420 megawatt coal facility in the UK to wood pellet fuel by the end of 2017. Deliveries under this contract are expected to commence in the 3Q 2017, ramp to full supply of 800,000 metric tons per year in 2018, and continue through the 1Q 2027.

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