Tree Frog Forestry News

Daily Archives: June 20, 2016

Business & Politics

U.S. and Canada Say Divisions Remain in Softwood Lumber Dispute

By Josh Wingrove and Jen Skerritt
Bloomberg
June 17, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, United States

The U.S. and Canada have “significant differences” amid talks toward a new softwood-lumber trade pact, according to the countries’ top trade officials. U.S. Trade Representative Michael Froman and Canadian International Trade Minister Chrystia Freeland released a joint statement Friday stressing that negotiations continue on what they described as an important part of both economies. The previous softwood lumber deal expired in October 2015, and the file has historically been one of the thorniest between the two trading partners. Both countries have until October to iron out a new trade accord, after which U.S. companies can file new trade cases against Canadian imports.

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Canadian sawmill jobs at risk as softwood lumber deal appears to fade: analyst

by Ross Marowits
Canadian Press in The Chronicle Journal
June 19, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada

MONTREAL – Canadian jobs and sawmills across the country are increasingly at risk because of fading prospects they will avoid a new round of U.S. duties on imported softwood lumber, according to an industry analyst. RBC Capital Markets analyst Paul Quinn says he expects the United States will impose duties of at least 25 per 1cent in mid-2017 and that will put pressure on Canadian producers. “They’ll be mills shut right across Canada because nobody’s making the kind of money that they’d have to pay in the duties,” Quinn said in an interview. He expects at least five mills to be affected in British Columbia but declined to say how many sawmills or jobs could be impacted in other provinces. Quebec-based producer Resolute Forest Products (TSX:RFP) said jobs would also be at risk if Canada accepts a U.S. proposal that would put a 24 per cent quota on Canadian imports.

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U.S., Canada report major differences in lumber dispute

By David Ljunggren
Reuters Canada
June 17, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada East, Canada

OTTAWA  – Talks between the United States and Canada on a long-running dispute over softwood lumber exports have bogged down amid “significant differences,” the two nations said on Friday, potentially paving the way for a fresh round of lawsuits. U.S. producers complain that Canadian lumber is subsidized, and have in the past launched trade challenges that resulted in the United States imposing billion of dollars in tariffs. The most recent round of arguments ended with a 2006 deal that expired in October 2015. Both sides agreed to take no action for a year after that, but without a new treaty, U.S. firms have made clear they will file new damage claims.

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Temporary layoffs at Port Hawkesbury Paper ‘could be a lot worse,’ union says

Union’s 1st VP says workers not ‘blindsided’ by the news
CBC News
June 18, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada East, Canada

A union representing hundreds of workers at Port Hawkesbury Paper says that for the first time there will be a temporarily layoff at the paper mill. It will last one week. “Any time you lay people off it sends a whole bunch of shivers through everybody and, in a small community, people say ‘Oh God, the mill is going down, right?'” said Archie MacLachlan, first vice-president of Unifor Local 972. “The news could be a lot worse.” MacLachlan said the facility in Port Hawkesbury, N.S., temporarily stopped production of supercalendered paper — the smoother, thinner paper often used in magazines. “The primary reason for shutting down this time is to make sure we’re not producing paper that we don’t have sales for right now,” he said.

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Cabinet shuffle pleases leaders, industry

Northern Ontario Business
June 17, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada East, Canada

The Federation of Northern Ontario Municipalities (FONOM) was delighted that all four Northern Ontario will stay in cabinet at Queen’s Park. …“While we are disappointed that Minister (Bill) Mauro will no longer be the Minister of Natural Resources and Forestry, a portfolio which is of utmost importance to FONOM and one that Mauro truly understands, we are pleased to have him as the Minister of Municipal Affairs,” said Spacek. … “For northern and rural Ontario, by responsibly harvesting our province’s renewable natural resource, trees, we can act on an opportunity to create more green jobs, grow local economies and mitigate the challenges associated with climate change,” said OFIA president-CEO Jamie Lim in a statement.

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More than half of employees at Nova Scotia paper mill to be laid off

Canadian Press in Metro News
June 17, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada East, Canada

POINT TUPPER, N.S. — The development manager for a Nova Scotia paper mill says more than half of the mill’s 330 employees will be affected by layoffs next week. Marc Dube of Port Hawkesbury Paper said today that poor market conditions for printing and writing-grade paper has led to the week-long shutdown. He says some of the unionized and non-unionized employees will take vacation during the shutdown. Dube says he’s not sure if more layoffs are in store, but company officials remain confident heading into the busier fall months — and workers could be called back if the company gets an order.

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US investigation of Lumber Liquidators comes to a close

Associated press in the Canadian Business
June 17, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States

NEW YORK, N.Y. – Federal regulators have closed an investigation of Lumber Liquidators after the company agreed not to resume sales of Chinese-made laminate flooring. Shares of Lumber Liquidators soared more than 16 per cent Friday morning. The Toano, Virginia, company stopped selling the Chinese-made laminate flooring last year, a couple of months after a news report on “60 Minutes” said it contained high levels of the carcinogen formaldehyde. The U.S. Consumer Production Safety Commission said late Thursday that Lumber Liquidators tested the air quality in 17,000 households and none had formaldehyde above guidelines. Customers who installed the Chinese-made flooring should not rip it out, the CPSC said. Instead, they can call Lumber Liquidators to have their air tested. Lumber Liquidators has agreed to continue to test the air quality of homes for people that bought the flooring

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The Case Against Greenpeace

A lumber company says activists impersonated its employees.
Wall Street Journal
June 17, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States

The pressure on businesses to fold in the face of environmental scare campaigns can be enormous. But in federal court in Georgia, Canada’s Resolute Forest Products is suing Greenpeace for defamation, racketeering, conspiracy and other alleged offenses. In March we told you about a separate defamation lawsuit filed by Resolute that is currently winding its way through Canadian courts. The company has since filed in the U.S. because that’s where many of the alleged offenses occurred and it’s home to many of Resolute’s customers and (thanks to Greenpeace) former customers. The Journal’s owner News Corp. is a Resolute customer.

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Longview plant offers strategic advantages for Nippon

By Marissa Luck
The Longview Daily News
June 18, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States, US West

Nippon Paper says it won’t lay off employees when it buys Weyerhaeuser Co.’s liquid packaging plant in Longview this fall, a move the Japanese paper maker has coveted for quite sometime. Nippon Paper Industries spokesman Mizuho Ishida confirmed Friday that the company will retain the mill’s existing 550-employee workforce. Both companies announced Wednesday that Nippon will buy Weyerhaeuser Co.’s liquid packaging plant in a $285 million cash deal. The deal excludes NORPAC, the newsprint and book paper manufacturing plant, which is jointly owned by Weyerhaeuser and Nippon. The Tokyo-based company says it has no plans to buy out the remainder of NORPAC anytime soon.

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No decision on Cedar Palace fate

Hungry Horse News
June 17, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States, US West

Six months after it announced its merger with Plum Creek, Weyerhaeuser has yet to make a final determination on how many employees will be retained in its administrative offices in Columbia Falls, known locally as the Cedar Palace. Tom Ray, Montana Resources team leader for Weyerhaeuser, said decisions on the future of the palace and its employees will be made in the next couple of months. He said the internal discussions are based on which management and support systems Weyerhaeuser will ultimately adopt. “We have different systems,” he said. “We’re still working through that.” About 100 people work at the Cedar Palace in secretarial, accounting, information technology and other administrative jobs. Privately, some employees have said they are likely out of a job in a couple of years unless they move to Weyerhaeuser’s Seattle offices.

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Finance chair never told about possible forestry job cuts

By Jeff Jenkins
Metro News West Virginia
June 17, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: US East, United States

CHARLESTON, W.Va. — House of Delegates Finance Committee Chairman Eric Nelson says his committee held at least three meetings during the 17-day special session of the legislature where representatives from the Department of Commerce and Division of Forestry were present but not once did anyone mention the possibility of layoffs. “Not once, not once, was that brought up as related to a cut in the Division of Forestry,” Nelson (R-Kanawha) said Friday on MetroNews “Talkline.” There’s been some finger pointing between the Department of Commerce and the legislature since Commerce announced plans to layoff 37, mostly state foresters, at the end of the fiscal year. The state Personnel Board tabled the request Thursday but the department has asked board members to reconsider.

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Wood, Paper & Green Building

The American Hardwood Export Council

Creamer Media’s Engineering News
June 20, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: International

The American Hardwood Export Council (AHEC), the leading international trade association for the American hardwood industry, has announced the launch of ‘Seed to Seat’, a collaboration with seven of the most prominent and exciting designers in the UAE, who have been given an open brief and asked to design ‘something to sit on’. The pieces, which will be made from a selection of four American hardwood species, will be unveiled at Downtown Design 2016, which will run from October 25 – 28, at Dubai Design District. With Seed to Seat, AHEC aims to identify the true environmental impact of design and build on its extensive work with Life Cycle Assessment (LCA).

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PLP Architecture unveils the design for London’s first timber tower

By Lldija Grozdanic
Inhabitat
June 19, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: International

Architects are finally recognizing the versatility of wood by building innovative timber-framed structures that offer an alternative to traditional steel and concrete construction. Over the last few decades, the trend of building with timber has expanded to include such challenging buildings as high-rises. Now, PLP Architecture and researchers from the University of Cambridge teamed up to design London’s first timber tower and, if realized, the city’s second tallest building, after The Shard. The 80-story Oakwood Tower will house up to 1,000 new living units. …As a lightweight and versatile alternative to traditional construction materials, timber allows for faster constructiPLP Architecture and researchers from the University of Cambridge teamed up to design London’s first timber tower on and lowers carbon emission.

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First wooden commercial office tower to rise in Barangaroo

The Sydney Morning Herald
June 18, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: International

The first commercial office building in Australia made completely from timber will be built by Lendlease as the gateway to its multi-billion dollar Barangaroo development in Sydney. The six-storey International House Sydney will be made from engineered wood – Cross-Laminated Timber (CLT) and Glulam (glue laminated timber) – setting a new benchmark in the use of sustainable building materials. The timbers are sourced from sustainably managed forests in Austria. The CLT has PEFC chain of custody certification. Engineered wood products are prefabricated in a factory and transported to the building site where they are put together like a Lego set. CLT consists of layers of softwood timber arranged crosswise on top of each other and glued together under pressure into large panels.

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Forestry

Forest Tent Caterpillars

Virden Empire-Advance
June 18, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

This year Forest Tent Caterpillars or better known to some as Army Worms, have invaded much of Virden and area. Groups of these worms are known to take over, and eat all the leaves off of hardwood trees. Forest Tent Caterpillar populations have a natural cycle of about eight years. In this time, the numbers will slowly increase, peak and then crash. Manitoba Habitat Conservation Specialist, Carol Graham said, “The Forest Tent Caterpillar is likely entering into the peak phase making their numbers more noticeable, which may also be in association with the mild conditions of this past winter. The high population phase can last for two to three years, depending on conditions.” 

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A model for sustainable forestry

Letter: Derek Nighbor, CEO, Forest Products Association of Canada, and Jamie Lim, President and CEO, Ontario Forest Industries Association
Toronto Star
June 19, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

Re: Ontario’s bold but somewhat vague climate-change plan, June 10 – Thomas Walkom wrote that trees are an antidote to climate change “only if the trees aren’t cut down for lumber or pulp.” But study after study has shown that harvesting a mature tree after it has absorbed years of carbon, storing that carbon in a product, and then replanting, as our industry does by law and practice, is more of an “antidote” for climate change than not harvesting at all. At some point in their life cycle, older trees actually become net emitters of carbon. The forest products industry and its commitment to sustainable forestry are important parts of the fight against climate change. The latest step, as reported by the Star’s Tim Harper on May 3, is the industry’s “30 by 30” pledge to cut more than 30 MT of GHGs by 2030 – more than 13 per cent of the federal government’s commitment to reduce emissions by 30 per cent by 2030.

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California to fire up burners to battle dead tree epidemic

By Scott Smith
Associated Press in The Missoulian
June 19, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

CRESSMAN, Calif.  — California’s drought and a bark beetle epidemic have caused the largest die-off of Sierra Nevada forests in modern history, raising fears that trees could come crashing down on people or fuel deadly wildfires that could wipe out mountain communities. Aerial images show vast forests that have turned a rust-color. The epidemic has killed an estimated 40 million trees since 2010 in the central and southern Sierra, and it’s spreading north. Officials who are cutting down and stacking the most dangerous trees in piles across six counties, however, say they are stumped by how to get rid of them all. One solution is to fire up a fleet of 10 large, mechanized incinerators the state recently purchased. Promoters say they burn so hot that they spew little if any smoke, making them environmentally friendly.

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California street trees are worth $1 billion, says USFS and UC Davis

Inhabitat
June 17, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Scientists from the USDA Forest Service and the University of California, Davis decided to put a price tag on the trees lining California‘s streets. Considering that trees combat climate change by taking in air pollutants and storing carbon, they offer a lot of value not just to citizens, but to the state. The price tag the researchers came up with was a hefty $1 billion. To come up with that figure, the scientists scrutinized data from 929,823 trees in 50 cities and published their findings in a study. They said trees are worth $839 million just for the beauty they contribute, or in more technical terms, the value added to property. Then, because trees provide shade, they help save energy, adding another $101 million value. Taking in air pollutants like ozone adds $18 million, and storing carbon adds $10 million.

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Tree nuts can reduce prostate cancer patients’ mortality risk: study

By Emma Tiller
New Hampshire Voice
June 19, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

Eating lots of tree nuts, such as almonds, pine nuts, cashews, walnuts and pistachios, can significantly reduce non-metastatic prostate cancer patients’ risk of dying from the disease, a new study suggested. A team of researchers from the Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston has found in the study that prostate cancer patients who eat tree nuts 4-5 times per week reduce their risk of death because of the disease by 34 per cent, as compared with patients who eat nuts just once per month. According Maureen Ternus, executive director of the International Tree Nut Council Nutrition Research & Education Foundation, eating 1.5 ounces or 1/3 cup of nuts per day can have a notable positive impact on prostate cancer patients’ health.

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LePage uses out-of-state contractor to build logging bridge

Associated Press in the Idaho Statesman
June 17, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

PORTLAND, Maine – An out-of-state company hired by Republican Gov. Paul LePage has installed a bridge across land owned by a family that wants to donate 87,500 acres to the National Park Service. While local contractors in the economically crippled Katahdin region said they could’ve done the work, the state said it put out a bid request and “local sources were not available.” A Pennsylvania company did the work last week. The bridge is part of the LePage administration’s $160,000 effort to re-establish a state right of way across land owned by Roxanne Quimby, founder of Burt’s Bees, a personal care products company that calls itself “Earth friendly” and says it has a triple bottom line: people, profit, planet.

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Omaha begins treating trees to fight emerald ash borer

Associated Press in the Idaho Statesman
June 17, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

OMAHA, Neb. Omaha officials have begun treating ash trees to fight an invasive beetle known as the emerald ash borer. The Omaha World-Herald reports that treatments started Wednesday. A private contractor injected insecticide into about 25 trees on the Elmwood Park Golf Course. City Parks Director Brook Bench said he wanted to get started on treatments quickly after the presence of the emerald ash borer was confirmed in Omaha for the first time earlier this month. Bench said that parks employees were going to treat the trees themselves, but did not have the necessary equipment. He said the equipment has been ordered and the job of treating trees on a larger scale has been put out for bids. The city put out a request for proposals for a contractor to treat 2,500 ash trees in the city by Aug. 15, and another 2,500 next year.

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Anti-cancer compound from tree fungus

By Mihika Basu
Bangalore Mirror
June 19, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: International

A team from the Indian Institute of Science (IISc), Bengaluru, has discovered an anticancer compound, which was isolated from a fungus that can be found in trees and plants. The team from IISc’s biochemistry lab, led by Prof C Jayabaskaran, for over a decade has been working on identification and extraction of natural compounds of pharmaceutical value found in well-known medicinal plants and their fungi. The latest chemical compound discovered is called “Cholestanol glucoside”.  “The need to identify and mine natural compounds before we destroy the existing biodiversity is a matter of huge concern. And this is the driving force of our research. 

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UK Government Plans To Create New National Forest

By Elisabeth Perlman
Newsweek
June 17, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: International

The U.K. government has backed plans to create a new national forest in England in an effort to improve the natural environment over a 25-year period. The Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs will publish the details of the scheme by the end of 2016 or by early 2017 at the latest, according to The Times. Millions of trees—including oak, beech, ash, birch and lime—will be planted in a large area of forest in England. Ministers hope that the project will see a significant increase in the number of trees planted throughout the country. In 2015, Prime Minister David Cameron pledged to plant 11 million trees in his manifesto by 2020; however, recent figures are low. The U.K. planted the fewest number of trees in over four decades in 2015 and the country is one of the least wooded in Europe. 

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Forest Fires

Prescribed fire in Waterton Lakes National Park hopes to save endangered tree

Global News
June 16, 2016
Category: Forest Fires
Region: Canada, Canada West

Wildfires are not typically something you’d hope for in the beautiful backdrop of Waterton Lakes National Park, but that is exactly what the doctor, Parks Canada, has prescribed.  “We know that fire suppression has left a legacy on our landscape,” Jed Cochrane, Parks Canada Fire and Vegetation Specialist said. “For 80 years, we went out and put out almost every naturally ignited fire we had on our landscape. That changed the forest communities.
 “It changed the habitat, it changed the vegetation communities, and ultimately just shifted the landscape because of a lack of fire.” …Parks Canada is using the prescribed fire to save an endangered species of pine tree. The Whitebark pine has grown in the area for generations, but
is dying off at an alarming rate.

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MLA: B.C. government failing to complete wildfire fuel management work

By Norm Macdonald, MLA Columbia River Revelstoke
Revelstoke Mountaineer
June 17, 2016
Category: Forest Fires
Region: Canada, Canada West

Our climate is changing; that is an irrefutable fact. And we need to deal with the implications of that fact. Our communities are surrounded by forests. We have always lived with the danger of wildfires, but as the effects of climate change become more pronounced, and these fires become more intense and more frequent, risks to our communities will be drastically increased. In British Columbia, the costs of fighting wildfires in recent years has been in the range of several billion dollars. We have some of the best firefighters and fire suppression infrastructure in the world. The focus is on saving lives first and then structures and infrastructure, and it is very expensive to do this properly.

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City promotes wildfire safety

Vernon Morning Star
June 19, 2016
Category: Forest Fires
Region: Canada, Canada West

Vernon residents can learn how to protect themselves from wildfire. From 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday and Tuesday, Vernon homeowners can join local and provincial fire officials at Deer Lake Park (9192 Tronson Rd.) to learn about the FireSmart program. “Residents play a key role in wildfire protection because when it comes to wildfires, everyone shares the responsibility for preserving life and property by planning to be FireSmart,” said Lawrie Skolrood, Vernon deputy fire chief.

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Burn ban in place throughout New Brunswick

Number of forest fires to date is up 20% over the same period in 2015
CBC News
June 20, 2016
Category: Forest Fires
Region: Canada East, Canada

People in New Brunswick may not be able to celebrate the first night of summer with a bonfire. A province-wide burn ban was issued Sunday by the Department of Natural Resources. The status will be updated Monday at 2 p.m., but with sunny weather and temperatures as high as 32 C forecast, it seems unlikely the ban will be lifted. There are three active forest fires burning in the province with two in the Fredericton area and one in the Miramichi area. The provincial government’s forest fire watch website indicated there have been 212 forest fires so far this year. The number is about 20 per cent higher than 168 fires recorded by the same date last year, and is also higher than the 10-year average of 175 fires to date.

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Forest Fire Update: One new fire reported in region

TB Newswatch
June 18, 2016
Category: Forest Fires
Region: Canada East, Canada

There was one new fire confirmed in the Northwest Region by the afternoon of June 17. Nipigon Fire Number 20 is not under control at 0.1 hectares and is located near Little Steel Lake. The fire hazard is high in the northern and eastern sectors of the region and low to moderate in the western sectors of the region. • Red Lake 3 is being observed and Thunder Bay 19 is under control. Check out ontario.ca/fireprevention for guidelines on safe outdoor fire management. For more information about the current fire situation, and the active fires map go to ontario.ca/forestfire

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US Forest Service Names New Director To Oversee National Fire and Aviation Management Program

US Forest Service
June 17, 2016
Category: Forest Fires
Region: United States

WASHINGTON – Shawna Legarza, who has earned more than 25 years of wildland fire management experience, has been tapped to serve as the National Director of Fire and Aviation Management for the U.S. Forest Service, Chief Tom Tidwell announced today. Legarza, who serves as the Regional Director of Fire and Aviation in the Pacific Southwest Region, California, will take on the critical leadership role to help create resilient landscapes, fire adapted communities, while putting safety and lives first in responding to wildland fire. The Forest Service has managed wildland fire for more than 100 years. While fire is a natural process necessary for the maintenance of many ecosystems, in the past two decades, extreme wildfire behavior has escalated, accompanied by significant increases in risk to responders, citizens, homes and businesses, as well as suppression costs and threats to communities and ecosystems.

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Forest service looking for a few good women to fight wild fires

By Christina Flores
KUTV Salt Lake City
June 16, 2016
Category: Forest Fires
Region: United States

The U.S. Forest Service, through its Women in Wildland Fire program, continues to encourage women to join the ranks of wildland firefighters. Nicole Craig, an elementary school teacher, joined the wildland fire program three years ago. She finds the job feeds her desire to test her limits and spend more time in the outdoors. “I’m an adrenaline junkie,” said the 43-year-old single mother of two. Craig said fighting wildfires in the summer works perfectly with her teaching job, which has a long summer break. While the Forest Service is encouraging women to join, the requirements are still as grueling as they have ever been. 

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Juniper Fire Near Young Appears Tamed

Payson Roundup
June 17, 2016
Category: Forest Fires
Region: United States, US West

The 31,000-acre Juniper Fire near Young continues to smolder, but hasn’t grown in several days. Some 138 firefighters remain on the fire line to monitor the fire and keep it within the planning area, despite rising temperatures and winds. Officially, the fire is 35 percent contained. …Summary: The Juniper Fire continues to smolder as higher temperatures and breezy afternoons have the potential to cause flare ups that could still ignite unburned vegetation. Fire crews are monitoring known hotspots and helicopters fly over periodically to observe the more inaccessible areas of the fire’s interior. Other crews continue to work on suppression repair activities such as restoring roads and obliterating dozer lines.

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Crews make progress against home-threatening Western fires

Canadian Press in the Chronicle Herald
June 18, 2016
Category: Forest Fires
Region: United States, US West

LOS ANGELES — Firefighters battling home-threatening wildfires in the West caught a break overnight as gusty winds died down but with the region bracing for sweltering heat, Saturday’s respite could be brief, authorities said. A four-day-old fire in California coastal canyons was 45 per cent contained after 40-mph “sundowner” winds failed to materialize. Those evening and night gusts had driven the flames through steep, brushy canyons west of Santa Barbara on previous nights and forced closure of a major highway. No homes have burned, but about 270 homes and ranches are at risk and campgrounds are evacuated with flames only 2 miles from more densely populated coastal communities. In New Mexico, Gov. Susana Martinez directed the New Mexico National Guard to assist in securing communities affected by a massive wildfire in the central part of the state. Guardsmen will be patrolling and protecting evacuated homes from possible looting.

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Greek, Israeli aircraft help battle huge Cyprus forest fire

Associated Press in The Washington Post
June 20, 2016
Category: Forest Fires
Region: International

NICOSIA, Cyprus — A pair of Greek Super Puma helicopters are on their way to join up with 14 Cypriot, Greek and Israeli aircraft to help battle a a large forest fire that continues to rage out of control on the east Mediterranean island of Cyprus that so has far scorched 15 square kilometers (5.8 sq. miles) of trees and countryside, officials said Monday. Cyprus’ President Nicos Anastasiades said the damage done to a large swath of forest in the mountainous regions southwest of the capital is “irreparable,” but nonetheless promised a speedy reforestation program. He said 66 firefighting vehicles and more than 300 people from the island’s Fire Service, Forestry Department, as well as volunteers have been mobilized to fight the blaze that has covered the area with thick plumes of smoke.

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Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy

Scientists say this Canadian forest could thrive in a warming climate

By Simone Scully
Business Insider
June 17, 2016
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: Canada

Climate change is expected to have a dramatic impact on ecosystems across the world, creating winners and losers: Some species are likely to survive in a warming climate, and some simply won’t. A new study in Science examined more than 26,000 trees across an area the size of Spain (583,000 square kilometers) and found that boreal forests in far-northern latitudes may one day act as a climate refuge for black spruce, the foundational tree of the northwoods ecosystem and the most dominant species in these forests. Northern boreal forests make up nearly 30 percent of the planet’s forested area, and store about 20 percent of the earth’s carbon. 

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These are the trees NASA predicts will get hit hardest by climate change

By Josh Hrala
ScienceAlert
June 19, 2016
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: US East, United States

Ecologists studying the effects of climate change have completed a new study that details which US trees will have the toughest time adapting as our world heats up. The findings suggest that while some species will thrive in a warmer environment, like red hickory and blackjack oak, some species – such as the eastern hemlock, red maple, and eastern white pine – will lose ground, which may eventually lead to them disappearing from their current habitats completely. …To find out how these areas might change in the future, the researchers used a combination of climate models that assume that carbon dioxide emissions will continue to rise at the same levels they are today, which will take emission rates from 400 parts per million to 1370 parts per million by 2100.

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