Tree Frog Forestry News

Daily Archives: July 5, 2016

Froggy Foibles

Meet the Amazon rubber tappers providing forest-friendly condoms for Rio

Reuters in ABC News Australia
July 4, 2016
Category: Froggy Foibles
Region: International

As Brazil’s Government distributes 9 million condoms for free around Rio de Janeiro during the Olympics, a push to encourage safe sex will also help to protect the Amazon rainforest. All of the condoms to be distributed are produced by a factory in the western Amazonian state of Acre, deep in the rainforest in Xapuri, near Brazil’s border with Bolivia. It is run by the Acre State Government and uses latex gathered from rubber trees by “tappers”, also employed in a Government-run program designed to protect their traditional livelihood, foster the sustainable use of the rainforest and deter illegal loggers.

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Business & Politics

Colville Lake buys sawmill to build its own log homes

‘If we get our building supply from the land, that will work in our best interest,’ says David Codzi
CBC News
July 4, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West


After switching to a solar power/diesel power hybrid system late last year, Colville Lake, N.W.T., is working on becoming even more self-reliant. The community purchased a portable sawmill in 2015 from D&L Timber Technologies for around $50,000 and David Codzi, president of the Ayoni Keh Land Corporation and band officer, says they have long-term plans to use the sawmill for building log homes. “We have an economy that’s in Colville,” he said. “We don’t have to keep spending money outside of Colville. We can spend it in. Once we start doing that we probably have more than enough money to spend on other things that we could build here.”

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Forest group critical of logging company’s grant request

By Edward Stratton
Daily Astorian
July 4, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States, US West

A local environmental group is raising opposition to a state grant application by a Knappa-based company that exports raw timber, among other commodities, from a private dock in Rainier. The North Coast State Forest Coalition has been emailing activists about an application by Teevin Bros. Land & Timber Co. Inc. to the state Department of Transportation’s ConnectOregon VI program. The state uses lottery-backed bonds to offer grants for pedestrian, road, rail, air and marine infrastructure projects. Teevin Bros. has asked the state to fund $750,000 of a $1.2 million project to construct seven mooring dolphins near Rainier for tugs and barges. “We just don’t want to see state dollars — in this case lottery dollars — facilitate the shipping of mill jobs to Asia,” said Chris Smith, executive director of the forest coalition.

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Maine paper mills look for a niche as they fight to stay open

Portland Press Herald
July 4, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: US East, United States

A global decline in demand for the kind of paper that has been the mainstay of the industry in Maine has prompted several mills to reposition themselves for new product lines – and, hopefully, a brighter future. Three Maine mills have recently announced that they are converting machinery that once produced reams of glossy, coated paper used primarily in magazines and catalogs, to start making specialty papers, such as labels, filters and packaging. The shift is part of a scramble to diversify product lines – publishing papers represent 65 percent of the output of Maine mills – and to capture a greater share of new markets. At stake are 3,300 jobs in the state’s remaining six mills, survivors in a contracting industry that has shorn 2,300 jobs in the past five years as five mills closed.

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Forestry’s cash ‘not spent on cycleways’

July 5, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: International

THE forestry industry has been reassured that the $1.1 million a year it pays to repair road damage caused by log trucks is not being used to build cycleways in the city. Speaking at a meeting of Gisborne District Council last week, councillor Graeme Thomson asked if heavy rural road users were getting value for money. He asked staff to confirm if the money paid by rural-based high-differential road users was used to fund cycleways in the city, or other items not directly related to the damage caused by heavy use. Tairawhiti Roads general manager Dave Hadfield said the district had a
$23.8m roading programme, $9.4 million of which came from collected
rates.

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Wood, Paper & Green Building

Supreme Court Decision is Good for Green Globes

By Stuart Kaplow
Green Building Law Update
July 3, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: United States, US West

The recent unanimous decision of the U.S. Supreme Court in Kingdomware Technologies, Inc. v. United States, is a win for small businesses and very good for those that work on Green Globes projects. In an effort to encourage small businesses, Congress has mandated that federal agencies restrict competition for some federal contracts. …Among the significant beneficiaries of this Supreme Court decision will be the many small businesses involved with Green Globes green building assessment and certification system. …In 2011, GBI worked with the VA to develop the first assessment program for existing buildings to assist federal agencies in measuring compliance to the Guiding Principles For Sustainable Federal Buildings.

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Forestry

?One board at a time?

Prince George Citizen
July 4, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

“When we first started building the universal boardwalk we had nothing materially to speak of – we had a chainsaw, a hammer, a few nails and high hopes,” said Nowell Senior, who was inspired to build the boardwalk so people with disabilities could access the Ancient Forest site. “McBride Community Forest donated about $3,000 worth of lumber to get us started and from there on we always had enough funding to purchase what we needed,” said Senior. “We’ve actually purchased more than $90,000 worth of lumber from a one-person mill in McBride.” That’s where McCarty and his solo operation, Midget Mills, comes in.

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Safety Alert of the Month – Ticks and Lyme Disease

BC Forest Safety Council
July 4, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Top Tick Facts: Ticks live in long grass and wooded or overgrown areas.  Tick season runs April to October, and peaks from June to August. Some ticks in Southern BC are known to be infected with the bacterium that causes Lyme disease. Risk areas include Vancouver Island, the Gulf Islands, the Lower Mainland and Southern Interior. …If you are bitten, quick removal is very important. Removing the tick within 24?36 hours of the bite usually prevents any infection. It is safe to remove ticks at home with the right technique, but don’t be afraid to see a doctor to have the tick removed if it’s in a place you can’t easily reach or see, you can’t see the mouth parts, you can’t get a good grip without squeezing the tick or if it doesn’t detach easily.

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Waging War on the Spruce Beetle

250 News
July 4, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Prince George B.C. – The battle against the Spruce Beetle is in full force, but it will be fall before it’s known if the epidemic has been stemmed. The beetle has already infested 156 thousand hectares of forest in the Omineca region, specifically northern reaches of the Prince George Timber Supply area, and the eastern valleys of the Mackenzie timber supply. Trees infested by the Spruce Beetle can take a year to 18 months to show signs they have been attacked. Infested trees can change colour from green, to yellow to red or they can have a green and healthy crown to losing all their needles.

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Scientists use genomics to design healthier forests

by Nelson Bennett – Natural selection creates trees less vulnerable to pests; genomics helps identify them
Business in Vancouver
July 5, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

BC and Alberta plant roughly 150 million new spruce and lodgepole pine trees each year.  But some of those seedlings might have come from parents that didn’t survive the mountain pine beetle infestation or that might otherwise be less adaptable to the stresses of climate change. In an attempt to grow a new generation of trees that can cope better with higher temperatures and pests, Genome BC and the universities of British Columbia and Alberta are working on AdapTree, a project that uses genotyping and climate-change mapping to improve forest health in a world of rapidly changing climates.  AdapTree is just one of about 19 forestry-related projects that Genome BC has been funding – to the tune of about $77 million – that uses genotyping to improve tree and forest health.

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Dry conditions prompt voluntary water restrictions on Haida Gwaii

Canadian Press in Victoria Times Colonist
July 4, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

VICTORIA – Residents of Haida Gwaii are being asked by the B.C. government to use less water as dry conditions persist. The province says stream and groundwater levels have dropped on the remote islands coast and the effects of recent precipitation were short-lived. Very dry conditions have raised the drought level to three or orange, and the Ministry of Forests says in a release that further drops in water levels could lead to water shortages and affect people, agriculture, industry and fish. …The Forests Ministry says staff are closely monitoring river and well levels, and there may be upgrades to the drought rating if water levels continue to drop.

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Emerald ash borer report to go before council

Administration recommends treating affected trees as much as possible
CBC News
July 5, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

Thunder Bay City Council will have several options to consider when it comes to addressing the appearance of emerald ash borers in the city. The invasive insect, which targets ash trees, was discovered in Thunder Bay in late June. On July 18, council will receive a report with recommendations on how to deal with the insects. “We’re going to recommend a combination of removals and treatment,” said Shelley Vescio, city forester. “We have beautiful ash trees in our city, and each of them is going to be affected by it.” “We’ll be recommending the highest number that we can afford to treat,” she said.

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Wildfire in Kansas, Oklahoma called ‘ecological cleansing’

By Bill Draper
Associated Press in St. Louis Post-Dispatch
July 4, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

KANSAS CITY, Mo. — The wildfire that scorched nearly 600 square miles of land in Oklahoma and Kansas in March cleared out more eastern red cedars in a week than local efforts to eradicate the invasive species could have accomplished in decades, conservation experts say. “This was an ecological cleansing for the environment,” said Ken Brunson, wildlife diversity coordinator with the Kansas Department of Wildlife and Parks. “That’s mixed-grass prairie down there. Prairie survives with fire.” …Flanders estimates it would have cost property owners $56 million to cut and remove the number of red cedars destroyed by the wildfire in Kansas. At current budget levels, it would take 17 years to get it done.

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BLM’s forest management plan too restrictive

By Steve Pilkerton – chairman of the Oregon Society of American Foresters, Mark Buckbee – past chairman, and Ed Shepard – board of directors.
The Register-Guard
July 5, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Professional foresters are trained in the science and technology of forest resource management. Foresters are equipped with the knowledge and tools to manage diverse forests to meet societal needs and expectations. We only need to be given clear goals and priorities. That’s why members of the Oregon Society of American Foresters believe the Bureau of Land Management’s proposed Resource Management Plan would limit the ability of forestry professionals to ensure the health, resiliency, productivity and accessibility across much of the 2.5 million acres of Western Oregon O&C forests. …A more balanced approach is necessary to implement what is known to be effective and to apply new scientific information when necessary and where appropriate. This is what keeps forestry professionals and forestry evolving over time and conditions. In dynamic systems like forests, there will always be conditions requiring new knowledge and the flexibility to apply lessons learned.

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GEORGE OCHENSKI: The true freedom of wilderness

The Missoulian
July 4, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

…But pandering to the interests of resource extractors under the rubric of collaboration is a losing game. Nothing illustrates that more clearly than the recent announcement by Weyerhaeuser to shut down the former Plum Creek mills in Columbia Falls and then plead a “log shortage” as the cause. That Montana’s highest elected officials bought that line without doing any research is shameful. The truth is Weyerhaeuser hasn’t bid on timber sales since its takeover of Plum Creek. Instead, the mega-corporation found it more convenient to blame environmentalists for trying to preserve what’s left of Montana’s forest ecosystems. And if anyone doubts the condition in which Plum Creek left its lands, a quick trip up Gold Creek off the Blackfoot will reveal the miles of weed-infested stumpfields that remain as Plum Creek’s rapacious legacy.

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With decades of experience behind them, three timbersport athletes earn the title of “Master”

The Longview Daily News
July 4, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Alvie Marcellus is a little older these days. When the 74-year-old climbs onto a bouncing springboard stuck into a notch he’s cut in a tree, he does so with a little less oomph, and his joints ache with arthritis. Yet he still swings an ax like Paul Bunyan, with a steady cadence and a strong arm. Marcellus said he’s devoted to timbersports. On Monday, he was among a trio of 70-plus-year-old men, the Masters as they were called, who competed in the Go 4th Festival Timber Carnival, a series of chopping, sawing, agility and speed events. Many younger competitors have the Masters to thank for mentorship and encouragement.

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Survival of ancient Rocky Mountain whitebark pines may rest on modern technology

By Bob Chaney
The Missoulian
July 4, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

DUPUYER – Even the living whitebark pine trees look tragic. Each living tree points gnarled limbs at 10 dead fellows on this mountain pass in the Bob Marshall Wilderness. They bend and twist the way the wind shrieks along the Continental Divide, implying a mix of pain and defiance. They adapted to grow on the most hostile ground in Montana. But they’re failing. Diana Six calls them “ghost forests.” At the edge of the tree line, beyond where the Ponderosa pine and spruce and alpine fir can survive, the whitebark pine used to rule. The University of Montana forest entomologist seeks them out on the slopes of Ch-paa-qn Mountain west of Missoula, in the Beaverhead Mountains above the Big Hole Valley, and the high ridges of the Bob Marshall. Her search gets harder every year.

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USDA lays traps for leaf-devouring invasive moths found in North Charleston

By Paul Bowers
Charleston Post Courier
July 4, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

Authorities are hot on the trail of an invasive species of moth that could lay waste to the Lowcountry’s majestic live oaks and other trees if left unchecked. The Asian gypsy moth lays fuzz-covered clusters of eggs in the winter on more than 600 species of trees and shrubs, including oaks, poplars and some evergreens. Hundreds of caterpillars hatch in the spring and start devouring foliage around them, often stripping branches bare and leaving trees vulnerable to infections or other pests. …The USDA’s policy is to conduct three years of surveys following each moth discovery. …Bestwick said a large-scale infestation could present a serious threat to South Carolina’s forestry and tourism industries. If researchers find more specimens, she said, one option would be to spray trees with a naturally occurring bacterium that is toxic to the moths in their caterpillar stage.

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Kauri disease found in ancient forest

Radio New Zealand News
July 5, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: International


A Far North community that pitched in to save an ancient forest from possums and rats now has a new enemy to contend with – kauri dieback. Warawara Forest in north Hokianga has been bouncing back after a 1080 poison drop last spring and intensive trapping on surrounding farmland. But scientists have now confirmed the presence of the kauri killing pathogen phytopthera agathidicida (PTA) around trees on private land in the Puapua area, just north west of the forest. Local man Todd Emery has been working on pest control on the farmland that surrounds the remote forest, and said the discovery was gutting. “The area where we took those three soil samples, two of them came back positive. And the scientist pointed out suspicious brown blotches on the root system, so it doesn’t look good,” he said. “I didn’t realise how gutting it was going to be when the tests came back positive.”

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Forest Fires

Burns Bog fire: How bog fires burn and why they’re difficult to combat

Global News
July 4, 2016
Category: Forest Fires
Region: Canada, Canada West


Forest fires can be difficult to combat, but peatland — or bog — fires present a whole set of new challenges for firefighters. The Burns Bog fire burning in Delta, British Columbia, is an example of how peatland fires can burn out of control. According to Natural Resources Canada, peatland accounts for about two to three per cent of Earth’s land surface, and about 25 to 30 per cent of the global boreal forest region. Of that, Canada is home to roughly 25 per cent. Bogs are home to peat, a collection of decayed organic matter and vegetation. This peatland collects more carbon than any other means on Earth. For that reason, when these areas burn, they release considerable amounts of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases into the atmosphere.

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Firefighters scramble to save industries, contain about 50 per cent of Burns Bog blaze

Vancouver Sun
July 5, 2016
Category: Forest Fires
Region: Canada, Canada West

UPDATE: The evacuation order has been lifted at Delta’s Tilbury Industrial Park after businesses in that area were forced to shut down Monday because of the Burns Bog blaze. Dave Sangara watched as aircraft bombers buzzed overhead, dropping water and retardant on a growing fire in Burns Bog, and made a silent prayer the winds wouldn’t shift and sweep the flames toward his lumber mill. But as he watched his worst fears were realized, as the fire spread to an estimated 70 hectares by nightfall Sunday and headed toward his business — Leslie Forest Products — in Delta’s Tilbury Industrial Park. Firefighters swooped into the premises, hosing down his stores of cedar, hemlock and fir, while police moved dozens of people out of the area and barricaded his street.

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Fire in Wood Buffalo National Park closes area along Peace River

2 road openings scheduled for Tuesday and Wednesday
CBC News
July 4, 2016
Category: Forest Fires
Region: Canada, Canada West

A section of Wood Buffalo National Park has been closed after a fire crossed the road near Carson’s Landing. Parks Canada says the entire area on the north bank of the Peace River from Moose Island to Peace Point is closed due to the unpredictable fire behaviour and the ongoing firefighting operations in the area. It says there is no impact on facilities or visitor services. There are two scheduled openings of the road for convoys. A convoy will leave the Wood Buffalo National Park office at 149 McDougal Road in Fort Smith on Tuesday at 9 a.m. for people bound from Fort Smith to Moose Island or Peace Point.

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Progress Continues at Bitterroot’s Observation Forest Fire

KLYQ
July 4, 2016
Category: Forest Fires
Region: United States, US West

The Observation forest fire on the Bitterroot National Forest is now 15 percent contained, according to Monday morning’s update from the Northern Rockies Incident Management Team. Doug Turman’s crew reports the fire size at 1,348 acres, with growth on the north end near Hayes Creek and Camas Creek. Heavy equipment has been working on a contingency line near Camas Creek, with the active fire threatening an earlier established retardant line. Helicopters are now dropping more retardant than water on hot spots and over inaccessible areas. Ground crews continue to build line on the east side of the blaze. Firefighters are watching the wind speeds, which have been increasing in the area. A helispot, safety zone and spike camp are planned for the northwest flank, depending on the wind.

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Fires active on the Salmon-Challis National Forest

Local News 8
July 4, 2016
Category: Forest Fires
Region: United States, US West

SALMON, Idaho – Update7-4-2016 12:30 pm: The USDA has provided an update on the status of three fires buring in the Salmon-Challis National Forest. The USDA says the 3-Mile fire is now reported at 10 acres and is 15% contained. Six smokejumpers and two 20 person crews are working to contain the fire. The fire was reduced in size due to more accurate mapping. Two other fires are burning in the region at Golden Trout Lake and Rattlesnake Creek. The fire at Golden Trout Lake is about 30 acres with 25% containment. 16 smokejumpers, two Type I crews, a Type II crew, and two Type I Helicopters are currently fighting the fire and two more crews will be joining them.

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Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy

NCSU study: Harvesting for wood pellets has no impact on woodland life

By Stephen Ginley
The News & Observer
July 5, 2016
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: US East, United States

RALEIGH – Harvesting wood debris from areas that have been clear-cut of timber does not affect the animals that live there, according to a study from researchers at N.C. State University. Chris Moorman, a professor of forestry and environmental resources, and his students spent four years cataloging small animals such as mice, toads, bugs and mourning doves at loblolly pine plantations. They found that the populations in clear-cut sites were unaffected regardless of how much wood debris was removed. This low-value wood, or “biomass,” left over from logging is pulverized to make wood pellets that are used as a carbon-friendly alternative to coal in Europe and in parts of the United States.

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First 6 months of 2016 hottest ever recorded in New Zealand

Associated Press in Victoria News
July 4, 2016
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: International

WELLINGTON, New Zealand — Ski fields are struggling to open and winter electricity consumption is down in New Zealand after the first six months of 2016 proved to be the hottest start to a year that scientists have ever recorded. Temperatures in the South Pacific nation were 1.4 degrees Celsius (2.5 Fahrenheit) above the long-term average for the first half of the year, according to the government-funded National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research. That’s the highest since record-keeping began more than a century ago, and significantly higher than the previous record of 1.1 Celsius above average, reached in 1938 and again in 1999.

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General

Forestry’s cash ‘not spent on cycleways’

July 5, 2016
Category: Uncategorised

THE forestry industry has been reassured that the $1.1 million a year it pays to repair road damage caused by log trucks is not being used to build cycleways in the city. Speaking at a meeting of Gisborne District Council last week, councillor Graeme Thomson asked if heavy rural road users were getting value for money. He asked staff to confirm if the money paid by rural-based high-differential road users was used to fund cycleways in the city, or other items not directly related to the damage caused by heavy use. Tairawhiti Roads general manager Dave Hadfield said the district had a
$23.8m roading programme, $9.4 million of which came from collected
rates.

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