Tree Frog Forestry News

Daily Archives: July 8, 2016

Business & Politics

BC contractor born to mulch on work sites

By Peter Kenter
Journal of Commerce
July 7, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

You might expect to see the name IronWolf Slasher on a resume at the human resource department for the X-Men. A monstrously powerful chunk of mechanical equipment, the purpose of the IronWolf Slasher is much more benign. It’s designed to mulch trees and plants in an environmentally sensitive manner during site-clearing operations. …”We consider mulching the most environmentally-friendly method of land clearing,” says Doyle. “It incorporates the plant and root matter back into the soil. There are still projects where they simply pile up the material alongside the cleared area or burn off the land. Mulching is far more environmentally stable and that’s the only approach to clearing that we offer.”

Read More

West Fraser supports B.C. Elders Gathering

Williams Lake Tribune
July 7, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

The Tletinqox Government is proud to announce West Fraser Mills as a silver sponsor for the 40th Annual B.C. Elders Gathering, in Williams Lake from July 11-14 with a donation of $5,000. On hand to accept payment, Tletinqox Government events co-ordinator and sponsorship chair for the event, Darwin Stump, said: “It is great to see a company we do business with give back to the community of Tletinqox Government, and I would like to see even more companies, as well, do the same, that we do business with throughout the past years, because this Elders Gathering is a once in a lifetime event, and Williams Lake will not see it for years ahead yet.

Read More

Forestry ‘innovation hub’ gets almost $1.7M in funding

By Shaina Luck
CBC News
July 7, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada East, Canada

Two levels of government and Emera are investing $1.67-million in a type of business incubator for the forestry industry in Nova Scotia.  The forestry “innovation hub” will help startups make a business out of using wood byproducts in new ways, the provincial government says. “Over the last number of years it’s become painfully apparent that we need to reinvent ourselves when it comes to forest utilization in Nova Scotia,” provincial Natural Resources Minister Lloyd Hines said. Hines gave the example of the AV Nackawic Mill in New Brunswick, which produces a type of pulp that is used to make rayon. “We need to start somewhere, and we’ve got to get very serious about how that works,” he said.  

Read More

Supporting Forestry Innovation

Government of Nova Scotia
July 7, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada East, Canada

Nova Scotia’s forest industry got a boost today, July 7, with the announcement of a project that is exploring innovative uses of forest products and new market opportunities. The Department of Natural Resources, the Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency (ACOA), Innovacorp, and Emera announced a new innovation hub that is identifying new products and production processes to help make Nova Scotia’s forestry and resource sectors a stronger competitor in the marketplace. …The hub is being supported with $1.67 million in funding, with $1 million coming from Emera, $250,000 from the Government of Canada through ACOA, $350,000 from the province, and $67,000 from Innovacorp.

Read More

Five Questions with Joe Gonyea: The Wood Products Industry

Woodworking Network
July 6, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States


Joe Gonyea III is Partner and CEO of Timber Products Company, and he has 30 years of experience in the wood products industry. Timberline recently sat down with Gonyea to discuss his thoughts regarding the market. …The wood products industry has become a global industry, producing both challenges and opportunities for our company and others. With a strong US Dollar, less expensive products from companies overseas are working their way into the North American marketplace. I don’t think this situation will change in the next few years. On a positive note, I anticipate continued growth in global demand for all wood products. In light of current market conditions, domestic manufacturers need to sell customers and end-users on the values provided beyond prices, such as service, quality, environmental compliance and time to market, which also equals dollars.

Read More

Industry groups applaud Timber Innovation Act

HBS Dealer
July 6, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States

The House just introduced a companion to a Senate bill known as the Timber Innovation Act, and many industry groups are pleased with it. The American Wood Council (AWC), American Forest Foundation (AFF), Binational Softwood Lumber Council (BSLC) and Southeastern Lumber Manufacturers Association (SLMA) all applauded the b ill, which would establish a performance-driven research and development program to advance tall wood building construction in the United States. In addition to advancing R&D, the House bill also includes language allowing the Wood Innovation Grant program to support proposals to use and/or retrofit existing sawmill facilities in areas with high employment to produce mass timber materials.

Read More

Weyerhaeuser mill shut down could have big tax impact, too

Hungry Horse News
July 7, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States, US West

The decision to permanently close the Weyerhaeuser Columbia Falls sawmill and plywood plant could also have a significant impact property tax revenue for School District 6 schools and Flathead County. While the company hasn’t announced what it will do with the properties after the shutdown, if it sells off the equipment and tears down the buildings, an analysis by the state Department of Revenue shows the total property taxes paid, which includes the business equipment tax, would fall from $462,129 to $68,106 based on 2015 tax bills. That a drop of $394,023.

Read More

Timber firm James Jones plans new Johnstonebridge plant

BBC News
July 8, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: International

Sawmill group James Jones and Sons has tabled plans to build a new timber processing plant in Dumfriesshire. It is part of a move by the firm to expand its operations in the area. The site earmarked for the processing facility is on agricultural land close to the A74(M) at Hangingshaw, near Johnstonebridge. It would act as a satellite to its current sawmill complex which lies just a few miles south at Stephen’s Croft on the outskirts of Lockerbie. That £25m plant opened in 2009 and remains one of Europe’s most technologically advanced sawmills, employing about 150 workers. The proposed new development would add capacity to the existing operation.

Read More

Woodchip exports to resume from Hobart waterfront, Government promises low truck traffic

ABC News, Australia
July 8, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: International

The Tasmanian Government is downplaying the impact of additional truck movements in Hobart after announcing the return of woodchip exports from Hobart’s Macquarie Wharf. Shipping of woodchips will resume within months after the signing of a contract with an exporter. Forestry Minister Peter Gutwein said negotiations were underway with two others. He said the deal showed the Government and the private sector had worked together to find a medium-term solution to help struggling contractors in the south. “We are now growing the industry in a sensible way,” Mr Gutwein said. Since the loss of the deep water port at Triabunna in 2011, southern forestry contractors have been without a nearby export facility for woodchips.

Read More

Wood, Paper & Green Building

PAINFUL TRUTH: Tallest wood building, for now

by Matthew Claxton
Langley Advance
July 7, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: Canada, Canada West

UBC is currently seeing the construction of a world leader. The new Brock Commons, an 18-storey student dormitory, will be one of the world’s tallest wooden buildings once it’s finished. It may be the tallest inhabited wooden structure – I’ve failed to find a taller building. A few years back, the building code only allowed for wooden buildings (wood frame buildings) up to four storeys. Then the province relaxed the building code to allow for up to six. There have also been a few other innovative projects using wood, including the big mass timber beams holding up the roof of the Langley Events Centre. For all that B.C. has a lot to offer, we aren’t often a world leader in big industries. But we do know an awful lot about timber. So the construction of Brock Commons is an interesting and hopeful development.

Read More

NSSGA opposed lumber legislation

World Cement
July 7, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: United States

Pro-lumber members of the US House of Representatives introduced legislation that would direct government funding towards studying the benefits of wood over traditional construction materials in tall residential and commercial projects. “NSSGA is very disappointed to see members of Congress foregoing marketplace fairness by using federal funding to show preference to one building material over another,” said Patrick Dunne, NSSGA communications director. …Dunne said the association was concerned about directing funds this way because little is known about the safety and long-term structural viability of tall wooden buildings. “Fire is one serious concern about a 10-story tall wooden building, both for occupants and any firefighters that would have to enter them in such an emergency,” he said.

Read More

Washington State legislation promoting wood construction gets crushed by Readymix concrete industry

by Lloyd Alter
TreeHugger
July 7, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: United States, US West

The National Ready Mixed Concrete Association (NRMCA) sends out a press release touting their recent political victory in Washington State, and their new promotional campaign, “Build with Strength.” Hilarity ensues. There is a lot of wood in Washington State. Meanwhile, the state faces some serious challenges, including building new housing, addressing climate change and dealing with rural poverty. That’s one of the reasons the State legislature recently considered legislation to promote the use of Cross Laminated Timber (CLT), the plywood-on-steroids building system that can replace concrete in low and mid-rise buildings. It’s relatively new technology in the USA, but it makes a lot of sense in the west, because the wood sequesters carbon, CLT buildings go up really quickly, it doesn’t burn very well and it puts people to work. …But they forgot about the entrenched interests like the National Ready Mixed Concrete Association (NRMCA), who managed to kill the bill.

Read More

OOPEAA’s wooden observation tower sits by man-made lake in finland

Designbloom
July 7, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: International

OOPEAA’s wooden observation tower sits by man-made lake in finland emerging from the shore of a manmade lake in seinäjoki, finland, ‘the periscope tower’ is a wooden observation tower constructed by OOPEAA for part of a large landscape project for this year’s seinäjoki housing fair. Recently opened to the public, the helsinki-based firm inserted a large mirror into the observation tower enabling 360 degree views of the surrounding, pristine landscape. made entirely of wood, the tower is composed of an inner core of cross-laminated timber (CLT) and an external wooden frame that serves as a load bearing structure. the inner CLT core forms the frame for an extra large periscope with stairs circling around it.

Read More

Frock on wood: how fashion’s must-have backdrop is plywood

Beneath and behind the models at the autumn/winter shows, in shop windows and all over the Frow, the secret star was one of the cheapest woods available
The Guardian
July 8, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: International

In current fashion as well as current news, it’s hard to see the wood for the trees, such is the onslaught of information. All the tweets. All the liveblogs. All the leaking and the jousting. But just as beneath the rubble of truth and spin in news there is hope, beneath fashion there is plywood. It started, of course, in a freezing warehouse in Paris, where the set at Raf Simons’ autumn/winter 2016 was fashioned almost entirely from ply (insider term) and gaffer tape. …The overall effect at each was modern, minimal and real. Because that’s the thing with plywood. It looks cheap because it is cheap, which is why in a post-Eames world (in the 1940s, the designers used moulded plywood to make some of their most iconic chairs) it’s the democratic wood of choice. Its presence in a catwalk show is nothing short of political. Affordable backdrops, less than affordable fashion.

Read More

Forestry

Now that the wildfire is contained, what happens to Burns Bog?

By Jesse Johnston
CBC News
July 7, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Now that crews have contained the 78 hectare wildfire that has been burning in Burns Bog since Sunday afternoon, ecological experts are anxious to visit the site so they can survey the damage. Delta Mayor Lois Jackson said it is essential the recovery of the bog is guided by science. “We determined that we had to have a Scientific Advisory Panel to oversee the bog and we have one of those,” said Jackson. “We will meet with them as soon as we can.” Dr. Richard Hebda with the Royal B.C. Museum is an expert on the bog. He is concerned that if the bog floor has been damaged, it will open the door for invasive species to move in.

Read More

One water source not enough

Letter by Denise Lagasse
Coast Reporter
July 7, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

It was very encouraging to see so many people attending the meeting about our Chapman Creek watershed, citizens and elected officials alike. A community of people who want to learn and be involved is always a sign that good, collective decisions can be made. …Using one watershed is literally having all of our eggs in one basket and makes us very vulnerable. …Considering the amount of money the SCRD is proposing to spend on water metering and blowing up a trench in Chapman Lake, it is time that we protect the integrity of the ecosystem by stopping all further logging in the watershed by AJB and viewing trees as the natural water storage systems that they are.

Read More

Caribou habitat protected thanks to new agreement

Saskatoon Starphoenix
July 7, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

A new forest management plan aimed at protecting caribou will prevent the logging of 223,000 hectares of forest for 20 years. The plan, which was recently approved by the provincial Ministry of the Environment, covers part of the Pasquia Porcupine Forest Management Area, a two-million-hectare area with the town of Hudson Bay at its centre, said Gord Vaadeland of the Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society. An additional 172,000 hectares of land have been designated as special management areas for caribou conservation. This means that while logging activity will continue in these areas to an extent, it will be done in a way that will improve caribou habitats, keeping in mind migratory paths, Vaadeland said.

Read More

Parkland donated to the Comox Valley Regional District

By Michael Briones
Comox Valley Echo
July 7, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

The Comox Valley Regional District has acquired a six acre forest property that is going to be preserved as a natural park land. It’s located on Treherne Road in Area C. The land was bequeathed to the regional district by the late Mark Muick Krotter, who also left a $50,000 donation. On Monday, CVRD chair and Area A director Bruce Jolliffe, along with Area B and C directors Rodney Nichol and Edwin Grieve respectively, introduced the new park named after Krotter’s good friend and neighbour, “Jack Shark.”

Read More

Spruce beetle a looming threat to BC forests

By Mike Carter
Dawson Creek Mirror
July 7, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Saulteau First Nations is preparing for an invasion from the south. Armed with lessons learned from the pine beetle outbreak, SFN, together with the provincial government and industry partners are taking steps to get ahead of the next big problem for B.C.’s forests: the spruce beetle.  Already, more than 156,000 hectares of forest in the Omineca Region, which includes Mackenzie and Prince George, are currently infested. It’s the biggest outbreak in the province since the 1980s, according to the Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resources.  Although the beetle is naturally occurring in forests throughout B.C and other parts of North America—in fact, each conifer has its own beetle—warmer winters in recent years have caused populations to increase. Like the pine beetle, the spruce beetle’s transition to adulthood has also been shortened from two years to one thanks to a warming climate.

Read More

Editorial: Burns Bog fire reminds us of value of wetlands

Vancouver Sun
July 7, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Burns Bog is an ecological wonder. As the largest raised peat bog on North America’s west coast, science tells us it’s a globally unique ecosystem. It’s been called the “lungs of the Lower Mainland” because it helps regulate the mild climate that attracts so many inhabitants to the Metro Vancouver region. And it’s an essential resting and refueling point for the more than 100 species of migratory birds that travel Pacific flyways as well as providing vital habitat for rare and endangered species. If, as the Burns Bog Conservation Society says, it is difficult to overstate the importance of such wetlands in general and this bog in particular, the wildfire which began around noon on Sunday and, fanned by winds, rapidly expanded to 200 hectares — almost seven per cent of the bog’s area — marks a significant environmental event.

Read More

Rally urges city to save forest from development

Fort Erie Times
July 7, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

A First Nations rally in front of Niagara Falls city hall Thursday to save the Thundering Waters Forest is just the beginning, promises organizer Karl Dockstader. “Just to be clear, if they don’t start listening to us, we’re going to say it louder,” said the Oneida Nation member from Fort Erie. “Whatever it takes to get the message across.” The message was shared loud and clear Thursday in front of about 125 people: Enough. “You have enough malls, you have enough shopping centres,” said Cayuga Nation senior Allan Jamieson, referring to a proposed $1 billion Chinese development over a forested area near the Thundering Waters golf course in Niagara Falls. “You have enough.” The rally called for a moratorium on the project until a transparent public process determines the full “social, environmental and economic benefit” of the forest remaining completely intact, said Dockstader.

Read More

Urgent fix needed for Forest Service fire budget

By Tom Vilsack
San Diego Union-Tribune
July 6, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States

…To get the Forest Service budget back on track, Congress needs to address two related but separate issues. First, the Forest Service should not have to pay for the costliest fires out of a fixed budget that was never designed for the catastrophic fires we see today. The largest 2 percent of wildfires now chew through 30 percent of the wildfire budget. Fixing this with an emergency fund like other disasters will have the greatest impact on the ability of the Forest Service to increase fire prevention and other mission critical work. Second, we need to end the practice of fire borrowing, which occurs when appropriated resources fall short, as they did in 2015 by $700 million, and the Forest Service is forced to transfer funds from non-fire programs to cover the cost of suppression. These transfers stop other critical work underway, cause uncertainty in planning and impact needed future projects.

Read More

Moving forward on the Elliott State Forest will take cooperation

By Jim Paul, director of the Oregon Department of State Lands
The Oregonian
July 7, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Oregonians have a history of coming together to solve tough issues involving natural resources. Cooperation has produced such iconic results as public access to our beaches, strong recycling and land-use laws, salmon recovery in our rivers and streams and, most recently, sage-grouse habitat protections in eastern Oregon. Determining the future of the Elliott State Forest provides Oregonians with another chance to solve a tough problem by working together. The Elliott State Forest near Coos Bay is made up mainly of lands owned by Oregon’s Common School Fund. These lands are unique because they represent the federal government’s contribution to our statehood and public school system.  

Read More

Grizzly managers hear criticism of recovery strategy

By Rob Chaney
The Missoulian
July 7, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

A listening session on future grizzly bear management in northwest Montana drew lots of criticism from both bear advocates and livestock proponents. “While the (U.S. Fish and Wildlife) Service claims it will maintain bear habitat security levels that existed in 2011, it is instead lowering the goal posts on what is considered secure bear habitat,” Keith Hammer of Swan View Coalition said in Missoula at Thursday’s workshop. He accused FWS of “lying” about grizzly population recovery to justify removing the bear from federal Endangered Species Act protection.

Read More

Biologists to trap Idaho grizzlies for study

Associated Press in KTVB News
July 7, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

ISLAND PARK, Idaho – Researchers have started trapping grizzly bears in parts of the Caribou-Targhee National Forest in eastern Idaho as part of a project to monitor the bear population in and around Yellowstone National Park. Idaho Department of Fish and Game officials in a statement Thursday say trapping in the western portion of the Centennial Mountains will continue until enough bears have been captured for the study. Officials say the trapping areas will be marked with bright orange warning signs and that such areas should be avoided. Biologists say they’ll use fresh road-killed deer and elk to bait traps and attract bears.

Read More

Elk gives kisses to firefighters responding to forest fire

Atlanta Journal Constitution
July 7, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

CLE ELUM, Wash. — An affectionate orphaned elk expressed some gratitude to first responders as they battled a hillside fire in Washington July 2. “She isn’t your typical white elk,” Kittitas County Fire District spokeswoman Richelle Risdon told ABC News. “The consensus seems to be she’s an orphan. She adopted the cows, horses and goats from a neighboring ranch as her family. She wants nothing to do with elk moving through the area, like she doesn’t see herself as an elk.”

Read More

My Turn: Tongass logging transition doesn’t do enough for old growth or timber jobs

By Dominick Dellasala, Catherine Mater and Jim Furnish
Juneau Empire
July 7, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

The U.S. Forest Service recently announced its long-awaited “Record of Decision” on the Tongass logging transition, and not much has changed from the draft. While all parties agree that an end to old growth logging is nearing, the agency’s plan does little to preserve old growth or, equally concerning, assure industry viability through accelerated testing of modern sawing technology required for economic transition. The Forest Service is slow-walking the transition by missing a unique opportunity to take advantage of a “wall of second growth wood” soon available to offset old growth logging. …Presidential action is needed to get the Tongass on track with national forests that transitioned years ago. The Tongass remains the only national forest in the country still clearcutting vast tracts of old growth. It doesn’t have to be this way.

Read More

UM researchers find lack of government accountability on widespread herbicide use on public land

The Missoulian
July 7, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

A pair of researchers at the University of Montana recently contributed to a new study that has found a lack of government data and accountability on whether this method is actually destroying “non-target” species and ecosystems and possibly allowing more destructive invasive species to take root. UM researchers Cara Nelson and Viktoria Wagner, along with two Canadian researchers, surveyed government agencies and ag statistics companies in the U.S., Canada and Mexico and recently published their findings in the Journal of Applied Ecology. They found that in 2010, 1.2 million acres of U.S. federal and tribal wildlands –an area the size of 930,630 football fields – was sprayed with 200 tons of herbicide. By far the most commonly used active ingredient was glyphosate –most commonly known to consumers under the brand name Roundup – which is a nonselective herbicide that also kills native grasses and herbs.

Read More

San Diego Union Tribune

Scientists, land managers debate need to cut down and remove those logs from forest ecosystem
San Diego Union-Tribune
July 6, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

…However, an emerging body of science finds little evidence to support these fears. Researchers studying wildfires across the western United States during the past decade have increasingly concluded that forests ravaged by bark beetles and other insects aren’t more likely to burn than healthy expanses of forest. “People get really freaked out about it,” said Tania Schoennagel, a researcher at the University of Colorado Boulder who co-authored one of the most prominent studies on the topic. “I cannot tell you how many times I’ve spoken to foresters, the public, even other scientists, and they say, ‘What? Bark beetles don’t increase wildfire?’ They look at me like I’m crazy, and I’m like, here’s the data,” the fire ecologist added.

Read More

Bullock has failed to lead on timber policy

by Greg Gianforte, candidate for governor of Montana.
Helena Independent Record
July 8, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

…Ultimately, we need litigation reform and federal land management reform. However, we need leadership in this state that will use every available tool to defend Montana’s interests and get more timber flowing to Montana’s mills. The governor of Montana has two very important and simple tools that he can use, but has failed to use, on this issue. In 2015, the Legislature appropriated $5 million over the biennium for a “Hazardous Fuel Reduction Fund.” Back in October, I called for the governor to release the full amount so we can better manage our forests and increase the timber supply. However, the governor has not released the full amount. The governor has been given another tool to help alleviate the timber shortage thanks to the “Good Neighbor Authority” granted to states under the federal farm bill. …Unfortunately, as is all too common with this administration, Gov. Bullock has failed to lead.

Read More

Gov. McAuliffe names new agriculture and forestry secretary

Associated Press in The Washington Post
July 7, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

RICHMOND, Va. — Gov. Terry McAuliffe has picked a new secretary of agriculture and forestry for Virginia. The Democratic governor said Thursday that Dr. Basil I. Gooden will take over for current Secretary Todd Haymore. Haymore is leaving to become secretary of commerce and trade. Gooden has been servng as state director of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Rural Development for the Commonwealth of Virginia since 2014. Prior to that, the Virginia native worked as chief deputy director of the Virginia Department of Housing and Community Development. Gooden is from Buckingham County, where his family owned a cattle farm.

Read More

Bornean Orangutan deemed ‘critically endangered’ by IUCN

The Malaymail News
July 7, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: International

KUALA LUMPUR — The Bornean orangutan is now a “critically endangered” animal, the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) announced this week. According to the IUCN’s findings, the Bornean orangutan population is expected to decrease by 86.2 per cent by 2025, compared to the population in 1950. “The combined impacts of habitat loss, habitat degradation and illegal hunting equate to an 86% population reduction between 1973 and 2025 which qualifies the species for listing as Critically Endangered,” reads the IUCN assessment.

Read More

Forest Fires

Fire near Snare hydro system out of control, no longer being fought

By Rachel Zelniker
CBC News
July 7, 2016
Category: Forest Fires
Region: Canada, Canada West

A wildfire 10 kilometres south of the Snare hydro system is now 50 times larger than when it was reported on Tuesday and the N.W.T. government is not going to fight it. The fire, which initially covered 10 hectares, is now covering 503 hectares of forest about 65 kilometres north of Behchoko and has been classified “out of control.” “We’ve got a lot of high priority fires close to values around Yellowknife that our resources are allocated to at this point in time,” said the N.W.T.’s manager of fire operations, Rick Olsen. “This fire is at a size right now where it would take extensive resources to really work on it.” Instead, crews are focusing on protecting values at risk in the area such as transmission lines and towers.

Read More

Red Lake blaze reaches 74K hectares in size, no new fires reported

TB Newswatch
July 7, 2016
Category: Forest Fires
Region: Canada East, Canada


There were no new fires by the early evening of July 06 in the Northwest Region. There were two new fires in the region by day’s end on July 05 – Lightning-caused fires in the Sioux Lookout and Red Lake Districts. Red Lake Fire 018 is now out. The forest fire hazard is low to moderate for most of the region and moderate to high in the far north. Active fires in the Northwest Region include: • Red Lake District Fire 003 is being observed at a size of 74,334 hectares. • Sioux Lookout District Fire 014 is being observed. This lightning-caused fire is located in a remote location in the far north. Its current size is 38 hectares.

Read More

Weekend winds could complicate firefighting efforts in Rio Arriba County

The Santa Fe New Mexican
July 7, 2016
Category: Forest Fires
Region: United States, US West

With forecasts offering little hope of rain but the prospect of heavier winds, crews swept into the Carson National Forest in eastern Rio Arriba County on Thursday to continue the fight against a wildfire burning 55 acres near Vallecitos. First reported Wednesday, the La Cañada Fire was scorching an area of wood fuel off a forest road, according to a statement from the U.S. Forest Service. Initially estimated at 15 to 20 acres, the fire later was found to be about three times larger, crews confirmed Wednesday evening. Carson National Forest spokeswoman Dorotea Martinez said crews aim to suppress the blaze before the weekend, when higher winds are expected. Martinez also noted that the western section of the Carson National Forest, where the fire is burning, is relatively dry.

Read More

Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy

New energy plant on Burnaby Mountain will cut emissions by 85 per cent

Burnaby Now
July 7, 2016
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: Canada, Canada West

Burnaby Mountain will see a dramatic reduction in greenhouse gases thanks to a new central energy plant that could be in operation by early 2019. Corix Multi-Utility Services recently signed an agreement with Simon Fraser University to move forward with the construction of a new $39-million facility that would use locally sourced biomass to produce green, thermal energy for the two grids it serves, SFU and the UniverCity community. Until now, Corix has used temporary natural gas boilers to produce the energy. Going forward, waste destined for local landfills – like wood chips from sawmills and tree cuttings and trimmings – would fuel the plant. The new system will provide sustainable energy to more than 40,000 people on Burnaby Mountain and reduce campus greenhouse gases by 85 per cent, according to Eric van Roon, Corix’s senior vice-president of Canadian utilities.

Read More

General

Group protests closing Klamath Forest for salvage operation

Redding Record Searchlight
July 6, 2016
Category: Uncategorised

Members of an environmental group are holding a rally Friday to protest the closure of a portion of the Klamath National Forest. Tom Wheeler, a program director for the Environmental Protection Information Alliance, said the group is trying to raise awareness that the U.S. Forest Service has closed off thousands of acres of the forest to many users while they harvest timber from an area known as the Westside Fire Recovery Project. The Forest Service is harvesting trees burned in the area during summer 2014. Wheeler said the Forest Service is violating the group’s free speech rights by preventing it from going into the area to “bear witness” about whether the agency was following plans to protect the northern spotted owl during the logging operation.

Read More