Tree Frog Forestry News

Daily Archives: July 15, 2016

Business & Politics

Government of Canada Invests in Science and Infrastructure Upgrades at the Laurentian Forestry Centre in Quebec City

By Natural Resources Canada
Government of Canada
July 15, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada East, Canada, Canada West

Science and research are key to innovation and environmental sustainability in the natural resource sectors. The Government of Canada is making strategic investments in scientific research infrastructure to support the competitiveness of Canada’s natural resources industries, create jobs and to support Canada’s transition to a low-carbon economy.  An investment of $3.3 million at the Laurentian Forestry Centre in Quebec City will ensure that the scientists and researchers who work at the facility can continue their cutting-edge work in forest pest management, forest regeneration and climate change research, among other projects. 

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New Zealand log export volumes and prices increase

By Wood Resources International
Scoop Independent News
July 15, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: International

New Zealand continues to be the world’s leading exporter of softwood logs followed by Russia and the US. These three countries accounted for almost 50% of globally traded logs in 2015, with a majority being destined for the Chinese market, according to the Wood Resource Quarterly (WRQ). New Zealand is exporting over 50% of the country’s total harvest in log form. In 2015, New Zealand exported 14.7 million m3 of radiata pine logs, of which almost ten million m3 was shipped to China. This was down from a record high of almost 12 million m3 in 2013. In late 2015 and early 2016, Chinese log buyers became more active in the New Zealand log market with shipments increasing from 1.8 million m3 in the 3Q/15 to 2.5 million m3 in the 1Q/16.

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Forestry

Fire Hazard Assessment – A Forest Practices Board Bulletin

BC Forest Practices Board
July 14, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

This bulletin explores why fire hazard assessment is important; recent Board audit findings; and provides some FAQs. A fire hazard assessment considers the risk of a fire starting, the hazard associated with the industrial activity, the difficulty in controlling a fire and the potential threat to values. Logging and most other industrial activities on forested land can create or contribute to an existing fire hazard. In British Columbia, the Wildfire Act requires a person carrying out an industrial activity such as logging to assess and abate fire hazards.

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Forests minister to address chamber

Campbell River Mirror
July 14, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

The Campbell River Chamber will host the Steve Thomson, Minister of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations at a Chamber members and guests luncheon. The luncheon takes place this Friday, July 15 at the Anchor Inn from 11:30 a.m. – 1:30 p.m. A few tickets remain for this event, so visit www.campbellriverchamber.ca or connect with the Chamber at 250-287-4636 to get one. Thomson’s mandate incudes climate change and adaptation, BC wildfire service, fish, wildlife and habitat management, land based investment strategy and crown land policies. “We have a vested interest in all of these topics and how it relates to Campbell River’s sustainable natural resource sectors and our rich natural environment,” says Campbell River Board Chair, Corby Lamb

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Forest industry studying logging truck accidents

By Colin Dacre
My Prince George Now
July 14, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

The BC Forest Safety Council is working to reduce the number of logging truck accidents on BC roads. Director of Transportation Safety Dustin Meierhofer says the inherent risks associated with hauling any type of cargo makes the logging truck one of the most dangerous spots in the forest industry . “Overall within the industry, log hauling typically ranks number two in terms of risky activity… hand falling is typically number one.” Data analysis conducted by the Safety Council on the first quarter of 2016 shows the majority of log truck incidents happen between 6a-8a with with secondary peaks between 2-4am and 12-2pm. Meierhofer says it’s too early to determine what factors behind those bumps are, but that work is ongoing. 

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Elphinstone Logging Focus blockade of controversial cutblock continues

Coast Reporter
July 14, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

BC Timber Sales (BCTS) has awarded logging rights on a contentious cutblock on the slopes of Mt. Elphinstone, but the group Elphinstone Logging Focus (ELF) is calling on the winning bidder to ask for rights to log somewhere else and leave A87125 alone. …In a release circulated to local media, ELF’s Ross Muirhead said, “ELF was alarmed to find out that the contentious Block A87125 was bid on by logging contractors residing in Gibsons and Roberts Creek. Perhaps these local contractors are not aware that an expanded Mt. Elphinstone Provincial Park is an actual bylaw under the SCRD Official Community Plan. We request that Mr. [George] Fallis and Mr. [Aaron] Service step away from A87125, and request that BCTS allocate them an area outside this high biodiversity zone.”

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Millstones relocated to new park

By Susan Quinn
Alberni Valley News
July 14, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

The millstones that have stood on the Catalyst Paper grounds for more than 50 years were moved to their final home, Monday morning. The 400-metre trip took a flat deck, crane crew and some ingenuity to free the 17-tonne millstones from their last mooring. Their new resting place is a low, circular base on a corner of city-owned land just beside the Catalyst helicopter pad on the Somass River. The millstones were originally made in Scotland and shipped to the Alberni Valley for use in the first paper mill, which was located at Paper Mill Dam in 1892. Catalyst donated the millstones to the city in 2014, Watson said.

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One Jump Ahead Mountain Pine Beetle – A BC Forest Service film from 1978

You Tube
July 15, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

An historical look at Mountain Pine Beetle control techniques being used in British Columbia in the late 1970’s. Produced by the Information Division and the Prince Rupert Forest District (that second producer surprises me because MPB is not a big coastal issue). This production is one of a collection of historical films and videos that were digitized as part of the celebration of the centenary of the BC Forest Service in 2012. Digitization was done through a grant from the UBC Ike Barber Learning Centre and funding from the BC Forest Service Centenary Society.

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Forest companies should work with trail groups

Letter by Ken Milbrath
Victoria Times Colonist
July 14, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Re: “Gates block ventures in the wild,” June 26. As a recent director of the Vancouver Island Spine Trail Association, it’s obvious VISTA’s decade-old problem has been gaining access through private forest land. So I was heartened to hear TimberWest had struck a deal with United Riders of Cumberland to allow mountain-bike access. The details reveal something much less than the community-spirited company portrayed in recent articles: Limited access, two-year term only, $16-million extra insurance coverage required, costing the association $3,300 per year. We were charged $500 just to cross their Cowichan cutblock to have a look at possible routes.

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Logging, mining in conflict

Letter by Dave Jorgenson
Prince George Citizen
July 14, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

…The trouble is, this winter, West Fraser Timber removed one-third of the watershed timber supply, without community consultation or addressing flooding concerns. Although it was a shock to the community, and even the mining company, it was left to the mines inspector to be the most disgusted. I can’t speak directly for the inspector, but I’m sure that he wondered why he was inspecting the mine for environmental hazards, making sure they had cariboo mitigatation strategies in place, and controlled their watershed impact, while he stood in a logged-out bowl with mud running over improperly installed culverts, creeks logged to the banks, and one third of all the possible cariboo habitat removed in one season’s pass. This inspector was bold enough to raise a formal complaint against West Fraser… but logging is not his jurisdiction, after all.

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Martin Mars takes flight again, but are its days numbered?

By Jessica Lepp
CTV News Vancouver Island
July 13, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

The Martin Mars water bomber has taken to the skies for the first time this year, but some are wondering whether it’ll be one of the iconic plane’s final flights. Coulson Aviation has invested $1-million to fly the aging air tanker to the world’s largest airshow in Oshkosh, Wis. later this month. Visitors to Port Alberni have been stunned to see the plane parked on Sproat Lake this week as it prepares for the eight-hour trip on July 23. “This is a big undertaking for us,” said Coulson project manager Mayco Noel. “We’ve been working on the aircraft for the last 90 days, with some engine repairs, some sheet metal. So it’s been, definitely, a big investment for us.”

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Fighting emerald ash borer will cost Thunder Bay millions: report

CBC News
July 15, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

City administrators in Thunder Bay, Ont. say they expect dealing with the arrival of the emerald ash borer in the city will cost millions over the next decade. A report slated to go to council Monday lays out several options for combating the invasive beetle, which destroys ash trees. The report, prepared by city forester Shelley Vescio, shows that simply doing nothing and removing trees after the ash borer kills them would be the most expensive option, costing $7.6 million over the next decade. The report goes on to say that the money would have to be spent, as the trees, once dead, become hazardous.  A combination of treating 50 per cent of eligible city trees in parks and along streets, while removing
and replacing others as they die, is being recommended, at a cost of $6.3 million over the next 10 years.

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4FRI contractor gets $9,000 state fine

Arizona Daily Sun
July 15, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

State regulators have fined a subsidiary of the biggest contractor on the Four Forest Restoration Initiative more than $9,000 after a worker caught and nearly severed his arm in a wood chipper at the company’s Williams sawmill in February. At its June meeting, the Industrial Commission of Arizona approved a $9,200 fine recommended by the Arizona Division of Occupational Safety and Health after a February inspection of the mill. The inspection was prompted after 19-year-old employee Marshall Ciampi got his sleeve or glove caught in the chain of a milling machine as he was clearing an area of wood chip debris. Ciampi’s arm was pulled into the sprocket of the running machine, rolled around and broken several times and nearly severed from his body, according to a report from the Williams Police Department.

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Letter: Urging Daines, Zinke to support Blackfoot Clearwater Stewardship Project land proposal

By Robin Poole, Missoula
Helena Independent Record
July 14, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

The University of Montana recently released a bipartisan poll showing that Montanans, by an overwhelming majority, cherish public lands. This poll is just the latest indication of what we all know intuitively — that nothing unites Montanans of all political stripes quite like our shared love of special wild places and our desire to conserve those places. As UM geography professor Rick Graetz put it after the poll was released, “national parks and conservation is about as popular and bipartisan an issue as you can find these days” in Montana.

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Olympic National Forest seeks applicants for resource advisory committee

Peninsula Daily
July 14, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

OLYMPIA — Applications are being accepted for the Olympic Peninsula Resource Advisory Committee. The RAC reviews and recommends land management projects that are on or adjacent to Olympic National Forest. Projects are funded under the Secure Rural Schools program.  Applications must be received or postmarked by Aug. 15. The committee consists of 15 members, and each is assigned to one of three categories. The Olympic Peninsula RAC has vacancies in all three categories.

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Selling the Elliott State Forest is only latest chapter of mismanagement

By Tanya Sanerib – senior attorney at the Portland office of the Center for Biological Diversity
The Oregonian
July 14, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Ever since members of the State Land Board voted to auction off an irreplaceable part of Oregon’s Elliott State Forest, they have tried to characterize their decision as a reasonable compromise to a difficult challenge. But the on-the-ground reality shows Oregon’s history of managing state lands has been far from balanced or reasonable.  For years, state land managers have failed to comply with the federal Endangered Species Act in managing state forests, allowing thousands of acres of old-growth and other forest habitat to be logged. In 2013, due to litigation by the Center for Biological Diversity, where I work, as well as the Audubon Society of Portland and Cascadia Wildlands, 1,700 acres of timber sales were suspended due to ESA violations related to the marbled murrelet, a rare, protected sea bird.  

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Forester Says Spruce Aphids Reduce Growth, But Don’t Kill Trees

KBBI.org
July 14, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

A spruce aphid infestation in the Homer area has been causing land owners to worry that their trees are dying. Wednesday evening, the Center for Alaskan Coastal Studies hosted area Forester Hans Rinke, with the Alaska Division of Forestry, to address the issue. “Spruce aphids have been around for, well, since the ’80s in Southeast Alaska. It’s recently shown up here in Southcentral Alaska. In Southeast Alaska it’s led to reduced growth, but not outright death of the trees,” said Rinke. Rinke says the aphids are sucking the sap out of conifer needles, which causes them to go from green to a rust color. It also causes early shedding of needles. Spruce aphids are causing problems with black spruce mostly on the southern peninsula, but can affect other conifers.

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Why are spruce grouse declining in the Northeast? Study aims to find out

Bangor Daily News
July 14, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

The Maine forest has a secret, and a University of Maine study project is trying to unravel the mystery. The spruce grouse has a wide range throughout Canada that dips down into several northern states. For some reason, they are declining in the Northeast. It’s become scarce in New York. It’s an endangered species in Vermont. …Yet, it appears to be doing OK in Maine. There is something about our forest management that apparently suits these grouse, and we’d like to know what it is. …The mystery may have much to do with how timber is harvested in Maine, especially with such practices as pre-commercial thinning.

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Congo kicks out activists who were investigating logging

Reuters Africa
July 14, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: International

KINSHASA – The Democratic Republic of Congo on Thursday expelled two Global Witness activists who were investigating logging practices in its vast forests, the government said. The Central African country accused the Global Witness employees of inciting a community living on the edge of a logging area to revolt, something the London-based NGO denied. “Such behaviour … would put this country in danger and, at the very least, (risk) the peace that is very valuable to us,” Environment Minister Robert Bopolo said, announcing that he had told the two investigators – a Canadian and a German – to leave. Last year, Global Witness reported that Congo’s biggest logging companies were systematically and illegally plundering the Congo Basin, undermining efforts to protect the world’s second largest rainforest.

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Forest Fires

Two new forest fires discovered in the northeast

Currently nine fires burning in the region
Sudbury.com
July 14, 2016
Category: Forest Fires
Region: Canada East, Canada

As of late yesterday afternoon, there were nine forest fires burning in the northeast region, two of them new since yesterday. Both of those fires are relatively small and both are burning near Hearst, far north of Greater Sudbury. Hearst 8, a 0.1-hectare fire, is already declared out, while Hearst 9, also 0.1 of a hectare, is under control, the Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry says.The MNRF said Guelph 1 is under control at 6.4 hectares. Crews will continue to utilize infrared scanning to eliminate hot spots on the interior of the fire. The forest fire hazard is mostly moderate to high across the region with the exception of the Greater Sudbury area, which is showing an extreme hazard today.

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Homeowner sued for $25 million over California wildfire

Associated Press in the Idaho Statesman
July 15, 2016
Category: Forest Fires
Region: United States, US West

LOS ANGELES The federal government sued a homeowner for nearly $25 million on Thursday, contending his negligence sparked a 2013 fire in the mountains east of Los Angeles that forced 5,000 people from their homes. The lawsuit says that a short in a poorly maintained electrical junction box sparked a blaze in the San Jacinto Mountains above Palm Springs that charred more than 27,500 acres of brush and timber — about 43 square miles — and at one point threatened the town of Idyllwild. Investigators determined that the lid of the plastic box containing wires was warped and ajar, the lawsuit said. “As a result, an electrical discharge inside the box shot sparks and hot material out of the box and onto dry ground vegetation below,” according to the lawsuit.

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Upper Peninsula Crews Continue Fighting Forest Fire

9&10 News
July 14, 2016
Category: Forest Fires
Region: US East, United States

Crews continue to fight a forest fire in the Upper Peninsula. The Pine Plantation fire has destroyed about 56 acres. A helicopter with a water bucket is being called in to help them. Fire crews are fighting the fire around Raco. It sparked Wednesday afternoon after a lightning strike. Northern Michigan’s News Leader got an up close look the area. The fire is still smoldering and is kept to the ground, not reaching high into the trees. No one in the remote area has been evacuated, but part of North Country Trail will remain closed through Monday. Crews say the weather Thursday helped. “Today we returned, we saw one area that the fire was able to move outside our dozer line, they were able to contain that. The weather has helped us out.

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Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy

Dr. Patrick Moore: Celebrate CO2

By H. Sterling Burnett
Somewhat Reasonable – Heartland Institute
July 14, 2016
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: International

In today’s edition of The Heartland Daily Podcast Dr. Patrick Moore, co-founder of Greenpeace and a leader in the international environmental field, joins Managing Editor of Environment & Climate News H. Sterling Burnett to talk about how he ultimately broke with Greenpeace. Dr. Moore forcefully rebuts Greenpeace’s arguments against GMO foods and in particular their harmful campaign against golden rice. He also addresses why he supports Resolute Forest Products in their case against Greenpeace, and taking on Greenpeace and other climate alarmists. Moore says we should celebrate rising carbon dioxide and that the worlds plants need more not less of it.

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