Tree Frog Forestry News

Daily Archives: July 21, 2016

Business & Politics

Canadian envoy fires back against ‘inflated rhetoric’ on softwood lumber in U.S.

By: Andy Blatchford
Canadian Press in MetroNews
July 20, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, United States

OTTAWA — Canada’s ambassador to the United States is firing back at a group of American senators who signed a public letter containing what he calls “inflated rhetoric” about Canadian softwood lumber. Earlier this week, 25 senators sent a letter to U.S. Trade Representative Michael Froman that alleged Canadian lumber is subsidized, unfairly traded and has had decades worth of well-documented adverse economic impacts in the U.S. Ambassador David MacNaughton shot back Wednesday in a missive of his own to U.S. Sen. Ron Wyden, saying the Americans’ letter contained concerning “mischaracterizations.” …”It is clear to me that inflated rhetoric can only complicate efforts to reach a solution. It is for this reason that I am disappointed with some of the inaccurate language that is contained in your letter to Ambassador Froman.”

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US senators turn up heat in Canadian lumber dispute

By Peter O’Neil
Vancouver Sun
July 20, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, United States

OTTAWA — The Canadian government fired back Wednesday at “inaccurate” claims from a group of influential American senators who are demanding the U.S. government support legal action against Canadian lumber exporters this October. B.C. Premier Christy Clark has already warned that “thousands” of West Coast jobs could be lost if the Canadian and U.S. governments don’t find a settlement by then in a protracted dispute that dates back decades. The senators, in a letter sent this week to U.S. Trade Representative Michael Froman, say tough action will be necessary unless the two governments reach an agreement that prevents American lumber producers from “the harmful effects of subsidized Canadian lumber in the U.S. market.”

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Canfor opens new pellet plants in Chetwynd and Fort St. John

Alaska Highway News
July 20, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

Canfor cut the ribbon on two new pellet plants in Chetwynd and Fort St. John on Tuesday. The two plants, at a cost of $58 million, were built at Canfor’s existing sawmills, and have a combined annual production capacity of 175,000 tonnes of wood pellets. The Chetwynd plant began operations late last year, while the Fort St. John plant reached full operations earlier this year. “(The plants) “play an important role in maximizing the value of our fibre with their production of sustainable wood pellets from once waste-bound sawmill residues,” Canfor CEO Don Kayne wrote in a post on the company’s website. Wood pellets are a form of wood fuel generally made from compacted sawdust. When put into pellet stoves, they can create a heat source proponents say is green and natural.

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Fire at Canfor wood processing facility in Houston this moring

By Daryl Vanderberg
My Bulkley Lakes Now
July 20, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

There was a fire this morning at the Canfor wood processing facility in Houston. Houston fire Cheif Jim Daigneault says the fire was put out in less than two hours, and was likely stated by overheating in the electrical system. “Something in the main electrical area overheated and caused a fire to start,” says Daigneault. “Sawdust… in the electrical wire tracks. We managed to get it put out and everything went well.” He says it was on the roof in the electrical precipitator. Daigneault says there was mostly smoldering on the scene with a little bit of smoke and small flames.

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SmartLam could be key to easing Weyerhaeuser layoffs

By Chris Peterson
Flathead News Group
July 20, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States, US West

Sometimes when a door closes, another one opens. That was the hope after Montana Sen. Jon Tester held a round table discussion Friday on impending layoffs at the Weyerhaeuser mills and administrative offices in Columbia Falls. Casey Malmquist, the president and general manager of SmartLam, said his company plans meeting with local Weyerhaeuser officials on the possible sale of at least one mill building to his company in the next week and a half. SmartLam builds super strong cross-laminated wood panels that are used in building construction, bridges, and platforms for oil well rigs. It currently has a facility in Columbia Falls behind Super 1 Foods, but would like to expand.

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Construction of $1.3 billion Sun Paper pulp mill project in Arkansas delayed more than six months due to ongoing pre-engineering, feasibility studies

RISI Technology Channels
July 20, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: US East, United States

LITTLE ROCK, AR – Sun Paper Industry of China says the planned early 2017 construction start for a $1.3 billion superproject in Clark County will likely be pushed back because of ongoing pre-engineering and feasibility studies for the bio-product paper mill. “They are still trying to nail down some of the issues involving the project and it has taken more time than was expected,” said Julie Mullenix of Little Rock-based Mullenix & Associates, a local governmental relations, PR and lobbying firm.

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Uruguay denies pulp mill pollution

Buenos Aires Herald
July 20, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: International

The new UPM pulp mill planned for construction near the Río Negro in Uruguay will have no effect on the Uruguay river, the neighbouring country’s environmental agency said yesterday. Its director Alejandro Nario addressed the issue after authorities in Gualeguaychú district, Entre Ríos, protested the creation of the new plant, sparking fears about a conflict similar to that seen a decade ago over a pulp mill in Fray Bentos, which strained billateral relations for years. “If the law is followed, everythings points to no pollution problems” in the river shared by both countries, Nario told Radio Sarandí.
“Uruguay was already able to analyze to pulp mills and follow how they worked, with no environmental impact at all in either of the previous two projects. 

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Wood, Paper & Green Building

Vancouver is getting a wooden skyscraper designed by Shigeru Ban

By Michael McCullough
Canadian Business
July 20, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: Canada, Canada West

Vancouver residential developer PortLiving nabs the Pritzker-prize winning architect to design the world’s tallest “hybrid” wooden skyscraper. The latest entrant in the global race to build the world’s tallest wooden building is a residential tower slated for Vancouver’s Coal Harbour designed by Pritzker Prize-winning Japanese architect Shigeru Ban. Unlike the 18-storey student residence rising at the University of B.C., or the 25-storey office tower planned for Vienna, the proposed Terrace House is not entirely wood-framed; developer PortLiving is calling it a “hybrid timber structure”—wood framed on its upper floors, but using more conventional steel and concrete construction methods lower down. This may offend purists who tout the low carbon footprint of super-strong treated lumber compared to traditional high-rise building materials. 

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New video makes case for building with wood

From Oregon Forest Resources Institute
PR Newswire
July 21, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: United States, US West

PORTLAND, Ore.– A new video produced by the Oregon Forest Resources Institute highlights the environmental benefits of wood construction and using wood products sourced from sustainably managed forests. The five-minute “Forest to Frame” video seeks to enhance public understanding of how building more structures with wood helps address pressing global challenges such as population growth and climate change. Wood stores carbon, meaning increased use could help fight climate change, says OFRI Director of Forest Products Timm Locke. “Half of the dry weight of wood is carbon,” he says. “Wood buildings are essentially huge carbon storage units. This fact alone is causing more and more architects, engineers, developers and policymakers to take a fresh look at building with wood.”

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Timber skyscraper takes root in the Netherlands

Gizmag
July 21, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: International

Love them or loathe them, wooden skyscrapers are on the rise, especially in Europe and North America. This latest example is designed by Team V Architectuur and will rise to 21 floors in Amsterdam. Dubbed Haut, the project is due to begin construction in late 2017. Expected to be completed in 2019, the 73 m (240 ft)-tall building will likely be the tallest timber tower in the Netherlands, perhaps in Europe, and even possibly in the world, though it’s just as likely that another firm will build something taller in the meantime. However, to put the size of these timber towers into perspective, the (non-wooden) Burj Khalifa is over 10 times taller, at 830 m (2,723 ft), including tip. Indeed, the only wooden skyscraper we’ve seen with serious height is PLP’s 300 m (984 ft)-tall Barbican skyscraper, but that’s just a concept with no immediate plans to build.

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A tiny beach shack in Essex wrapped in “magic” cork panels

By Tafline Laylin
Inhabitat
July 20, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: International

Cork is a “magic” material that is “stable, durable, insulating, breathable but not water permeable,” according to the UK-based architect Lisa Shell. Commissioned to design a small beach house for a flood-prone plot on the edge of Essex, it is no wonder she chose cross-laminated timber (CLT) and cork as her main building materials that give the home a gentle strength in harmony with the surrounding ecosystem. …Elevated on red steel stilts like a Redshank wader, the home is constructed in CLT with a 180mm thick expanded cork agglomerate overcoat. The cork panels are created from the by-product of wine cork production in Portugal, according to Shell, using only heat and compression to form a chemical bond between cork chips. 

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Forestry

Restoring Fort McMurray’s Urban Forest Our Greatest Challenge Yet

By Michael Rosen, RPF, President of Tree Canada
Huffington Post
July 21, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada

Like all Canadians, I watched the nightly news in disbelief as wildfires devastated the Fort McMurray region throughout the months of May and June. I read about how the blaze destroyed roughly 2,400 homes and buildings, and how 80,000 people were forced out of their residences for nearly a month. But I still wasn’t fully prepared for what I experienced during my visit last week. I’m a professional forester and I’ve seen my fair share of forest fires up close. Still, the vastness of this fire and extent of damage in an urban area was sad, sobering and more than a little eerie. Once-vibrant neighbourhoods now looked like cemeteries. Hundreds of burnt cars, pieces of patio furniture and still-standing stone chimneys were coated with an ashen-coloured paper and water mixture to prevent the toxic ash from flying. 

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Western red cedar able to adapt to changing climate

By Travis Paterson
Saanich News
July 20, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

In a greenhouse behind the Pacific Forestry Centre, research scientist Cosmin Fillipescu points to a tiny wrapping foil around the base of an evergreen seedling. Within the foil is a fungus. Researchers are trying to recreate the butt rot found in millions of B.C.’s most treasured tree, the western red cedar. There are few woods, if any, that are as durable and in demand as the western red cedar. First Nations call it the ‘tree of life,’ for the tree’s variability. To date, red cedar is not under threat. But with climate change, and an increasing global demand, it will be, and in more ways than one. That’s why Fillipescu spends his days at the Pacific Forestry Centre in Saanich dedicated to understanding what’s in store for B.C.’s red cedar stock.

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Alberta environment minister defends caribou plan

By Kyle Muzyka 
CBC News
July 20, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Critics say predator control, barricaded habitat not the answer. Alberta’s environment minister is defending the province’s draft caribou protection plan against criticism that it puts industrial development ahead of protecting caribou habitat. In a statement provided to CBC News, Shannon Phillips said “inaction” by the previous Conservative regime forced the NDP government to move quickly to come up with its own solution. “Protecting this iconic species is not only the right thing to do, it’s mandated by the federal government,” Phillips said. “Unfortunately, the previous provincial government did little to solve this problem and their inaction put Alberta in a position where range plans would have been imposed on us by Ottawa.   “Our government got right to work by hiring a mediator to work with forestry, energy, Indigenous, environmental and municipal stakeholders to help us establish a
made-in-Alberta a solution that protects both the caribou and jobs in the area.”

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Forest industry in danger, say BC mayors

By Chris Bolster
Powell River Peak
July 20, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

More than a decade after the provincial government made policy changes to BC’s forest industry, optimism about its future is waning, according to Truck Loggers Association (TLA), a forest contractor lobby group. That is the view of mayors from 27 coastal communities surveyed by TLA for its community perspectives report on the BC coastal forest industry. City of Powell River mayor Dave Formosa participated in the survey and said that when local forest contractors fold it has a ripple effect throughout communities. “We’ve seen contractors go out of business in Powell River,” said Formosa. “First, you see job loss. These contractors are huge, great community supporters. It leaves a big hole.”

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Environmentalists challenge BC Hydro’s right to relocate amphibians

Canadian Press in Victoria Times Colonist
July 20, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

VANCOUVER – A tiny tadpole is at the centre of the latest legal fight to stop a massive hydroelectric project in northeastern British Columbia. An environmental activist with a history of defending amphibians alleges that the provincial government knowingly overstepped its authority when it gave permission in May for BC Hydro to move tadpoles and frogs from a section of the Peace River upstream from the new Site C dam. Water from the area is slated to be removed in order to build dikes. Josette Wier and Sierra Club BC filed a petition in B.C. Supreme Court on Wednesday, asking for a review into whether the Ministry of Forest, Lands and Natural Resource Operations followed the law when it exempted BC Hydro from prosecution for relocating the amphibians, which include toads and salamanders.

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‘Generational amnesia’ softens fight for forests

By Jack Knox
Victoria Times Colonist
July 20, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Maybe if they scattered Pokémon Go characters among Vancouver Island’s forests, people would notice the loss of old-growth trees. Or maybe our treehugger stereotype is outdated. …Which is what came to mind the other day when the Sierra Club of B.C. warned that “high and increasing old-growth logging rates on Vancouver Island will lead to an ecological and economic collapse unless the B.C. government changes course.”  The environmental group wants the provincial government to phase out the cutting of ancient trees and speed the transition to what it calls sustainable, value-added, second-growth logging.  This sort of story used to send Islanders flying to the barricades (to which they would then chain themselves). Carmanah, Walbran, Meares Island, the Texada lands on Salt Spring — the names of logging protests fall off the tongue like those of Second World War battlefields.

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Milton tops up emerald ash borer strategy budget as trees continue to deteriorate

By Melanie Hennessey
Inside Halton
July 20, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

The Emerald Ash Borer is out in full force in Milton, hitting both the Town’s trees and pocketbook hard. The invasive species is costing the Town over $1 million this year to combat through its Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) Strategy and has resulted in the removal of 600 trees on municipal property so far in 2016. “Unfortunately, we will have to eventually remove all the ash trees in Milton in the road right of ways, parks and woodlots,” said Town Manager of Operations Jim Cartwright. With local ash trees deteriorating more quickly than the Town expected, council recently approved a $521,000 cash infusion from the slot reserve fund for the EAB Strategy budget, bringing the 2016 total spending to $1.2 million.

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Saving Toronto’s ravines: forestry researchers track ecological changes

University of Toronto
July 20, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada


As the city considers a ravine strategy plan, University of Toronto forestry professor Sandy Smith and her students are tracking the ecological changes of a Rosedale ravine – and they’re alarmed by what they’re finding so far. Graduate student Anqi Dong says non-native species of trees – including the notorious Norway Maple, a prolific seed producer – have multiplied across Rosedale’s Park Drive Ravine. They have jumped from 10 per cent to 40 per cent of the tree population over the last 40 years, forcing the overall diversity of trees in the ravine into a dramatic decline. Smith, who was part of the City of Toronto’s ravine strategy advisory group last year, and her students are working with community activists and nature enthusiasts to raise funds for further in-depth studies of this area, which abuts Evergreen Brickworks, along with other Toronto ravines.

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Grow letter: Our forests

Letter by Cecil W. Grow
Idaho Statesman
July 20, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Responding to overplanting the forest. Tim L. Tanton Sr. stated “This is just my opinion but I think we are creating this ourselves” when he stated, “Then we plant seven seedlings for every one that is lost.” The problem is not the planting of seven seedlings for each tree lost. Nor is it from the prolific growth of the natural seeding process. Overforestation is not caused by overplanting. Overforestation happens when we limit selective cutting of trees for lumber by trying to save some overly protected bird, animal or reptile species and to satisfy some people who care more for things than people’s welfare. If we do not thin the forests by selective harvest for lumber, Mother Nature does it by beetle infestation and fire.

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Record tree die-off poses fire concern

By Sydnee Scofield
KOLO
July 21, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

RENO, Nev. — This year the U.S. Forest Service is reporting record numbers of tree die-off. The more dead trees in our forests, the more fuel there is for wildfires. They attribute this to multiple factors. “Around the 1860s to 1890s, a lot of the forests here in Reno, and up in Tahoe, were clear-cut and this is the resulting forest we’re seeing today,” Duncan Leao, with the U.S. Forest Service, said. This means all of the trees in our forests are the same age. For that reason, there is no diversity. This creates a less resilient environment as all of the trees are susceptible to the same things. Over time, firefighters have also become better at fighting wildfires, meaning less natural mitigation is happening in forests today.

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Forest Service gathers local data for use in national survey

Goanacortes.com
July 20, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

At least one 2.5-acre plot of the Anacortes Community Forest Lands is starting to take on some characteristics found in old growth stands. This is according to U.S. Forest Service biological scientist Nathan Malcomb who works with the service’s Forest Inventory and Analysis Program researching the health and makeup of the nation’s forests. It is one of about 350,000 plots in the country the Forest Service surveys about every 10 years. The plots were selected using a hexagonal grid and are located about 3.4 miles apart. Each represents about 6,000 acres of land area. Data is collected from plots on public and private land and analyzed to make up a forest inventory. That data includes how much forested land there is in a region, where it is, who owns it and what plant species are present as well as forest conditions and changes over time.

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DNRC offers programs to help residents pay for forest thinning

KPAX
July 20, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

MISSOULA – The Montana DNRC is encouraging residents in forested areas to take proactive steps in reducing fire danger around their homes by offering to pay for some, or even all of the costs involved with thinning surrounding forests. Steve Siebert is a forestry professor at the University of Montana and knows the importance of thinning dense forests to promote fire safety, and vegetation growth. 16 years ago, Siebert purchased his lot in the Upper Rattlesnake and almost immediately began thinning the forest right past his back yard. He says thanks to help from the Montana DNRC, he has been able to keep up with all the work.

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WHITEBARK RESCUE – Resort, agency combine for pine project

By Sam Wilson
The Daily Inter Lake
July 20, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Overlooking the Flathead Valley from Whitefish Mountain Resort, a team of restoration specialists spent Tuesday morning scaling whitebark pine trees to place protective cages over the still-ripening cones — part of a years-long effort to halt the disappearance of the species from the region. The popular ski area is one of 18 sites on the Flathead National Forest where foresters are working to re-establish the species in the midst of sharp declines brought on by blister rust, a fungal tree disease introduced to the region about 50 years ago. …“If we do nothing, they will become functionally extinct,” she said. “Humans created this problem, and because we created this problem, we have a responsibility to help restore the trees.”

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Forest Service planning logging in northwestern Crazy Mountains

by By Michael Wright
The Bozeman Daily Chronicle
July 20, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

It doesn’t have many of the details yet, but the U.S. Forest Service is planning logging in a northwestern portion of the Crazy Mountains. Using authorities granted by the 2014 Farm Bill, the agency wants to cut down trees near the Smith Creek and upper Shields River watersheds, which flow off the west side range. The project is meant to focus on dead and downed timber and trees that have been beaten up by insect infestations in recent years. Tera Little, who will lead the environmental analysis of the project, said they’ve yet to hammer out all the details of the project — like how many acres would be logged.

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Time runs out for Oregon timber ballot initiatives

East Oregonian
July 19, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Three ballot initiatives that would have restricted clear-cutting and aerial spraying in Oregon have failed to qualify for the November general election. One of the petitions, which would have imposed new limits on aerial pesticide applications, was able to obtain the Oregon Supreme Court’s approval for its ballot title language. However, that didn’t leave enough time for supporters to collect about 88,000 valid signatures by the July 8 deadline. The state’s highest court has yet to rule on the ballot title for another petition that would restrict aerial spraying and logging in landslide-prone areas. A third petition to prohibit clear-cut timber harvests was withdrawn by supporters due to legal complications involving forestland property value laws.

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GOP platform supports transferring western public lands to states

By Jeff Mapes
Statesman Journal
July 20, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

The newly approved Republican platform expands the party’s support for turning over federal lands to the states — creating a new flashpoint in the presidential campaign. The call for sweeping land transfers comes largely from Republicans in Oregon and other western states with huge tracts of federal forests and grasslands. They have long argued that the federal government is a poor land manager that puts too many restrictions on logging, ranching and mining. But critics say it would damage the environment, and they frequently demonize the idea by saying it’s aligned with the kind of sentiment that led to the takeover of the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge.

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Judge dismisses lawsuit seeking to block logging project

The Missoulian
July 20, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

HELENA, Mont. – A federal judge has dismissed a lawsuit seeking to stop a logging project in the Kootenai National Forest in northwestern Montana. The Alliance for the Wild Rockies had argued in its lawsuit filed in May 2015 that logging on more than 92,000 acres on the east side of Lake Koocanusa violates environmental laws and could harm bull trout, grizzly bear and lynx habitat. U.S. District Judge Dana Christensen on Tuesday granted the U.S. Forest Service’s request to dismiss the lawsuit. Christensen says in his order that none of the environmental organization’s claims warrants blocking the project. The East Reservoir Project plan approved by the Forest Service calls for logging 8,845 acres spread out across the larger area about 15 miles east of Libby. END OF STORY

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LETTER: Look at the German model for harvesting timber

by Roger Dellinger
Daily Inter Lake
July 19, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

The recent announcement of the closure of Plum Creek Lumber Mill in Columbia Falls got me to thinking (always a danger!). In terms of how our federal government should handle our national forest, I think they should look at what Germany does with its forests. For the past 300 years Germany looks upon their lumber forests as a crop. Many homes in Germany are still built only of wood and many homes are still heated with wood. As a crop, for every tree cut down, a new one is planted. And just like a farmer controls his weeds, the Germans keep their forest floor fairly uncluttered, which helps to reduce the number of large fires.

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Thinning work begins in Upper Rattlesnake area

KPAX
July 19, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

MISSOULA – The Lolo National Forest is trying to protect one of Missoula’s most popular recreation spots from forest fires. US Forest Service contractors have begun fuel reduction work on thousands of acres of dense forest in the Upper Rattlesnake area. The Marshall Woods Project will reduce common forest fire fuels. Contractors are focusing on eliminating what are called “ladder fuels”. Ladder fuels are smaller trees, or bushes, next to large trees. When a fire hits, it will typically catch small trees first then climb up to larger ones. But Forest Ecologist Dave Atkins this area located approximately two miles north of the main Rattlesnake Trailhead is just one of several that are a part of the project, which is estimated to take three to five years to complete.

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Under Bullock push, only seven timber sales actually cut, signed, or sold

By Mike Dennison
KPAX
July 19, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

HELENA – While Gov. Steve Bullock is touting his administration’s work to hasten timber sales on federal forests in Montana, only one such project has been cut and just three others have completed contracts. Together, those four projects account for nearly 8 million board feet and an estimated 150 timber jobs – but the latter three awarded contracts won’t be logged until later this year or next. Three additional projects totaling another 11.2 million board feet are signed and ready for bid, but probably won’t be logged until next year at the soonest. Volume from these seven projects is about 6 percent of the timber sold in one year in the Northern Region, which includes Montana and northern Idaho.

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Good Neighbor Authority projects launched

UpMatters.com
July 19, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

MICHIGAN– Today the U.S. Forest Service and Michigan Department of Natural Resources announced that the two agencies are completing another step toward implementation of the Good Neighbor Authority in the state. The parties are signing three Supplemental Project Agreements for timber sale work on the Hiawatha, Huron-Manistee and Ottawa National Forests. The Good Neighbor Authority offers the opportunity to work across jurisdictional boundaries to sustainably manage forest lands by allowing state resources to accomplish work planned on national forest system lands. The projects will maintain and create healthy forest conditions as called for in the national forests’ land and resource management plans, while providing additional wood fiber to Michigan’s vital forest products industry.

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Forest Fires

Crews working to bolster fire lines on blaze east of Boise

Associated Press in the Idaho Statesman
July 20, 2016
Category: Forest Fires
Region: United States, US West

BOISE, Idaho About 175 firefighters supported by airplanes dropping retardant and helicopters have slowed a wildfire burning in grass and sagebrush 15 miles east of Boise. Officials say the fire on Wednesday is about 7 square miles in size after starting on Tuesday and ballooning to 5 square miles by that evening, destroying a barn and two other outbuildings. On Wednesday crews worked to build fire lines to the north of the fire and to reinforce a bulldozer line on the eastern and southern perimeters. The Ada County Sheriff’s Office and Boise County Sheriff’s Office have closed Rocky Canyon Road and all trails east to State Highway 21. “With a wind shift and a topography change, the Mile Marker 14 Fire has the potential to spread towards Rocky Canyon Road,” said Incident Commander Lindsey Neiwert in a statement.

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The Latest: Officials: Utah brush fire may have been arson

Associated Press in The Missoulian
July 20, 2016
Category: Forest Fires
Region: United States, US West

CHEYENNE, Wyo. — The Latest on wildfires burning in the Western United States (all times local): 12:45 p.m. – Utah authorities are investigating whether a brush fire that destroyed at least 10 mobile homes was intentionally set. The 30-acre fire in the northern Utah city of Tooele ripped through a trailer park overnight after high winds pushed it out of a field and into a neighborhood. Tooele fire and police officials said Wednesday that the blaze appeared suspicious and investigators were trying to determine if it was arson.

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Cliff Creek Fire grows to 12 square miles, new forest fires ignite in western Wyoming

Casper Star Tribune
July 20, 2016
Category: Forest Fires
Region: United States, US West

CHEYENNE — New wildfires have broken out on national forest land in western Wyoming while firefighters sought to check a growing blaze that has closed one of the highway routes accessing the touristy Jackson Hole region and Yellowstone National Park. The new fires were discovered on Tuesday in the Bighorn and Shoshone national forests. Both are in remote areas. The Arden Fire has burned about 350 acres near Shell Reservoir in the Bighorn National Forest. The Shoshone Lake Fire, which is about 57 acres, is burning west of Lander in the Shoshone National Forest. The new fires are in addition to a large fire burning in the Bridger-Teton National Forest in Sublette and Teton counties about 5 miles north of the community of Bondurant. The Cliff Creek Fire has burned about 12 square miles and closed a 40-mile section of U.S. 191/189 between Daniel Junction and Hoback Junction.

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Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy

Trees contribute to reducing carbon footprints even after being cut down 8211 UN report

Canada Standard
July 21, 2016
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: Canada

Forests can contribute greatly to the fight against climate change even after trees have been logged, according to a new United Nations report which looks at the impact of wood products on carbon storage. “Forests are at the heart of the transition to low-carbon economies, not only because of their double role as sink and source of emissions, but also through the wider use of wood products to displace more fossil fuel intense products,” the Assistant Director-General for Forestry at the UN Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), Ren” Castro-Salazar, said from Rome, where she is participating in the UN agency’s World Forest Week.

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Northern Ontario biomass industry learning from European methods

Northern Ontario Business
July 20, 2016
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: Canada East, Canada

The biomass market in Northern Ontario is heating up, literally and figuratively. As fossil fuel-reliant remote communities prepare to scale back their consumption and transition to more sustainable energy sources, researchers and industry are looking to Europe for best practices and partnerships. “We’re looking at how we can collaborate for sustainability, sharing science, and leveraging best practices,” said Dawn Lambe, executive director for the Biomass North Development Centre in North Bay. “Their forest industry is incredibly sustainable and a key economic platform for them in economic hard times.” In May, Lambe and a team of delegates from across the North headed to Sweden and Finland to meet with Nordic biomass experts, establish partnerships and exchange information.

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