Tree Frog Forestry News

Daily Archives: July 28, 2016

Business & Politics

Catalyst Announces Second Quarter Results

Marketwired
July 27, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada

RICHMOND, BRITISH COLUMBIA– Catalyst Paper Corporation (TSX:CYT) today announced results for the second quarter ended June 30, 2016. The company recorded a net loss of $26.6 million and a net loss before specific items of $27.3 million in the second quarter. This compared to net earnings of $16.9 million and a net loss before specific items of $5.1 million in the previous quarter. Adjusted Earnings Before Interest Tax Depreciation and Amortization (adjusted EBITDA) was negative $5.3 million and adjusted EBITDA before specific items was negative $1.1 million in the second quarter.

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Tembec reports financial results for its third fiscal quarter ended June 25, 2016

Canada Newswire
July 28, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada

MONTREAL – Consolidated sales for the three-month period ended June 25, 2016, were $376 million, as compared to $365 million in the same quarter a year ago. The Company generated net earnings of $9 million or $0.09 per share in the June 2016 quarter compared to a net loss of $16 million or $0.16 per share in the June 2015 quarter. Operating earnings before depreciation, amortization and other items (adjusted EBITDA) was $26 million for the three-month period ended June 25, 2016, as compared to adjusted EBITDA of $2 million a year ago and adjusted EBITDA of $36 million in the prior quarter.

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Softwood Lumber Dispute Heating Up

By Colin Dacre
My Prince George Now
July 27, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

Rhetoric is flying on both sides of the border over softwood lumber. Last week, both Canada’s Premiers and Ambassador to the United States penned open letters chastising American Senators over long running allegations that Canadian lumber is unfairly subsidized. The crux of the American argument is that most timber harvesting takes place on private land in the United States, and on crown land in Canada. Canada’s Premiers and Ambassador both point to past trade court rulings that dismissed the allegations, with the Council of the Federation calling on the Prime Minister to publicly denounce the claims. “Unfair and inaccurate allegations of Canadian lumber subsidies by American interests must not go unchallenged by the federal government” writes Council Chair and Yukon Premier Darrell Pasloski.

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Tolko should clean up its act

Castanet Kelowna
July 27, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

It is time for the citizens of Kelowna to demand Tolko Mills to clean up their act if they wish to be respected in this community. The attached letter is from 2014, when the Mayor was Walter Gray. Now we have a new Mayor and Council and it is time they stepped up. The attached picture was taken July 25th, 2016 and shows Tolko’s stacks pumping carcinogenic pollutants into our environment. As I journey further into this issue and lack of care for the citizens of Kelowna, I hear many stories of how we got there. The boilers at Tolko, I have been told, are from the 40’s or 50’s and have not been upgraded. The pollution scrubbers need upgraded boilers to be efficient. In 1972, I have been told, the government of BC grandfathered Tolko’s equipment.

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Prince George economic outlook tops among seven mid-sized cities: Conference Board of Canada

Prince George Citizen
July 27, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

Prince George will see the strongest economic growth among the seven mid-sized cities covered in a Conference Board of Canada outlook. Following growth of 2.6 per cent last year, Prince George’s economy is forecast to make further gains over the next two years, with real GDP rising by 2.4 per cent this year and 2.8 per cent in 2017. “The Prince George economy has been growing at a healthy pace for several years, and 2016 should be no different,” said Conference Board associate director – municipal studies centre Alan Arcand. “We expect that much of the city’s growth this year will be fuelled by strong gains in forestry, construction, finance, insurance, and real estate.” …Growth is being driven by stronger U.S. new home construction activity, which has generated higher demand for B.C. wood products. 

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Fortress Paper completes the sale of Lebel-sur-Quévillon pulp mill and sawmill assets

Lesprom
July 27, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada East, Canada

Fortress Paper’s wholly owned subsidiaries, Fortress Global Cellulose Ltd. and Fortress Lumber Corp., have closed the asset purchase agreement entered into with LSQ Energy, L.P. and LSQ Development, L.P., as the company said in the press release received by Lesprom Network. The asset purchase agreement provides for the sale of all of the assets relating to the non-operating pulp mill and sawmill, as well as the cogeneration facility, located in Lebel-sur-Quévillon, Québec.

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Boise Cascade Company Reports 2016 Second Quarter Net Income of $19.2 Million on Sales of $1,043.8 Million

Nasdaq
July 28, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States

BOISE, Idaho – Boise Cascade Company (Boise Cascade or Company) (NYSE:BCC) today reported net income of $19.2 million, or $0.49 per share, on sales of $1,043.8 million for the second quarter ended June 30, 2016. In second quarter 2016, total and single-family U.S. housing starts increased approximately 1% and 7%, respectively, from the same period last year. Total U.S. housing starts from the July 2016 Blue Chip consensus forecast for 2016 and 2017 reflect 1.20 million and 1.32 million, respectively, or expected annual increases of 8% and 10%.

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Wood, Paper & Green Building

Wood-ribbed huts provided warmth at TED2016

By Peter Kenter
Journal of Commerce
July 27, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: Canada, Canada West

The Vancouver TED conferences have become a home for people who want to express big ideas. Standing outside TED2016 was another big idea: ELEVATE, a temporary installation of two warming huts inspired by high-alpine shelters. The wood structures were designed and built by local students as part of a three-month design-build course at the DBR (Design Build Research) school. The school is a not-for-profit institute dedicated to teaching design and construction founded by architect Michael Green of Michael Green Architecture, social entrepreneur Scott Hawthorn, CEO of Native Shoes, and wood engineer Eric Karsh, of Equilibrium Consulting Inc. 

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What is possibly the world’s largest wooden tower clock is ticking away in Nannup

ABC News, Australia
July 28, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: US West, International

Contentedly ticking away in a specially built shed in Nannup, Western Australia is possibly the largest working wooden tower clocks in the world. Built predominantly of jarrah by local Kevin Bird, the clock is nearly 6m tall and just over 3m wide and 3m long. The jarrah clock was originally destined for a new civic centre in the main street of Nannup. When the project did not eventuate, Mr Bird decided to assemble the clock in a specially built shed on his property. The clock face is 2m in diameter and made of leaded glass with a steel armature inside a timber frame. Building the clock has taken the best part of a decade of Mr Bird’s life.

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Tackling the big squeeze

Specification Online
July 27, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: International

Engineered timber has gained traction as a structural solution, with the UK seeing a rapid increase in the number of offsite manufactured hybrid timber buildings. With many developers taking advantage of its numerous benefits and areas such as the London Borough of Hackney, supporting this rapid and sustainable form of construction – the current trend is set to continue and intensify. In densely populated cities such as London, where space is limited and land comes at a premium, many developers are looking for solutions to rapidly maximise their return on investment. Tall timber is becoming part of our vernacular and extra storeys equate to a better return on investment. Cross laminated timber panels and glulam beams, as robust, yet lighter weight structural solutions, reduce overall foundation requirements.

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Wood Awards shortlist revealed

Timber Trades Journal
July 27, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: International

Some of the best architectural designs in wood have been chosen for the 2016 Wood Awards shortlist. The commercial and leisure category finalists include Gloucester Services, which incorporates a glulam roof and is designed by Glenn Howells Architects, as well as a the Stihl Treetop Walkway at Westonbirt, the National Arboretum. The education and public sector shortlist includes Maggie’s at Manchester, a design by Foster + Partners utilising LVL, while new buildings at St Clare’s College, Oxford saw Eurban supply cross-laminated panels. In the small projects category, a bespoke doors project in Westminster saw TimbaTeq Bespoke Joinery, Whitmore’s Timber Ltd and Capital Crispin Veneers combine using German and French oak.

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Forestry

Insect traps help guard Edmonton’s urban forest

By Lydia Neufeld
CBC News
July 27, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Hundreds of insect traps have been set up around Edmonton so city pest management staff can monitor any threat to the city’s urban forest. “About half of our street trees are green ash and the other half are American elm so between the two of them there’s a lot of vulnerability there,” said Mike Jenkins, biological sciences technician with the city of Edmonton. Two of the most destructive pests in North America go after those two tree species, which are a huge asset to the city, Jenkins said. “Edmonton has the largest stand of Dutch elm disease-free elms in the world,” he said. “We have about 60,000 city-owned trees and about 30,000 privately owned elms.”

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Lake Louise Ski Resort investigated for alleged removal of endangered whitebark pine

Resort says it will work with officials as probe continues and ‘some form of reparation program’ is possible
CBC News
July 28, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Lake Louise Ski Resort is in court for allegedly removing endangered whitebark pine trees from the land on which it operates. Parks Canada has been looking into the removal of trees from the back side of the Lake Louise leasehold in Banff National Park and resort spokesman Dan Markham said it will work with officials as the investigation continues. Markham said it’s standard practice to remove trees and brush on resort land, but employees may have removed some whitebark pine by mistake. The potentially problematic removal of trees was first noticed when resort employees and Parks Canada officials did a walkaround of the area in the summer of 2014, Markham said.

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Lightning strike sends two loggers to hospital

The Castlegar Source
July 26, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

TMTV in Nelson is reporting that two men were treated for injuries after being knocked unconscious during a lightning storm at a logging operation northwest of the Heritage City Tuesday. TMTV reports the men were hooking up a cable while logging when the lightning hit and knocked both men unconscious. One man received head lacerations and the other received burns. The men were treated for their injuries and released from Kootenay Lake Hospital early Tuesday evening. Environment Canada issued Thunderstorm watch for the West Kootenay beginning Tuesday morning.

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Raw log rally attendees send message to BC gov’t

By Susan Quinn
Alberni Valley News
July 27, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Close to 100 people gathered … to support a campaign to ban raw log exports. Representatives from major forest industry unions and environmental organizations along with local elected officials and First Nations marched Friday, July 22, in Port Alberni to rally for sustainable forestry. The Public and Private Workers of Canada (PPWC), Unifor, Wilderness Committee and Ancient Forest Alliance are calling on the BC government to end raw-log exports and to prioritize the transition to sustainable second-growth forestry. …A rally was held in Duncan in the fall, and while no specific date has been chosen for the next rally, Coste said there will be another one—perhaps Nanaimo or Campbell River, which are other Island communities where logging is an important industry.

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Envirothon draws hundreds of students from 52 states, provinces, plus China, to Peterborough

By Jessica Nyznik
The Peterborough Examiner
July 27, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

High school students from across North America and China competed Tuesday in the 2016 North American Envirothon at Selwyn Conservation Area. It’s a five-day environmental educational competition, based at Trent University, for teams that have won their state or provincial event. More than 250 students from 52 states and provinces and China took part. They put their knowledge of environmental science and natural resource management to the test at the conservation area, working in five areas: soil, aquatic ecology, wildlife, forestry and invasive species. This year’s Envirothon host is Forests Ontario, a charity that focuses on tree planting and forest education programs.

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Canada is a Natural Resource-based Economy, Right?

By Eric Rempel, South Eastman Transition Initiative
My Steinbach
July 27, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

One of the arguments used over and over when the question of environmental protection comes up, is that protection of the Canadian natural environment must not impede our use of natural resources, because they are an important part of our economy. They are assumed to add value. How true is that assumption? Data from Statistics Canada for 2015 shows that mining, quarrying, oil and gas extraction together account for 8% of Canadian Gross Domestic Product (GDP); and agriculture, forestry, fishing and hunting together account for <2%. Resource extraction ranks 3rd and agriculture and forestry rank 18th. The top two generators of GDP are real estate activity (excluding construction) at 13% and manufacturing at 11%.

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Spruce budworm moth infestation creates cleanup headaches

By Bridget Yard
CBC News
July 27, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

The millions of spruce budworm moths that have been swarming the Campbellton and Dalhousie areas seem to be dying off, but they’re leaving behind an enormous mess. Wayne Mann of Mann’s Garden Centre in Tide Head has been on call the past few days, on clean-up duty around the region. He was called in by Campbellton’s Plaza auto dealership to help clean up the moths that carpeted the parking lot, vehicles, windows and shrubs on the property. …However, for insect ecologist Rob Johns with Natural Resources Canada, that “mess” could provide a major source of information about the spruce budworm moth, which in its larval stage defoliates fir and spruce and has caused hundreds of millions of dollars in damage to forest land during major outbreaks.

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First Nations students learn hands-on natural resource sector skills

By Leith Dunick
Thunder Bay News Watch
July 27, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

THUNDER BAY — Give a student a desk and a classroom and they might doze off. But send them into the woods to learn how to use buzz saws or teach them how to use drones and you might just get their attention for life. Forty-eight Aboriginal students from across Northern Ontario are getting just that chance over a six-week period this summer, taking part in the First Nations Youth Employment Program. The hands-on activities free the youth, aged 16 to 19, from classroom shackles and open up a world of opportunities, teaching them leadership and skills while opening their eyes to potential career paths in the natural resource sector.

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Former lumber town rides digital wave to a comeback

By Andrew Selsky
Associated Press in Mail Tribune
July 26, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

PRINEVILLE — It was not long ago that Crook County had five major lumber mills. Timber was king, and the rural Oregon county was the nation’s top producer of ponderosa lumber. But amid restrictions on harvesting from federal lands, logging started to freefall around 1990. The county’s mills began closing. The global recession hit a few years later. Unemployment soared to around 20 percent, the highest in Oregon. …Logging is ingrained in Oregon’s culture. A statue of an ax-wielding pioneer tops the state Capitol. Oregonians’ favorite local novel is Ken Kesey’s “Sometimes a Great Notion,” about a logging family. Oregon’s professional soccer team is the Portland Timbers, its logo a double-bladed ax over a forest-green background.

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Zinke’s position on forest management

by Mark Peck. Lincoln County county commissioner
The Missoulian
July 28, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

As a county commissioner, third generation Montanan, hunter, hiker, fisherman and a strong supporter of public access to public lands, I am deeply troubled by a recent opinion piece by John Sullivan and Hannah Ryan (co-chairs of the Montana chapter of Backcountry Hunters and Anglers.) The piece grossly misrepresents HR 2316, the Self-Sufficient Community Lands Act, and falsely demonizes Congressman Ryan Zinke’s support of the bill. Their statement that the bill “legislates the transfer of millions of acres of public lands and jeopardizes the health of America’s national forest system, fish and wildlife habitat, and public access to quality hunting and fishing” is not factual. Number one, our national forest system is already in jeopardy for multiple reasons: antiquated laws, budget cuts to managing agencies and excessive litigation, to name a few.

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Buying the view won’t keep forest healthy

by Gary Ullman, Retired forester
Bozeman Daily Chronicle
July 27, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Shawn Regan’s July 22 column suggests an alternative to actual execution of the Limestone West forest management project, while still allowing the DNRC to produce income for its trust beneficiaries. Unfortunately, the other benefits that would result from the project would not come to fruition. Well-planned and executed timber management projects can result in improved vigor and health of the residual stand of trees, reduction in fire hazard, less likelihood of a catastrophic fire, as well as numerous economic benefits. …To automatically assume the timber harvest will harm views, wildlife, and water quality is archaic thinking steeped in logging practices from 50 or 100 years ago. Mr. Regan proposes a compromise that will not make the citizens of Montana whole.

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North Coast timber conflict flares up—again

By Will Parrish
The Bohemian
July 27, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

After an era of relative quiet compared to the so-called timber wars of the 1980s and ’90s, conflict over logging in the forests of Northern California has returned. A plan to log 100- to 150-year-old redwood trees across 320 acres of northwestern Sonoma County in the Gualala River floodplain has generated fervent opposition from environmentalists and local residents over the past year. Clear-cutting of 5,760 fire-impacted acres in the Klamath National Forest kicked off in April, much of it on land previously designated as endangered species habitat. The indigenous people of the area, the Karuk tribe, worked with local environmentalists to craft an alternative plan, but the Forest Service largely ignored it. The Karuk and the environmental groups have filed a lawsuit in an attempt to scuttle the logging.

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Landowner seeks injunction against the Bitterroot National Forest’s Westside management project

Missoulia Independent
July 27, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

After months of feeling helpless and ignored, a property owner south of Hamilton has decided to take the fight against a controversial logging proposal on the Bitterroot National Forest to the next level. Yesterday, Fred Rohrbach, along with the Hamilton-based company Bitterroot LLC, filed a legal complaint against the U.S. Forest Service alleging the agency’s approval earlier this month of the Westside Collaborative Vegetation Management Project violated several environmental laws. Furthermore, the plaintiffs claim the decision notice and finding of no significant impact signed by forest supervisor Julie King were arbitrary and capricious, and constitute “an abuse of discretion.”

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At Stoltze tour, Zinke stumps for Forest bill

Hungry Horse News
July 27, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Montana Congressman Ryan Zinke toured the F.H. Stoltze Land and Lumber Co. mill last week, while promoting the Resilient Federal Forests Act. The Act looks to streamline timber project on federal lands through a collaboration with local stakeholders. Projects that go through the collaborative process would also receive a categorical exclusion from the National Environmental Policy Act. Groups that want to challenge projects in federal court would also be required to post a bond equal to the estimated legal costs of defending a suit. It also shifts some wildland fire fighting costs to emergency federal funding, rather than dipping out of Forest Service coffers. The bill made it through the House earlier this year, attached to a larger energy bill and awaits consideration in conference committee by the Senate.

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$220.8 million price tag put on Elliott State Forest

by Tracy Loew
Statesman Journal
July 27, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Oregon has put a $220.8 million price tag on the Elliott State Forest. That’s much less than the $300 million to $400 million value estimated in August, when the State Land Board decided to sell the 82,500-acre property near Coos Bay. “We knew there was a range. We knew there was uncertainty,” said Jim Paul, director of the Oregon Department of State Lands. “It wasn’t anything close to the rigor of the appraisal and timber cruise we went through to get this price.” This time, three independent firms provided appraisals. Mason, Bruce & Girard, an Oregon natural resources consulting firm, prepared the final report and valuation. The forest was created in 1930 to provide funding for the Common School Fund, but has lost money as timber harvests have declined.

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Oklahoma Forestry Services closing 4 offices due to budget

Associated Press in News Channel 10
July 28, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

OKLAHOMA CITY – Oklahoma Forestry Services says it’s closing four offices and reducing services as part of a restructuring program forced by budget reductions. Forestry Services Director George Geissler says the agency plans to reallocate resources to maximize its remaining services. While some services will no longer be available to landowners in western Oklahoma, all 77 Oklahoma counties will continue to receive wildfire suppression support. Offices being closed include those in Enid, Burns Flat and Ardmore in the western half of the state and Battiest in southeastern Oklahoma. Employees who work at the offices are being reassigned to other locations or offered different positions within the agency.

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The eucalyptus controversy

By Bashir Hussain Shah
The News International
July 28, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: International

The eucalyptus tree is native to the Australian continent and has been introduced to the other five continents due to its ability to grow quickly. In Pakistan it was introduced during the time of the British but concentrated research on its species performance was carried out at the Pakistan Forest Institute (PFI) since its establishment at Peshawar by eminent forest officers and research scientists. In Australia there are about 700 species of eucalyptus but in Pakistan only five species were introduced, either for their fast growth or for their aesthetic value. Eucalyptus camaldulensis, its scientific name, is the species that has been planted extensively as roadside and canal-side plantations, as well as compact irrigated plantations in all the four provinces. It was also planted on farm lands in all the four provinces through USAID-sponsored Social Forestry Project in the mid-1980s and 90s.

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Log exports starving local processors (with audio)

Interview with Winston Peters
Waatea News NZ
July 28, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: International

New Zealand First leader and Northland MP Winston Peters is backing concerns by wood processors at the hollowing out of forests through the uncontrolled export of logs. Processors and forest owners including large Maori land trusts met officials in Whangarei this week to discuss an acute shortage of logs for Northland mills. The processors say the harvest rate is unsustainable, Northland forests are being harvested and exported at an immature stage, there is little replanting and no new forests being planted.

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Mexican farmers using fireflies to save forest

By Lulu Orozco
Associated Press in St. Louis Post-Dispatch
July 26, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: International

NANACAMILPA, Mexico — In the village of Nanacamilpa, tiny fireflies are helping save the towering pine and fir trees on the outskirts of the megalopolis of Mexico City. Thousands of them light up a magical spectacle at dusk in the old-growth forests on reserves like the Piedra Canteada park, about 45 miles (75 kilometers) east of Mexico’s sprawling capital city. Piedra Canteada in Tlaxcala state isn’t a government-run park, but a rural cooperative that has managed to emerge from poverty and dependence on logging with the help of the fireflies. For years, economic forces, including low prices for farm produce, forced rural communities like Piedra Canteada to cut down trees and sell the logs. Then, in 1990, community leader Genaro Rueda Lopez got the idea that the forest could bring tourism revenue from campers.

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Forest Fires

Bulldozer operator killed fighting California blaze

By Terence Chea and Kristin J. Bender
Associated Press in Monterey Herald
July 27, 2016
Category: Forest Fires
Region: United States, US West

Big Sur — The operator of a bulldozer was killed when it rolled over during the fight against a wildfire near Big Sur that has destroyed 20 homes and spread across more than 36 square miles, California fire officials said Wednesday. Another operator escaped injury when a second bulldozer rolled over and sustained minor damage, according to the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection. The name and age of the operator who was killed was not immediately available. Battalion Chief Robert Fish said the operator was working in steep and difficult-to-access terrain when the accident occurred. Fish did not have further details about the incident but said 60 bulldozers were being used in the fight against the fire.

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Homes on edge of the wilderness complicate wildfire efforts

Associated Press in Herald and News
July 27, 2016
Category: Forest Fires
Region: United States, US West

…Telleria’s home near Boise stands on the edge of the wilderness in a landscape that offers pastoral serenity but is also susceptible to wildfires. Some 44 million homes have been built in similar areas of the lower 48 states, making the properties expensive to protect from flames and draining resources that might otherwise be used to defend forests, rangeland and wildlife habitat. “I fly back and forth across the country and I see it,” Interior Secretary Sally Jewell told the nation’s top wildfire managers during a meeting in May at the National Interagency Fire Center in Boise. “We should be holding these people accountable, and we’re not.” …In 2015, the U.S. Forest Service set aside more than half of its budget for fire suppression. In one week in August, it spent $243 million fighting fires, much of it to protect homes.

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Pioneer Fire approaching 10000 acres, about 900 personnel on scene

Idaho Statesman
July 28, 2016
Category: Forest Fires
Region: United States, US West

About 980 personnel are battling the Pioneer Fire, which grew to 12,986 acres by Thursday morning, according to Traci Weaver, spokesperson for the Great Basin Team 1. Crews have been working to increase containment on the fire, and keep it from burning further east. The fire has occasionally jumped east across Idaho Highway 21, so firefighters are on the road, battling to keep those flares from burning more severely. Crews are also working to protect yurts in the Whoop-Um-Up campground, but crews are prioritizing the safety of personnel and citizens, Weaver said. “Our number one priority is life safety,” she said.

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The Latest: Southern California fire now 65% contained

Associated Press in the Washington Post
July 28, 2016
Category: Forest Fires
Region: United States, US West

Officials say the huge blaze in northern Los Angeles County is now 65 percent surrounded. The fire command said Thursday that crews have stopped the spread of the nearly 60-square-mile blaze in forest land east of Santa Clarita. Firefighters are aided by light winds but will contend with another day of triple-digit temperatures. Metrolink commuter rail service is running again after being closed for days in the burn area. To the north, crews braced for a spike in temperatures near Big Sur where a huge wildfire has destroyed 34 homes. Crews working around the clock took advantage of cooler overnight weather as they braced for a spike in daytime temperatures near California’s Big Sur where a wildfire has destroyed 34 homes and killed a bulldozer driver working to contain the blaze.

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Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy

Biofuel: is it the answer?

By David Suzuki, co-founder of the David Suzuki Foundation
Castanet Kelowna
July 27, 2016
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: Canada, Canada West

The shift from fossil fuels to renewable energy is occurring mainly at the power plant level. But what about transportation? Can we significantly reduce greenhouse gas emissions by switching to cleaner fuels? Or is this just an attempt to keep 20th century technology chugging along while trading one set of environmental problems for another? …Biofuels can play an important role in reducing greenhouse gas emissions, especially for applications like long-haul trucking and possibly air travel. …Research into new types of biofuels is also important, but the massive amounts of land, biomass and water required to produce conventional biofuels mean they aren’t a panacea. We can get further in transportation by focusing on fuel efficiency and conservation, increased public transit and other alternatives to private automobiles, and shifting to electric vehicles, especially as clean electricity sources become more widely available.

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