Tree Frog Forestry News

Daily Archives: September 12, 2016

Froggy Foibles

Carlisle man to tackle coast-to-coast – on wooden bike

UK News and Star
September 9, 2016
Category: Froggy Foibles
Region: International

A cyclist will tackle the hills of Cumbria just days after the Tour of Britain athletes – but instead of pedalling the latest carbon-fibre bike, he’ll be cycling a wooden one. It took Richard Harris, 42, of Skiddaw Road, off Wigton Road, Carlisle, about a year to make the wooden bicycle from scratch using more than 150 pieces of wood. He now plans on cycling it tomorrow along a Coast to Coast route, from Anthorn to Whitley Bay. He and four friends aim to complete the route in about eight hours. Mr Harris, a joiner by trade, took up the challenge about this time last year as he said he was looking for a project to keep him busy through the long, dark winter. He had seen a few wooden bicycle before online and set about making a wooden frame.

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Business & Politics

U.S., Canada Haven’t Given Up on Lumber Pact

By Rossella Brevetti
Bloomberg Bureau of National Affairs
September 8, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, United States

Negotiations to reach a new softwood lumber pact are ramping up in advance of a meeting planned between Canadian Trade Minister Chrystia Freeland and U.S. Trade Representative Michael Froman. Canadian Trade Minister Chrystia Freeland discussed the issue with U.S. Trade Representative Michael Froman in Hangzhou, China Sept. 4 on the sidelines of the Group of 20 summit, Christine Constantin, spokeswoman for the Embassy of Canada in Washington, told Bloomberg BNA. Freeland expects to meet with Froman again “shortly,” Constantin said in a Sept. 7 e-mail. No date has been confirmed yet, she said.

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Catalyst Announces Resignation of Its Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

from Catalyst Paper Corporation
MarketWired
September 12, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada

RICHMOND, BRITISH COLUMBIA— Catalyst Paper Corporation (TSX:CYT) today announced that Frank De Costanzo, Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer, is leaving the company to pursue a CFO position with another organization. “While this was a difficult decision for me to make, I am truly proud of the work we have done during my tenure at Catalyst,” said Mr. De Costanzo. “My new position will allow me to return to the U.S. and be closer to my family.” “We would like to thank Frank for his contributions to Catalyst in his role as CFO”, says Joe Nemeth, President & Chief Executive Officer. “He has built a strong finance and accounting team and we wish him all the best in his future endeavours.”

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First Nations businesses flourish off B.C.’s wild coast

By Susan Smith
Globe and Mail
September 12, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

A landmark ruling in 2004 by the Supreme Court of Canada paved the way for the Haida Nation and other aboriginal groups to gain control over resources on their ancestral lands. For the Haida, that meant the richly timbered Haida Gwaii archipelago off the coast of British Columbia, formerly known as the Queen Charlotte Islands… Starting up wasn’t easy. After all, at the time of the ruling, non-aboriginals – particularly big forestry companies – had been calling the shots in the region for decades. But what the Haida lacked in business experience was made up for in determination. They now have three established businesses under the Haico umbrella: Taan Forest LP, Westcoast Resorts and Haida Wild, a seafood processing company… Taan Forest holds Haida Gwaii’s largest licence for harvesting trees. It specializes in sustainable harvesting of Northern red cedar, Sitka spruce and hemlock, but also cuts alder and pine. And for the Haida, sustainability is more than a fashionable buzzword – it is a way of life and was a key reason for their long-running legal battle against non-aboriginal forestry practices.

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Firefighters battle fire at Biomass One

Flames reported to be more than 25 feet tall; 3 buildings damaged
Mail Tribune
September 11, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States, US West

WHITE CITY — Firefighters got two sawdust fire calls to Biomass One Sunday afternoon. The second quickly turned into a three-alarm fire, damaging three buildings. “We initially got a call around 2 p.m. and the second one came in just after 5 p.m.,” Fire District 3 spokesperson Ashley Lara said. “It escalated to a second alarm very quickly and a third alarm shortly after that.” Firefighters reported flames more than 25 feet high as smoke billowed up high above Highway 62. Hours later, more than a dozen engines and more than 30 fire personnel from agencies across Jackson and Josephine counties as well as Oregon Department of Forestry were still pouring water from high above two smoldering buildings and the grassy fields surrounding them. A second shift worked into the night.

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Wellington Shields buys $1,695,494 stake in Weyerhaeuser Co

By Don Renner
The Founders Daily
September 11, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States, US West

Wellington Shields scooped up 9,076 additional shares in Weyerhaeuser Co during the most recent quarter end , the firm said in a disclosure report filed with the SEC on Aug 15, 2016. The investment management firm now holds a total of 53,217 shares of Weyerhaeuser Co which is valued at $1,695,494. Weyerhaeuser Co makes up approximately 0.98% of Wellington Shields’s portfolio. Other Hedge Funds, Including , Williams Jones Associates boosted its stake in WY in the latest quarter, The investment management firm added 65,010 additional shares and now holds a total of 398,269 shares of Weyerhaeuser Co which is valued at $12,688,850.

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Wood, Paper & Green Building

IN DEPTH: Engineered Lumber

By Katy Tomasulo
LBM Journal
September 9, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: United States

Like much of the industry, engineered wood producers are still navigating a fickle recovery in which builders are challenged by supply constraints, tight lending, and hard-to-come-by lots. Though the market is emerging from the recession, it’s still on the slow side. “The demand is there for 1.5 million housing units. We’re not meeting that,” says Joe Elling, director of market research for APA–The Engineered Wood Association. Production is up on a year-ago basis, “but starts could be stronger if some of these supply-side constraints were not as binding,” Elling says. “I anticipate a modest improvement in the second half of the year, but it’s still going to be agonizingly slow going forward.”

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It’s time for a concrete plan for replacing concrete in construction

by Lloyd Alter
TreeHugger
September 9, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: US East, Canada, United States

In recent coverage of how an Atlanta suburb banned wood construction, we quoted their bylaw promoting concrete construction because of its purported “increased building quality, sustainability, durability, and longevity.” But there has been a lot of research and not a few articles recently that call all of those so-called virtues into question. The sustainability argument is the easiest and and most important one. … The Economist doesn’t mention that cement is only 10 to 15 percent of concrete; the bulk of it is aggregate, or sand and crushed rock. In 2014 in the US, 1.26 billion metric tons of crushed stone was produced by 1,550 companies operating 4,000 quarries and 91 underground mines.

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Forestry

CNC creates research chair in forest health

By The College of New Caledonia
Wood Business
September 9, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada

The College of New Caledonia in Prince George, B.C., and the regional forest industry in central British Columbia have partnered to establish a long-term industrial research chair in forest health. The Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (NSERC) has announced a $1 million grant for CNC, to fund the position for five years. The $1 million will be supported with $100,000 in funding from the CNC Research Forest Society, $160,000 in funding from industry partners, and an additional $2 million of in-kind funding from numerous partners as well. The position will be filled by Richard Reich, a CNC Natural Resources and Environmental Technology (NRET) instructor. Reich will work closely with forest companies and collaborating scientists, from government and the post-secondary sector, to develop innovative tools that will help mitigate the impacts of forest diseases on the productivity and resilience of young managed forests in British Columbia.

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Jasper National Park could face ‘change in landscape’ due to mountain pine beetle infestation

September 12, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Faced with increasing losses of millions of trees being killed by the dramatic spread of the mountain pine beetle, Jasper National Park has come up with a new plan to halt the beetle’s infestation. A new management plan was released July 22 after a tripling of the beetle population in the park over the past two years. “I’m astounded at how quickly and rapidly the beetle has affected the pine forest through these valleys,” said Keith McClain, the program lead for the mountain pine beetle ecology program at the Foothills research institute in Hinton. …Parks Canada believes large swaths of the forest have been affected, with an estimated 21,568 hectares of lodgepole pines killed by its invasion.

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The BC Forest Safety Council is pleased to announce the appointment of the new Falling Program Manager, Glenn Hestnes

BC Forest Safety Council
September 9, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Nanaimo, BC – The BC Forest Safety Council is pleased to announce the appointment of the new Falling Program Manager, Glenn Hestnes Nanaimo, BC, September 9, 2016 – The BC Forest Safety Council is pleased to announce the appointment of Glenn Hestnes as the new Falling Program Manager effective October 21, 2016. Glenn takes over from Peter Sprout, who retires on October 20, 2016 to pursue new challenges. Glenn brings more than 30 years of diverse falling and industry experience to his new role. He was most recently a Falling Safety Advisor for the past two-and-a-half years at the BCFSC. He is a Certified Faller, QST, certified danger tree blaster, critical incident investigator and a licensed BC scaler.

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Keeping B.C.’s forest sector competitive

By Minister Steve Thomson, Forests, Lands and Natural Resources Operations
Kelowna Capital News
September 11, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Forestry was one of our province’s earliest, and most successful, industries. Today, it’s an industry that over 65,000 workers and their families rely on – an industry worth defending. That’s why, as minister of forests, lands and natural resource operations, I was proud to announce at the end of last month “Strong Past, Bright Future”, our B.C. Liberal government’s agenda for boosting the competitiveness of our forestry sector. B.C. has a longstanding, worldwide reputation for well-managed forests that produce top-quality wood products. In recent years, however, an uncertain market environment and the ongoing scourge of the mountain pine beetle have threatened to undermine the ability of our forest industry to compete on a global scale.

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Wing and a prayer: northern spotted owls on the brink despite captive breeding program

By Larry Pynn
Vancouver Sun
September 11, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

He’s the $300,000 bird, a fluffy ball of feathers that represents a last faint hope for his species. His theoretical value represents the approximate annual budget of a provincial captive-breeding program for endangered northern spotted owls — one of Canada’s most endangered species — in north Langley that successfully produced just a single newborn this year. Nameless so far, the young male born in April shares its enclosure at the Northern Spotted Owl Breeding Centre with grandparents, Shakkai, hit by a car and brought to a rehab centre in 1994, and Einstein, taken from the Stein Valley as a juvenile in 2007.

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Jasper National Park could face ‘change in landscape’ due to mountain pine beetle infestation

September 12, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Faced with increasing losses of millions of trees being killed by the dramatic spread of the mountain pine beetle, Jasper National Park has come up with a new plan to halt the beetle’s infestation. A new management plan was released July 22 after a tripling of the beetle population in the park over the past two years. “I’m astounded at how quickly and rapidly the beetle has affected the pine forest through these valleys,” said Keith McClain, the program lead for the mountain pine beetle ecology program at the Foothills research institute in Hinton. …Parks Canada believes large swaths of the forest have been affected, with an estimated 21,568 hectares of lodgepole pines killed by its invasion.

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Not just Keji – DNR proposing clearcuts near more protected spaces in Nova Scotia

By Jonathan Riley
Cape Breton Post
September 9, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

KEJIMKUJIK, N.S. – The Department of Natural Resources has proposed cutting forests up to the boundaries of 15 other protected spaces within Nova Scotia besides Kejimkujik National Park. Chris Miller, national conservation biologist with Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society (CPAWS), thinks this the wrong direction for the provincial to be headed. “Clearcutting right up to a protected area boundary will shove those impacts into the protected area itself. The damage doesn’t stop at the border. The concept of edge-effect is well known and the solution is to buffer your protected areas against that type of heavy industrial footprint,” says Miller.

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Our View: Environment should drive monument debate

Mail Tribune
September 11, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Backers of a proposed expansion of the Cascade-Siskiyou National Monument east of Ashland have a good case to make when it comes to the environmental benefits of protecting the unique landscape and the flora and fauna it harbors. But the notion that expanding the boundaries would lead to a measurable boost in tourism is a stretch at best. President Bill Clinton created the existing 53,000-acre monument in 2000, after months of strenuous debate and stiff opposition from ranchers, timber interests and others. The borders have not changed since, although owners of private land within the monument have willingly sold about 13,000 acres to the federal government.

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This Proposal To Torch Dead Forests For Fuel Is Nuts

By Maddie Stone
Gizmodo
September 9, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Drought and bark beetle infestations have not been kind to western forests in recent years. California alone has an estimated 66 million dead trees speckling its landscapes and waiting to become wildfire fuel. To prevent that from happening and help us kick our coal habit at the same time, a pair of scientists has put forth an intriguing, potentially disastrous proposal: burning those trees for energy. Yes, it sounds more than a little dystopian to wean ourselves off fossil fuels by torching our nation’s dying forests, whose plight is due, at least in part, to climate change. But according to a new University of Wyoming-led study published in Energy Policy, this might make economic and environmental sense, because it would give the Forest Service a leg up on the task of clearing out dead fuel to prevent catastrophic wildfires.

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Advocates say forest management plans could save money

Pamplin Media Group
September 12, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West


A recently announced five-year environmental project could promote the health of 21,000 acres of forests in northwest Oregon and western Washington — provided landowners get involved. The project, called “Unlocking Carbon Markets for Non-Industrial Private Forestland Owners in the Pacific Northwest,” was made possible through the USDA’s Regional Conservation Partnership Program…. Spurred on by the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS), the Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF) and the Pinchot Institute, owners of small family forests are being offered financial incentives to hire consultants to prepare forest management plans that will outline pre-commercial thinning, treatments, native shrub planting, and other conservation practices to bolster the health and vigor of their trees, while also providing options for a regional carbon crediting program.

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State releases updated forest management plan

By Marie Cusick
StateImpact Pennsylvania
September 9, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

The state Department of Conservation and Natural Resources has released an updated plan outlining its priorities for managing Pennsylvania’s 2.2 million acres of public forest land. It’s the the first time DCNR has updated the plan in nine years. “It’s a good road map for us to use over the next several years,” says State Forester Dan Devlin. “It’s a guidance document for our own staff, but it also informs everybody else how we intend to manage the state forest system.” He says the Marcellus Shale boom has been one of the biggest changes the department has seen during the past decade. The department has issued a new position statement on oil and gas development, which includes a commitment to protect public parks “to the greatest extent possible.”

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Future of Pennsylvania’s State Forests Outlined in Resource Management Plan

By Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources
PRNewswire
September 8, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

HARRISBURG, Pa. — Department of Conservation and Natural Resources Secretary Cindy Adams Dunn today announced that the plan that will chart the course of Pennsylvania’s future state forests has been finalized and is now available on the DCNR website. “Management of our state forest system is an ever-changing undertaking, as there are constantly new challenges and best practices. Society continues to place increasing needs on state forest land such as recreational use and resource extraction, and the forest also is under environmental stressors including climate change and invasive plants and insects,” Dunn said. “The careful and deliberate approach to management outlined in the plan will help protect and sustain the forest’s ecological, social and economic benefits now and for the future.”

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Voracious Asian jumping worms strip forest floor and flood soil with nutrients

Science Blog
September 11, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

Gardeners tend to look at earthworms as good helpers that break down fallen leaves and other organic matter into nutrients plants can use. But not all earthworms do the same work in the soil. New research from the University of Wisconsin-Madison shows that Asian jumping worms, an invasive species first found in Wisconsin in 2013, may do their work too well, speeding up the exit of nutrients from the soil before plants can process them. “Earthworms are the kind of organisms we call ecosystem engineers. They change the physical and chemical properties of the ecosystem as they dig and feed,” says Monica Turner, a UW-Madison professor of zoology. “But nobody really understood if these Asian worms would have the same effect as the European worms we have had here for many years.”

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Forest Service unleashes secret weapon on tree-killing beetles: wasps

September 12, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

STREET GAP, CHEROKEE NATIONAL FOREST — Paul Merten has spent nearly a decade chasing down a killer in the Southern Appalachians, armed with no more than a pocket knife and measuring tape. But recently the entomologist with the U.S. Forest Service in Asheville, N.C., has been homing in on the tiny, yet lethal pest with what he hopes is a secret weapon — parasitoids, also known as wasps. Merten and Haywood County Community College forestry student Caroline McGough were deep in the woods on the Appalachian Trail slicing across the North Carolina-Tennessee border last week, unleashing parasitoids in a science fiction-like attack on the emerald ash borer.

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Do trees have feelings too? One expert says they do

By Peter Wohlleben
UK Telegraph
September 11, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: International

When I began my career as a forester in western Germany’s Eifel mountains, I knew as much about the hidden life of trees as a butcher knows about the emotional life of animals. The forestry industry produces lumber; it fells trees and then plants new seedlings. If you read the professional literature, you quickly get the impression that the wellbeing of the forest is only of interest insofar as it is necessary for optimising the lumber industry. But about 20 years ago, I began to organise survival training and log-cabin tours for tourists. In conversations with the many visitors, my view of the forest changed. …Beeches, spruce and oaks all register pain as soon as a creature nibbles on them. When a caterpillar takes a bite out of a leaf, the tissue around the site of the damage changes. In addition, the leaf tissue sends out electrical signals, just as human tissue does when hurt.

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Talking Point: Burn the desire to fire up forestry

By Peg Putt
The Mercury Australia
September 9, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: International

WHO knew that intentions to rev up logging of native forests in Tasmania are to be underpinned by building forest furnaces? Or that taxpayer-funded largesse is soon to be showered on likely proponents of such developments? Plans of the Tasmanian Government to entrench and expand native forest logging by encouraging burning large volumes of freshly logged forests for electricity production and industrial heat have been flying under the radar, despite the certainty of conflict and dubious claims of environmental benefit. The innocuously named Wood and Fibre Innovation Program is strongly focused on the use of forest biomass to produce energy.

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Korean pines are dying off on Jiri Mountain

Korea JoongAng Daily
September 12, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: International

From a distance, it almost looks like the slopes of Jiri Mountain are covered with telephone poles. That’s because the Korean fir trees there are losing their needles and branches, turning pale and slowly dying as warmer winters and spring droughts are changing the climate these trees need to survive. Reporters from the JoongAng Ilbo participated in a field study around Mount Jiri, analyzing the massive forest dieback there on Aug. 18 and 19, along with specialists from the Korea Forest Service, its affiliated organization the National Institute of Forest Science and Green Korea United. “It’s sad that the Korean fir trees are dying out,” said Lim Jong-hwan, head of the Forest and Climate Change Center at the National Institute of Forest Science. “One out of three Korean firs seem to have died.”

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Forest Fires

Update: Cool weather could suppress Pioneer Fire

Idaho Statesman
September 10, 2016
Category: Forest Fires
Region: United States, US West

Just days after blaming a low-humidity snap for flareups in the Pioneer Fire, officials are optimistic that an incoming cold front could held them gain ground on the 184,000-acre fire, which started in mid-July. Crews on Sunday held containment of the blaze at 56 percent, according to a Boise National Forest press release. Cool weather and light precipitation had tempered the fire over Labor Day weekend. But officials earlier in the week were preparing for even more increase in fire activity due to dry conditions and say that heat will have a hold on fuel moisture despite the cold front.

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New Wildfire Forces Evacuations in Southeastern Wyoming

KOWB1290.com
September 11, 2016
Category: Forest Fires
Region: United States, US West

Smoke from the 200-acre Snake Fire burning on the Medicine Bow National Forest in the southern Sierra Madre Range spread across southeastern Wyoming over the weekend, making for particularly hazy skies in the Laramie Valley. The fire was first reported Saturday evening. It is located in southern Carbon County, five miles southeast of Battle Creek Dispersed Campground and just two miles north of the Wyoming/Colorado state line. Hunters and campers have been evacuated from the fire area. The public is being kept out of the area, pending an official closure order. Fuel at this point is mixed conifer and aspen, some of it dead.

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Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy

Researchers Warn That Hawaii’s Forest Birds Are Vulnerable to Climate Change and Disease

By Joanna Lawrence
Natural Science News
September 10, 2016
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: United States, US West

Birds native to forests on the island of Kauai in Hawaii are disappearing. Researchers predict a surge of extinctions over the next few decades. Climate change and invasive species are thought to be the driving forces behind the rapidly declining bird populations. The findings are in a paper that was just published in the journal Science Advances. Researchers analyzed data and population trends of forest birds on the island of Kauai over a 25-year period. They also collected data on the prevalence of introduced diseases, such as avian malaria (Plasmodium relictum). In addition, the research team recorded the presence of mosquitoes, non-native birds, and invasive plant species. The team found that Kauai’s native forest birds are experiencing rapid population declines.

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Brothers ramping up feed, wood-pellet mill in Patten

Bangor Daily News
September 12, 2016
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: US East, United States

PATTEN, Maine — Brothers Adam and Matthew Fronczak sit astride three industries dear to Patten — forestry, farming and milling — and it can make for some scattershot workdays. …The 175-year-old empty mill site on Mill Street was acquired in 2013 by an investor who wishes to remain anonymous, the brothers said. The two managers began working on it immediately. Since opening the facility in January 2016, the brothers have expanded their payroll from three to 13 full-time workers and begun round-the-clock manufacturing of softwood pellets five days per week. Their goal is to produce 5,000 tons of home-heating pellets this year and double that amount next year.

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General

Forest Service unleashes secret weapon on tree-killing beetles: wasps

September 12, 2016
Category: Uncategorised

STREET GAP, CHEROKEE NATIONAL FOREST — Paul Merten has spent nearly a decade chasing down a killer in the Southern Appalachians, armed with no more than a pocket knife and measuring tape. But recently the entomologist with the U.S. Forest Service in Asheville, N.C., has been homing in on the tiny, yet lethal pest with what he hopes is a secret weapon — parasitoids, also known as wasps. Merten and Haywood County Community College forestry student Caroline McGough were deep in the woods on the Appalachian Trail slicing across the North Carolina-Tennessee border last week, unleashing parasitoids in a science fiction-like attack on the emerald ash borer.

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