Tree Frog Forestry News

Daily Archives: September 15, 2016

Business & Politics

Softwood lumber dispute: American consumers have lost nearly $6 billion since 2006

Montreal Economic Institute
September 15, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, United States

MONTREAL – The tariff barriers imposed on Canadian softwood lumber cost American consumers a fortune, all while enriching a limited group of producers, shows a Viewpoint published today by the Montreal Economic Institute (MEI), a Canadian public policy research center. Since the entry into force of the latest Softwood Lumber Agreement between Canada and the United States, tariffs at the border have reduced Canadian exports and have allowed American producers to increase their market shares. The latter thus registered additional net earnings of US$4.31 billion between 2006 and 2015. American consumers, however, are the big losers of this deal.

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Canada, U.S. may not meet deadline for softwood-lumber deal: Freeland

by Steven Chase
Globe and Mail
September 14, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, United States

Canada’s International Trade Minister is warning it may not be possible for Canadian and American officials to settle a looming softwood-lumber battle before an October deadline – after which Washington is free to slap duties on timber from Canada. “This is a notoriously, historically tough and complicated issue to resolve,” Chrystia Freeland told media in a conference call Wednesday from Washington, where she met with counterpart U.S Trade Representative Michael Froman on the matter. “We know it may not be possible – but we are working hard at it.” The U.S. proposal for a deal to manage the softwood-lumber trade envisions a level of exports from Canada that is still far below what Canada would accept. The dispute covers about $6-billion in annual exports.

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Tech sector gains strong foothold in BC’s north

By Albert Van Santvoort
Business in Vancouver
September 14, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

Northern British Columbia’s thriving tech sector is putting some distance on its outdated image as an economy dominated exclusively by mining and forestry. Technology in the north, with almost 500 tech firms and counting, provides more than 5% of employment in the Northeast, North Coast, Nechako and Cariboo regions. … “Of course resources are important, but particularly after the collapse of the logging industry with the pine beetle, we’re seeing real regional investments in other sectors.” McDowell said sectors receiving investment like manufacturing are interrelated with the resource sector and add value to resource products. The same goes for the developing tech industry in British Columbia’s north.

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Enterprise wood pellet mill looks for wood harvester for site

Aurora Wood Pellets has issued a request for proposals for wood harvesting on the future mill site
CBC News
September 15, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

The long-awaited wood pellet mill in Enterprise is another step closer to reality. Aurora Wood Pellets has issued a request for proposals to have someone harvest the wood from the future site of the mill. Hay River Mayor Brad Mapes has been working on this plan for six years, and is the principal shareholder in the company. He says the mill could help revitalize the economy in the region. “I want it to happen for our community but also the surrounding communities of the South Slave,” says Mapes. “There’s really not much happening for the Fort Resolution and Fort Providence areas.” Mapes estimates the plant will directly employ 50 to 75 people once it’s built, and indirectly employ at least that many people around the region in wood harvesting.

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Time to Buy Interfor Corp After Today’s Huge Increase?

By Nellie Frank
The Chester Independent
September 14, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

The stock of Interfor Corp (TSE:IFP) is a huge mover today! About 150,619 shares traded hands. Interfor Corp has risen 42.00% since February 8, 2016 and is uptrending. It has outperformed by 27.17% the S&P500. The move comes after 8 months positive chart setup for the $999.08 million company. It was reported on Sep, 14 by Barchart.com. We have $21.30 PT which if reached, will make TSE:IFP worth $469.57 million more.

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Tasmania’s forestry industry concerned Government woodchip solution falls short

By Georgie Burgess
ABC News, Australia
September 15, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: International

Forestry Tasmania is signing contracts with two operators to export woodchips from forests in southern Tasmania, but the industry has concerns it will have product left on its hands. The expressions of interest process (EIO) for a solution for woodchip exports in the south opened in June last year. Resources Minister Guy Barnett announced on Wednesday in Parliament that the EIO has been finalised, and two companies had entered contracts with Forestry Tasmania. Majestic Timbers Australia will take up to 180,000 tonnes annually for export in containers from Hobart’s Macquarie Wharf to markets in South-East Asia.

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Binderholz brings focus on UK market

Timber Trades Journal
September 14, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: International

Austria-based timber group Binderholz is positioning itself to make greater inroads in the UK’s sawn and planed softwood market following the formation of a new UK division. The company is looking to sell production from two Finnish mills it acquired from Vapo Oy earlier this year – the Lieksa and Nurmes mills which have a combined 500,000m3 sawn timber capacity. There is also the possibility of further products from its other European mills being targeted at the UK market. Binderholz has hitherto been known in the UK mainly for selling its glulam and cross-laminated timber. The newly-registered Binderholz UK has already joined the Timber Trade Federation (TTF) and London Softwood Club.

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Wood, Paper & Green Building

Crews complete structure of record-setting Brock Commons timber tower

By Gordon Hamilton
Business in Vancouver
September 14, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: Canada, Canada West

UBC’s Brock Commons highrise student residence is the tallest building of its kind in the world. Eight months after construction started on the Brock Commons student residence at the University of British Columbia, Brent Olund signed his name to the last of 648 giant panels of cross-laminated timber as it was secured into place on the 18th floor. It was more than just a routine topping-out ritual for Olund and his firm, Urban One, who are construction managers at the UBC tall wood building project. Olund and the workers who signed with him on June 9 had just established a new world record. At 53 metres in height, Brock Commons is now the highest tall wood building on earth. And it was built in record time, thanks to new technologies that are transforming the way the world thinks about wood.

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A New Office Building at Barangaroo is Constructed Mostly of Timber

TV News Story [Video]
9News Australia
September 15, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: International

A new office building at Barangaroo is constructed mostly of timber. Andrew Wilson, Led Lease, says the timber comes from sustainable plantations in Austria, is manufactured offshore, then brought to the Australian site and erected like a huge Lego set. Construction is so simple it’s being put together by eight carpenters. There’s zero waste in the production process and 60 per cent less carbon. After Wynyard Walk opens in a couple of weeks, the building will eventually be admired by 33,000 people each day.

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Pulp friction: new wood to shake up furniture industry

Manufacturer’ Monthly
September 15, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: International

Researchers from the Flinders Centre for NanoScale Science & Technology (CNST) in South Australia have collaborated with Australian company 3RT Holdings Pty Ltd to develop a method for converting cheap pulpwood into a highly sustainable tropical hardwood substitute. 3Wood contains the same properties as tropical hardwood but maintains a stronger dimensional stability, making it easier to be moulded into furniture. CNST Director and co-developer David Lewis said 3Wood helped eliminate wastage and was a more environmentally friendly alternative to other products. We can manufacture blocks of wood out of pulpwood with the same strength as a 100-year-old tree but without the problems,” he said.

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Forestry

First Nations are investing over $200 million to develop the Great Bear Rainforest conservation economy

By Coast Conservation Endowment Fund Foundation
Canada Newswire
September 14, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

GREAT BEAR RAINFOREST, BC – First Nations are developing a conservation-based economy throughout coastal British Columbia and have announced the latest results from their ongoing environmental stewardship and sustainable development efforts today. Published by Coast Funds, the conservation financing organization created in the 2006 Great Bear Rainforest agreements, First Nations are showcasing how over 250 initiatives are strengthening well-being in twenty-seven coastal communities.

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Hungarians return to Powell River mill

By Jason Schreurs
Powell River Peak
September 14, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Forestry students who immigrated to Canada in 1957 first landed in small town—A group of more than 40 alumni of Hungary’s Sopron Forestry School, who first landed as immigrants in Powell River before attending University of BC, recently returned to the place where they were welcomed to Canada nearly 60 years ago. Nearly 250 students and faculty from the forestry school fled Hungary in 1957 to escape Soviet rule. Needing a place to stay when UBC was unable to house them, owners of Powell River Paper Company took in the students for several months as they were taught English by Powell River residents. “We owe a great deal of thanks to the company at that time. Through its generosity, we were offered bunkhouses at the mill and the company made all of the necessary arrangements to accommodate all of us, including a kitchen,” said alumnus Joseph Nemeth.

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More work needed for Castle area, says group

by Dave Mabell
Lethbridge Herald
September 14, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Putting an end to logging in the Castle River area was a great start, conservation groups say. So are the plans for new provincial parks, though not much more has happened since the provincial government’s announcement last September. But much more needs to be done, according to the Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society and the Yellowstone to Yukon Conservation Initiative. They’re responding to a new report from Global Forest Watch Canada, raising issues about land-use plans for the new parks. “Ending logging was important to slow the fragmentation of the Castle,” says Stephen Legault, program director with the Yellowstone to Yukon group.

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‘Quite alarming’: Report finds skies quieter by 1.5 billion fewer birds

Canadian Press in Chronicle Herald
September 14, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

North American skies have grown quieter over the last decades by the absent songs of 1.5 billion birds, says the latest summary of bird populations. The survey by dozens of government, university and environmental agencies across North America has also listed 86 species of birds — including once-common and much-loved songbirds such as the evening grosbeak and Canada warbler — that are threatened by plummeting populations, habitat destruction and climate change. … The culprits are familiar. Agriculture disturbs habitat of grassland birds and introduces pesticides into the landscape. Logging fragments the intact forests birds use as refuelling stations as they migrate. Domestic cats are thought to kill more than two billion birds a year.

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Most logs don’t get exported

Letter by Paul Barnum, Executive director, Oregon Forest Resources Institute
The Register Guard
September 14, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Tim Hermach (“Forest industry’s ‘science’ means more logging,” Sept. 8) hates the forest industry. That’s obvious from three decades of his inflammatory op-ed pieces. I admit the forest sector has made mistakes in the past, but the industry has changed for the better with stronger laws, improved practices and deeper concern for the environment. Hermach cites myths as facts, and makes false claims that border on hysteria. His latest invective states “Most of the trees logged in Oregon wind up overseas… .” This is patently false. The Oregon Forest Resources Institute tracks this type of data. We rely on credible, third-party experts to study and report on timber harvest and manufacturing. The data is public, available to anyone.

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9th Circuit halts Koocanusa timber project

By Rob Chaney
The Missoulian
September 14, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

A logging sale along Lake Koocanusa that won U.S. District Court approval in July was blocked by the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals just days before it was to start this week. The project would have allowed logging on 8,845 acres along the east side of Lake Koocanusa, 15 miles east of Libby. …“The Forest Service’s plans to clearcut lynx critical habitat were in direct violation of a binding 9th Circuit precedent on this issue, so we are pleased but not surprised that the appellate court stopped this massive timber sale,” said Michael Garrity of Alliance for the Wild Rockies, which sued to block the project. “That the Forest Service could possibly even consider such a massive logging project in an area in which only 1 percent of the remaining old growth exists in small, isolated stands defies law and logic.”

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Letter to the editor: Look at public land mismanagement this election

By Lenthal Kaup
Pamplin Media Group
September 14, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

In reference to the editorial cartoon in the Aug. 31 issue of the Woodburn Independent: The cause of the mess in the case of Oregon’s public lands is not climate change. If it were, the Weyerhaeuser Company would be having the same problems with its forest lands that the public lands are having. We know that Weyerhaeuser is being managed for maximum lumber production and has been for the last 16 years at least to meet the world demand for quality lumber products. The private forest lands in the state of Oregon aren’t burning up and the majority of them are better hunting lands than the public lands, better recreational camping lands and are providing better watersheds for fresh potable water, controlled water flows and fish spawning grounds. As I see it, the problem is the people that are managing the public lands.

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Rare bat has Hendricks County park planners treading lightly

By John Tuohy
Indianapolis Star
September 14, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

When the Indianapolis Airport Authority agreed to hand over management of 2,000 acres of wildlife refuge to Hendricks County parks last year, it set the stage for development of a local nature preserve larger than Fort Harrison and nearly the size of Turkey Run, both state parks. But the presence of the endangered Indiana bat in the area ensures that development of the land will be slow going — and access to it for the public could be limited, even denied. “We may be able to put some trails in, but we could end up with a trail that goes around the property,” said Jeremy Weber, the new parks

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Forest bathing: A mindful walk in the woods, no getting wet

By Beth Harpaz
Metro Vancouver
September 14, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

NEW YORK — In Japan, it’s called “shinrin-yoku,” which translates as forest bathing. It’s the practice of immersing yourself in nature to improve your well-being, and interest in the concept is growing, with spas, resorts, retreat centres , gardens and parks offering guided “forest bathing” experiences. These programs take participants into the woods for a slow, mindful walk to contemplate nature with all the senses. It’s not a hike, because you don’t go far or fast. And while the term forest bathing may lend itself to jokes about nude hot springs, rest assured: You don’t take off your clothes.

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Forestry practices from 1960s don’t cut it today

Letter by Don Ogden
Daily Hampshire Gazette
September 15, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

It was more than telling when a recent letter-writer tried defending clearcut logging in the Quabbin Reservation by referencing his education at the University of Massachusetts Amherst “in the late 1960s.” So-called forestry has come a long way in the nearly 50 years since. Today, we are confronted with the climate crisis and must consider what our children and grandchildren will be faced with as a result of our actions. Part of that consideration must be the protection of our forests and forest soils where CO2 is sequestered. When loggers take out large swaths of trees and disturb the soil and soil organisms the stored carbon is released into the atmosphere.

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Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy

Senate bill gives biomass industry a boost

Redding Record Searchlight
September 14, 2016
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: United States, US West

Biomass facilities across the state banked their future on Gov. Jerry Brown’s signing of Senate Bill 859 on Wednesday, which gives energy providers incentive to consider bioenergy and purchase electricity from those plants. The bill will allow bioenergy plants to stay in business or at least that is the hope. Contract negotiations between power companies and bioenergy plants will work out the details of who will stay afloat. Current contracts with power companies with will term out by the end of this year, leaving many biomass plants scrambling to sign new deals. SB 859, along with Assembly Bill 1613 signed on Wednesday, provides direction on the spending of $900 million in cap-and-trade funding. SB 859 gives bioenergy the type of incentive solar and wind power enjoys.

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