Tree Frog Forestry News

Daily Archives: September 23, 2016

Special Feature

Forestry industry and First Nations team up on new labour market project

Ministry of Jobs, Tourism and Skills Training
September 9, 2016
Category: Special Feature
Region: Canada, Canada West

Forestry is one of B.C.’s key economic sectors and today, the Province and the BC First Nations Forestry Council (BCFNFC) have announced a new labour market partnership project. This new partnership project sets the stage for helping Aboriginal groups, forest industry companies and skills and training services providers prepare and understand forestry-related, labour opportunities at the community or territorial level… The goal of this project is to bring together Aboriginal communities, forestry sector employers and other partners including the Aboriginal Skills Employment Training Strategy, so they can identify the forestry labour demands and opportunities in various B.C. regions.

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B.C. and forest industry partner to meet workforce needs

Ministry of Jobs, Tourism and Skills Training
September 22, 2016
Category: Special Feature
Region: Canada, Canada West

To ensure that the forest industry has the skilled workforce it needs in the future, the Province has partnered with the B.C. Forest Safety Council (BCFSC) and the Council of Forest Industries (COFI) on two new Forest Workforce projects that will support the recruitment, identification and skills assessment of qualified workers…Today, Minister Bond highlighted these two new projects at the Prince George Community Dinner hosted by COFI. The new LMP projects complement other forest sector workforce projects that BCFSC and COFI have been working on with forest stakeholders, including local employers… The two projects are part of the government’s support for the forest sector through the Sector LMP program and align with key actions under B.C’s forest sector competitiveness agenda… According to COFI president and CEO Susan Yurkovich, “The B.C. forest industry is facing a demographic shift with up to 50 per cent of its skilled workforce retiring over the next 10 years. The industry is hiring approximately 2,700 new employees each year over the next decade, and this investment will support workers to find jobs in the forest sector in communities throughout the province.”

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Business & Politics

Canadian Chamber Develops Stand On Softwood Lumber

Magic 99.9 Thunder Bay
September 22, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada

The issue of a new softwood lumber agreement with the United States is front and centre for the Canadian Chamber of Commerce.  Following its annual meeting in Saskatchewan, Thunder Bay Chamber president Charla Robinson says the national chamber voted to develop a clear stand on the issue. Robinson says this is huge for the region especially for the newest mills in Kenora, Emo, Longlac and White River which would benefit greatly from a fair softwood agreement. She says the Canadian Chamber agreed to press the government to give loan guarantees and support in case of any legal challenges.END OF STORY

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The Global Timber Price Index GSPI Was up 4.2% in the 2Q/16 after Having Fallen to the Lowest Level since 2009 in Early 2016

Wood Resources International LLC
Business Wire
September 22, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, International

The Global Sawlog Price Index (GSPI) was up 4.2% in the 2Q/16 to US$71.18/m3, the highest quarter-over-quarter increase since the 2Q/11. Sawlog prices increased in 16 of the 19 regions tracked by the Wood Resource Quarterly (WRQ) and were generally higher in both the local currencies and in US dollar terms. The biggest price increases in dollar terms occurred in Russia, Brazil, Germany and British Columbia. The only regions that experienced lower log prices in the 2Q/16 were Chile, where lumber export markets weakened, and the US Northwest, where log export to Asia slowed down the first few months of the year and the domestic sawmills run at fairly low operating rates.

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Tolko Industries to close Merritt mill

Merritt Herald
September 22, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

A total of 203 people will be out of work in a little more than two months as Tolko Industries announced today (Sept. 22) that it will permanently close its Merritt mill on Dec. 16. “Making the decision to close an operation is never easy,” said Tolko president and CEO Brad Thorlakson in a press release. Thorlakson indicated that the shutdown is the result of the province’s recent reduction to the annual allowable annual cut, which led to the company conducting an extensive review of the wood supply for all of its Southern Interior operations. “Based on this review, we have determined there is not enough timber to supply all of our mills. This has resulted in the decision to permanently close our Nicola operation.”

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Tolko to close Merritt mill; 203 jobs will be lost

Kamloops This Week
September 22, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

Tolko Industries announced Thursday it will permanently close its Merritt mill, effective Dec. 16, putting 203 people out of work. “Making the decision to close an operation is never easy,” Tolko president and CEO Brad Thorlakson said in a release. Thorlakson said a reduction in the annual allowable cut as a result of the completion of the pine beetle harvest led to a review of wood supply for all of Tolko Southern Interior operations. “Based on this review, we have determined there is not enough timber to supply all of our mills,” Thorlakson said. “This has resulted in the decision to permanently close our Nicola operation.”

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Surrounding community bracing for impact of looming Tolko closure

By Josh Crabb
CTV News Kitchener
September 22, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

The looming closure of a pulp and paper plant in The Pas, Man. has people in a nearby community fearing the worst. Tolko Industries, the largest employer in The Pas, announced in August that it will be closing its kraft paper mill in December because the operation is not financially viable… Some people living south of The Pas have also started bracing for an uncertain future. Spruce Products Limited, a sawmill in Swan River, Man., sells wood chips to the Tolko plant, which are used in the production of kraft paper. Spruce Products president Ward Perchuk said the sale of those wood chips accounts for 40 per cent of his company’s gross sales. If Tolko closes, Perchuk worries Spruce Products could face a similar fate.

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Softwood lumber agreement necessary: MP Doherty

By Monica Lamb-Yorski
Williams Lake Tribune
September 22, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

A softwood lumber agreement is needed to assure the forest industry’s future, Conservative MP Todd Doherty said as the one-year standstill of the agreement’s Oct. 12, 2016 expiry date approaches. “We need our friends and families that are employed in our forest industry to know that they are going to have a job,” Doherty told the Tribune Tuesday before he planned to address the House of Commons on the issue. “Mills in our region are looking at work curtailment and that impacts families and friends.” In August, the Conservatives challenged the Liberals, during an emergency meeting, to bring the provinces and industry together to plan the best way forward, he added.

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Hefler gets more time to deal with debt

By James Risdon
The Chronicle Herald
September 22, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada East, Canada

Six companies are eyeing the iconic Hefler Forest Products lumber and electrical co-generation company in Sackville, some to take an equity stake in the operation, others to simply scoop up its assets. “At least half of them are engaged in the green energy sector,” Floyd Gaetz, president and co-owner of Hefler Forest Products, said in an interview Thursday. “They like the aspect of us having access to our own biomass,” he said.

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Tembec to sell its Senneterre, Quebec sawmill

Canada Newswire press release
September 22, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada East, Canada

MONTREAL – Tembec signed a binding agreement with Resolute Forest Products to proceed with the sale of Tembec’s Senneterre sawmill operations. This sale is conditional on the transfer of the sawmill’s wood supply from Tembec to Resolute. Discussions on this transfer with the provincial government authorities will take place over the next several weeks. Tembec will receive a nominal amount for fixed assets of the sawmill and the forest operations. Certain working capital items are also included in the sale.  This agreement covers sawmill operations, forest operations and the transfer of all employees. The Senneterre sawmill currently employs 124 employees (103 unionized and 21 non-unionized employees).

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Wood processors push for faster trade refresh

By Paul McBeth
Scoop Independent News
September 23, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: International

New Zealand wood processors and manufacturers want the government to speed up a refresh of the nation’s trade policy as other countries offer more support to their forestry sectors. Trade Minister Todd McClay plans to tilt policy to focus on squeezing more from existing free trade agreements rather than simply pursuing new deals. He argues this will be more effective in pulling down non-tariff barriers, government measures to either protect a domestic industry or prop up exports. Wood Processors and Manufacturers Association (WPMA) chairman Brian Stanley told a regional meeting in Wellington that refresh needs to be “urgent” and “substantial” because other nations are giving more support to their industries.

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Wood, Paper & Green Building

Would you live in a wooden skyscraper?

By Warren Cornwall
Science Magazine
September 22, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: Canada, Canada West

A Douglas fir tree is a marvel of natural engineering. The trunk, made mostly of slender dead cells each a few millimeters long, can reach heights of 100 meters. It’s supple enough to sway in windstorms without snapping, yet strong enough to support its weight—up to 160 metric tons. Kilogram for kilogram, a wooden beam made from this fir is 3.5 times stronger than steel. A single tree can store half its weight in carbon and can replace itself, given enough time. Its luminous, patterned wood can be sculpted into virtually any shape. Not far from Canadian forests thick with Douglas firs, the most ambitious effort yet to harness these remarkable qualities in a human structure is rising.

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TimberFever Engages Ryerson Students for Wood-Based Design

By Doug Ascanio Graffeo
Urban Toronto
September 22, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: Canada East, Canada

An upcoming design competition presented by Moses Structural Engineers and Ryerson University will see architecture and civil engineering students at Ryerson University build fully-functional installations made entirely out of wood. TimberFever Design-Build Challenge, as the event is titled, will take place September 24th and 25th on the Ryerson University campus and will feature eight teams composed of four to six students coming together to bridge gaps in their respective disciplines and create collaborative designs that help shape the future of construction in Toronto.

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Is Timber the Future of Urban Construction?

By Jimmy Stamp
Smithsonian Magazine
September 22, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: US East, United States

From the street, the new seven-story “T3” building going up in Minneapolis looks a lot like an old warehouse: large repeating windows and weathered steel sheathing the color of brick. But it’s a revolutionary structure, and the irony is that its cutting-edge nature rests on an old-school material: wood. When T3 opens this month, it will be the tallest modern wooden building in the United States. And to hear the architect behind the tower tell it, T3 is the future of urban construction. The timber used to make T3 is a far cry from the pine two-by-fours used to build houses. T3 uses “nail laminated timber” (NLT) panels, crafted by stacking and fastening hundreds of two-inch by eight-inch boards together to make large, structural pieces—an update of an old technique. 

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“Stingray-shaped” timber roof for London Crossrail station

Global Construction Review
September 22, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: International

Austrian firm Wiehag is now assembling an engineered timber roof for one of the new stations servicing London’s Crossrail. The Abbey Wood station, the eastern terminus for a section of the new railway, has been designed by architect Fereday + Pollard to resemble a stingray, and will be topped by a 1,600-sq-m glulam roof. In addition to the glulam timbers, which are pre-fabricated using computer-numerically-controlled (CNC) technology, assembly of the roof support structure requires 30 tons of steel.

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Forestry

Walk in the Woods educating future foresters

Prince George Citizen
September 22, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Within seconds on the trail, dense forest surrounds nine children scampering uphill behind their new tour guide teachers. Sunlight streaks through, catching upturned faces and later an open spot on the forest floor. Even that’s a lesson. While the light catches low-growing plant life, a few steps away thin trees stand in shadows. “Look on the ground. Do you see any other types of plants growing over there?” asks Jesse Anaka to a chorus of “no’s” from the kids. “That’s because there’s more sun reaching the forest floor,” says Anaka, who had a dual role on Thursday’s class trip as biologist and father. “They’re all fighting for the sun and the water and the nutrients in the soil,” forestry technician Christine Taylor explains.

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Forest needs protection

Letter by Rita Wong, Vancouver
Sunshine Coast Reporter
September 22, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

The logging of cutblock A87125, also known as the proposed expansion area for Mount Elphinstone Provincial Park in Roberts Creek, should be immediately stopped. There are existing tree farms that can supply the timber without destroying much needed forest ecosystems. According to the Roberts Creek Official Community Plan, cutblock A87125 is part of a valuable 1,500-hectare zone that needs protection for ecological and recreational reasons.

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ICF land could go back to public

Letter to the Editor by Derrick Grimmer
Parkville Qualicum Beach
September 22, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

In Ron Merrick’s letter to the editor, serious questions are raised re: why the Island Corridor Foundation continues. Put simply, the ICF demise means the end of the E&N railway and that means the end of the original Dunsmuir land contract… In all reality, the Crown would settle immediately with present owners, including First Nations and the timber companies, but control of the minerals, timber and watersheds would be under strict provincial control for the commonwealth, where public well-being in these matters would supersede private interests… So long as the faint possibility exists that the E&N can be resurrected, the Dunsmuir contract has the possibility of continuing and the land is not seizeable by the Crown.

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More logging protest arrests

By Sean Eckford
Sunshine Coast Reporter
September 22, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Sunshine Coast RCMP confirm at least three more people have been arrested since officers moved in on Sept. 9 to enforce a court injunction against interfering with logging on cutblock A87125 on the slopes of Mount Elphinstone. On Sept. 14, a 28-year-old Roberts Creek man was arrested after locking himself to some logging equipment. There was a similar incident four days later. “On Sept. 18, police were called to the area of B&K Road after protesters again impeded logging operations and violated the terms of the Supreme Court injunction,” Const. Harrison Mohr said. “Police arrived to find that a 24 year-old male from Bowen Island had used a lock to chain himself to a piece of machinery. After some negotiation and de-escalation by police, the male agreed to unlock himself from the machine. 

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Foraging for fabulous forest fungi on Haida Gwaii

CBC News
September 22, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

It’s mushroom season on British Columbia’s Haida Gwaii islands. From August to late October, mushroom pickers and buyers descend on B.C.’s northwest to harvest the fungi… Mabit is a passionate advocate of wild foraging — in fact, he started the Sandspit Wild Harvest Festival to celebrate local products like seaweed, berries, and of course, mushrooms. Ultimately, Mabit hopes the festival can help transform the way people view the forest. “We see the forest just for the trees, but there’s more to it than just the value of the timber,” he said. “Maybe we can generate revenue by actually tending to the forest so that they give more mushrooms, and we can get some revenue that is more sustainable.” 

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For the Love of Trees – TD Bank Group helps NCC conserve forests in all 10 Provinces

By The Nature Conservancy
Edmonton Journal
September 22, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

TORONTO – The Nature Conservancy of Canada (NCC) and TD Bank Group (TD) are marking National Forest Week with the announcement of 25 conservation projects across the country. The projects were made possible through the TD Forests program, which works to help protect critical forest habitat and grow and enhance urban green space. Over $5 million was invested by TD Forests to conserve and care for some of Canada’s most important forest habitat through NCC.

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Fire hazard can rebound ‘quickly’

By Carl Clutchey
The Chronicle Journal
September 22, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

Though slightly cooler, wetter weather has prevailed across much of Northwestern Ontario over the past few weeks, provincial fire officials hope the relative dampness doesn’t cause locals to get sloppy as brush-burning season begins. “The fire hazard can rebound very quickly, just like it can in the spring,” Dryden-based fire information officer Debbie MacLean said Wednesday. Forest fire season officially runs between April 1 and Oct. 31. The number of forest fires recorded across the province so far this season has been lower than the 10-year average — 622 as of Wednesday, compared to the average of 933 fires for the same period.

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Province hopes to plant 50 million trees by 2025

By Louis Pin
Chatham Daily News
September 22, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

Conservation groups across Ontario are on board with a new environmental revitalization initiative, and the Lower Thames Valley Conservation Authority is no exception. Led by Forests Ontario, the 50 Million Tree Program’s goal is to push back against deforestation in Ontario by planting 50 million trees by 2025. The LTVCA highlighted the project during their Farm to Coast tour in Chatham-Kent on Thursday. The conservation group says trees are positive for the shade and wind protection they provide, and is encouraging farmers to plant trees on unused land.

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Tribute to trees could see hundreds sprout

By Brent Linton
The Chronicle Journal
September 22, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

On Wednesday, the Murillo area Crestview Public School marked National Tree Day by sending a letter and a seedling to Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, along with a donation of 250 seedlings from Van Duyn. National Tree Day is an important day for the school to observe as the school has been designated a Gold Ontario Eco School, said Jo-Anne Giertuga, the school principal. The students felt that the prime minister should know about the importance of National Tree Day to the school and country, and urged him to plant the seedling and recognize the day.

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Innovation, Investment and Collaboration Mark Forest Week

Nova Scotia Liberal Party
September 22, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

Forestry remains a key economic driver as Nova Scotia celebrates National Forest Week, Sept. 18-24. “Forestry employed 11,500 Nova Scotians in direct or indirect jobs in 2015 and added $800 million to the province’s gross domestic product,” said Natural Resources Minister Lloyd Hines, who planted a tree today in Sir Sandford Fleming Park, Halifax. “Innovation is absolutely the key to unlocking the future potential of our forest resource and sustaining and building on the economic and environmental benefits our forests can provide.” Government is engaged in collaborations to help ensure sustainably managed forests.

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Forest Service chief looks to partnerships for forest management

by Rob Chaney
The Missoulian
September 21, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States

U.S. Forest Service Chief Tom Tidwell said his agency is trying to manage 60 million acres in need of restoration with 40 percent fewer staff and dollars than he had a decade ago. In an interview with the Missoulian on Tuesday, Tidwell the agency would depend on partnerships with states and private partners to nurture those ecosystems, protect them from wildfire and provide jobs and recreation for the people who live near them. “We need to focus on large landscapes, where we’re treating private land and national forest at the same time,” Tidwell said. “And we really need to focus on the outcomes we’re after – healthy, resilient forests that withstand disease outbreaks, fires, drought conditions that we’ll all face in the future. That’s the thing that produces economic activity that sustains communities and eliminates some of the conflict we’re seeing. That’s something we’ve been trying to address for decades in the agency.”

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First Forester: The Enduring Conservation Legacy of Gifford Pinchot

By Kevin Dennehy
Yale School Forestry & Environmental Studies
September 21, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States

Gifford Pinchot, the first U.S. forest chief and founder of the Yale Forest School, doesn’t get enough credit, says historian Char Miller. In the early 20th century, Miller says, Pinchot helped shape our modern understanding of conservation, environmental education, and the very notion of “public lands.” During his tenure as chief of the U.S. Forest Service, Gifford Pinchot helped triple the nation’s forest reserves and shaped the agency’s guiding principle to “provide the greatest good for the greatest amount of people in the long run.” But according to historian Char Miller, those achievements only hint at Pinchot’s legacy. Pinchot, who also founded the Yale Forest School (now F&ES), was nothing less than a missionary for sustainable resource management during the early 20th century, says Miller, author of the books “Gifford Pinchot and the Making of Modern Environmentalism” and “America’s Great National Forests.”

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Federal land takeback pitch roils Condon community

By Rob Chaney
The Missoulian
September 22, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

CONDON — A loudly divided crowd came to hear American Land Council representatives Jennifer Fielder and Kerry White pitch their reasons for demanding more local management of federal property. Nearly 100 people packed the Condon Community Center on Tuesday night for the presentation, which filled two hours with presentations, questions and debate. The gathering exposed a widening gap in this Swan Valley center of 431 residents at the northern edge of Missoula County. While the American Land Council was invited by the Condon Community Council, more than half the audience appeared opposed to their presence. “All I wanted to accomplish was to have people listen,” Council President Ken Donovan said after the session adjourned. “We don’t have too many meetings with this many people coming.”

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Nedsbar sale goes unsold

The Mail Tribune
September 22, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

The controversial Nedsbar timber sale went unsold today at an auction following a protest by opponents, threats of tree-spiking and promises of civil disobedience against whoever bought the trees for logging. No bids were entered for the first Nedsbar sale at the Bureau of Land Management auction, held at the agency’s Medford office late this morning after about 75 protesters railed against the sale they believe would over-log sensitive areas in the Applegate watershed. But that doesn’t kill the sale, because BLM plans to keep it open another 30 days for sealed bids under a procedural process that could result in the sale actually going through.

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No need to ‘politicize’ fighting wildfires the way Labrador does

September 23, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

This is a good lesson in the politics of the West. When it comes to wildfires, some politicians use them to exploit people’s fear while pushing a special interest agenda. But a much better approach uses common sense, hard work and honesty to address the challenges and opportunities created by this perennial force of nature. Currently, up to 40 percent of the Forest Service budget is drained by wildfire suppression. That’s why I support common-sense bills such as the Wildfire Disaster Funding Act, which would fund firefighting the same way the nation funds hurricane and tornado recovery.

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Retired professor donates timberland to benefit rural school

Capital Press
September 21, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

PHILOMATH, Ore. – The forestry program at Philomath High School, already considered robust for a small school district, will be the chief beneficiary of 20 acres of timber donated by one of the pioneering figures in agricultural and resource economics. Emery N. Castle donated the Castle Family Forest near Wren, Ore., to the Philomath Community Foundation, which will lease it to the school district. Philomath High has a four-year forestry and natural resources program that includes course and field work in reforestation, timber inventory and harvest practices. …Bruce Weber, emeritus professor and director of the Rural Studies Program at OSU, said Castle is “one of the most influential agricultural economists in the United States.”

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The Problem is Lack of Professionalism

By George Wuerthner
Flathead Beacon
September 22, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West


The editorial written jointly by Dale Bosworth, David Mihalic and Ryan Zinke was a mixed bag (Sept. 7 Beacon: “We Have a Land Management Problem”). I certainly celebrate our public lands as the authors do. Yet the other message that we need to “manage” (read: log) our public lands more demonstrates a singular lack of ecological understanding by the authors. Part of the problem is the Forest Service does not act professionally and/or rationally (not because it doesn’t have good employees). …There’s a pattern here. No matter what the problem reall is (and often completely fabricated) the only solution that is advocated is logging. Logging is like magic elixir of the old-time snake oil salesman who convinced naïve people that it could cure arthritics, cancer, kidney stones and almost every other imagined ill.

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Forest Fires

Climate Change Is Here: Inside the Summer of Hell and High Water

By Tim Dickinson
Rolling Stone
September 22, 2016
Category: Forest Fires
Region: United States

Southern California was ready to burn. El Niño rains that topped off reservoirs in the north of the state barely drizzled down south, leaving the region in a worst-in-centuries drought. By June, tree die-off in state forests, accelerated by bark beetles feasting on dry pines, had more than doubled from 2015, topping 66 million. Record heat – 122 degrees in Palm Springs – pushed the extreme fire conditions typical of September and October into midsummer. So when sparks hit the ground in August, fires across the state literally exploded. “It’s almost like the mountains are just doused in gasoline,” said one fire captain… It may seem far-fetched that global warming is producing both megafires and superstorms. But climate scientists say the same thermodynamics are driving both disasters. Simply put, a hotter atmosphere demands more water. In the drought-prone West, it sucks soils, shrubs and trees bone-dry – setting the stage for fire.

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Indonesia forest fires well-managed, fewer hotspots this year: Minister

By Saifulbahri Ismail  
Channel News Asia
September 22, 2016
Category: Forest Fires
Region: International

JAKARTA: Indonesia’s Environment and Forestry Minister Siti Nurbaya Bakar has said that the forest fires this year have been well-managed as seen by the reduction of hotspots of up to 88 per cent as compared to 2015. Giving an update on the forest fires this year to lawmakers at the House of Representative on Thursday (Sep 22), Dr Siti Nurbaya said slight haze only occurred for a few days in August… She added that hotspots in Riau province went down by up as much as 81 per cent. The land areas devastated by the fires were also much less this year.

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Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy

The Forest Products Association of Canada and the Canadian Wood Council bullfrogpower Head Offices as part of “30 by 30” Climate Challenge

Forest Products Association of Canada
September 22, 2016
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: Canada

OTTAWA – Bullfrog Power, Canada’s leading green energy provider, is announcing a new partnership that will see both the Forest Products Association of Canada (FPAC) and the Canadian Wood Council (CWC) choose 100 per cent green electricity and 100 per cent green natural gas for their head offices in Ottawa. The commitment, announced in conjunction with the industry’s National Forest Week celebrations, builds on FPAC’s ambitious “30 by 30” Climate Challenge that proposes to remove 30 megatonnes of CO2 a year by 2030—more than 13 per cent of the federal government’s entire goal. “Choosing green energy with Bullfrog Power is a significant step for an industry that is taking a leadership position in helping Canada achieve its climate goals,” said Ron Seftel, CEO, Bullfrog Power. “By bullfrogpowering their workplaces, both FPAC and CWC are reducing their environmental impact and helping develop new renewable energy projects across the country.”

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Different tree species use the same genes to adapt to climate change

Phys.org
September 22, 2016
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: United States

An international research team from six universities, including Virginia Tech, works to better understand how trees adapt to changing climates. Recently the team discovered that two distantly related tree species use the same genes to adapt to the range of temperatures in their geographical region. Their results were published Thursday in the journal Science… the team studied two different conifer tree species, lodgepole pine and interior spruce, which are widespread in western parts of the United States and Canada. They collected seed from over 250 locations in western Canada, before sequencing more than 23,000 genes in each tree. Their large-scale analysis revealed that both pine and spruce use the same suite of 47 genes to adapt to geographic variation in temperature, and to appropriately time acquisition of cold hardiness – a trait that allows plants to tolerate the adverse conditions of winter.

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Scientists: With Climate Change, Some Species To Have New Neighbors

UW-Madison Study Looks At How Plant, Animal Communities Could Change
Wisconsin Public Radio
September 20, 2016
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: US East, United States

A team of researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and Aarhus University in Demark say they have an idea of where climate change will push more species together. In a study published this week in the journal Nature Climate Change, UW-Madison Geography Professor Jack Williams and colleagues at Aarhus University looked at likely new species communities caused by changes like global warming. One new combination is expected in northern Wisconsin forests, Williams said. “The pines and spruces in the north that are expected to become less abundant as temperatures rise, and you think of some more southerly species such as various oak species expanding their ranges northward,” Williams said. Williams said the new mix may mean challenges for scientists, the timber industry and other industries.

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New Zealand Forestry Carbon Credits Gain Ground!

Digital Journal
September 22, 2016
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: International

HAMILTON, New Zealand — There is some volume starting to appear at current levels in the New Zealand carbon market – though most of it is above NZ$19. However, virtually none of it belongs to major holders of NZUs. It’s a collection of small forest owners and speculators. Dunwold Farm, located 10km from Cambridge, South Waikato, New Zealand is a ready investment for discerning investors in New Zealand farm and forestry… “Carbon emitters who are actively seeking carbon buying opportunities below the $20 should take a look at New Zealand,” says Farm owner and Forester Peter Fairclough of Dunwold Forest and Farm, New Zealand.

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Soil carbon storage not the climate change fix it was thought, research finds

The Guardian
September 22, 2016
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: International

Hopes that large amounts of planet-warming carbon dioxide could be buried in soils appear to be grossly misplaced, with new research finding that the ground will soak up far less carbon over the coming century than previously thought. Radiocarbon dating of soils, when combined with previous models of carbon uptake, has shown the widely assumed potential for carbon sequestration to combat climate change has been overestimated by as much as 40%. Scientists from the University of California, Irvine (UCI) found that models used by the UN’s Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) assume a much faster cycling of carbon through soils than is actually the case.

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General

No need to ‘politicize’ fighting wildfires the way Labrador does

September 23, 2016
Category: Uncategorised

This is a good lesson in the politics of the West. When it comes to wildfires, some politicians use them to exploit people’s fear while pushing a special interest agenda. But a much better approach uses common sense, hard work and honesty to address the challenges and opportunities created by this perennial force of nature. Currently, up to 40 percent of the Forest Service budget is drained by wildfire suppression. That’s why I support common-sense bills such as the Wildfire Disaster Funding Act, which would fund firefighting the same way the nation funds hurricane and tornado recovery.

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