Tree Frog Forestry News

Daily Archives: October 3, 2016

Business & Politics

Lumber industry hopes for ‘good deal for Canadians’ in talks with U.S. trade ambassador

By Ross Marowits
Canadian Press in CBC News
October 2, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, United States

U.S. expected to begin process of imposing tariffs on Canadian lumber imports by mid-October—Canadian softwood lumber executives will meet this week with America’s trade ambassador as they brace for the prospect of U.S. tariffs that they say could result in mill closures and layoffs. U.S. Trade Representative Michael Froman will speak with the Canadian lumber industry in Toronto on Wednesday, days before U.S. producers could start petitioning Washington to impose new duties on Canadian softwood. “I think it’s an opportunity to have direct conversations with an absence of filters and I think that’s a good thing,” said Susan Yurkovich, president of the B.C. Lumber Trade Council.

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U.S. trade ambassador to meet with Canadian lumber execs before softwood deadline

Canadian Press in the Chronicle Herald
October 2, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, United States


MONTREAL — Canadian softwood lumber executives will meet this week with America’s trade ambassador as they brace for the prospect of U.S. tariffs that they say could result in mill closures and layoffs. U.S. Trade Representative Michael Froman will speak with the Canadian lumber industry in Toronto on Wednesday, days before U.S. producers could start petitioning Washington to impose new duties on Canadian softwood. “I think it’s an opportunity to have direct conversations with an absence of filters and I think that’s a good thing,” said Susan Yurkovich, president of the B.C. Lumber Trade Council. She remains hopeful that a deal can be reached to avoid a protracted and costly trade war.

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DeFazio calls for fair softwood trade

The News-Review
September 30, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, United States

U.S. Rep. Peter DeFazio, D-Springfield, called this week for fair competition and a level playing field for American softwood lumber in the next trade deal with Canada. In a letter to U.S. Trade Representative Michael Froman Wednesday, DeFazio and 40 other members of Congress urged that any new trade agreement be written to counter the Canadian government’s subsidy of its lumber producers. Most American timberlands are privately owned, while Canada’s are owned by its provincial governments. Canadian provinces set the price of timber and subsidize it, keeping prices for its lumber artificially low. DeFazio argued that unless that is countered by a fair trade deal, Canada’s share of the market would increase, leading to displaced American mill workers and loggers, and harm to many local businesses.

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The Pas extends Tolko tax incentive to potential buyer, mayor confirms

The incentive works out to about $460,000 per year, mayor Jim Scott says
CBC News
October 1, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

The town of The Pas is extending a tax incentive initially offered to Tolko Industries to a potential buyer for the town’s paper mill. Mayor Jim Scott says the town’s council voted to extend the offer, which would see the buyer granted three years of tax breaks, at a meeting this week. “They [potential buyer] had a bunch of things that they were looking for in order to locate and come here and work here and that was one of them and we decided to get moving on it right away,” Scott said Saturday. …The offer would see the buyer given three years of municipal taxes plus debentures in the form of a grant that works out to about $460,000 per year, Scott said.

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US Lumber Coalition Going after Canadian Manufacturers Again

Net Newsledger
September 30, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada East, Canada

THUNDER BAY – Here we go again. The U. S. Lumber Coalition is going after the Canadian softwood lumber manufacturers. “The case of softwood lumber is a perfect illustration of how protectionism generally provides benefits for a small number of people while harming a majority,” points out Alexandre Moreau, Public Policy Analyst at the MEI and author of the publication. American producers have long criticized Canada for lacking a market mechanism that is deemed appropriate for determining the level of royalties paid for timber harvested from public forests. Indeed, to respond to this criticism, Quebec and British Columbia have implemented public auction mechanisms.

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U.S. Lumber Coalition Welcomes House of Representatives Letter Supporting Efforts to Negotiate a New Softwood Lumber Agreement to Offset Unfair Canadian Lumber Trade Practices

The US Lumber Coalition
PR Newswire
September 30, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States

WASHINGTON — The U.S. Lumber Coalition today welcomes a letter from 41 United States House Representatives supporting efforts to negotiate a new, stable, and sustainable Softwood Lumber Agreement to offset unfair Canadian lumber trade practices. The letter, co-sponsored by Reps. DeFazio (D-OR) and Zinke (R-MT), states that border measures against subsidized and unfairly traded lumber imports are critical for the U.S. lumber industry because Canadian timber is heavily subsidized and sold or contracted at pennies on the dollar compared to the free market, competitive pricing of U.S. timber of comparable quality. The House letter highlights that without an effective agreement to counter this subsidy, Canadian trade practices would yield ever increasing market shares for Canadian product and producers, displacing and harming U.S. manufacturers, mill workers, loggers, and many local businesses and jobs in their communities.

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Wood, Paper & Green Building

The World’s Tallest Wooden Building Has Been Finished

By Issac Taylor
M2 magazine New Zealand
October 3, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: Canada, Canada West

Four months ahead of schedule the world’s tallest wooden building has been completed. Expecting to have 700 students in it by September 2017 the 18 storey tall building Brock Commons is the first mass wood, steel and concrete hybrid project taller than 14 stories. It has two concrete cores and a concrete podium but the rest of the 17 stories is cross-laminated-timber floors supported on glue-laminated wood columns. The entire experiment behind this sustainable building is expected to cost approximately $51.5 million. Wood is a wonder material as far as global warming is concerned as it stores, rather than emits, carbon dioxide. Using wood in this project rather than other common building materials is akin to taking 500 cars off the road a year. That’s a reduction of 2,432 metric tonnes of carbon dioxide.

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Forestry

Nanaimo forest school takes kids learning outside

By Skye Ryan
CHEK News
October 1, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

In Nanaimo, a new forest school is passing on that love of nature to a whole new generation. Learning lessons once taught in a classroom, in the great outdoors. Off a beaten path of Nanaimo’s Westwood Lake, behind a thick of bushes lies a secret place, only these children and their teachers know. “This is our forest classroom,” says Vanessa Pearson, who is the driving force behind Nanaimo Forest School. Like a treehouse and classroom in one that they’ve built with their own little hands, this unique school is teaching these tikes what can’t be learned inside. “We collected the branches from other areas of the park and they dragged them up and down the hill so it’s for their construction, cognitive development,” says Pearson. “They had to use team building skills. They had to agree where they wanted to put things. ”

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Vancouver-area children take learning to the forest

By Amy Logan
Vancouver Metro
September 30, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Surrounded by moss-covered trees, a group of raincoat-clad children closely examine a slug, peppering their teacher with questions about what it eats and where it lives. This might not look like a traditional classroom, but for a growing number of Vancouver area children, the forest is where they learn. Forest School is an educational approach based on developing a relationship between the learner and the natural environment. Students of all levels and abilities gain hands-on experience in nature, learning through discovery. Vancouver has seen a steady increase in such schools over the past five or six years.

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Alberta announces tree planting will be part of caribou protection plan

Canadian Press in CTV News
October 1, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

EDMONTON – The Alberta government says it’s moving ahead with the oil and gas industry to restore habitat for dwindling caribou herds. The province announced Saturday that work is beginning that will eventually see trees planted along thousands of kilometres of land that were cleared for seismic lines in the Little Smoky and A La Peche caribou rangelands. The work starts with compiling a restoration guide, as well as setting up a pilot project along 70 kilometres of seismic lines in the spring.  A $200,000 contract will be issued to source and grow the trees for the pilot project, and $800,000 will be earmarked for an operational plan to restore 3,900 kilometres of lines.

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What would Arcand do?

by Neil Godbout
Prince George Citizen
September 30, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

…The late MaryAnne Arcand fought on behalf of logging truck drivers during her years with the B.C. Forest Safety Council and eagerly provided Hoekstra with contacts and background information while he was working on Dying For Work. After the series was published, Arcand credited Hoekstra and the actions of local MLAs Pat Bell and Shirley Bond for saving lives, minimizing her significant role in making a difference. There are still logging truck drivers dying on the job. Arcand’s mission to get all of them home safely to their families must continue. As in most male-dominated industries, from professional sports to the factory floor, there is a testosterone-fuelled machismo that comes with the job.

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Log truck deaths leading to clampdown by WorkSafeBC

by Mark NIELSEN
Prince George Citizen
September 29, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

WorkSafeBC will be ramping up inspections of log trucks across the province in response to a spike in the number of fatal incidents so far this year. There have been five deaths involving the vehicles, the most recent occurring on Sept. 2 near Fernie, where a truck went off a logging road and down a steep embankment. By comparison, there were three over the entire length of 2015. “That concerns us,” WorkSafeBC vice president of prevention-field services Al Johnson said. The push begins Saturday, with inspectors popping up at weigh scales and loading sites. “We’re going to take advantage of anything we can,” Johnson said.

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Huu-ay-aht Nation protests UBCM’s ban on old-growth logging

First Nation’s chief says UBCM’s proposal to ban old-growth logging violates self-government
CBC News
October 1, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

A Vancouver Island First Nation is at odds with a proposed ban on logging old-growth forests. Huu-ay-aht Nation chief-councillor Robert Dennis says a resolution made by the Union of B.C. Municipalities to abolish old growth logging in the province was done without their consultation and therefore tramples on their land rights. “It’s interfering with our rights to manage our land and our territories in accordance with our traditional practices,” said Dennis on CBC’s All Points West. “That’s not to say that we object to the resolution — we object with how it was done,” he said. The Huu-ay-aht Nation is based out of Pachina Bay near Port Alberni, B.C. The First Nation holds two logging licences in the region, which encase some of Vancouver Island’s oldest growing forests.

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Comment: Leadership needed to revitalize forestry industry

by Ben Parfitt
Victoria Times Colonist
October 2, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

During the last provincial election, not a day seemed to go by that Premier Christy Clark wasn’t donning a hard hat and promising us a brighter economic future built around a new liquefied natural gas industry. Thousands of new jobs, steadily increasing royalty payments and taxes, and a resurging rural, resource-based economy all awaited us, the premier promised. Today, LNG is an even more fleeting possibility than it was then. And the tragedy is that four lost years later, our government has let its management of our forests and forest industry languish in direct proportion to its love affair with a non-renewable, climatically disastrous fossil fuel. In 20 years, nearly 100 B.C. sawmills have closed their doors.

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Bob and Dan Davidson honoured with Minister’s award

Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations
BC Government
October 1, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

The Province is recognizing Bob and Dan Davidson for innovation and excellence in woodlot management, Mike Morris, MLA for Prince George-Mackenzie, announced on behalf of Minister of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations Steve Thomson yesterday at the Federation of BC Woodlot Associations’ annual general meeting in Prince George. The Davidson brothers are being honoured with the $2,500 Minister’s Award for Innovation and Excellence in Woodlot Management for the south area, recognizing the keen focus they have had on integrated resource management and healthy forests. This focus on forest stewardship began when they took over the woodlot licence from their father, Don Davidson, in the early 1970s.

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Logging violations cut through scenic mountainside in Port Alberni — twice

Investigation launched by watchdog finds logger violated government standards on two occasions
CBC News
September 30, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West


A heavily logged mountainside in Port Alberni has watchdogs concerned the B.C. government failed to notice clear violations of provincial forestry practices. An investigation launched by B.C.’s Forest Practices Board found a scenic mountainside on the Port Alberni Inlet was over-logged — twice — according to provincial ‘visual quality’ standards, and the ministry of forests was warned of the violations, but failed to act. “The government’s enforcement of visual management in that instance was not adequate or appropriate,” said Tim Ryan, director of the FPB. The area was cut by foresters from the Tseshaht First Nation. According to the report, in 2011, logging left large scars across the landscape visible from the Port Alberni Harbour — a practice that is not allowed in the area, according to legislation.

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West Fraser urges scrapping of timber pooling plan

Edson Leader
September 30, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

West Fraser has commended the Alberta Government for its caribou preservative plan but there could be a fly in the ointment – the loss of timber supplies and jobs. West Fraser officials appeared before members of Yellowhead County Council on Sept. 27 to inform councillors of the possible consequences of the Little Smoky and A La Peche Caribou Recovery Plan. The recovery plan would require that companies in the caribou conservation region share wood supplies, something that West Fraser is hesitant to do. “West Fraser is most likely the company most negatively impacted by the draft range plan,” said West Fraser Silviculture manager for Edson and Hinton Hal Jackson.

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The Ash Crisis: If a tree falls in Thunder Bat, will anybody hear it?

by Taylor Wright, project co-ordinator, Invasive Species Centr
The Chronicle Journal
October 3, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

On June 27, the highly destructive emerald ash borer (EAB) was confirmed in Thunder Bay. This small, metallic green beetle, thought to be unintentionally introduced to North America from Eastern Asia in untreated wood packaging materials, was first discovered in Detroit, Mich., and Windsor, Ont., in 2002. It has since devastated North American ash tree populations in Ontario, Quebec, and many neighbouring American states. In Ontario, it has already killed more than 1 million ash trees, and continues to spread. EAB acts quickly and is capable of killing mature, healthy ash trees in three to four years once it is established. Thunder Bay has been preparing for the arrival of EAB.

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Scholarship named for founding forestry dean

By Leith Dunick
Thunder Bay News Watch
September 30, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

THUNDER BAY — John Naysmith says he’s hopeful a scholarship named in his honour will have a lasting impact on the future of forestry around the globe. Naysmith, the founding dean of the forestry department at Lakehead University, on Friday said he thinks the annual award will help students focus on stewardship and people involved in the industry. “When I went through my undergraduate work people was not something you (were concerned about),” he said at a ceremony which saw fourth-year student Julia Ieropoli named the inaugural Naysmith scholar. “You had classmates, but as far as the profession was concerned, you talked about trees and you talked about water. You got pretty good at it, but the connection with the people just wasn’t there. Today it’s absolutely essential that it happens.”

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After Record Heat, California Fires Burn Into The Fall

National Public Radio
October 2, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

A wildfire in the mountains of California’s Santa Clara County has destroyed a dozen homes and consumed about 4,400 acres of forest. The Loma fire has been burning in the Santa Cruz mountains since September 26, and although it is more than 60 percent contained, it still threatens more than 150 structures, according to Cal-Fire, the state agency in charge of wildfire efforts.  …The Loma fire is one of 9 major active blazes burning across California, after a record-breaking heatwave last week and a weather phenomenon known as the Santa Ana wind, which brings hot, dusty air sweeping across the already-desiccated landscape of drought-ridden Southern California.

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Prescribed Burn Turns To Wildfire In Central Oregon

Oregon Public Broadcasting
October 1, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

A controlled burn that jumped to private land in the Ochoco National Forest grew to more than 1,700 acres Saturday morning. Firefighters worked through the night Friday to contain the fire. Estimates indicate it’s 25 percent contained. The Oregon Department of Forestry says the fire began as a prescribed burn to improve range and forest health within a 333-acre unit in the national forest. The agency says an unexpected wind event pushed fire north across planned containment lines, resulting in a wildfire. A portion of the national forest is temporarily closed while fire suppression efforts are underway.

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Idaho auctions federal timber in deal with Forest Service

Associated Press in The Idaho Statesman
September 30, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

BOISE, Idaho Some 600 square miles of U.S. Forest Service land burned in Idaho in 2015 in one of the most destructive summers ever for the cash-strapped agency that for years has faced a backlog of projects aimed at reducing wildfire risks and completing habitat restoration work. Now the agency in a unique partnership with Idaho that is being eyed by other states is looking to take on landscape-scale projects by using the state’s land management expertise that includes selling timber on federal land. The first state-managed sale earlier this week brought in $1.4 million for 4.5 million board feet of timber on 216 acres of the Nez Perce-Clearwater National Forests in northern Idaho.

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Quabbin foresters make case for regular cutting in watershed

The Recorder
September 30, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

NEW SALEM — The team of four state foresters makes its way around a dense stretch of watershed at Quabbin Reservoir one day recently, as they look for a roughly 1½-acre area that was cut about 6½ years ago not far from Gate 21A. Led by Jonathan Yeo, the team walks across patches of periwinkle and avoids occasional clusters of moose pellets, holding countless sapling branches from springing back on one another before finding the area corresponding to a widely disseminated photo that depicts what one group has labeled “clear-cutting” in the Quabbin. Arriving at what Yeo describes as an “opening” — a 1¼-acre piece of forest that was cut back in 2010 as part of an overall management plan of about 70 acres in that year — he explains it was done to improve diversity of tree species as well as age classes in the area around the reservoir that provides the Boston area with its water.

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2 vying to become Washington’s next public lands chief

By Phuong Le
Associated Press in The Longview Daily News
October 2, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

SEATTLE — Washington’s next public lands commissioner will be expected to preserve forests, water and habitat in the face of more intense wildfires and a changing climate, while also ensuring revenues from logging, land leases and other operations for school construction and other projects. Democrat Hilary Franz, an environmental attorney, and Republican Steve McLaughlin, a retired Navy commander, are running next month to lead Washington’s largest firefighting force and manage 5.6 million acres of state-owned lands. McLaughlin, 60, who served in the Navy for 25 years, said he supports increasing timber harvests and opening more state lands to recreational opportunities, such as horseback riding, hunting and off-road vehicles.

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Oregon wildfires down significantly in 2016

Statesman Journal
September 29, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West


Despite dry conditions and summer temperatures on the warm side, Oregon enjoyed one of the least damaging forest fire seasons of the past decade. Wildfires torched 186,317 acres in Oregon this year, the lowest total since 2010 and well below the 10-year average, according to data from the National Interagency Fire Center. Forest fires are down nationwide as well, with 4.9 million acres burned, compared to last year’s record-setting 10 million acres blackened. “We’ve seen significantly less fire activity than last year,” said Jessica Gardetto, spokeswoman for the interagency fire center.

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Setting bugs against a pest weed

By Thames Coromandel District Council
Scoop Independent News
September 30, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: International

Our Council has worked with Waikato Regional Council and Forest & Bird to release 400 small beetles to combat a big pest weed problem in New Zealand’s oldest arboretum. The beetles have been specially bred by Landcare Research to tackle tradescantia – also known as wandering willie – in the William Hall Arboretum and Walk at Thames. For more on the arboretum go to www.tcdc.govt.nz/thamesarboretum. Over the past two days the beetles have been released by the Regional Council’s pest plant officer Benson Lockhart. He was joined by staff from our Council and Forest & Bird, as well as community volunteers.

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Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy

Protecting the Big Sur redwoods: How is climate change a threat

By Sukee Bennett
Santa Cruz Sentinel
September 30, 2016
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: United States, US West

Big Sur — A group of scientists is trying to determine if climate change poses a threat to the iconic California Redwood. If it does, they say, Big Sur forests could be at ground zero. How forests and climate interact isn’t quite clear. But an alliance of scientists has converged, and they’re eager to examine coastal sustainability. The team hypothesizes that coastal fog affects redwood resilience. Though the trees have ample drinking water during rainy Central Coast winters, summer droughts bring a different story. Redwoods depend on coastal fog to quench their summer thirst. But according to UC Berkeley professor and project collaborator Todd Dawson, climate change is threatening the extent of coastal fog.

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EPA drags its feet on renewable biomass policy

October 3, 2016
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: United States, US West

Built in 1948, the International Paper Springfield pulp and paper mill has been providing opportunities for workers and small businesses in Lane County for nearly 70 years. It’s the type of business that provides stable, high-wage jobs that can support families and build community. Today, the Springfield mill supports 270 workers. Most people don’t realize, however, that the mill produces much more than economic activity. The mill uses wood and paper scrap to generate renewable biomass energy that efficiently powers much of its operations. Unfortunately, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is threatening the future of biomass, which would have significant consequences for the generation of renewable energy in Oregon. Pulp and paper mill operations are well-suited for the generation of renewable carbon-neutral biomass energy.

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General

EPA drags its feet on renewable biomass policy

October 3, 2016
Category: Uncategorised

Built in 1948, the International Paper Springfield pulp and paper mill has been providing opportunities for workers and small businesses in Lane County for nearly 70 years. It’s the type of business that provides stable, high-wage jobs that can support families and build community. Today, the Springfield mill supports 270 workers. Most people don’t realize, however, that the mill produces much more than economic activity. The mill uses wood and paper scrap to generate renewable biomass energy that efficiently powers much of its operations. Unfortunately, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is threatening the future of biomass, which would have significant consequences for the generation of renewable energy in Oregon. Pulp and paper mill operations are well-suited for the generation of renewable carbon-neutral biomass energy.

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