Tree Frog Forestry News

Daily Archives: October 4, 2016

Business & Politics

Interfor Appoints Gillian L. Platt to Its Board of Directors

Interfor
Yahoo Finance
October 3, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

Vancouver – INTERFOR CORPORATION is pleased to announce the appointment of Gillian L. Platt of Kelowna, BC to its Board of Directors. Ms. Platt has over 30 years of broad-based, global executive leadership experience spanning a variety of industries, sectors and roles with a focus on human resources management, executive compensation, talent development and strategy.  Most recently, Ms. Platt served as Executive Vice President and Chief Human Resources Officer of Finning International Inc., where she was responsible for human resources and communications globally.

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Timber Industry Report, Sept. 29

by Rick Sohn
The News-Review
September 29, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States, US West

The 2×4 lumber price has fallen back from its high of $315 last month, to $305. This is the first fall in the stud price since a steady rise started at $242 per thousand board feet (MBF) in January. Log prices remain within a $15 price range of $676-$691/MBF since January. Usually the price is more volatile. Housing starts actually lost a little ground, building permits remained steady, and the inventory of unsold homes remains tight. Random Lengths reports that we are in a waiting game with millennials on home purchases. Random Lengths also reports a shortage of urban lots for building and construction labor. These issues may improve over a period of a few years, but not months.

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Wood, Paper & Green Building

‘World’s tallest wood building with 18 storeys completed’

Deccan Herald
October 3, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: Canada, Canada West

The world’s tallest wood building with 18 storeys and measuring about 174 feet in height has been constructed at the University of British Columbia in Canada, four months ahead of schedule, the varsity said. The mass wood structure and facade has been completed for University of British Columbia (UBC)’s Brock Commons student residence. The structure, showcasing the advantages of building with wood, was completed less than 70 days after the prefabricated components were first delivered to the site. Construction will now focus on interior elements, with completion expected in early May 2017 – 18 per cent (or four months) faster than a typical project. The building is expected to welcome more than 400 students in September next year.

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New design guide for mid-rise timber buildings released

The Fifth Estate Australia
October 4, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: International

A new timber design guide for mid-rise buildings aims to help designers, architects, engineers and other built environment professionals to act on the recent changes to the National Construction Code. The changes from 1 May 2016 made timber construction systems suitable for the Deemed-to-Satisfy pathway for class 2, 3 and 5 buildings up to 25 metres in height, which is generally between four and eight stories, depending on the floor-to-ceiling ratio. The provisions cover both traditional lightweight timber framing and engineered timber systems including cross-laminated timber and glulam.

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Students created a $15,000 house that can go up in under 24 hours

Business Insider UK
October 3, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: International

Architects are increasingly coming up with clever ways to design homes that cut down on construction time. Take the Kokoon, a new three-story wooden house that can go up in under a day. The first prototype was recently unveiled in Otaniemi, Finland. Built by students, the home was a project for the Aalto University School of Arts Design and Architecture’s Wood Program. Every year, the Program designs and builds a small structure, ranging from pavilions to houses. This year, they created the Kokoon, Stephanie Jazmines, a student who worked on the project, tells Business Insider. It’s a portable, prefabricated house, meaning the majority of its parts are built offsite. The prefab nature of the house makes onsite assembly efficient and quick.

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Forestry

Ian Robert Lawson, 1992-2016

By Anthony A. Davis
Maclean’s Magazine
October 3, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

…Then, just before his 21st birthday, he completed a fallers training program. He became a part of a band-of-brothers in red flannel and orange helmets, fallers who called themselves “the Lost Boys.” They were a tight, loyal group of friends hooked on the spectacular scenery and adrenalin rush of felling giant cedars and other trees. Ian loved his Lucky Lager beer, friends and family and, says Evan, “really, really loved his job.” Ian’s parents worried about his decision to be a faller. …His parents suggested Ian consider a safer line of forestry. “But he was fully committed to being a faller,” says Gary. …This month, Ian’s crew, usually about 10 guys, was heli-logging near Zeballos, a tiny village on Vancouver Island’s northwest coast. On Sept. 11 Ian was cutting a “snag,” a partially rotten and unstable tree, to make it safer for him to cut other trees nearby. The tree collapsed in an unexpected direction, part of it striking and instantly killing him. He was 23.

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‘Imminent’ spruce budworm outbreak worries forest industry

Insect been wreaking havoc near border in Quebec and several ‘hot spots’ in province have been sprayed
CBC News
October 4, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

New Brunswick is on the brink of another spruce budworm outbreak and the forestry industry — the largest in the province — is doing everything in its power to prevent massive defoliation like that of the 1970s. Over the border in Quebec, the insect has been wreaking havoc around the Matapedia region and scientists warn it’s been inching closer to New Brunswick. Just this summer millions of moths descended on Campbellton, coating parking lots, cars and even people. “It is right at our doorstep,” said Rob Johns, research scientist with the Canadian Forest Service. “An outbreak potentially is imminent in New Brunswick.”

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Eugene-based Cascadia Wildlands sues Oregon Board of Forestry in effort to increase marbled murrelet protections

The Register Guard
October 1, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Cascadia Wildlands and three other environmental groups filed a lawsuit Friday against the Oregon Board of Forestry, calling for more marbled murrelet habitat protections. “We are just trying to jumpstart that agency on its responsibility,” said Nick Cady, legal director for Eugene-based Cascadia Wildlands. The state forestry board regulates timberland practices on state-held and private forests, though not on national forests. A seabird, the marbled murrelet lays eggs in old trees along the Oregon Coast. In their lawsuit filed Friday in Lane County Circuit Court, Cascadia Wildlands,

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Rim Country Streams Dwindling Toward Crisis

Payson Roundup
September 29, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

They’re essential; To almost all the wildlife in the forest; To the tourism economy of Rim Country; To future growth and economic development; To the growth of the Valley. But they’re in terrible shape — threatened on every side. We’re talking here about the watersheds, streams and reservoirs of the Tonto National Forest, the most vital component of a complex ecosystem sprawling across 3 million acres. A shocking forestwide study has concluded only 10 percent of the 450 miles of stream front in the Tonto National Forest are functioning normally and fulfilling their vital role in the ecosystem. An alarming 26 percent are “impaired.” The report didn’t evaluate or come to a conclusion on about a third of the stream frontage.

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Dianne Feinstein: Feds should cut 5.5 million dead trees in state

Dianne Feinstein represents California in the U.S. Senate
San Francisco Chronicle
September 30, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

After five years of punishing drought, I am more fearful than ever that increasingly destructive and unpredictable fires will exceed our capacity to put them out quickly and protect the lives and property of Californians. And the odds are high that the state will continue to grapple with extreme fire seasons long after the current drought ends….If we’re ever going to get a handle on these increasingly destructive and unpredictable fires, then we need to address the root of the problem: the 5.5 million trees that are the biggest threat to public safety — about 8 percent of the 66 million. These trees are most likely to fuel catastrophic blazes or fall on roads, power lines and homes.

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Getting out the cut

by Paul Edwards
Helena Independent Record
September 30, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

In the recent article on the Western Governors’ Forest and Rangeland Management confab, Governor Bullock and USFS Chief Tidwell warmly congratulated each other on at last creating agreement on forest policy between timber mills, government, and environmentalists. The challenge was “getting anyone outside that room to pay attention to the solution” proposed, which was — hey, surprise! — cutting down a lot more trees. That would include you, me, groups who take defense of our remaining forests seriously, and the entire population of the United States to whom Federal Forests belong. Putting us all aside, though, the “partners” — including collaborating “environmental” groups — find themselves joyously united in a new push to get out the cut. Not surprising, since that’s what they came there to do.

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Olympic Peninsula forest ‘lab’ fosters logging ideas

Kitsap Sun
October 1, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Decades of experimentation in a 270,000-acre Olympic Peninsula “laboratory” is changing the way state timberlands are managed. Last week, the state Department of Natural Resources released its management plan for the Olympic Experimental State Forest, a collection of state-owned timberlands scattered across 50 miles on peninsula’s west side. In the making since the OESF was founded in 1992, the 171-page plan aims for a balance between timber harvest goals and ecological health. DNR is required to manage millions of acres as revenue generators for schools, universities and other beneficiaries.

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Salvaged timber continues through the export market

Tribal Tribune
September 30, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

EVERETT—When the fires of 2015 ravaged timberlands on the Colville Indian Reservation, tribal loggers knew the shelf life of the burned timber was limited. By spring, pine began to blue, and eventually the regional non-tribal mills closed their gates to the trucks hauling fire-blackened timber pulled from the remains of the North Star and Tunk Block scars. Now, just shy of a year after the fires were finally called controlled and contained, Colville Tribal Sort Yard has begun to market with Forest Marketing Enterprises, who in turn exports timber with Eastern Car Liner. The American Journal of Transportation first published an article on the partnership, which noted 3.3 million board feet of timber has joined aerospace containers on an ECL chartered ship destined for Japan.

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Pros and cons of logging in Indiana state forests

AgriNews
September 30, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

INDIANAPOLIS — Foresters who manage state parks and activists fighting to limit logging on state land have one thing in common: They both love nature. The way they approach forest management, however, varies significantly. Leaders of the Department of Natural Resources say that harvesting select trees improves the ecosystem. Activists in the Indiana Forest Alliance say that logging is out of control and needs to be slowed. Both sides have different vantage points from which they view the issue. John Seifert, Indiana forester at DNR, has a holistic approach. He wants to make decisions that are best for Indiana’s forests long term.

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Armenian and Georgian journalists learn to report on forest issues

Newsday Georgia
October 4, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: International

The EU-funded forestry program FLEG II organised a regional training and media tour for Armenian and Georgian journalists in Armenia between 19 and 23 September, aimed at supporting the development of their professional skills to provide accurate, reliable, and lively articles on environmental issues, with an emphasis and understanding of forestry aspects. The press tour included lectures and open discussion on the activities of the program, on legal and institutional issues of the forestry sector in Armenia and Georgia, assessment of forest use policy, accountability of governmental bodies, forest monitoring, sources of information on the forest sector, illegal logging, main threats to the forests, and analysis of different case studies.

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Native forests are worth more unlogged, so why are we still cutting them down?

By Caitlin Fitzsimmons
The Sydney Morning Herald
October 4, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: International

I spent the first four years of my life living in the middle of the forest in southeastern NSW. Our log cabin was at the end of a dirt road, surrounded by stringybark, spotted gum and the sounds of kookaburras and lyre birds. …The truth is – and Macintosh has written on this too – native forests are worth more unlogged. Of course, forests are more than a number in a ledger, but even in pure economic terms you can assign value to forests’ role in biodiversity, water quality and sequestering carbon. One way for state forestry organisations to convert that to actual money would be to accept carbon credits from the federal government for not logging forests.

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NZ’s only forest butterfly faces extinction

Stuff.co.nz
October 4, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: International

The elegant native butterfly, the forest ringlet or Dodonidia helmsi, is on the brink of extinction, experts claim. Up until the 1970s, forest ringlet butterflies were found throughout New Zealand districts, ranges and regional parks. However, over the last few decades it has experienced a major decline in both numbers and distribution. …The cause of the decline in the species has been under much debate and speculation from expert entomologists.

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Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy

Alabama Continues to Contribute to U.S. Biomass Industry

The LaFayette Sun
October 3, 2016
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: US East, United States

Alabama has been one of the wealthiest states caused by their natural resources for years. Ensuring future generations have the benefits of a surplus of natural resources is one of the main goals of Alabama’s Department of Agriculture, and biomass looks like the way to do that. Biomass consists of any organic matter that can be used as fuel, especially within a power station to generate electricity. Alabama has a plethora of wood, an organic fuel. Using wood in pellet form is one of the most energy efficient ways of using this biomass. The pellets are small, compacted parts of sawdust and other lumber and wood waste and burn easier than almost anything.

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General

‘Extinct’ elms found in Queen’s garden in Edinburgh

BBC News
October 4, 2016
Category: Uncategorised
Region: International

Trees believed to have been extinct in Britain have been discovered at the Queen’s official residence in Scotland. The two 100ft Wentworth elms have been identified in the Queen’s garden at the Palace of Holyroodhouse in Edinburgh. Tree experts are now looking into ways of propagating the rare specimens, Ulmus Wentworthii Pendula. Dr Max Coleman, of the Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh (RBGE), identified the mature trees after they were noted as being unusual during a tree survey. He said: “Such a discovery when the trees in question are just shy of 100ft and in plain sight does sound rather odd. “It is very likely the only reason these rare elms have survived is because City of Edinburgh Council has been surveying and removing diseased elms since the 1980s.

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