Tree Frog Forestry News

Daily Archives: October 6, 2016

Special Feature

Vancouver architect Bing Thom dead at age 75

By Mike Laanela
CBC News
October 6, 2016
Category: Special Feature
Region: Canada, Canada West

Major wood innovator and prominent Vancouver architect Bing Thom has died of a brain aneurysm—Thom is remembered as one of Canada’s leading architects and urban visionaries — both at home and abroad — by those who knew him. Fellow Vancouver architect James Cheng said he was shocked to hear of Thom’s death. “He really was the last of the ‘starchitects’ like Erickson,” said Cheng on Tuesday shortly after learning about Thom’s death. Thom was a ground-breaking architect for his generation of Chinese-Canadians… Thom was born in Hong Kong, studied architecture at UBC and UC Berkeley, and worked in the offices of Fumihiko Maki and Arthur Erickson before opening his own firm in Vancouver… Cheng said Thom’s architecture went deeper than simply following a style. “He had more of a commitment to a philosophy than an artificial style. His buildings were always very warm. He used a lot of wood … and that’s partly his roots in B.C. and the West Coast.”

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Business & Politics

Canadian lumber executives press softwood deal with U.S. trade representative

by Ross Marowits
Canadian Press in Canadian Business
October 5, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, United States

MONTREAL – Canadian lumber and government officials told the U.S. trade representative that any new softwood lumber agreement must reflect the differences in forestry regimes across the country. The chief executives of 10 lumber producers and Canadian International Trade Minister Chrystia Freeland met Wednesday in Toronto with Michael Froman. Resolute CEO Richard Garneau declined to provide details of what was discussed but said he conveyed that changes to Quebec’s forestry regime means the province should have free and open access to the U.S. market, said spokesman Seth Kursman. …Attending the meeting also were the chief executives of Canfor, West Fraser, Interfor, Tembec, J.D. Irving, EACOM, Tolko, MLTC Industrial Investments and Kalesnikoff Lumber.

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Wood, Paper & Green Building

New Technology Sparks Wooden Highrise Boom

By Doichin Caso, with University of BC and University of Cambridge
Eatglobe
October 5, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: Canada, Canada West

With 18 stories and 53 meters height, the recently completed Brock Commons dormitory of the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, Canada, is the world’s tallest timber tower. Recent advances in solid wood panel technology, specifically in cross laminated timber (CLT) materials, have fueled an unprecedented boom in the construction of wooden buildings over the last few years.  …A number of other projects are in the works, including the 21 story, 73 meters tall Haut building in Amsterdam (construction to begin in 2017), the 24 story, the 84 meter HoHo office building in Vienna (construction started in October 2016), the proposed 41 floor and 133 meter Tratoppen in Stockholm and the Oakwood Tower in London, an 80 story, 300 meter tall skyscraper proposal. If and when given the go-ahead, the Oakwood Tower will be London’s second tallest building and the tallest wooden structure in the world.

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Canada Tops Out World’s Tallest Wood-Frame Building

By Aisha Abdelhamid
Green Building Elements
October 5, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: Canada, Canada West

The new University of British Columbia student housing tower rises 18 stories to reach a stunning 178.8 feet (53 meters) tall. Under construction at the University of British Columbia Point Grey campus, the CA$51.5 million mass timber structure is a hybrid system comprised of cross-laminated timber (CLT) floor slabs, glulam columns, steel connectors, and concrete cores. On target to achieve LEED Gold certification, the building structure was completed less than 70 days after delivery of prefabricated components to the site. Construction will now turn to completing the building’s interior elements, with completion scheduled for early May 2017, approximately four months (or 18 percent) faster than standard high-rise projects.

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Nordic Structures joins AWC as first CLT-producing member

IHB – The Timber Network
October 5, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: Canada East, Canada

Nordic Structures, headquartered in Montreal, Quebec, has joined the American Wood Council (AWC). The company is dedicated to engineered wood products for the construction industry, with over 50 years of experience in the industry. Nordic Strutures manufactures cross-laminated timber (CLT), glued-laminated timber (glulam) and I-joists. “Mass timber technologies have sparked considerable innovation in building construction,” AWC President and CEO Robert Glowinski said.

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The Ever-changing World of Offsite Construction

By Warren McGregor
Sourceable
October 6, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: International

We will all have our own view as to what we think prefabrication and offsite construction is, and whatever your view is, I suggest that it is unlikely to be wrong. However, I am equally confident in saying that it is increasingly likely to be incomplete or outdated. And that’s a good thing, because new elements are being added to the spectrum of offsite construction all the time. Factory built complete homes, fully fitted apartment and hotel modules captured a lot of the attention early on. …Engineered timber products like Glulam, LVL, and cross laminated timber (CLT) provide exciting new design opportunities, as do the recent changes to the national construction code which now allows timber structures up to 25 metres (eight storyes). XLam has announced that next year it will open Australia’s first CLT manufacturing plant in Wodonga Victoria (for clarity, the Lend Lease Design Make factory in Sydney transforms imported CLT blanks into precision cut elements for rapid installation at site.)

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Forestry

From enemies to honours

Canadian Press in Castanet Kelowna
October 5, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Three groups that were once labelled enemies of the province by a former British Columbia premier have been given a prestigious international award for their work in the Great Bear Rainforest. The Rainforest Solutions project — a collective effort of Greenpeace, the Sierra Club and Stand.earth — have received the $100,000 Buckminster Fuller Design Award for their decades-long effort to safeguard the forest. In 1996, during the peak of the so-called War in the Woods effort to save B.C.’s old-growth forest, then-premier Glen Clark called the environmental groups enemies of British Columbia.

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Great Bear Rainforest project earns environmental group $100K US award

by By Terri Theodore
CBC News
October 5, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Three groups once labelled enemies of the province by a B.C. premier have been given an international award for their work in helping to protect the Great Bear Rainforest. The Rainforest Solutions Project, a collective effort of Greenpeace, the Sierra Club and Stand, has received the $100,000 Buckminster Fuller Design Award for a decades-long effort to safeguard the forest. In 1996, during the peak of the so-called War in the Woods to save B.C.’s old-growth forest, then-premier Glen Clark called the environmental groups enemies of British Columbia. Valerie Langer of Stand said they’re pleased to be recognized by the foundation for helping solve divisive conflicts involving environmentalists, logging firms, First Nations and the provincial government.

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Premier should move to protect Walbran forest

Letter by Cameron Young
Victoria Times Colonist
October 5, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Premier Christy Clark appeared to be positively beaming in Bella Bella last week as she watched Prince William unveil a plaque endorsing the Great Bear Rainforest as part of the Queen’s Commonwealth Canopy. She even came up with a million-dollar trust fund in support of this extraordinary old-growth coastal rainforest. Buoyed by this experience, and given the recent decision by British Columbia’s mayors and councillors at the Union of B.C. Municipalities convention to call for a halt to logging in all remaining old-growth forests on Vancouver Island, Clark should grasp this opportunity to shut down all old-growth logging on the Island and establish a trust fund for the protection of these rare and remarkable ancient forests.

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Rainforest negotiator sees path to politics

By Tom Fletcher
BC Local News in Comox Valley Record
October 5, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

One of B.C.’s toughest aboriginal critics during the decade-long negotiations for preservation of the Great Bear Rainforest on the B.C. coast has turned his attention to provincial politics. Dallas Smith has been outspoken in his role as president of the Nanwakolas Council representing six aboriginal communities on northern Vancouver Island and the adjacent coastline. He pushed back against Greenpeace and other environmental groups on the right to harvest timber, and with the B.C. government over aboriginal control of traditional territories and the size and shape of protected areas. With the Great Bear Rainforest agreement enshrined in law this spring, Smith announced this week he will run for the B.C. Liberal Party in the constituency of North Island, where NDP MLA Claire Trevena is seeking a fourth term in the B.C. legislature.

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Oldest tree plantation in Ontario discovered in Perth County

by By Kate Bueckert
CBC News
October 6, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

A test plot of conifer trees on an eroded hill on a farm in Perth County continues to thrive more than 100 years after it was initially planted. The woodlot south of Stratford near Harmony is now full of maple, pine, spruce, ash and cherry trees. The property, known as the Monteith farm, was the site of a pilot project and the woodlot was recently rediscovered by forestry consultant Terry Schwan of Rockwood, Ont. He determined it is the oldest tree plantation in Ontario with the help of historical records. “Knowing that this is here is important,” he said during a tour of the woodlot Tuesday. “There aren’t too many of these around.”

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Ash borer plan consideration delayed

by: Jon Thompson
TB Newswatch
October 5, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

THUNDER BAY – City council’s consideration of a plan to confront the invasive emerald ash borer has been delayed again. Administration’s $6.8-million proposal to manage the inevitable decimation of local ash trees over the next decade was to have returned to council on Monday but was postponed until Nov. 7. “There was a request from (McKellar) Coun. (Paul) Pugh on the basis of the impact on his ward in terms of the urban forest as well as storm management,” city clerk John Hannam told council. “It doesn’t impact the action going forward so we accommodated his request.” The plan, which would begin in spring of 2017, suggests inoculating half the ash trees on public property over the next 10 years and removing the other half over the next five years.

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Who Runs the Forest, the People or Nestlé?

Mountain News
October 6, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

“National Forests exist today because the people want them,” said Gifford Pinchot, the first chief of the United States Forest Service (USFS) from 1905 to 1910. “To make them accomplish the most good, the people themselves must make clear how they want them run.” An American forester and politician, Pinchot reformed the management of U.S. forests. He advocated for conservation of the nation’s reserves by planned use and renewal. Pinchot created the term “conservation ethic,” and it was his leadership that established forest conservation as a high priority for America. Considering the controversy of Nestlé’s annual extraction of 38 million gallons of water from Strawberry Creek, now is the time when the people must make clear how they want the San Bernardino National Forest (SBNF) run, particularly with regard to corporate extraction and retail sale of the people’s water for profit.

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Logging California’s dead trees is harmful to the forests

by Chad Hanson, Ph.D. John Muir Project in Big Bear (San Bernardino County) & Dominick DellaSala, Ph.D., Geos Institute in Ashland
San Francisco Chronicle
October 4, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

The logging industry and some members of Congress have been spreading misinformation and fear of fire about dead trees in California’s forests in order to promote a weakening of environmental laws and increased logging on national forests. Dead trees are not an end to a forest but are part of the renewal cycle of life and death that rejuvenates forest ecosystems. There is a Republican-led effort to pass two similar logging measures — S3085, which already passed the House last year, and the Wildfire Budgeting, Response, and Forest Management Act of 2016, circulating in the Senate — both of which would eliminate most environmental analysis of the substantial impacts to fish, wildlife and water quality from clear-cutting both “snags” (dead trees) and live old trees, while reducing public participation and increasing taxpayer-subsidized logging.

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Keep Elliott forest in public’s hands

by Josh Laughlin, executive director of Eugene-based Cascadia Wildlands
The Register Guard
October 5, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

If all goes according to the state of Oregon’s plans, the 93,000-acre Elliott State Forest is likely to become privatized in December. Oregonians then would be met with locked gates and no-trespassing signs while trying to gain access to some of Western Oregon’s stateliest rain forests, finest salmon streams and most sought-after hunting grounds. The disposal of the Elliott could go down as one of the greatest modern-day public lands tragedies in Oregon. Fortunately, Gov. Kate Brown and the rest of the State Land Board can avert this disaster by jettisoning the ongoing disposal process to ensure this incredible forest, located east of Coos Bay, is retained in public ownership for its diversity of values Oregonians hold closely.

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Not a fan of Alliance for Wild Rockies’ ‘last-minute lawsuit’

by Sandy Compton, Program Coordinator, Friends of Scotchman Peaks Wilderness
The Western News
October 4, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Just before Christmas, 2015, years of work and thousands of hours of individual effort by people from all walks of life in northwest Montana came to fruition when the Kootenai Forest Stakeholders made a landmark agreement about land use on the Kootenai National Forest. The spectrum of participants was stunning: timber executives, motorized use groups, fish and wildlife scientists, the U.S. Forest Service, local governments and wilderness advocates — including the group I work for — all took part. Organizations and individuals — some that have been past adversaries — got together, sat down at the table and worked out a deal. No one got everything they wanted, but everyone got a lot of what they wanted. …Not everyone participated. The Helena-based Alliance for the Wild Rockies didn’t show up.

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Open your eyes and see a sustainable forest through the trees

by Lee Burnett, project director for Forest Works!
Portland Press Herald
October 6, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States


SPRINGVALE — When Saco Valley Land Trust conducted a timber harvest on some of its property in Biddeford last winter, the trust faced an issue unheard-of in logging country – the suburban sensibilities of neighbors. “We got complaints,” said Richard Rhames, a vegetable farmer and president of the land trust. “We heard things like ‘Boy, they made a mess in there.’ ” Not long ago, logging was taboo among Maine land trusts, many of which grew out of a preservationist “forever wild” ethic. But that is changing as land trusts have come to appreciate the multiple benefits of sustainable forestry in managing invasive species, mitigating climate change, improving wildlife habitat, providing community benefits and earning income for stewardship activities.But it takes gumption to embrace active forest management in southern Maine.

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Environmental group didn’t get permits to kill trees for Passaic County habitat

NorthJersey.com
October 4, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

An environmental group failed to obtain required state permits when it killed trees on 15 acres of a public forest in Passaic County to create habitat for the golden-winged warbler and timber rattlesnake, two endangered species in New Jersey. The New Jersey Conservation Foundation recently received a warning letter from the state Department of Environmental Protection explaining that it should have applied for prior approval from the agency for the project in Tranquility Ridge County Park, in the Highlands communities of Ringwood and West Milford. …Conservation Foundation officials said they are working to rectify the problem, and that the violation was an oversight.

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Bush detective: the ‘art and science’ of forest fire investigation

“It’s like looking for that needle in a haystack. Sometimes you find it, sometimes you get stuck by it”
Coast Reporter
October 6, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, Canada


As Jeff Antoszek walks through bush near Lively that was left blackened and crispy by a forest fire earlier this summer, he doesn’t see what everyone else sees. After 15 years as a fire investigator and fire behaviour specialist with the Ministry of Natural Resources, it doesn’t take him long to figure out where the fire started — and which path it took through the forest. But, Antoszek said it’s rare to find that “smoking gun” like a cigarette butt or shaved metal from a railway track. “Sometimes, you know, it’s like looking for that needle in a haystack. Sometimes you find it, sometimes you get stuck by it,” he said. Here’s what the fire looked like when his colleagues at the ministry were trying to put it out.

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