Tree Frog Forestry News

Daily Archives: October 14, 2016

Business & Politics

Canada, U.S. poised to resume hostilities over softwood lumber

By Janyce McGregor
CBC News
October 13, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, United States

Don’t panic: Even though the deadline has passed, there’s still hope of a resolution to Canada’s dispute with the U.S. on softwood lumber. Both sides are still negotiating in Washington, and there won’t be any punitive measures kicking in right away. But the stage is set for Canada and the U.S. to gird for another costly, drawn-out trade battle. “I think it’s quite clear — if we can take them at their word — that the U.S. industry is gearing up to get the process started,” said analyst Naomi Christensen of the think-tank Canada West Foundation.”The U.S. lumber industry’s overarching goal is to restore an environment in which it can invest and grow to its natural size,” the statement said, to “allow the domestic industry to better supply the American market and help restore the thousands of jobs lost to unfair trade.”

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U.S. lumber trade faces uncertain future

by Tom Fletcher
BC Local News
October 13, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, United States

Negotiations for a new deal to regulate Canadian lumber exports to the U.S. are continuing as the protection of the latest softwood lumber agreement expires this week. …That solution may have to wait until after the U.S. election in November, with a campaign marked by anti-trade rhetoric from Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump and Democrat Hillary Clinton. Whatever the solution, it will not be free trade in lumber. Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and U.S. President Barack Obama agreed in June that a new agreement would be “designed to maintain Canadian exports at or below an agreed-upon U.S. market share to be negotiated.” The U.S. industry has long maintained that B.C. lumber is subsidized by an artificially low price paid for Crown land timber.

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BC mills could see layoffs if the United States imposes softwood duties

By John Dowman
The Junior College
October 13, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, United States

Canada and the US pledged to continue with talks after failing to agree to a new softwood lumber trade agreement by the end of a 12-month period that allowed tariff-free imports from north of the border. Prior to the 2006 accord, Canadian companies were stuck for years paying duties that started at 27 per cent in 2001, and were gradually lowered to 11 per cent by the U.S. Commerce Department. At the root of the lumber-trade row are so-called stumpage fees charged by the province of British Columbia, which accounts for over half of the 8.60 billion Canadian dollars ($6.5 billion) in Canadian lumber exports sent to the US a year ago.

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BC Lumber Trade Council vows to “defend” the industry

Revelstoke Current
October 13, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

The BC Lumber Trade Council (BCLTC) says it will work to “defend the (lumber) industry against any potential trade actions brought by the United States,” says its president, Susan Yurkovich. “BCLTC will continue to support work towards achieving a negotiated resolution to this dispute, she said in a statement. “However, we are also fully prepared and working alongside the Canadian government to defend the industry against any potential trade actions brought by the United States, as we have done successfully in the past.” Yurkovich made that vow on Wednesday, October 12, at the end of the one-year “standstill period” following the expiry of the 2006 Canada – US Softwood Lumber Agreement.

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14% rise in Finnish exports to non-EU countries

EUWID
October 14, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: International

Finnish exports of rough-sawn and planed softwood lumber to non-EU countries increased by 14% in the second quarter vis à vis the comparative quarter of the preceding year to 1.543m m³. As a proportion of exports overall, this figure thus increased by one percentage point to 64%. According to Eurostat, deliveries to China (+76%), Japan (+16%) as well as to Morocco (+19%) increased at an above-average rate. Regarding exports to Egipt, a below-average increase of 7% was recorded. Exports to EU countries amounted to 877,611m³, which represents an increase of 11% compared to the preceding year’s figure. Due to the below-average increase, their proportion of exports as a whole declined to 36%. .

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Wood, Paper & Green Building

Urban Beacon

By Rachel Hayes
Church Designer Magazine
October 10, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: United States, US West

… Immediately greeting the eye is the chancel wall created with floating 40-foot cross laminated timber (CLT) panels. The CLT panels, suspended from a steel structure, are cut and tapered through CNC modeling and angle out over the sanctuary chancel, washed in indirect light from hidden northern skylights and full-height side windows. “We wanted to bring in daylight from the sides and top and let it reverberate through the entire space, not isolate it to one area,” says Jones. “And we wanted to add depth by casting the light against the very natural texture of the pine, fir and spruce wood of the CLT.”

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Exhibition Review: Timber City at the National Building Museum

By Braulio Agnese
Architectural Record
October 13, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: US East, United States

A new show demonstrates that, when it comes to using timber to its full potential, we’re not out of the woods. After 19th-century construction codes limited wood’s structural use—a response to devastating fires in Boston and Chicago—it seemed the future of cities’ skylines would belong to concrete and steel. But as a new exhibition at Washington, D.C.’s National Building Museum (NBM) demonstrates, wood deserves renewed consideration in the design and construction of large edifices, and engineers and architects are starting to explore the possibilities. Modest in size yet chock-full of interesting information, Timber City is equal parts science lesson and architectural display.

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Racing for the top: Austrian crews break ground on world’s tallest wood building

By Kim Slowey
Construction Dive
October 13, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: International

Although designers all over the world have ambitious plans for “plyscrapers,” the current titleholder of the world’s tallest wood building goes to the University of British Columbia’s 174-foot-tall, 18-story, $39 million Brock Commons residence hall. The 174-foot structure will house more than 400 students when it is finished in September 2017. Similar to its Austrian counterpart, it relied on concrete for its foundation and stair cores. Project officials also said the building’s materials and design will have the same effect as taking 500 cars off the road for one year.

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Object of the Moment: PaperBricks by WooJai Lee

By Selin Ashaboglu
Architecture Magazine
October 13, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: International

Based in Eindhoven, Netherlands, Korean-New Zealander designer WooJai Lee likes experimenting with nontraditional materials in the furniture and objects he creates. One of his latest projects is PaperBricks, crafted from used newspapers. Lee turns discarded newspapers into a pulp, mixes in wood glue, and presses it into molds to form bricks that look like concrete masonry units. Once the shape has set, the bricks are taken out of the mold to dry, and then sanded for uniform and smooth edges. The 2-inch-thick bricks measure 4 inches wide by 11.8 inches long, and have a marble-like surface reminiscent of the Turkish Ebru art form.

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Too hut for TV: ‘Cabin Porn’ photographs reveal the ultimate quiet retreats

By Jennifer Newton
UK Daily Mail
October 13, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: International

A series of pictures dubbed ‘cabin porn’ has revealed some of the ultimate quiet retreats around the world. Tucked deep into the woods or out of sight at the top of a mountain, the collection of images of the home built cabins show just how idyllic the outdoor lifestyle can be. One picture shows a tree house fort thirty-feet up in the air and a quirky geometric yurt.

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Forestry

Minister’s grasp deficient

Letter by Janet Oxley
Sunshine Coast Reporter
October 13, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Mr. Thompson:  Your letter printed Oct. 7 in Coast Reporter requires a rebuttal. The “required clarification” you propose shows an embarrassing deficiency in your grasp of the issues that ELF defends. First, BCTS posting its harvesting plans on its website hardly qualifies as community consultation. …Secondly, cosmetic buffering of trails does not address the value of the whole forest as our system of water filtration and erosion control. Clearcutting results in desertification and is an irresponsible practice. Presenting such secondary issues exposes your shallow understanding of the region’s ecology and the long-term consequences of clearcutting. BCTS removes one cutblock from its plan only to snatch up another one.

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A hike in the forest

October 14, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

I was saddened to read the letter by Forests Minister Steve Thomson, in the Oct. 7 Coast Reporter, in which he attempted to defend himself for issuing logging permits in the Elphinstone Forest (“Forest values balanced on Mount Elphinstone”). I am not an activist, but after reading that letter I decided I must add my voice to the chorus of others who are trying to protect our local forests. … Unfortunately, today, we no longer feel that connection to the forest. Most of us don’t realize that only a tiny percentage of our old forests remain. These forests have to be preserved – especially the ones closest to communities, like the Elphinstone Forest. And their preservation must be our government’s chief priority.

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Two opposing letters to the editor about Cantimber

Cantimber doing its best, says worker AND Resident looks for relief
Alberni Valley News
October 13, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Terry Moore: I personally work for this company as a power engineer and pay taxes in this town. The product we use is a recycled product (wood chips) from logs that have been cut here and then shipped to foreign countries, putting local citizens and taxpayers out of work.
Vanayssa Love: I have had endless bouts of explosive sneezing, dry coughing spells, choking, sometimes feeling as though I would suffocate before it settled down, for over a year now here in Alberni.

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B.C. bear problems surge this fall

By Tom Fletcher
Alberni Valley News
October 13, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

B.C.’s Conservation Officer Service has recorded more than 18,000 human-animal conflicts since April 1, many of them bears attracted by fruit trees or garbage as they forage for food to fatten up for winter. Chris Doyle, deputy chief of the service, said Thursday the number of incidents this year has been about average, picking up in September and October. Notable incidents include:
a

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Logging pace, worldwide and on Island, is not sustainable

Letter by Bill Woollam
Cowichan Valley Citizen
October 13, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

I recently sat in with a group of retired professionals who were discussing how our forests across the globe maintain balanced CO2 and oxygen levels in our atmosphere, as well as keep the forest floor cool in the hot summer months, and prevent flooding and erosion in the rainy months. The proof that clear-cutting forested land for industry and subdivision expansion is not sustainable is evident right here in the greater Cowichan Valley region. I counted over 10 logging trucks running through Duncan every hour during the weekday working schedule. It works out to one football field of deforestation every hour, and that is just here in the Valley. I imagine there are at least 30 other communities in B.C. where clearcutting for suburban housing and for industrial processing is taking place.

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A hike in the forest

October 14, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

I was saddened to read the letter by Forests Minister Steve Thomson, in the Oct. 7 Coast Reporter, in which he attempted to defend himself for issuing logging permits in the Elphinstone Forest (“Forest values balanced on Mount Elphinstone”). I am not an activist, but after reading that letter I decided I must add my voice to the chorus of others who are trying to protect our local forests. … Unfortunately, today, we no longer feel that connection to the forest. Most of us don’t realize that only a tiny percentage of our old forests remain. These forests have to be preserved – especially the ones closest to communities, like the Elphinstone Forest. And their preservation must be our government’s chief priority.

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Endangered species now protected in lower Musquodoboit River

By Amanda Panacci
The Chronicle Herald
October 13, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

Many snapping turtles and Atlantic salmon are now safe from drilling and tree cutting in the lower Musquodoboit River. The Nature Conservancy of Canada announced the protection Thursday of about 70 hectares of wildlife habitat just a 30-minute drive from Halifax. Much of the upper Musquodoboit River already has been altered by mining, agriculture and forestry practices. In the lower section of the river, the loss of tree cover was beginning to warm the lower portion while sediment was starting to seep through. “There are impacts of those upstream land uses but, despite that, the lower section remains remarkably intact and in good ecological health,” said Craig Smith, NCC program director for the province.

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Citizen foresters take up the cause for Toronto’s urban forest

By: May Warren
Metro News
October 14, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

The seeds of environmental stewardship are being planted around the city with new projects that encourage “citizen forestry:” regular people taking care of trees in their own neighbourhoods. In Cabbagetown, a non-profit called Cabbagetown ReLEAF is working with the faculty of forestry at the University of Toronto to to care for neighbourhood trees. Earlier this month, they held a training session for other budding citizen foresters. Covering basics such as pruning, tree inventory, and knowing who to call if a tree needs help, the first training day was just “scratching the surface,” said professor Danijela Puric-Mladenovic.

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Study: Decline in forest diversity could cost billions per year

By Susan Kelley
Cornell Chronicle
October 13, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States

The world’s forests constitute the most varied and diverse terrestrial ecosystems on the planet, and are home to thousands of species of plants, animals and microorganisms. A new study [co-authored by Chris Barrett] of all major forest ecosystems on Earth finds that conserving these diverse forests not only retains a species-rich environment, but also maintains the forests’ output and services for future generations. The study, published in Science Oct. 14, reveals that biodiversity – the variety of living things on Earth – in forests promotes productivity. In other words, when the number of tree species increases, so does the amount of timber that can be harvested. They also found the opposite to be true – a decline in biodiversity would result in an accelerating decline in forest productivity.

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While Congress fiddles, wildfire ravaged California burns

By the Editorial Board
The Sacramento Bee
October 11, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

The Soberanes Fire near Big Sur has been burning for 2 1/2 months and is the most expensive wildfire in U.S. history. Wildfire season is year-round, and towering firenadoes are now commonplace. So far this year, the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection has dealt with 5,340 wildfires covering nearly 150,000 acres, an increase of 27 percent compared to last year. Record high temperatures and bark beetles have fueled the fire risk. But while the state struggles to do its part, federal dollars have become scarcer. ….California has borne the brunt of those cuts, despite the expanses of federal land here. And a one-time federal allotment of $662 million last fiscal year did little to meet the long-term need, which is overwhelming.

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How bark beetles use mob mentality to kill millions of California trees

abc10
October 13, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

There are killing machines on the loose in California and the entire West Coast. They’re found in packs and look for the weak but they’re not the scary predator you’d imagine. In fact, they’re about the size of a rice grain. They’re called bark beetles. …But what is a bark beetle and how is this insect able to wreak so much havoc?  Bark beetles are typically black or brown hard-bodied insects. There are 600 different species of bark beetles in the U.S. according to the United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service. About 200 species live in California and are native to North America. Each species of bark beetle usually only feeds one one type of tree and stays within one region.

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Big Sur fire 100 percent contained

Associated Press in The Washington Post
October 13, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

BIG SUR, Calif. — The nearly 3-month-old wildfire that churned through the scenic coastal mountains north of California’s Big Sur is 100 percent contained. Fire officials say full containment was reached Thursday. The blaze, which burned more than 148 square miles in the Los Padres National Forest and charred 58 square miles of private land, was started by an illegal campfire on July 22. The wildfire has surpassed $200 million in firefighting costs, becoming the costliest to fight in U.S. history, according to a National Interagency Fire Center report last month.

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Misrepresenting Forest Management Issues

By Kari Gunderson and Addrien Marx
Flathead Beacon
October 13, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

We are longtime residents of the Seeley/Swan Valley who attended the Sept. 20 Swan Valley Community Council-sponsored presentation by Montana Sen. Jennifer Fielder and Rep. Kerry White of the American Lands Council (ALC). The ALC presentation was filled with misinformation, inaccurate graphics, and emotionally charged rhetoric designed to create fear. In their proposal to transfer federal lands to state control, the ALC speakers oversimplified and misrepresented complex forest management issues, while ignoring us hikers, hunters, anglers and other local citizens who value and cherish our public lands. Fielder and White claim that the transfer of 17,151,047 acres of U.S. Forest Service (USFS) lands to state ownership would not present an undue financial burden on Montana taxpayers, yet offer few details of how the state will manage these lands.

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Our national forests need to be multi-purpose

by DeAnn Stish, Lake States Director, Healthy Forests Healthy Communities
Grand Rapids Herald Review
October 12, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

…Congress and the Administration have finally come to realize they can’t borrow their way out of this naturally occurring cycle and if we stop managing our forests the way they should, we will only see fire, insect and disease and other catastrophic events continue to turn our National Forests into a thing of the past….As hunting season approaches, remember, our game habitat depends on managed forests too! We need our National Forests to become to multi-purpose entities they once were to provide for recreation, habitat, fiber supply and to make them resilient to catastrophic events. Congress needs to act as soon as possible and make our National Forests strong and productive once again.

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Libs ‘getting on with the job’ on forestry, says Premier Will Hodgman

The Mercury
October 12, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: International

THE Liberals have denied they are going to bring forward logging in former reserves to whip up environmental conflict ahead of the next election. Resources Minister Guy Barnett told State Parliament yesterday the Government was considering opening former reserves to logging sooner than anticipated because Forestry Tasmania was running out of trees. For Forestry Tasmania meet its wood supply obligations, it may be granted early access to 400,000ha of forests that had been reserved under the forest peace deal. One of the Liberals’ first acts in government was to reverse the protection of the areas, but they were not to be logged for at least six years.

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Forest Industry Safety Council honours Helen Kelly

Scoop Independent News
October 14, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: International

The Forest Industry Safety Council (FISC) is saddened to hear of the passing of Helen Kelly, former NZCTU President and passionate advocate for health and safety at work. “Helen was instrumental in driving reforms of health and safety in the forest industry over the past 3-4 years,” says FISC National Safety Director Fiona Ewing. “Through our Council we will continue to work with forest owners, contractors, unions and forest workers to strongly support her goal of improving health and safety in forestry – particularly worker engagement and participation.”

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