Tree Frog Forestry News

Daily Archives: October 18, 2016

Special Feature

Internationally renowned forestry expert succumbs to cancer

October 18, 2016
Category: Special Feature
Region: Canada, Canada West

Vancouver resident Les Jozsa remembered by friends and colleagues as a Renaissance man. The house you live in, the guitar you strum, or even the couch you hang your hat on — chances are, Les Jozsa likely left his imprint and expertise on it. A renowned forestry scientist, carver and UBC alumnus, Jozsa died Oct. 5 after a brief battle with cancer. He was 78. His colleagues, family and mentors remember the Vancouver resident as a man of immeasurable talents. He authored more than 150 academic papers that would go on to help shape forestry practices across the world. He lectured in North America, Europe and South America, helping industry and governments ensure maximum quality and quantity in secondary wood products: furniture, doors, windows, veneer products, skateboards, musical instruments, log homes and more.  “He is a Renaissance man because he could do all kinds of things and do them very well: he was an athlete, an academic, he cooked superbly, he was a gardener, an artist, he could speak in public well,” said Bob Kennedy, a former dean of the UBC faculty of forestry. “I don’t know of anybody else who had that variety of skills.”

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Internationally renowned forestry expert succumbs to cancer

October 18, 2016
Category: Special Feature
Region: Canada, Canada West

Vancouver resident Les Jozsa remembered by friends and colleagues as a Renaissance man. The house you live in, the guitar you strum, or even the couch you hang your hat on — chances are, Les Jozsa likely left his imprint and expertise on it. A renowned forestry scientist, carver and UBC alumnus, Jozsa died Oct. 5 after a brief battle with cancer. He was 78. His colleagues, family and mentors remember the Vancouver resident as a man of immeasurable talents. He authored more than 150 academic papers that would go on to help shape forestry practices across the world. He lectured in North America, Europe and South America, helping industry and governments ensure maximum quality and quantity in secondary wood products: furniture, doors, windows, veneer products, skateboards, musical instruments, log homes and more.  “He is a Renaissance man because he could do all kinds of things and do them very well: he was an athlete, an academic, he cooked superbly, he was a gardener, an artist, he could speak in public well,” said Bob Kennedy, a former dean of the UBC faculty of forestry. “I don’t know of anybody else who had that variety of skills.”

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Business & Politics

Canada Prepared for WTO Softwood Lumber Fight, Freeland Says

by Josh Wingrove and Jen Skerritt
Bloomberg News
October 17, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada

Canada will fight U.S. softwood lumber tariffs in front of the World Trade Organization if a negotiated settlement can’t be reached, Trade Minister Chrystia Freeland says. A tariff standstill expired last week and opened the door for U.S. industry to begin proceedings to add charges to Canadian lumber. The last softwood pact expired in 2015 and Canadian exports have since increased. Freeland, speaking Monday in the House of Commons, said the Canadian government is now taking a “two-track approach” — pursuing a negotiated deal while preparing for any WTO fight. “We understand the way to get a great deal is to be prepared for the possibility there is no deal at all,” Freeland told lawmakers in Ottawa. “We want a good deal, not just any deal. And if we can’t achieve a negotiated agreement, Canada’s prepared to fight.”

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A breakdown in relations?

By Scott Jamieson
Wood Business
October 18, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

More than anywhere else in Canada, contractors on the BC Coast are concerned about a recent souring of relations with the industry they supply. That, and stagnant rates and declining profitability are reasons why succession planning may be a bigger challenge here. Job satisfaction is a relative concept, and the loggers on the BC Coast are relatively unsatisfied with their recent lot in life. Based on results from the 2016 Canadian Forest Industries Contractor Survey, logging contractors across Canada continue to struggle with stagnant logging rates, climbing machine costs, and staffing challenges.

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OPINION: Softwood lumber deal has become a political hot potato

By Keith Baldrey
Burnaby Now
October 17, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

The B.C. economy keeps chugging along and leads all provinces in terms of performance, but there is a dark cloud on the horizon that may change all that. The one-year truce that followed the expiration of the nine-year softwood deal with the United States has ended and no new agreement is in sight. As a result, U.S. lumber companies are expected to quickly file lawsuits and B.C. lumber producers could face serious financial penalties come next March, when hefty duties will almost certainly be slapped on B.C. softwood shipments south of the border. Layoffs in the forest industry are more than likely, and the shutdown of mills could also occur. While B.C.’s forest industry has declined in terms of numbers and economic activity since say, the 1980s, it remains a vital component of the provincial economy.

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PG MPs Named to Softwood Lumber Task Force

By Greg Fry
250 News
October 17, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

Prince George, B.C. – Two Prince George MPs have been named to the Conservative party’s new Softwood Lumber Taskforce. Cariboo-Prince George MP Todd Doherty and Prince George-Peace River-Northern Rockies MP Bob Zimmer are among six Conservatives on the taskforce which the party says has been created to hold the Trudeau government accountable in its softwood lumber trade dispute with the United States. This after the federal government failed to strike a new softwood lumber agreement with the U.S. to replace the one-year interim deal that expired last week which the party says has left “thousands employed in the forestry sector across Canada anxious and uneasy.”

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Weyerhaeuser is safest mill

By Mamta Lulla
Drayton Valley Western Review
October 17, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

Alberta Forest Products Association (AFPA) named Weyerhaeuser Drayton Valley the safest mill in Alberta at the recent AFPA awards night. At its 74th Annual General Meeting and Conference, the Alberta Forest Products Association recognized the excellence of AFPA member companies, contractors, and employees. Awards were presented in several categories, including health and safety and lumber grading. Weyerhaeuser Company Limited in Drayton Valley won the President’s Award for Health and Safety Performance from 2013 to 2015. “Weyerhaeuser has a long history of really creating a culture that safety comes first and so we build safety in everything we do and that’s the first step,” said plant general manager in Drayton Valley Sean Cheeseman.

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Doherty, Zimmer named to Conservatives’ softwood lumber task force

Prince George Citizen with files from the Vancouver Sun
Prince George Citizen
October 17, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

Prince George area MPs Todd Doherty and Bob Zimmer have been named to a task force the Conservative opposition has formed “to hold the Liberal government to account for solving the softwood lumber trade dispute with the United States.” “We are a group of MPs who are tired of the Liberal government mismanaging this very important file,” Doherty said in a statement issued Monday. “We will make sure the Liberals don’t forget about the workers and communities affected by their trade war. “We will talk to companies, workers and community leaders from coast to coast to coast, bring them together, and see if we can chart a path forward to solve this problem.” In all, seven MPs and one senator, including international trade critic Gerry Ritz, are on the task force.

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Warkentin Says Trudeau Government Failed Canadian Forestry Sector

YL Country Alberta
October 14, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

The softwood lumber one-year interim deal between the United States and Canada, recently reached its expiration date this week. Chris Warkentin, Member of Parliament for Grande Prairie-Mackenzie and Official Opposition Critic for Agriculture, is now saying the Liberal Government failed the forestry sector. He says in a release on Friday, October 14, 2016, “this failure leaves thousands employed in the forestry sector across Canada anxious and uneasy.” Warkentin adds there is an alarming lack of attention on the issue from The Prime Minister. “The Liberal Government has failed Peace Country forestry workers and their families,” said Warkentin, in the release.

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Sappi North America Is Working Towards Its Environmental Sustainability Goals

By Gina-Marie Cheeseman
Justmeans
October 17, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States

Sappi North America, a subsidiary of Sappi Limited with over 2,000 employees in the U.S. and Canada, focuses on sustainability. The company established long term sustainability goals in 2008, called 2020Vision. One of those goals is to ensure that 60 percent of its fiber content is certified by third-party certification programs, including the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), the Sustainable Forestry Initiative (SFI) and the Programme for the Endorsement of Forest Certification (PEFC).  Already, all of its wood fiber is sourced from well-managed forests according to FSC controlled wood standard and the SFI certified sourcing standard, as its most recent CSR report details.

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U.S. producers push for tariffs on Canadian timber

By Aaron Bolton
KTOO Public Media
October 15, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States, US West

The deadline to strike a deal on Canadian softwood lumber imports into the U.S. came and went Wednesday. The past agreement controlled Canadian lumber import prices which allowed Alaskan lumber to compete in the market. The U.S. Lumber Coalition said that leaves American producers with little choice but to push for tariffs on Canadian wood. The U.S. and Canadian governments have been at odds for decades on whether Canadian sawmills receive government subsidies, particularly “stumpage” fees, a tax on harvested trees. Mills in the states say that gives Canadian producers an unfair advantage in the U.S. market. The most recent deal struck in 2006, expired in 2015 and a standstill period was in effect until Wednesday.

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Weyerhaeuser announces possible sale of Uruguay business

IHB – The Timber Network
October 18, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States, US West

Weyerhaeuser announced it is exploring strategic alternatives, including a possible sale, for its timberlands and manufacturing operations in Uruguay. Weyerhaeuser has been restructuring its business since it bought Plum Creek Timber Co Inc PCL.N in February, combining the two largest owners of timberland in the United States. Since then, Weyerhaeuser has said it would sell its pulp business to International Paper Co (IP.N) for $2.2 billion and its liquid packaging unit to Nippon Paper Industries Co Ltd (3863.T) for about $285 million. Weyerhaeuser said earlier this month it would sell its North Pacific paper unit to private company One Rock Capital Partners LLC.

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With Matthew’s damage minimal, S.C. forestry industry looks to future growth, exports surge

by David Wren
The Post and Courier
October 15, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: US East, United States

As he surveyed the fallen trees near his Berkeley County home last week, Gene Kodama worried about Hurricane Matthew’s impact on forests in South Carolina. “I thought, ‘This is going to be terrible’,” said Kodama, the state forester with the S.C. Forestry Commission. “But when I got up in the plane to assess the damage, there wasn’t as much as I thought there would be. For some individual landowners, there is significant damage. But statewide, it’s not that bad.” Trees near roadsides and in open areas bore the biggest brunt of the storm. There also was damage to recently thinned stands of trees. Post-storm flooding is likely to kill some trees planted within the last three years, as they will be under water for extended periods.

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Global softwood plywood market forecast to 2021 made available by top research firm

By The Market Reports
WhaTech
October 17, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: International

Global Softwood Plywood Industry 2016 Market Research Report provide the details about Industry Overview and analysis about Manufacturing Cost Structure, Revenue, Gross Margin, Consumption Value and Sale Price, Major Manufacturers, Distributors, Industry Chain Structure, New Project SWOT Analysis with Development Trends and Forecasts 2021. The Global Softwood Plywood Industry 2016 Market Research Report is a professional and in-depth study on the current state of the Softwood Plywood industry. With around 150 tables and figures this report provides key statistics on the state of the industry and is a valuable source of guidance and direction for companies and individuals interested in the market.

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Wood, Paper & Green Building

UNBC gets tall wood research chair

By Mark Nielsen
Prince George Citizen
October 17, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: Canada, Canada West

The University of Northern British Columbia now has a research chair who will focus on engineering tall wood and hybrid structures. Thomas Tannert was introduced to dignitaries and local media during an event Monday afternoon at the Wood Innovation and Design Centre. Previously the associate chair in wood building and design construction at the University of British Columbia, where he earned a doctorate, Tannert moved to Canada from Germany in 2003. He said he was drawn to B.C. by its commitment to design, manufacturing and construction involving wood.

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Provincial investment bolsters wood innovation and sustainable design

Government of BC
October 17, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: Canada, Canada West

With $2.25 million in provincial funding, the University of Northern British Columbia (UNBC) has a new Tall Wood and Hybrid Structures Engineering Research Chair to drive innovative wood design and bolster its master of integrated wood design program. Thomas Tannert, an expert in timber engineering design, comes to UNBC from the University of British Columbia, where he was the associate chair in wood building design and construction. He will establish an interdisciplinary research program at UNBC, building capacity to design and deliver innovative and sustainable hybrid engineering solutions. Tannert’s research is being funded through the Leading Edge Endowment Fund, which was distributed through the BC Innovation Council, a provincial Crown agency.

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The Rise and Fall of a Miracle Wood

By Scott Gibson
Green Building News
October 17, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: United States

Acetylated lumber wins accolades for its performance and small environmental footprint, but getting a foothold in the market can be tough. Each year, specialty publisher BuildingGreen selects 10 of its favorite green products, the ones with the potential to “transform the industry” by conserving energy or water, reducing greenhouse gas emissions, or otherwise shepherding the building world toward a better future.This year’s Top 10 list included a mixed bag of products — a new kind of battery, an electric lawnmower, water piping, a composting toilet — and something called Accoya acetylated wood. Accoya is a brand name for a type of softwood lumber, mostly Radiata pine, that has been treated with a chemical called acetic anhydride, which BuildingGreen describes as “really strong vinegar.” After treatment, the wood has gained remarkable performance characteristics at a very low environmental cost.

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Steve Lohr: Fire chief applauds HB 1472

Steve Lohr is fire chief for the City of Hagerstown.
Herald Mail Media
October 16, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: US East, United States

I have been fighting fires in Maryland for more than 45 years. In December 2014, I retired as fire chief of Montgomery County, and I now serve as fire chief in Hagerstown. As a firefighter, I’ve seen a lot over the years. …The use of wood as a primary construction material in certain structures carries unacceptable risks and can be dangerous for residents and firefighters alike. Every day, our buildings are getting taller, larger and closer together. They are becoming more architecturally complex, with nonlinear designs, inaccessible courtyards and nontypical access points….HB 1472, a proposed bill in Maryland during the 2016 session, sought to curtail the use of lightweight wood in large-scale structures. I applaud this effort, and for the sake of our community, I hope the pursuit continues.

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Alumnus Joe Harmon unveils first wooden supercar, Splinter

by Wesley Hayes
N.C. State University Technician Online
October 17, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: US East, United States

The fascination surrounding cars, and their appealing design and power, is something shared by many people. In the case of Joe Harmon, a former graduate student studying industrial design, this love was taken to a new level. That level was the Splinter supercar project. The Splinter car is the first supercar made almost entirely out of wood that Harmon’s company, Harmon Design, recently completed. …. Harmon goes on to explain how he got the inspiration for a wooden car from a World War 2 plane called the de Havilland Mosquito. According to Harmon, the Mosquito was one of the fastest planes of the war and was made almost entirely out of wood. “Most people don’t think about wood in that way,” Harmon said.

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Huge blaze engulfs partly built Gorton flats

BBC News
October 17, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: International

A huge blaze has engulfed a partly built block of flats in Manchester. Greater Manchester Fire and Rescue Service (GMFRS) said the top two floors of the high rise block in Gorton were well alight when it arrived at the scene on Sunday evening. The fire quickly spread through the timber framed building, it said, and nearby homes were evacuated and roads closed. GMFRS said no-one was hurt and was investigating the cause of the fire. Five fire engines attended the blaze at its height. Incident commander Ben Levy said the fire service received more than 40 calls about the blaze.

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Forestry

Maple bugs are back and they might be worse than ever

CBC News
October 17, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

The pesky little bugs are back, and according one of the province’s top entomologists, they’re back in higher numbers than he’s ever seen. Cedric Gillott, biology professor emeritus University of Saskatchewan, has “an enormous number of them” at his acreage south of Saskatoon. The native species, Gillott explained, goes through a population cycle every seven to nine years much like tent caterpillars. What we’re seeing right now is population peak during the cycle of the bug.

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Broadsided by logging truck

Castanet Kelowna
October 17, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

A Kelowna woman is lucky to be alive after she was broadsided by a logging truck on the William R. Bennet Bridge Sunday night. …Police have determined that a Kenworth logging truck and the Mazda were westbound on the bridge when the semi sideswiped the car as it pulled into the right-hand slow lane from the centre lane. …“RCMP would like to ensure that motorists are aware that commercial vehicles have larger blind spots than passenger vehicles,” said O’Donaghey. “Driving alongside a commercial vehicle can be dangerous. Drivers should consider slowing down to allow these vehicles to pull ahead or pass them when it is safe to do so.”

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Fort McMurray fights wildfire risk by removing dead urban trees

By David Thurton
CBC News
October 17, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, United States, Canada West

Municipality has earmarked $1.5 million for tree-clearing project. Fort McMurray is taking steps to prevent another catastrophic forest fire by extinguishing a fire threat in the heart of the the city. The wildfire hazard, the Birchwood Trails, has been described as a “tinder box” waiting to go up in flames. Birchwood Trails is a network of more than 130 kilometres of maintained trails sandwiched between the Timberlea and Thickwood neighbourhoods. Fire chief Darby Allen has also said he’s worried about the fire risk posed by the urban forest than by a wildfire outside the city.

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Judge grants new injunction against logging protesters

by Sean Eckford
Sunshine Coast Reporter
October 15, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada West

Elphinstone Logging Focus (ELF) says it will respect a B.C. Supreme Court decision to grant a new injunction to Peninsula Logging. The company was the successful bidder for the harvesting rights on cutblock A87125 on the slopes of Mount Elphinstone. BC Timber Sales (BCTS) put the block up for auction in June. BCTS said at the time the requirements it would impose on the company doing the logging would protect veteran Douglas fir and leave additional buffers around riparian areas and the popular mountain biking trails. An interim injunction granted by a judge in Vernon in late August was not extended after a Sept. 26 hearing in Vancouver. The company filed a new application within days, and the judge in the case ruled Oct. 7 to approve a new injunction.

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Family of grizzly bears killed and dumped in Granisle, B.C.

By Andrew Kurjata
CBC News
October 17, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Conservation officers are searching for whoever is responsible for killing a family of grizzly bears and dumping their bodies on a logging road in northwest B.C. The dead bears were found Oct. 16 near the community of Granisle, about 320 kilometres northwest of Prince George. “They appear to be a family group, being a sow and a couple of cubs,” said Flint Knibbs, one of the officers investigating the killing. Knibss said that although there is a “fairly healthy” grizzly population in the region, the loss of a sow and two cubs would likely have an impact on a species considered at-risk in the province. Earlier this year, B.C. grizzly bear expert Lana Ciareniello warned of the impact of losing female grizzlies.

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Great Bear Rainforest Legislation: A Unique Solution

By Bob Craven, RPF, Interfor [Article was originally published in the September-October 2016 edition of BC Forest Professional.]
Coast Forest Products Association
October 17, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Not many people likely want to read about legislation; however, the Great Bear Rainforest (GBR) legislation is special. It’s the result of an epic journey — a story complete with drama, conflict and weary characters slogging through tough territory toward worthy goals. I’ve spent 10 years on this file; some from a technical perspective and the last three years on a negotiating team working with environmental non-governmental organizations (ENGO). I’m proud to have been part of developing a unique solution for a globally significant area.

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Emerald Ash Borer costs continue to rise

By Miriam King
Bradford Times
October 17, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

The annual budget for urban forestry in Bradford West Gwillimbury now stands at $200,000 – $100,000 for Town parks and properties, and another $100,000 allocated in 2016 for maintenance of trees planted along the boulevards. A report on urban forestry, presented to Council in Committee of the Whole in September, proposed increasing the budget further in 2017, to continue the work of removing and replacing dead and damaged trees on urban streets, and treating some of the Town’s mature Ash trees of “significant value,” to protect them against the Emerald Ash Borer. The Town replaced 200 trees in 2015, but saw a 15% mortality rate, believed to be due to drought and heat this summer.

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Smith, Warness: Forest management better than doing nothing

by Nick Smith, member of the Oregon Society of American Foresters & Executive Director of Healthy Forests, Healthy Communities. Lindsay Warness, Forest Policy Analyst with Boise Cascade.
East Oregonian
October 14, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

In response to George Wuerthner’s Oct. 7 column, there are good reasons why there is broad support for active and collaborative management of our forests. It all comes down to a choice, and Mr. Wuerthner made his choice clear. We can choose to manage our forests to protect and enhance the economic, social and environmental benefits they provide. We can choose to proactively help our forests adapt to drought, insect infestations and changing climate conditions, and use forest management tools such as timber harvest, thinning and prescribed fires to mitigate the impacts of catastrophic wildfire. Or, we can choose to do nothing and suffer the consequences of inaction. Fortunately, more Americans are choosing active, science-based forest management over passive, “hands-off” management.

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How can we save California’s forests?

By Julia Franz
Public Radio International
October 17, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

To say trees in California are having a tough time may be an understatement. Years of drought conditions and warmer temperatures have stressed millions of trees, and surging numbers of bark beetles, the rice-grain size invaders that attack tree bark, are dealing a death blow. The US Forest Service estimates that 66 million trees are already dead in the state, and the siege drags on. But to slow the wave of tree death from these outside assailants, scientists are looking close to home for answers: to the trees themselves.

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Colorado Wildfire Destroys Structures, Forces Evacuations

Associated Press in ABC News
October 18, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

A fast-growing wildfire in southern Colorado has destroyed structures and forced the evacuation of more than 150 homes, officials said. The fire was reported before dawn Monday some 25 miles southwest of Pueblo, the Custer County Emergency Management Office said. And by Monday evening it had mushroomed to 21 square miles, according to El Paso County sheriff’s spokeswoman Gail Perez. The fire sent up large plumes of smoke, which led to a health advisory for people living as far east as Pueblo. “We have confirmed four structures lost — one home and three other structures were lost on the Junkins Park Loop near where we believe the origin of the fire was,” Custer County Sheriff Shannon Byerly told the Pueblo Chieftain.

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Federal judge denies injunction, allows logging to continue near Colville

By Nina Culver
Spokesman Review
October 14, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

A federal judge on Friday ruled against an environmental group seeking an emergency injunction to stop a logging project in the Colville National Forest in northeast Washington. The project, known as A to Z, is the first of its kind. It’s a 10-year project that includes a contract with Vaagen Brothers Lumber Co. to thin trees and do road maintenance and stream restoration work over 54,000 acres. The contract also calls for Vaagen Brothers to do environmental reviews for the proposed work. Work began in the forest in June. Attorneys for the Alliance for the Wild Rockies argued that the U.S. Forest Service should be required to do a full environmental impact statement on the proposed project, not just an environmental analysis.

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After 2014 fire, a Minnesota forest begins to rebound

Inforum
October 16, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

BELTRAMI ISLAND STATE FOREST, Minn.—Driving down a sandy stretch of the Black’s Winner Forest Road, Charlie Tucker pointed out a sea of big bluestem, a prairie grass not typically associated with pine forests. Until after a wildfire. “This is one of the larger open areas that have been created here,” said Tucker, assistant manager of Red Lake Wildlife Management Area at Norris Camp south of Roosevelt, Minn. “It looks like a prairie, doesn’t it?” Charred pines, small trees that now resemble blackened matchsticks, bordered the prairie grass in places, offering a hint of what once grew here. “This was all ages of jack pine and red pine,” Tucker said. “What we have out here right now is basically a dry prairie until it comes back to a forest.”

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A Frog Dies in Atlanta, and a World Vanishes With It

By Joseph R. Mendelson III
The New York Times
October 10, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

Atlanta — Two weeks ago, the last known Rabbs’ fringe-limbed tree frog died in a biosecure safehouse at the Atlanta Botanical Garden. Its distinctive, barklike call was last heard in the wild, as far as we know, in a Panamanian forest in 2007. I was among a group of biologists who discovered this species in 2005 in the canopy of a cloud forest in central Panama. We documented a remarkable behavior never seen in any other animal. The males stayed with their tadpoles in small water-filled cavities high in the trees. These tiny arboreal ponds lacked sufficient food for the tadpoles, so the male would lower himself into the water, allowing his offspring to rasp the skin from his back for nutrition.

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Forest Conservation Has a New Poster Child: the Gopher Tortoise

By John R. Platt
TakePart
October 17, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

The imperiled reptile will benefit from a plan to help landowners preserve America’s disappearing longleaf pine trees. How do you protect some of the most endangered forest habitats in the United States? The answer may lie with a critter that often lives beneath that forest: a burrowing species called the gopher tortoise. Gopher tortoises, which are listed as threatened by the federal government, are native to the Southeastern United States, where they have made their home in a unique, sandy ecosystem called the longleaf pine forest. These forests, which once covered more than 90 million acres across the Southeast, have all but disappeared. Today, after more than 200 years of development, only about 3 percent of historic longleaf pine forests remain.

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Species, Interrupted – Why it Matters When Extinction Silences a Tree Frog

By Andrew C. Revkin
New York Times
October 10, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

…Toughie, living alone in recent years in a special habitat at the Atlanta Botanical Garden, was one of several dozen Rabbs’ frogs and tadpoles captured in Panama in 2005 and brought to Atlanta by biologists practicing the emerging art of “captive conservation” — trying to safeguard this (and other) tropical frog species ahead of the fungal holocaust. The chytrid fungus arrived shortly afterward. By late 2007, this frogs’ distinctive call was silenced in the wild. The species — remarkable for its gliding behavior and the male’s habit of letting tadpoles feed on its skin — was formally described in 2008 by a team led by Mendelson. He gave it the plural possessive name Rabbs’ in honor of a devoted pair of amphibian conservationists, the herpetologist George B. Rabb and his wife, Mary, a librarian and biology teacher.

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Government Committed to Supporting Strong Growth in Forestry

By Guy Barnett, Minister for Resources
Government of Tasmania
October 17, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: International

The resurgent Tasmanian forest industry is experiencing strong growth, with new figures showing a massive 48.5 per cent rise in the private forest harvest last year. This dramatic turnaround has occurred under a majority Hodgman Liberal Government that backs the sector, as opposed to the previous Labor-Green government that brought it to its knees. The Liberal Government remains absolutely committed to securing a sustainable future for the industry because we know how important it is in regional communities, such as Triabunna, where we are visiting today. That’s why we are acting on the advice of Forestry Tasmania (FT) that we need greater resource security to sustain ongoing growth and put the Government Business Enterprise on a proper commercial footing.

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Conkers could vanish from Britain within 15 years as horse chestnut trees are ravaged by moths and disease

By Telegraph Reporters
The UK Telegraph
October 17, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: International

The conker could vanish from Britain because of a lethal combination of disease and invasive moths, scientists have warned. Experts predict that two million horse chestnut trees will be lost in the next 15 years, while they are no longer being planted because they only survive three to five years before they are killed by the leaf-miner moth. The moth has spread throughout the UK after arriving in southern England from Europe around 13 years ago. Its larvae cause the leaves on horse chestnut trees to turn brown early and drop in summer, before the conkers have had time to develop.

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Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy

Global Industrial Biomass Boiler Market to Grow at a CAGR of 7.11% During Forecast 2016-2020

By ResearchMoz
Digital Journal
October 17, 2016
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: International

Albany, NY — Industrial biomass boilers are sometimes called bio boilers. The boilers primarily use wood chips or wood pellets as they are both efficient and sustainable when compared with traditional boilers that primarily use fossil fuels such as oil, coal, and gas. These boilers can cover the heating and power generation requirements of an entire building or a network of buildings. The global industrial biomass boiler market to grow at a CAGR of 7.11% during the period 2016-2020. The report covers the present scenario and the growth prospects of the global industrial biomass boiler market for 2016-2020. To calculate the market size, the report considers the key emerging trends and their influence on the current and future market scenarios.

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