Tree Frog Forestry News

Daily Archives: October 19, 2016

Business & Politics

The softwood lumber war is back, so prepare for a long fight

By Peter McKenna – professor and chair of political science at the University of Prince Edward Island in Charlottetown
Globe and Mail
October 19, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada

The one-year standstill period for launching trade action under the 2006 Canadian-U.S. softwood lumber agreement has now expired. So get ready for a very damaging timber war to begin. If the past is any indication, this bilateral conflict is not likely to end any time soon. In fact, the chances of an early lumber truce are somewhere between slim and none – and I suspect that slim has already been chopped down. Dust-ups with the United States over the export and harvesting of Canadian softwood lumber (and other forestry products, such as wood shakes and shingles) go as far back as the late 1800s. Needless to say, they have been a constant splinter in Canada’s side ever since and frequently bedevilled the Canadian-U.S. relationship.

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Canadian Railroad Earnings: What to Watch

By David George-Cosh
Wall Street Journal
October 18, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, United States

Canadian railroad earnings begin this week, with third-quarter results from Canadian Pacific Railway Ltd. due out early on Wednesday. Bigger peer Canadian National Railway Co. follows, with results on Oct. 25. Here are a few things to watch: …SOFTWOOD LUMBER UPDATE: Investors will likely closely parse comments from both railroads on forestry-related shipments following the expiration of a one-year moratorium between the U.S. and Canadian over softwood-lumber trade. Forestry shipments have been a rare bright spot for both CN and CP as U.S. home-building expanded in recent years.

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Return of trade dispute provides uncertainty in forest industry around Parksville Qualicum Beach

By John Harding
Parksville Qualicum Beach News
October 18, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

Every five years or so, an agreement expires, the rhetoric heats up and jobs in the B.C. forest industry seem to be in jeopardy, including those in the Parksville Qualicum Beach region. Negotiations for a new deal to regulate Canadian lumber exports to the U.S. are continuing as the protection of the latest softwood lumber agreement expired last week. …Most of the forests in the Parksville Qualicum Beach region are privately held, as opposed to Crown land. “There are a lot of private forests on the east side of Vancouver Island and your readership is right in the heart of it,” said Rod Bealing, the executive director of the Private Forest Landowners Association. Companies that own the forests around here include Island Timberlands and TimberWest.

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Opposition says government not taking softwood concerns seriously

By Doug Collins
CFJC Today Everything Kamloops
October 18, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

KAMLOOPS — If the Trudeau Liberals don’t take softwood lumber problems seriously, Canada will be the big loser in the long run. The U.S. and Canada are talking to try and renew the expired softwood deal, but to no avail so far. The opposition is claiming the government isn’t putting the need to negotiate a new agreement high enough up the priority list. Kamloops MP Cathy McLeod has seconded an opposition motion to get moving on the deal. She says she’s hoping some suggestions by her colleagues can stall any trade action while the new deal is being negotiated. “One of the suggestions by my colleague Gerry Ritz was ‘see if you can make it that there is no action while you continue to negotiate’ ‘”. says McLeod. “Right now they continue to negotiate, but his suggestion was that while we’re at the table, there can be no action, and I thought that was a great idea.”

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Softwood dispute could hurt province’s prosperity

By Todd Whitcombe
Prince George Citizen
October 17, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

Back in the early 1980s, I was heavily involved in spelunking. One of our trips was a weeklong exploration of a cave system in southern Montana working with an American group of cavers. One of the individuals I met through this trip was a forester working in the state of Washington. He took me out to his job site. He explained how the company he worked for owned the land on which it grew its trees and as a consequence had to invest in both maintaining and regenerating the forest. The only way the company could ensure its future was by taking care of its forests today. He went on to point out in British Columbia, it is done differently. Companies don’t own the land. It is owned by the Crown. From his perspective, no one is directly responsible for maintaining the forests nor for ensuring trees are replanted after harvest. B.C. forests, in his opinion, are unmanaged and that was a significant economic advantage.

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Quebec hires ex-ambassador to United States to help in softwood lumber dispute

Canadian Press in Montreal Gazette
October 18, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada East, Canada

QUEBEC – Quebec has hired a former Canadian ambassador to the United States to represent its interests in the difficult softwood lumber negotiations between Canada and its southern neighbour. Raymond Chretien was named Tuesday as Quebec’s representative in the ongoing talks, which could affect thousands of lumber jobs in the province. The Americans could start imposing duties on Quebec softwood by March 2017 if a deal can’t be reached. Chretien, ambassador to Washington between 1994 and 2000, told reporters time is a factor in the negotiations because the United States will elect either Donald Trump or Hillary Clinton as president Nov. 8.

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National Manufacturing Day

By Steve Zika CEO Hampton Affiliates
Tillamook Headlight Herald
October 18, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States, US West

On Friday, Oregon celebrated National Manufacturing Day with numerous events aimed at raising awareness about the importance of manufacturing to Oregon’s economy and the quality, high-paying jobs value-added industries create. As CEO for Hampton Lumber, a family-owned company that operates four sawmills in Oregon, I’m pleased to see this commitment to domestic manufacturing, which is the backbone of our urban and rural economies. Unfortunately, that commitment can ring hollow when it comes time to distribute scarce public resources. Sawmills are closing throughout the region because of a log shortage created by declines in public timber harvests and the export of raw logs from private forestlands to Asia, which raises the costs of logs and makes it difficult for local sawmills to compete.

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American Biomass acquires Okanagan Wood Pellets from Viridis

By American Biomass Corporation Inc.
Biomass Magazine
October 18, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States, US West

American Biomass Corporation Inc., a leader in wood pellet distribution, has completed its purchase of Okanagan Wood Pellets from Viridis Energy, Inc. With this acquisition, Okanagan brand pellets will be available this fall to retailers exclusively from American Biomass. “We are excited to add the Okanagan Wood Pellet brand for our wholesale customers,” said David Nydam, CEO of New Hampshire based American Biomass. “Okanagan is one of the highest quality brands in New England with tremendous brand loyalty from both retailers and consumers. We are proud to be able to provide these super premium pellets to the retailers throughout New England and beyond.”

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The insider activity don’t lie: Weyerhaeuser Co.

By Steve Dixon
Review Fortune
October 18, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States, US West

Weyerhaeuser Co., with 1.77% gains in previous 5 sessions, is under coverage of 13 analysts who collectively assign a hold rating on stock. 9 of the brokerages firms have a buy or better rating; the 1 sells versus 0 underperforms. The 12 stock analysts who cover the stock have an average PT at $35.38, with individual targets in the range of $31 to $37. The shares ended last trade at $31.61, implying that Wall Street analysts see shares climbing about 11.93 per cent in 12 months’ time.

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Swedish exports in July up 5% on preceding year

EUWID Wood Products and Panels
October 19, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: International

Significant increases in exports of softwood lumber and planed lumber to Africa (+3%), and particularly to Asia (+42%), led to an increase in Swedish exports by a total of 5% to approximately 986,000m³ in July. Concerning sales in Africa, exports to Egypt – at +54% to 114,500m³ – are again back near the level of sales volumes recorded prior to the start of the liquidity crisis in the region.

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Wood, Paper & Green Building

The World’s Most Advanced Building Material Is… Wood

This article originally appeared in the March 2014 issue of Popular Science
True Viral News
October 18, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: International

…The simple beauty of CLT is its orthotropic quality. Normal wood is strong in the direction of the grain but weak in the cross direction. CLT’s perpendicular layers make it strong in two directions. And because it relies on layers of smaller beams, it can reduce waste by using odd-shaped, knotty timber that lumber mills would otherwise reject. CLT came about just as architecture was going through its own technological revolution. In the past, an architect would draft schematics by hand and send them to an engineer, who would convert the documents into specifications for each wood beam or steel plate. The components would then be cut at a mill and assembled, piece by piece, on-site—an expensive, time-consuming and often imprecise process. Today, that’s all done by computer.

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Forestry

Lumby, Splatsin work together on community forest

by Richard Rolke
Vernon Morning Star
October 18, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Just like the cedar they were carved from, new signs have rooted two communities together. Signs proclaiming the Monashee Community Forest were unveiled at the Splatsin First Nation and in Lumby Tuesday. “It’s a visual testament of the partnership between the Splatsin and Lumby,” said Rick Fairbairn, community forest president. The community forest, which began harvesting in 2013, is managed jointly by the village and the Splatsin and the revenue is shared. “The relationship is built on dialogue back and forth,” said Wayne Christian, Splatsin chief. “What has developed is an understanding of each other.” The community forest has an annual allowable cut of 21,595 cubic metres and covers 7,411 hectares.

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A future for grizzlies

By Carmen Weld
Castanet Kelowna
October 18, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

An external review of B.C.’s grizzly bear management procedures provided the province with 51 recommendations to enhance the system already in place. According to Minister of Forests and local MLA Steve Thomson, the province is now taking steps to improve its procedures in light of recommendations from the expert panel. The authors of the Scientific Review of Grizzly Bear Harvest Management System in B.C. found that the province has a high level of rigour and adequate safeguards in place to ensure the long-term stability of grizzly populations. They also note that B.C. has produced more DNA-based population estimates for grizzly bears than any other similar jurisdiction in the world.

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Rapattack not in danger

Castanet Kelowna
October 18, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

It looks like the rapattack base in Salmon Arm isn’t in danger of closing, after all. The Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations said a decision was made to phase-out catering services and accommodation services for the crews stationed there. “The ministry is not closing the rapattack base,” said the statement sent to Castanet. “Accommodations and meals have been provided to Salmon Arm initial attack crews since the late 1970s.”

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Spruce beetle outbreak expanding

By Mark Nielsen
Prince George Citizen
October 18, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

The spruce beetle is spreading, according to preliminary results released Tuesday in advance of a two-day summit on the outbreak in the Omineca region. Aerial surveys over the summer showed 210,000 hectares of forest damaged by the bug, up from 156,000 in October 2015. At 137,000 hectares the Prince George forest district is the most heavily hit while the remainder is within the Mackenzie district. The latest figures are based on preliminary data from the 2016 overview survey. Final results will be available later this fall. The summit is set for Wednesday and Thursday in Prince George and is expected to draw 100 academics, researchers, stakeholders and government staff to discuss best practices and the latest research on spruce beetle management.

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RapAttack barracks closure angers city council

By Jim Elliot
Salmon Arm Observer
October 17, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Salmon Arm city council was notified of Minister Steve Thomson’s decision to close the wildfire service Rapattack barracks in Salmon Arm on Thursday, Oct. 13 — and it’s not sitting well with them. The planned closure will take place in phases, with catering at the barracks ending on Jan. 1 2017 and housing on Jan. 1 2018. Rapattack crews are specially trained helicopter-mobile firefighters. The Salmon Arm barracks houses as many as 40 firefighters during wildfire season. This does not mean the base will close entirely. A Ministry of Forests Lands and Natural Resources spokesperson said the base will remain open after catering and accommodation services are phased out.

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Lack of contractor sustainability confirmed by third-party analysis

Truck Loggers Association
October 18, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Today, Canadian Forest Industries published third-party confirmation that BC’s independent timber harvesting contractors are struggling the most compared to their colleagues across Canada.  This national survey confirms the advocacy position the Truck Loggers Association (TLA) has taken for more than two years. “More than 25 contractors have had to seek insolvency protection in communities throughout coastal BC in the last decade and many continue to struggle to remain sustainable,” said David Elstone, TLA Executive Director. “We must level the playing field between contractors and licensees.”

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Areas affected by Spruce Beetle in Northern BC grow by 35%

By Liam Britten
CBC News
October 19, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

The impact of the spruce beetle on Northern B.C. forests continues to grow, with areas impacted by the pest up 35 per cent in the last year. B.C.’s Spruce Beetle Project coordinator Heather Wiebe says the spread of the spruce beetle is concerning, but not as much as the mountain pine beetle’s rise was. “The way that the spruce is laid out in the province compared to pine … spruce comes in pockets,” Wiebe said. “Pine was a continuous forest that would act like a highway for the [pine] beetle to travel along.” Wiebe says those “pockets” of spruce are much easier to treat than continuous pine forests, but the latest aerial surveys from the province show about 210,000 hectares of forest have been affected by the spruce beetle in the Prince George and Mackenzie region, up from 156,000 hectares in 2015.

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Kimberley mayor talks watershed issues with Minister Thomson

By Carolyn Grant
Kimberley Bulletin
October 18, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

While at the Union of British Columbia Municipalities convention in Victoria in September, Mayor Don McCormick has a couple of meetings specific to watershed issues. McCormick wanted to speak to Minister of Forests Steve Thomson, as well as officials from Interior Health, as issues in Kimberley’s watersheds cut across both. “The City has, for a number of years, held the position of no activity in the watersheds because any activity puts the quality of water at risk because we don’t have a filtration plant. But the tact is we have activity in the watersheds. Logging is a fact of life and recreational activity is impossible to police.”

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Farm prices have gone hog wild

By Joanne Laucius
Ottawa Citizen
October 18, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

…The price of farmland has gone hog wild in recent years. That has farmers worried about what the MPAC assessments will mean for them. …In 2013, when the price of land soared to $20,000 an acre in Chatham-Kent, south of London, the clearing of farm woodlots sparked controversy, as did a proposed bylaw to halt the cutting. Forest cover in the area at the time was estimated to be as little as four per cent. “If there’s word that a (clear-cutting) bylaw is about to be created, people go out and clear land,” said Eric Thompson, executive director of the Ontario Woodlot Association. “While we have no hard numbers, we are aware of many instances where this has happened. The Ontario Woodlot Association promotes healthy intact forests for the future, but the reality is when the land is worth more growing agricultural crops, trees usually lose out.”

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Papua New Guinea activist receives prestigious award for protecting forests

By Mike Gaworecki
Mongabay
October 18, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, International

Paul Palosualrea Pavol of New Britain Island, Papua New Guinea (PNG) has won the Alexander Soros Foundation’s Award for Environmental and Human Rights Activism. In a statement, the Alexander Soros Foundation said that it had given the annual award to Pavol “for his courage and commitment to protecting his community’s land and forests from the illegal and aggressive operations of one of the world’s largest logging companies.” Since 2010, Pavol has been defending the rainforests in his home district of Pomio against the operations of Malaysian conglomerate Rimbunan Hijau, which is responsible for a third of all PNG log exports.

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Idaho officials eye purchase of 1,400-acre forest parcel

By Keith Ridler
Associated Press in The Idaho Statesman
October 18, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

BOISE, Idaho—In a push to add more forests to state endowment lands, the Idaho Land Board voted Tuesday to consider buying about 1,400 acres near St. Maries from the state Department of Fish and Game. The unanimous vote by the five-member board is part of the board’s new strategic reinvestment plan to use about $160 million from commercial real estate and residential cottage site sales to buy timberland and agricultural land. The land near St. Maries has an appraised value of $4.6 million.

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Calmer Weather Helps Crews Fighting Wildfire In Southern Colorado

Associated Press in CBS Denver
October 18, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

WESTCLIFFE, Colo. — Cooler and calmer weather on Tuesday should help crews fighting a wildfire in southern Colorado that mushroomed to 24 square miles in its first day, officials said. The fire was reported before dawn Monday east of the small town of Westcliffe near the Rocky Mountain foothills. Gusty winds helped it spread quickly, destroying one home and forcing the evacuation of hundreds of people. The winds also grounded water-dropping helicopters. The fire sent up large plumes of smoke, which led to a health advisory for people living as far east as Pueblo, about 25 miles from Westcliffe. It also destroyed five outbuildings.

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‘Controlled burn’ rekindled by high winds into southern Utah wildfire

By Bob Mims
Salt Lake Tribune
October 17, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Gusty winds are suspected to have rekindled an intended “controlled burn” set last week on private land into a 1,033-acre southern Utah wildfire by Monday evening. Iron County Sheriff’s Lt. Del Schlosser said three homes were evacuated after initially being threatened by the Hicks Creek Fire, burning about 3 miles southwest of Cedar City. Homeowners in the Cedar Highlands subdivision also were warned to be ready to evacuate on short notice. With rain showers pelting the area and winds relenting Monday, the fire was reported to have died down. Earlier, winds of 25-40 mph, gusting to 60 mph, had fanned flames from Cedar Mountain toward Kanarraville Mountain. The fire was visible to pre-dawn motorists on Interstate 15.

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Colorado State Forest Service: Use more local wood

By J. Adrian Stanley
Colorado Springs Independent
October 18, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Well, this is something you don’t see every day: The Colorado State Forest Service urging all of us to kill more trees.  But with fires burning near Rampart Reservoir and in Custer County, the Forest Service is blaming large-scale wildfires on overgrown forests.  According to Ryan Lockwood, the Service’s Public and Media Relations Coordinator, “[H]aving a robust wood products industry results in healthier forests and reduced wildfire risk.” And indeed, it’s hard to argue that there are fewer fires where there are fewer — or no — trees.

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Brunell: Our schools need money from state timber sales

By Don Brunell
The Columbian
October 18, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Uncoupling state timber sales revenue from public school construction funding doesn’t make sense. It is akin to killing the goose laying the golden eggs. That idea came up during this year’s campaign for public lands commissioner. Democrat Hilary Franz, a Seattle environmental attorney, and Republican Steve McLaughlin, a retired Navy commander, are the candidates. Franz stated her position in a candidate questionnaire, according to the business publication Lens. She wrote the state mandate to use revenue from timber sales on public lands to pay for school construction is “environmentally harmful” and “archaic.” McLaughlin disagrees. The current funding arrangement may be old-fashioned, but it works well. One of the key reasons is Washington has strong forest practices and environmental protections written into its laws.

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2016 Colorado wildfires highlight need to use local wood

North Forty News
October 17, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

The large and destructive wildfires in Colorado this year, from the 38,000-acre Beaver Creek Fire still burning in beetle-kill timber in northwestern Colorado to the 16,000-acre Hayden Pass Fire southeast of Salida, are in part due to unhealthy forest conditions that made them prone to intense fire behavior. And with this week being National Forest Products Week, the Colorado State Forest Service wants to emphasize how having a robust wood products industry spurs not only widespread forest management, but the healthy forests and reduced wildfire risk that result from them. “If we could increase the share of locally produced wood products that are purchased by Coloradans, the benefits would accrue not only to family-owned businesses, but to our forests themselves,” said Tim Reader, CSFS utilization and marketing forester.

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Alabama Forestry Commission explains the state’s dangerously dry conditions

By Bethany Davis
WBRC FOX6 News
October 18, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

MONTGOMERY, AL  – All of Alabama remains under a Drought Emergency or a Fire Alert, despite the rain that fell over the weekend. “A Fire Alert means that we restrict burn permits that we issue to the public so that we can curtail the number of fires that are happening,” said Balsie Butler, Fire Operations Chief for the Alabama Forestry Commission. “for the Drought Emergency, which we’re in now, we eliminate all outdoor burning, outdoor flames. That means no outdoor burning can be done at all.” There are a number of factors that go into the Alabama Forestry Commission’s decision to issue these kinds of alerts.

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Concern Grows Over Invasive Emerald Ash Borer In Northeast Oklahoma

By Dale Denwalt
KGOU
October 19, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

Scientists have found an invasive, tree-eating beetle in far northeastern Oklahoma, and the ash trees headed to a Spavinaw lumber yard are at risk from the pesky insect. Johnson Lumber Co. owner Darren Johnson told The Journal Record’s Brian Brus he hasn’t seen any damage yet, but he’s still hoping for a hard winter to slow down the emerald ash borer beetle. A single sample of the beetle was found recently in a borer trap in Delaware County, Oklahoma Department of Agriculture urban forester Mark Bays said. Given the movements of the bug through other parts of the country, entomologists were expecting it in Oklahoma soon enough – thus, the trap – but they didn’t foresee the borer showing up so far north of Arkansas, he said.

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Salem man dies while logging in Jackson-Washington State Forest

WTTV CBS4Indy
October 18, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: US East

SALEM, Ind.– Conservation officers are investigating the death of a man who was logging at Indiana’s Jackson-Washington State Forest Monday. Officers responded to the forest, near the Mail Route outside of Salem shortly after 12 p.m. Thomas Sidwell, 44, of Salem, was pronounced dead at the scene. Investigators believe a large limb from a dead tree became dislodged, and struck Sidwell. Sidwell was a contracted logger and was discovered by a fellow employee. He was wearing a safety helmet at the time of the incident.

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Labor Continues to Sell Out on Forestry

from Adam Brooks, Liberal Member for Braddon
Tasmanian Government
October 18, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: International

Labor is continuing to dance to the Greens’ tune on forestry, threatening thousands of jobs across regional Tasmania. Hopes that Shadow Resources Minister David Llewellyn – who opposed the disastrous Labor-Green forest deal – might support growth in the industry have been extinguished by his Green-friendly comments in the media. Mr Llewellyn’s pathetic criticism that the Liberal Government wants to reignite “conflict in our forests” shows that he has fallen into line with Labor’s policy of surrendering to the Greens rather than backing the industry. Labor sold forestry workers down the river after the 2010 election to stay in government, and they would clearly do it all again.

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Inside 12 of the world’s coolest glasshouses

By Tim Entwisle
ABC News Australia
October 19, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: International

Like a prize-winning cupcake, the world’s best glasshouses are as much (or more) about what they look like from the outside as what they contain. The very best have charisma and content….Emerging into view like some space colony on the moon are geodesic biodomes, morphed into each other at the edges. The high-tech name is fitting. Like some forgotten part of a fairway, these glasshouses emerge like golf balls from the floor of this giant excavation. Their contents are equally startling, with rainforests big enough to include their own huts and waterfalls, Mediterranean landscapes with a giant paella pan on the boil, and a brightly painted sugar van next to the sugarcane plantation.

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World’s mammals being eaten into extinction, report warns

By Damian Carrington
The UK Guardian
October 19, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: International

Hundreds of mammal species – from chimpanzees to hippos to bats – are being eaten into extinction by people, according to the first global assessment of the impact of human hunting. Bushmeat has long been a traditional source of food for many rural people, but as roads have been driven into remote areas, large-scale commercial hunting is leaving forests and other habitats devoid of wildlife. …“There are a plenty of bad things affecting wildlife around the world and habitat loss and degradation are clearly at the forefront, but among the other things is the seemingly colossal impact of bushmeat hunting,” said Prof David Macdonald, at the University of Oxford and part of the international team that produced the research.

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UC academic wins award for forestry research

from University of Canterbury
Scoop Independent News
October 19, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: International

A University of Canterbury academic has been recognised for his important contribution to the forestry industry, winning the award for his international quality science research at the 2016 Forest Science Awards. At the Awards dinner held in Napier last week, University of Canterbury Forestry Professor Euan Mason was recognised for the innovation he is bringing to the New Zealand Forestry sector, receiving the science of international quality award for his work, which has been widely published in international journals. Forest Owners Association research manager Russell Dale says the science awards were initiated in 2011 to recognise the extremely important contributions scientists and innovators make to the profitability and sustainability of forestry.

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Reforestation benefits climate and economy: PCE report

By Forest and Bird
Scoop Independent News
October 19, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: International

Hill country farmers, including iwi, stand to win if the Government acts on the Parliamentary Commissioner for the Environment’s recommendation to restore a million hectares of native forest, Forest & Bird says. In today’s report on agricultural greenhouse gas emissions, Dr Wright says allowing a million hectares of marginal farmland to revert to bush would store enough carbon over 50 years to offset 17 per cent of greenhouse gas emissions from farming. “The PCE’s report is an important signal to the Government to rethink existing offsetting initiatives, such as the ETS and the Permanent Forest Sink Initiative” says Forest & Bird’s Climate Advocate, Adelia Hallett.

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Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy

Orangeville council denies support for new industry in town

By James Matthews
Orangeville Banner
October 18, 2016
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: Canada East, Canada

Orangeville council voted against a move that could’ve helped a proposed biomass energy project trying to set up shop in town. Orangeville 1 LP, which is an affiliate of Petawawa Renewable Power Corp., proposes to construct and operate a 500 kilowatt biomass project at 195 Centennial Road under the provincial Feed-in Tariff (FIT) Program. That program was created by the provincial government as a means to encourage greater renewable energy use including on-shore wind, waterpower, renewable biomass, biogas, landfill gas and solar photovoltaic (PV) for electricity generation.

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News Release: New Technology Cuts Air Pollutants by Transforming Logging Waste into Cleaner-Burning Replacement for Coal

By OBM Team
Oregon Business
October 18, 2016
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: United States, US West

HM3 Energy, an Oregon-based cleantech startup, has developed a proprietary process that has the potential to cut air pollution from two major sources — coal-fired power plants and waste wood burned by logging operations — while creating hundreds of new jobs in rural timber communities. The technology provides forest managers with an alternative to onsite, open burning of logging slash (branches, brush, defective trees and low value species such as juniper) by transforming the waste wood into sturdy biomass briquettes that can be sold and shipped to power plants as a drop-in replacement for coal.

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Oregon company opens torrefied briquette demo plant

By Anna Simet
Biomass Magazine
October 18, 2016
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: United States, US West

An Oregon company that has been working toward commercialization of a torrefied biomass briquetting technology for several years has successfully completed a demonstration-scale plant in Troutdale, Oregon. And, the company announced, it is licensing its technology to a Japanese utility that intends to site a commercial-scale facility in the U.S. Attended by Oregon Sen. Ron Wyden, who has supported the company’s work over the past few years, HM3 held a grand opening and tour of the plant on Oct. 18. HM3 said it has demonstrated the process to potential customers, but this was the first time the company opened the plant to energy policy makers, forestry managers and others in the timber industry.

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Biomass power can prevent energy shortfall

by Gary Melow and Larry Ward
Detroit News
October 18, 2016
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: US East, United States

Today is the fourth annual National Bioenergy Day — a day dedicated to shining a light on the many economic, infrastructural, and environmental benefits of bioenergy production in the U.S. On this day we would like to have a conversation about Michigan’s energy future, and the important role that Michigan biomass power can and should play in a “no regrets” energy policy. …An energy capacity shortfall is unacceptable and indeed avoidable….Biomass power is produced from local resources, provides local jobs and supports local communities, giving new meaning to the phrase homegrown renewable energy. It does all this while helping to stabilize the electrical grid — especially in rural areas that need it most — which improves reliability for everyone in the state.

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FutureMetrics offers wood pellet demand, spot pricing estimates

By Katie Fletcher
Biomass Magazine
October 17, 2016
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: International

FutureMetrics LLC recently released a white paper with estimates of industrial wood pellet tonnage demand and spot prices. The tonnage estimates are based on optimistic scenarios in which cofiring or full-firing wood pellets in large pulverized coal (PC) power plants develops in Japan, Korea, the U.S. and Canada. The spot price estimates are based on a model of industrial wood pellet price behavior. Policy drives industrial wood pellet markets, and has had a tremendous impact on the traditional markets in Europe and, more specifically, England.

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