Tree Frog Forestry News

Daily Archives: October 21, 2016

Business & Politics

Resolute president speaks out on softwood lumber

By Cindy Macdonald
Pulp and Paper Canada
October 19, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada

Richard Garneau, president and CEO of Resolute Forest Products Inc., reaffirmed the company’s support of free, unencumbered access for softwood lumber exports from Central Canada (Quebec and Ontario) to the United States. Garneau has been a vocal figure in the ongoing softwood lumber dispute between the U.S. and Canada, and draws on over 40 years of experience and leadership in the forest products industry across Canada. …
Garneau has consistently challenged the claims by some that the 2006 Softwood Lumber Agreement between the U.S. and Canada produced predictability and stability. “Managed trade increases volatility, creating an unpredictable and unstable trade environment between two of the world’s largest trading partners,” stated Garneau.

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Aborignal Company from B.C. Honoured by Forest Industry

Forest Products Association of Canada
October 20, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

The Forest Products Association of Canada (FPAC) and the Canadian Council for Aboriginal Business (CCAB) today presented the 2016 Aboriginal Business Leadership Award to Chilcotin Plateau Enterprise Ltd. (CPE) owned by the Toosey Indian Band. The award was presented to Chilcotin’s Forestry & Economic Development Manager, Craig Kennedy, at the 2016 Aboriginal Economic Development Corporation Conference in Banff. Chilcotin Plateau Enterprise, located near Williams Lake B.C., began as a silviculture company 20 years ago and has grown to 30 employees. …“FPAC is pleased to recognize the entrepreneurial nature of this Aboriginal company,” says Derek Nighbor, CEO of FPAC.

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Coast Beat Podcast Episode 30: Log Exports

Audio program
Sunshine Coast Reporter
October 20, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

Coast Beat Ep. 30: Sean, John and Christine talk about 30 years of shishalh Nation self government, which is marked by a special section and extended coverage in this week’s paper. We hear from NDP leader John Horgan on raw log exports. Go to minute 12.54 to hear the interview with John Horgan in this podcast.
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India trade mission highlights B.C. forest products, financial and economic ties

Ministry of Finance
BC Government
October 20, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

Finance Minister Michael de Jong is leading an investor tour to India to advance bilateral trade and investment opportunities for B.C. businesses, and to promote the province’s stable economy. The minister will travel to India aboard Air Canada’s inaugural non-stop flight between Vancouver and New Delhi. …B.C. exports to India have jumped from $201 million in 2011 to $623 million in 2015, making India B.C.’s fifth-largest trading partner. Key exports include copper, coal and wood products. By 2030, India is expected to be the world’s third-largest economy behind the United States and China.

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Could Domtar Corp (USA) See a Reversal After Today’s Strong Options Activity?

Frisco Fastball
October 20, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada East, Canada

In today’s session Domtar Corp (USA) (UFS) registered an unusually high (1,000) contracts volume of call trades. Someone, most probably a professional was a very active buyer of the October, 2016 call, expecting serious UFS increase. With 1,000 contracts traded and 18354 open interest for the Oct, 16 contract, it seems this is a quite bullish bet. The option with symbol: UFS161021C00037500 closed last at: $0.4 or 0% . About 51,492 shares traded hands. Domtar Corp (USA) (NYSE:UFS) has declined 0.53% since March 17, 2016 and is downtrending. It has underperformed by 5.61% the S&P500.

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Domtar announces reduced production at Kingsport plant

WCYB 5 News
October 20, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada East, Canada

An official with Domtar confirmed to News 5 on Thursday that they have currently reduced their production at their pulp and paper mill facility in Kingsport, Tenn. “At Domtar, we must continually monitor our production output and inventory with that of customer orders. Accordingly, we are taking appropriate measures to reduce our inventory by slowing down production at our Kingsport mill,” the official company statement said. The company, based in Canada, did not release any details how many jobs would be affected by the move or how long the cutback would take place.

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Domtar idling paper mill to reduce inventory

by Hank Hayes
Kingsport Times-News
October 20, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: US East, United States

KINGSPORT — Domtar Corp. announced Wednesday its downtown paper mill is being idled to reduce inventory. At Domtar we must continually monitor our production output and inventory with that of customer orders,” Domtar spokesman Mike Cunningham explained in an email. “Accordingly, we are taking appropriate measures to reduce our inventory by slowing down production at our Kingsport Mill. We will keep you informed about the expected restart of operations as circumstances dictate.” The mill, first doing business in 1916 as the Kingsport Pulp Mill, is experiencing its centennial year in Kingsport. In that time, the mill has been acquired by four other owners — Mead in 1920, Willamette in 1995, Weyerhauser in 2002 and Domtar in 2007.

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Wood, Paper & Green Building

How the world’s tallest wood building was constructed

Business News Network
October 20, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: Canada, Canada West


At 18 storeys high, The University of British Columbia’s newest residence is said to be the tallest wood building in the world. Bill Downing, president of Structurlam Products, the company that supplied the wooden components of the structure, spoke to BNN about what went into the construction process. The building is a hybrid structure made of timber, but it uses steel connectors and its first two floors are made of concrete. Downing said all of the wood was pre-fabricated in his company’s Okanagan plant before it was shipped to Vancouver. He also said large amounts of drywall were used to encapsulate the wood.

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In a City of Steel Giants, Can Skidmore, Owings & Merrill Build a Wood Skyscraper?

By Whet Moser
Chicago Magazine
October 20, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: US East, United States

…Among the wondrous designs was what looked like a straightforward Miesian skyscraper. It took a second to figure out what it was: a skyscraper made, mostly, out of wood. Among the models of architectural grace, it was an engineering idea, but it compelled me the most. It looked like this. It was a prototype for a 42-story building made out of cross-laminated timber for the floors and laminated timber for the columns. It’s a simple idea: smaller pieces of timber are glued together to make big pieces. It’s an old idea, too; glued laminated (glulam) timber has been used for roofs and other structural elements since the mid-19th century, such as for the spectacular roof of the Richmond Olympic Oval. In South Dakota, there’s a beautiful glulam highway bridge from the mid-20th century.

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Forestry

The Hidden Life Of Trees: Discover A New Way To Look At Forests

By The Nature Conservancy of Canada
Huffington Post Canada
October 20, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada

To read Peter Wohlleben’s The Hidden Life of Trees is to discover a secret world that you never knew existed in the forest. You’ll learn how fungi acts as the Internet of the woods to communicate signals between trees and other plant life, mother trees stunt the growth of their young to ensure that they live to a ripe old age, and how trees form bonds and help each other when one is sick. …While Wohlleben is German, he frequently mentions the work of Suzanne Simard throughout the book. Simard is a professor of forest ecology at the University of British Columbia. She has done groundbreaking work in many areas, but in particular the communication between trees.

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More letters to the editor opposing Cantimber Biotech

Alberni Valley News
October 20, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Shirley Brewer: NIMBY? Wow! …This was an actual hazardous event, from a poorly situated pyrolysis plant, that resulted in legitimate health ailments. The plant had to be shut down on three separate occasions.
Michael H. Wright: It seems incredible that Cantimber is pursuing its bid to push its wood-burning charcoal plant forward at the expense of polluting the air we breathe in the Alberni Valley. They do not have the social contract to impose respiratory health problems and the deterioration of our air quality onto our community.

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Aboriginal High School Students Experience UBC Forestry

UBC Forestry News
University of British Columbia
October 20, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

The Verna J Kirkness Education Program was founded in 2009, and was designed to increase the number of Aboriginal students in science programs. This past spring saw the first year of this program at UBC, with 8 grade 11 students spending one week at the Faculty of Forestry working on science projects. Students were supported by professors, undergraduate and graduate students, and staff – with mentors outnumbering the students. The students and mentors got a hands on experience about the forest by visiting the Faculty of Forestry’s Malcolm Knapp Research Forest in Maple Ridge. Jayme from Grindrod and Mary from Skidegate worked with Lori Daniels in her tree ring lab, researching the properties of western red cedar.

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Victoria filmmaker explores B.C.’s coastal forest

by Karly Blats
Alberni Valley News
October 20, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

A Victoria-based filmmaker is shedding light on B.C.’s coastal forest industry with a new documentary series entitled Heartwood: A West Coast Forest Documentree. In his series, Daniel J. Pierce highlights coastal communities, like Port Alberni, Cortes Island and Port Hardy, that are uniting to defend the last few pockets of old-growth temperate rainforest on the west coast. “When I started off it was with the intention to make a single one-off feature length documentary and it all started with me on Cortes Island.”

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Opinion: Vancouver Island’s rainforest and communities need urgent action

By Arnold Bercov, Maquinna (George Lewis), Dan Hager, Andy MacKinnon and Jens Wieting
Vancouver Sun
October 20, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Vancouver Island’s rainforests are among the rarest ecosystems on the planet — temperate rainforests have never occupied more than 0.5 per cent of the earth’s land surface. They are also among its richest — they have been home to First Nations for time immemorial, and they contribute to a diverse economy including forestry, tourism and wild salmon in indigenous and non-indigenous communities. Unfortunately, today, the vast majority of productive old-growth rainforest on Vancouver Island and B.C.’s south coast has been logged and replaced by young forest. Only about 10 per cent of the biggest trees are still standing, and some types of forest such as old-growth Douglas fir on south-eastern Vancouver Island have less than one per cent of its original range left.

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Canfor passes audit of tree farm licence

BC Forest Practices Board
October 20, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

VICTORIA – An audit of Canfor’s Tree Farm Licence (TFL) 14, south of Golden, found compliance with British Columbia’s forestry legislation, according to a report released today. “Canfor complied with requirements of the Forest and Range Practices Act and the Wildfire Act,” said Tim Ryan, board chair. “Auditors did find that Canfor had not completed fire-hazard assessments for all cutblocks, but had treated all fire hazards by piling and burning slash. Canfor was in the midst of developing procedures for fire-hazard assessments when the audit took place, but they had not yet been fully implemented.” The audit covered all forestry activities carried out in the TFL between July 2014 and July 2016.

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Reports find B.C. government failing to clamp down on suspect logging practices

By Jon Hernandez
CBC News
October 20, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Colin Richardson has fished along the Skidegate Channel in Haida Gwaii all his life. But in 2009, he noticed a fresh gash in the forest, left behind by Teal Cedar Products — a Surrey-based logging company. …”We were horrified by what we saw,” he said. “As [the loggers] started to go back there, it became very clear to us again that they weren’t even following their own rules.” The band filed a complaint with the Forests Practices Board — a government-funded logging watchdog — which sparked an investigation. The board found that there were clear logging violations — and that the Ministry of Forests had been aware of the suspect operations, but chose not to come down on the loggers. And as other reports suggest, this isn’t the only time the provincial government has let these types of logging violations slide….

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?We should be managing a forest ecosystem not just the trees?

by Samantha Wright Allen
Prince George Citizen
October 20, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Approaches to forest management must change if B.C. wants to end bug outbreaks sooner, said the closing speaker at a two-day summit on managing the spread of spruce beetles. “We need to keep the system in focus and remember the beetles are always there. They may not always kill trees but we need to act as if they’re going to very soon,” Staffan Lindgren, a retired University of Northern B.C. professor, told the group gathered Thursday at the Ramada in Prince George. Management focuses too much on the agent – the beetle – when most focus should be on mimicking natural ecosystems and looking at what the beetle needs to survive.

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Community Forest grows

by Trent Ernst
Tumbler Ridge News
October 20, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

The Tumbler Ridge Community Forest is expanding. Recently, the Ministry of Forest, Lands and Natural Resource Operations allocated 15,500 cubic meters of coniferous volume and 2000 cubic meters of deciduous volume to the annual allowable cut that the Tumbler Ridge Community Forest is allowed to harvest. This bumps the total annual allowable cut for the community forest to 35,500 cubic meters. That’s about 75 percent more harvest, says Community Forester, Duncan McKellar. He says, while this isn’t really enough to support a full-time logging outfit, it is a nice bump to the size of the community forest. “For three or four years we’ve been working on this,” he says.

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Langley City must log small park

by Heather Colpitts
Langley Advance
October 19, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Langley City will remove at least 100 trees from Hunter Park, at 199th Street and 45A Avenue, to stop the spread of laminated root rot. The disease, also known as yellow ring rot, affects conifers. The park’s fir and hemlock are affected. “While it is unknown when the disease impacted these trees, the City is proactively minimizing the risk by clearing away the susceptible trees to ensure the safety of the residents and users of the park,” said Rick Bomhof, director of Engineering, Parks, and Environment. It is one of the leading causes of dead and wind thrown trees since trees die from failure to take up water and nutrients due to primary root decay. The fungal disease spreads from root to root contact and can remain viable for up to 50 years. “The age of the trees varies between five and 75 years old,” he said.

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Logging plan lacks sense

Letter by Gordon MacMahon, MA, BSc
Cochrane Eagle
October 20, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

I had an opportunity this weekend to participate in a clear-cut tour in the Ghost Valley with three representatives from Alberta Agriculture and Forestry. I greatly appreciated them taking time out of their weekend to meet with myself and eleven others to better explain some forest management principles and forest regeneration practices. I was however disturbed by the conclusion I reached after our two-plus hours together.  It is now clear to me, that logging of our Easter Slopes is guided by a set of generalized operating procedures; with minimal or no deviation to recognize varying conditions across a diverse and complex landscape.

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Province Releases Industry Outlook Profile

By Elaine Macdonald-Meisner
250 News
October 20, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Prince George, B.C.- The Province has released its Industry Outlook Profile for the next ten years , predicting which sectors will see growth and job demands. …. According to the report forestry will see a decline despite the housing market recovery in the U.S. The decline in forestry will be the result of the fall out from the mountain pine beetle epidemic and the loss of merchantable timber. Yet, even though there will be a decline in expansion ( down 1.4% between now and 2025) there will be nearly 23hundred job openings created by the retirement of current employees.

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As objection hearings wrap, countdown to new Tongass plan

By Elizabeth Jenkins
Alaska Public Media
October 20, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

The U.S. Forest Service wrapped up objection hearings Wednesday on a plan that could shape the future of timber in the Tongass National Forest. It was the last chance for the public to register opposition to to the Tongass Land and Resource Management Plan amendments, which has been nearly three years in the making and will go into effect this winter. The meetings took place during a two week span in Ketchikan and Juneau. Timber industry reps say the forest service plan transitions too quickly from logging valuable old growth trees to smaller young growth timber. Meanwhile, some environmentalists believe there’s too much old growth left on the table.

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USFS head expected to focus on firefighting challenges during Missoula speech

By Dennis Bragg
KPAX
October 20, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

MISSOULA –  The problems of trying to fight more wildfires, while still managing the national forests, will be the key discussion Thursday morning as the head of the U.S. Forest Service speaks to Montana’s county commissioners. Tom Tidwell, Chief of the USFS, will kick off the second day of the Montana Counties Forest Summit in Missoula. Senator Jon Tester spoke on Wednesday. Both men are expected to focus on the growing problem of the USFS budget being sucked up by firefighting. “Twenty years ago, 16% of their budget was spent on fighting forest fires. Today it’s over 50. In 10-years two-thirds of their budget will be spent on fighting forest fires. We’ve got to figure out a different way of fighting fires, a different way of funding them so they can do the management necessary to cut some trees in the forest and move that economy forward,” Sen.Jon Tester (D-MT) said on Wednesday’s edition of Montana This Morning.

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LETTER: Here’s hoping for return to reason on timber issues

from Jack Markley
Peninsula Daily News
October 21, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Ron Richards, a hopeful for Clallam commissioner, has less conflict of interest than his opponent. Hopefully, the year-plus election season will soon end with some return to reason and judgment. This applies to public timber management issues locally. Rather than argue over inventory statistics (arrearage), perhaps forestry science can interest the public by providing more money, better wood and less environmental harm. How? Grow trees until their average total growth over their lifespan begins to slow — not sooner or later. Ask your candidates why they would oppose this fact and forest agencies to explain contrary policies.

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Forest Service looks at Dog Head Fire lessons

by Todd G. Dickson
Mountain View Telegraph
October 19, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

In the wake of this summer’s nearly 18,000-acre Dog Head Fire caused by forest thinning operation, U.S. Forest Service officials told East Mountains residents last Thursday they will make changes to avoid causing another wildfire. “I wanted to let you know I am terribly sorry this fire happened,” Cibola National Forest Supervisor Elaine Kohrman said at a community meeting in Tajique. “This has been hard for everyone.” The Dog Head Fire started June 14 in the Manzano Mountains where a thinning crew was running a large machine called a masticator that shreds trees and brush into small pieces. The fire quickly spread, destroying at least 12 homes. Fighting and containing the fire cost more than $10 million, Kohrman said.

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Zinke Discusses Timber Industry Issues with Pyramid

By Andi Bourne
Seeley Swan Pathfinder
October 20, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West


SEELEY LAKE – The one-year stand-down after the expiration of the Softwood Lumber Agreement (SLA) Oct. 12, 2015 is now over. Since there has been no resolution, those in the timber industry are asking if there is going to be a trade case filed by either the Americans or Canadians or if an agreement can be reached. This SLA along with other issues was a point of discussion with U.S. House representative Ryan Zinke when he visited Pyramid Mountain Lumber, Inc. Oct. 14. According to Pyramid’s Chief Operating Officer Loren Rose, the Americans have been trying to get the Canadians to the table to negotiate another agreement but things have been so favorable for the Canadians that they are not very interested.

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Drax Biomass inks ‘unprecedented’ agreement to protect forested wetlands from logging

Bioenergy Insight Magazine
October 20, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

Drax Biomass (DBI), a pellet manufacturer operating in the Southeast US, has signed an agreement declaring the cypress and tupelo stands found in forested wetlands, including the Atchafalaya Basin, to be off-limits for its timber purchases. Louisiana’s famed Atchafalaya Basin is a popular destination for boaters, fishermen, and migratory birds. The “river of trees,” noted for its magnificent cypress-tupelo swamps, has also been eyed by logging operations, some illegal, for mulch and lately for wood pellets.  A collaborative effort between the bioenergy company and Atchafalaya Basinkeeper (ABK), a non-profit organisation dedicated to protecting and restoring the area’s ecosystems, aims to provide greater protection for these and other valuable forested wetlands.

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Michigan: First Good Neighbor Authority Timber Sale Contracts Awarded

by Duncan Johnson
Ammoland
October 19, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

Michigan – The Michigan Department of Natural Resources and the U.S. Forest Service today announced that the first Good Neighbor Authority (GNA) timber sale contracts have been awarded to Biewer Lumber, LLC. The timber sales are located in the Huron-Manistee National Forest in Lake and Wexford counties. Under the GNA partnership, the DNR acts as an agent – in collaboration with the Forest Service – to conduct land-management projects on national forest lands. A 10-year master agreement was signed by the Forest Service and the DNR in October 2015. “Michigan greatly appreciates the diligent work by the U.S. Forest Service to make this agreement a reality,” said Bill O’Neill, chief of the DNR’s Forest Resources Division.

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Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy

UNBC Celebrates BioEnergy Day

250 News
October 19, 2016
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: Canada, Canada West

Known as Canada’s “green ” university, UNBC recently renovated the Neyoh student residence to be linked to the new Sustainable Communities Demonstration Project (SCDP) a district energy system on campus. In just two months, the connection has resulted in reduced consumption of electricity and natural gas.  Consumption of electricity is down by 40% and it’s estimated that in one year, the new system will reduce natural gas use by 7 thousand GJ or $25 thousand dollars. The energy system is similar to that used to heat several buildings in the downtown of Prince George. In the case of UNBC, a pellets are used to heat a boiler and the hot water is then distributed to the buildings.

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Oregon company ready to license its biomass technology

by Eric Mortenson
Capital Press
October 20, 2016
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: United States, US West


TROUTDALE, ORE. — An Oregon company showed off a demonstration facility where it converts forest slash to biomass briquettes, and said it is prepared to license the technology and sell it world-wide. Hiroshi Morihara, an Oregon developer and engineer who is CEO of HM3 Energy Inc., also announced the company has found a “big fish” investor: A Japanese energy company that wants to use the briquettes to fire electrical power plants in Japan and replace coal and nuclear facilities. New Energy Development Co. has invested $2 million in HM3 and plans to build a briquette production plant at an undisclosed location in Oregon.

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From trees to paper—how Swiss wood impacts the environment

By the Swiss National Foundation
Phys.Org
October 19, 2016
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: International

Wood has a largely favourable environmental effect. A study of the National Research Programme “Resource Wood” recommends using wood more widely as a source of energy and as a building material. The study has systematically examined the overall environmental impact of wood in Switzerland, analysing the entire value chain: from cutting trees to recycling wood or burning it, including the manufacture of semi-finished products such as paper, boards and pellets for heating purposes. …In the very long term, the climate footprint of forests is neutral, Suter explains: all the CO2 absorbed during the growth of a tree is returned into the atmosphere when it naturally decomposes or is burnt. The use of wood as a construction material means that this CO2 is stored for decades, which is a mitigating factor in these times of global warming.

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Thirteen organisations to benefit from Wood and Fibre Processing Innovation Program

By Toli Papadopoulos
Tasmania Examiner
October 21, 2016
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: International

Bioenergy and biomass are at the forefront of 13 grants revealed under the state government’s $1.25 million Wood and Fibre Processing Innovation Program. However, the Wilderness Society believes the grants will be used by the government as a justification to pursue logging of 400,000 hectares of forest, locked up until 2020.  The Meander Valley Council, Dorset Renewable Industries and East Tamar Maintenance Services are just a few of the organisations to benefit, with projects ranging from bioenergy generation to pellet production.

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Reforesting marginal land could buy time – climate change report

Radio New Zealand
October 20, 2016
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: International

At least a million hectares of marginal land in New Zealand could easily revert to forest and absorb carbon dioxide from the atmosphere as it grows, a new report suggests. Parliamentary Commissioner for the Environment Jan Wright was speaking during the release of her latest report on climate change and agriculture. Dr Wright said almost 4 percent of New Zealand’s total area could revert to carbon-soaking forest without anyone having to do anything too difficult, unlike preparing it for farming which took a lot of work clearing scrub. “Fence it off, let it go, the manuka grows, then the kanaka, and eventually the forest returns,” she said.

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Buildings Could Join Forests as Carbon Sinks

By Tom Martin, President and CEO of the American Forest Foundation and Robert Glowinski, President & CEO of the American Wood Council
Huffington Post
October 18, 2016
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy

We all know from our elementary science classes that trees absorb carbon dioxide (CO?) during their growth cycle. Once absorbed, trees lock that carbon in, keeping it out of the atmosphere. In fact, forests, and forest products, capture and store 13 percent of the U.S.’s greenhouse gas emissions each year. …So, the emergence of the green building trend to use wood, presents a real opportunity to reduce CO? emissions in the building process, store more carbon in the buildings themselves, and help forest owners keep their forests as forests and our great carbon sink intact.

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