Tree Frog Forestry News

Daily Archives: October 26, 2016

Business & Politics

QP Monday: Trade minister defends her tears

By Janice Dickson
iPolitics
October 24, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada

Conservative MP Denis Lebel kicked off question period today by needling International Trade Minister Chrystia Freeland over her inability to sign the Canada-EU free trade agreement (CETA) last Friday. “She threw up her hands and gave up,” said Lebel, charging that the Liberal government is fast earning a reputation for being unable to conclude significant trade agreements like the Trans-Pacific Partnership or the softwood lumber agreement. In a line she would repeat for almost the entire duration of QP, Freeland said that “Canada has done its job.”

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Meeting strengthens India-B.C. partnerships

Ministry of Finance
BC Government News
October 24, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

Meeting strengthens India-BC partnershipsMinister of Finance Michael de Jong met with Indian Finance Minister, Minister of Corporate Affairs in the cabinet of India, Arun Jaitley, today in New Delhi to discuss ways to continue to strengthen economic ties between India and British Columbia. …In addition, with Budget 2016, the Government of British Columbia committed $5 million over three years to promote a stronger B.C. wood brand in India. This investment is helping B.C. companies establish themselves as the world’s leading suppliers of sustainably harvested wood products to a market that includes the world’s largest middle class.

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Northwestern B.C. sawmill explores CT technology

By Margaret Speirs
Terrace Standard
October 25, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

Skeena Sawmills wants to use the kind of technology used in hospitals to give precise images of the interior of patients to get the best value possible out of the logs it processes. Greg DeMille, woodlands manager at Skeena, told Terrace city council last night the trees around here, mainly hemlock and balsam, tend to be poor quality but their value could be increased by a CT scanner, similar to ones used in hospitals, which can identify the knots, cracks and to a lesser extent, the areas of rot inside the logs. From that, a decision can be made as to the best use of the log and which parts of it are worth using, said DeMille.

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Canfor Co. (CFP) Receives C$20.00 Average Price Target from Brokerages

By Don March
Financial Market News
October 25, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

Shares of Canfor Co. (TSE:CFP) have been given an average recommendation of “Buy” by the seven ratings firms that are covering the company. One research analyst has rated the stock with a hold rating and four have issued a buy rating on the company. The average 1-year price target among brokerages that have covered the stock in the last year is C$20.13. CFP has been the subject of a number of analyst reports. Raymond James Financial Inc. reduced their price objective on shares of Canfor from C$19.50 to C$18.00 in a report on Thursday, October 20th. 

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What Wall Street is saying about Louisiana-Pacific Corp.

By Orlando Rodriquez
The Independent Republic
October 25, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States

Louisiana-Pacific Corp. (NYSE:LPX) stock is currently trading at about $18.35 and lots of rating firms seem to have a target price set on the stock. The median 12-month price target of 10 analysts covering the company is $22.25, which suggests the stock could still gain more than 18 percent. The highest analyst price target is $26.00, which implies a gain of 58 percent. And roundups of analyst notes show that 0 are rating the stock a buy while 0 rate LPX a strong buy. There are 0 equity research firms suggesting a Hold and 0 consider it Sell.

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DBRS : Publishes Commentary on U.S.-Canada Softwood Lumber Negotiations

DBRS Limited
4-Traders
October 25, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States

The latest U.S.-Canada softwood lumber agreement (SLA 2006) that took effect on October 12, 2006, expired on October 12, 2015. Since then, Canadian lumber producers have enjoyed unfettered access to the U.S. market. A standstill agreement expired on October 12, 2016. Although negotiations regarding a new agreement are underway, DBRS anticipates that, at the U.S. lumber producers’ request, the relevant U.S. authorities will again authorize and impose trade duties on lumber imports from Canada, starting some time in 2017. This is likely to retrigger a series of legal challenges under different trade deals until a new softwood lumber agreement is negotiated. Regardless of how this process develops, any change from the current status quo will be negative for Canadian firms shipping lumber to the United States.

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Spc Financial buys $1,803,722 stake in Weyerhaeuser Co (WY)

By Eric Arthur
Trading Calls
October 25, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States, US West

Weyerhaeuser Co (WY): Spc Financial scooped up 2,161 additional shares in Weyerhaeuser Co during the most recent quarter end , the firm said in a disclosure report filed with the SEC on Oct 21, 2016. The investment management firm now holds a total of 57,261 shares of Weyerhaeuser Co which is valued at $1,803,722.Weyerhaeuser Co makes up approximately 0.59% of Spc Financial’s portfolio.

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Mike Denham: Kentucky’s abundant forest lands generating $14.6 billion for state’s economy

by State Rep. Mike Denham
Northern Kentucky Tribune
October 25, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: US East, United States

Over the last 50 years, usually around the time fall colors are in full bloom, state and federal officials have dedicated a week to highlight all of the products our forests provide. Kentucky, of course, has been blessed more than most states. Trees cover nearly half of our 25 million acres, and we are among the nation’s leaders – and first in the South – when it comes to hardwood production. Nearly 58,000 Kentucky jobs are directly dependent on our forests, which generate $14.6 billion for our economy, putting it on par with the state’s tourism industry. An in-depth look at our forests by the University of Kentucky in 2013 showed that the biggest economic impact can be found in paper products, while wood used in such other areas as furniture and flooring was second. There are 1,800 logging companies that get the wood to the market and 700 saw, paper and pulp mills that get the first cut, so to speak.

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State’s forestry question needs answering

by Doug Dingwall
The Examiner
October 26, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: International

The future of Forestry Tasmania is a question to which the state still hasn’t found an answer.   In previous years it’s been publicly subsidised. But like any enterprise, it should stand on its own feet. News on Tuesday that the company made a $67 million loss last financial year was foreshadowed when Forestry Minister Guy Barnett revealed FT had expressed concerns about the sustainability of its yield from public production forests. …The government’s solution, met with opposition from the Greens and
environmentalists, could see a reboot of the forest conflicts that have exhausted Tasmanians for decades. …Also unclear in the government’s plan is whether logging the native forests would tarnish Tasmania’s brand as a pristine wilderness tourism destination.

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Forestry Tasmania Advice Highlights Need for Action to Protect Jobs, Growth

by Guy Barnett, Minister for Resources
Tasmanian Government
October 25, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: International

Forestry Tasmania is losing money on more than a quarter of the trees harvested from production forests each year, costing taxpayers and threatening as many as 700 jobs. This is a direct result of the Labor-Green government’s disastrous Tasmanian Forest Agreement, which locked up the best forests and pushed Forestry Tasmania (FT) into more marginal country. Today, I tabled both Forestry Tasmania’s annual report and the advice received from the Board showing that – despite all the improvements to date – the business is not operating profitably and will be unable to do so under the current business model. The advice makes clear that FT cannot deliver agreed production levels in a commercially sustainable way.

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Forestry Tasmania downsized, renamed Sustainable Timber Tasmania

By Georgie Burgess
ABC News, Australia
October 26, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: International

Forestry Tasmania will be renamed and a further 35 jobs will be cut under a revamp announced by the State Government. It will remain a government business, but will be downsized and renamed Sustainable Timber Tasmania.  Resources Minister Guy Barnett told Parliament 35 positions would be axed as part of the changes. The challenges are substantial, this will not be easy but we have a lot going for us,” he said The state-owned company has reported a loss of $67 million. …”While Forestry Tasmania has reduced costs over recent years and significantly reduced employee numbers, there is more to do before the business is fit for purpose in its new operating environment,” he said.

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Wood, Paper & Green Building

Plateau startup blends passion for wood with love of cycling

by Michelle Pucci
Montreal Gazette
October 25, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: Canada East, Canada

Pierre Laplante never planned to make more than a single wooden bike. The 63-year-old bike enthusiast walked into a woodworking shop in the Plateau in January 2015 hoping to design a personal bike out of ash wood. The five- by 10-foot work bench he rented monthly for $300 was where he drew large models of a bike, named Picolo Vélo, that started out as a palm-sized cardboard cut-out. With zero background in industrial design, Laplante sketched plans when he wasn’t working at the outdoor equipment shop La Cordée. He spent 150 hours at the shop conceiving the bike, and in January 2016, the first Picolo Vélo frame weighing 3.3 kilograms was born. By that time, shop-owners Nicolas Goupil and Loïc Dehoux wanted in.

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Time to try Teak — Chef’s choice in cutting boards

October 26, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: Canada East, Canada

The best knife blade in the world is only as good as the surface it cuts on, and frankly, knives like wood. Wood is self-healing, unlike plastic that scars, as the sharp edge of the knife opens the grain with each cut and then the wood closes back up. Bacteria is the enemy of any kitchen and studies from the University of California’s food safety lab concluded that wood traps much of the bacteria deep down in the fibre where it has no chance to grow, so it dies off. Plastic, once scarred and grooved, is shallow, creating the perfect breeding ground for bacteria despite hot water, soap and regular washing. Teak has become very popular with commercial chefs, as this oily wood overcomes many of the issues regular hardwoods have as cutting boards.

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Fay Jones School, Arkansas Forest Resources Center Receive Grant

University of Arkansas Newswire
October 25, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: US East, United States

FAYETTEVILLE, Ark. — The Fay Jones School of Architecture and Design at the University of Arkansas and the Arkansas Forest Resources Center in the UA System Division of Agriculture have received a nearly $250,000 grant from the U.S. Forest Service for a collaborative project. The project, titled “From Forest to Campus: The Innovative Timber University,” stems from the Forest Services’ national “Wood Innovations” program, and it is expected to take about two years to complete. The project uses the timber products harvested from an ongoing collaborative forest landscape restoration project in the Ozark National Forest in Northwest Arkansas to design a prototype for a new, sustainable residence hall at the University of Arkansas.

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MAATworks references Scandinavian architecture with wooden townhouse in Amsterdam

By Eleanor Gibson
Dezeen
October 25, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: International

Panels of cross-laminated pine form an angular staircase at the heart of this Amsterdam townhouse by MAATworks, which features a bright red facade. Local studio MAATworks designed the five-storey house to slot into a thin plot in the IJburg district of the Dutch city. The architects were asked by their clients to reference the wooden residences typically found in Scandinavia. They constructed the residence from panels of engineered pine wood and named it Houten Herenhuis, which means wooden house. The interior features exposed pine wood walls and ceilings, as well as a thick stair banister that dog-legs up through the floors. The all-pine finishes are intended to lend the interior the appearance of having been carved from wood.

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Forestry

UBC researcher worries global warming may harm predator and prey connections

The Boundary Sentinel
October 25, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

A UBC study highlights the potential harm that climate change may have on a number of predator and prey relationships. Rebecca Tyson, an associate professor of mathematics at UBC’s Okanagan campus, recently published a study on predator and prey relationships, how they change seasonally, and how climate change may lead to the extinction of some species. With mathematical modelling, Tyson uses quantitative tools and computational models based on key features of real ecosystems and landscapes. These models can then be used to inform environmental management and conservation strategies.

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Fir beetle hitting trees at Otway

By Mark Nielsen
Prince George Citizen
October 25, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Signs of a fir bark beetle outbreak are emerging in a forested area within city limits. About 200 trees at the Otway Nordic Centre are showing the telltale reddish-brown dust that marks the boring holes the insects leave as chew their way into the tree. Runners and cyclists are being asked to keep their eyes out for any more. According to signs posted at Otway, six of the trees on the Java single track between the Sawmill east and Upper Hickory Wing ski trails will have to be cut down and burned this winter and have been marked with “pest management” flagging tape.

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Project Perseverance fundraising continues this week

Comox Valley Record
October 25, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

The run is done, but not the fun. With the 12th annual Perseverance Trail Run in the books – as another unqualified success – from now until Saturday, Oct. 29 there are many ways to help the Cumberland Community Forest Society meet some ambitious fundraising targets. And every penny is matched by a generous secret agent. As part of Project Perseverance, Perseverance Raffle tickets ($10) are on sale at the Wandering Moose and Riders Pizza or from a CCFS volunteer.

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Forest ecologist says we need to get fire ‘smarter’ in B.C. (interview)

A wildfire conference in Kelowna is all about building resiliance to save our homes and communities
CBC News
October 25, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

You would think after years of dealing with wildfires in the Southern Interior, we would know all about being fire smart. But Lori Daniels says we have a ways to go. She’s an associate professor of Forest Ecology at UBC in Vancouver. She’s one of the speakers at the Wildland Fire Canada conference this week in Kelowna. The theme is “Building Resilience.”

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Hungarian foresters recognized during Hungarian Cultural Week

BC Government News
October 25, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Oct. 23-29, 2016, is Hungarian Cultural Week in British Columbia, acknowledging the role and contributions Hungarian refugees have made economically, socially and culturally to the province. This year marks the 60th anniversary since the start of the Hungarian Revolution, which resulted in more than 200,000 refugees fleeing their country. More than 37,000 emigrated to Canada. More than 200 faculty and students from Hungary’s 200-year-old school of forestry based in Sopron were among those who arrived in Canada and established the Sopron division of the faculty of forestry at the University of British Columbia. A total of 141 Sopron students graduated from the forestry program. One-third of these graduates obtained further credentials, including 20 doctorates.

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Okanagan project aims to preserve and restore Garnet Valley

Penticton Western News
October 25, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

A co-operative project is underway to mitigate impacts from wildfire and to preserve and restore the Garnet Valley, north of Summerland, is underway. The Penticton Indian Band, B.C. Ministry of Forests, Land and Natural Resource Operations and the Okanagan region of the B.C. Wildlife Federation received $150,000 to prevent and/or mitigate economic, ecologocal and cultural impacts of wildfire in the Summerland area, improve important wildlife habitat habitat (particularly the Mule deer winter range) and provide a platform for relationship building between the province, the PIB, the Summerland and Peachland Sportsman’s Associations and the B.C. Wildlife Federation. The funding is from the Forest Enhancement Society of B.C., which allocated over $2.74 million to 23 projects around the province to the first group of funding commitments.

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First maple syrup, now fir resin subject of lucrative heist

CBC News
October 25, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

It turns out maple isn’t the only sap worth stealing. Fir-resin producer Gérald Charbonneau learned that the hard way when he opened his garage recently to find about 1,000 pounds of his product had been stolen. Charbonneau runs Gomme de sapin du Québec in Stoneham, about 30 kilometres north of Quebec City. He noticed the theft of the year’s harvest — worth about $35,000 — when he returned home from the Thanksgiving holiday. …Charbonneau said the resin is harvested with specially made artisanal tools.  The resin is collected drop-by-drop from balsam fir trees. “Pure gold of Quebec,” Charbonneau called it.

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Proposed no-logging buffers on streams could expand to Southern Oregon

By Mark Freeman
The Mail Tribune
October 25, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

A member of the Oregon Board of Forestry hopes Jackson and Josephine counties soon will see extension of streamside no-logging buffers on private and industrial timberlands similar to those now proposed for the rest of Western Oregon to keep salmon streams cool. Board member Cindy Deacon Williams of Medford tried last year to get the Siskiyou Region added to proposals for expanding riparian buffers from 40 feet to 60 feet on small salmon streams, but it was narrowly voted down because stream data from here was not part of the report used to support buffer expansion. The board will meet Nov. 2 in Ashland, and Williams said she will seek to have existing data mined to frame discussions of streamside buffer expansions here, where scores of streams within the Rogue River Basin already are deemed too warm for salmon’s cold-water needs.

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Forest Service plans summer jobs workshops

By Holly Owens
Herald and News
October 25, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

LAKEVIEW – The Fremont-Winema National Forest is preparing to hire more than 100 summer positions across south-central Oregon, and wants to help interested applicants with the process, according to a news release. Two workshops are scheduled to share information on temporary positions for the 2017 field season and firefighting positions, as well as tips on navigating the federal application website, usajobs.gov.

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Yosemite National Park Study Finds Wildfire Management Vs. Fire Suppression Benefits Forest and Watershed

By Robert Sanders
Sierra Sun Times
October 25, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

An unprecedented 40-year experiment in a 40,000-acre valley of Yosemite National Park strongly supports the idea that managing fire, rather than suppressing it, makes wilderness areas more resilient to fire, with the added benefit of increased water availability and resistance to drought. After a three-year, on-the-ground assessment of the park’s Illilouette Creek basin, UC Berkeley researchers concluded that a strategy dating to 1973 of managing wildfires with minimal suppression and almost no preemptive, so-called prescribed burns has created a landscape more resistant to catastrophic fire, with more diverse vegetation and forest structure and increased water storage, mostly in the form of meadows in areas cleared by fires.

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Forest Service plans timber thinning project in Upper Fryingpan Valley

by Scott Condon
Post Independent
October 24, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

The U.S. Forest Service is proposing a timber-thinning project in the vicinity of the White River National Forest where the Freeman Fire has scorched 348 acres over the last week. The Upper Fryingpan Vegetation Management Project was planned well before the Freeman Fire started Oct. 15. However, it could help prevent similar fires from affecting the heavily timbered Upper Fryingpan drainage, according to Doug Leyva, timbers and fuels program manager for the White River National Forest. The Fryingpan project is proposed on 1,847 acres surrounding the Lime Park area, where the Eagle-Thomasville Road intersects with the Burnt Mountain Road. The Forest Service will hold an open house on the project Wednesday to supply details to the public so they can provide feedback (see related fact box).

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Study: Human-caused warming burns more Western forests

By Keith Ridler
Peninsula Daily News
October 25, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

BOISE, Idaho — A new study of Western forest fires confirms what is already apparent in the Northwest— wildfire seasons are getting longer and more destructive. But researchers with the University of Idaho and Columbia University also say humans are to blame. The study made public earlier this month says human-caused global warming contributed an additional 16,000 square miles of burned forests from 1984 to 2015. Researchers say the 16,000 square miles represent half of the forest areas that burned throughout the past three decades.

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Oregon weighs whether all kids should get outdoor education

By Gillian Flaccus
Associated Press in Helena Independent Record
October 25, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

MOUNT HOOD NATIONAL FOREST, Ore.  — Each year, thousands of Oregon parents hug their kids goodbye and send them tramping into the wilderness for up to a week to learn about their state’s natural wonders. The Outdoor School program was groundbreaking when it started more than a half-century ago. Since then, more than 1 million children have enjoyed — or endured — this rite of passage at campsites scattered from Oregon’s stormy coast to its towering evergreen forests to its rugged high desert. At the program’s heyday, 90 percent of sixth-graders spent the week testing water samples, studying fungi and digging through topsoil.

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U.S. Forest Service release new Mountain Pine Beetle research

KOTA TV
October 25, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

RAPID CITY, S.D. – The U.S. Forest Service released their latest publication that chronicles 100 years of the understanding, controlling and impact of the mountain pine beetle in the Black Hills of South Dakota and Wyoming. The U.S. Forest Service first took action in the Black Hills in 1902, with significant studies starting in 1985. According to Research Forester Russell T. Graham, with the U.S. Forest Service, the mountain pine beetle population in the central hills is on a decline. “Beetle fitness and beetle health, basically the beetle can’t get away from the brood tree, as its carrying bacteria, fungus [and] disease from tree to tree with it and it cannot get away,” said Graham.

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Forestry committee awards National Tree Farmer of the Year for 2016

PR Wire, Australia
October 25, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: International

Roger and Outhay Poltock have been named as the 2016 National Tree Farmers of the Year at the Australian Forest Growers National Conference in Launceston. The award including a $5000 cash prize is sponsored by the Department of Agriculture and Water Resources and is widely contested. Dr Kevin Harding, President of Australian Forest Growers said, ‘The independent panel which assessed entries this year was very impressed with the quality of applicants. ‘In the end, the result was very close – but we are excited by the great work done on Roger and Outhay’s property and they are worthy winners.

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The Netherlands Will Increase its Forests By a Quarter

By Feargus O’Sullivan
The Atlantic CityLab
October 25, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: International

The Netherlands currently shares with Ireland the title of Europe’s least wooded country—trees currently cover just 11 percent of its surface area. But following an announcement Monday, Mainland Europe’s most densely populated country should start getting a lot leafier. Holland’s State Forestry Commission, the Staatsbosbeheer, just unveiled a plan to boost the country’s forested area by as much as 25 percent. Over the next thirty years, the country will get 100,000 hectares (386 square miles) of new woodland as part of a scheme to both reduce carbon emissions and boost domestic timber production.

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New automatic forest fire detection system by using surveillance drones

Phys.org
October 26, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: International

Researchers from UPM are developing a method to detect forest fires by using a new color index. The index is based on methods for vegetation classification and has been adapted to detect the tonalities of flames and smoke. Via color treatment, researchers from the Research Center on Software Technologies and Multimedia Systems for Sustainability (CITSEM) at Universidad Politécnica de Madrid (UPM) have detected forest fire and the smoke created during combustion,and isolated these visual components from the rest of the scene. Due to the rapidity and precision of detection, the use of this innovative system is focused on environmental surveillance systems using drones.

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Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy

N.B. must plan, lead on climate change future, says MLA

By Gail Harding
CBC News
October 25, 2016
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: Canada East, Canada

The chair of the New Brunswick’s select committee on climate change says he hopes, over time, all 85 recommendations made will be implemented to help combat climate change. …When it comes to forestry and the report’s recommendation to invest more in mixed forests, Harvey said government will have to provide a strong leadership role on it. “On the particular issue, they have to set the tone. The government owns half the ground in New Brunswick, the crown land and so they have to lead by example and say these are alternative methods of sustainable forestry.” Harvey said large forest companies told the select committee they are willing to adapt. “They have to adapt because they have to have product 30 and 40 years down the road that they can harvest.”

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USDA awards $327 million in REAP funding

By Erin Voegele
Biomass Magazine
October 25, 2016
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: United States

On Oct. 25, the USDA announced it is investing more than $300 million to help hundreds of small businesses adopt renewable energy sources or implement more efficient energy options. The investment includes $327 million to support 423 businesses through the Rural Energy for America Program and a $68 million loan awarded to the Pedernales Electric Cooperative of Johnson City, Texas, through the Energy Efficiency and Conservation Loan Program to fund system-wide energy efficiency improvements to assist a rural portion of the co-op’s service territory. …Recipients of the REAP funds will use the loans and grants to install renewable energy systems, such as biomass, geothermal, hydropower and solar. 

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Wednesday In Washington: Explore Latest Developments In Forest-Carbon Finance

By Steve Zwick
Ecosystem Marketplace
October 25, 2016
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: United States

The Paris Climate Agreement creates a framework for reducing greenhouse gas emissions, in part by funneling money into programs that promote better management of forests, farms and fields – our impact on which generates nearly 25% of global greenhouse-gas emissions. It formalizes mechanisms that have been evolving for decades both inside and outside the United Nations, and two reports published this year offer insight into how those mechanisms have evolved in the past and how they may evolve in the future. On Wednesday, we’ll offer a deep dive into both reports, and an opportunity to speak with report contributors Kelley Hamrick and Peter Graham. The first report, to be released tomorrow at the Washington, DC, offices of Baker & McKenzie, is the most recent State of Forest Carbon Finance report. 

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Bioenergy Byproduct to Soil Savior

By Anna Simet
Biomass Magazine
October 25, 2016
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: United States, US West

Greg Stangl is a power guy. Self-proclaimed and readily apparent to others, that title has been earned by the CEO of Phoenix Energy after a decade-plus of developing and building small-scale biomass electricity projects. While there may be hundreds of companies working in the smaller-scale bioenergy project space, Stangl has something that most of them don’t: biochar. And, he knows how to use it. Perhaps more accurately, he knows its worth. But that’s not to say he always did. “We used to give our biochar away at two cents per pound, when we built our first facility in Europe,” Stangl says. “Our plans then were all about electricity—we sold that biochar to people using coal furnaces.”

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Technology could solve juniper problem, generate electricity

by Eric Mortenson
Capital Press
October 24, 2016
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: United States, US West

GRESHAM, Ore. — Hiroshi Morihara jokes that his current project — finding a clean-fuel replacement for coal — was his wife’s fault. “Hiroshi,” his wife, Mary McSwain, told him several years ago, “you look bored. Why don’t you invent something again?” On Oct. 18, Morihara’s company announced it has refined a process for turning logging slash or other biomass into briquettes that can be burned in coal-fired electrical plants such as the one in Boardman, Ore. …The fuel is produced through a method called torrefaction, in which woody debris, crop residue or other plant material is essentially roasted in the absence of oxygen. The end product is a brittle, briquette-looking material that can be crushed and burned.

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State partnerships can promote increased bio-energy production, reduce emissions

By the University of Missouri-Columbia
EurekAlert!
October 25, 2016
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: US East, United States

COLUMBIA, Mo. – New study determines most efficient ways governments can increase renewable energy production. Under the Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) Clean Power Plan, states soon could be mandated to significantly reduce carbon emissions. Researchers at the University of Missouri have identified the most effective ways for various Midwest states to partner and share resources in order to increase the amount of renewable energy they produce through burning woody biomass, which is recognized as a carbon neutral source of energy. Francisco Aguilar, an associate professor of forestry in the MU College of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources, says that by finding effective and efficient partnerships, states can greatly improve the environment by maximizing renewable energy production and reducing carbon emissions.

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Radioactive Fukushima Wood Becomes Power in German Biomass Plant

By Brian Parkin
Bloomberg
October 25, 2016
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: International

Japan is turning to a small German company to generate power from timber irradiated by the Fukushima Dai-Ichi nuclear meltdowns. Closely held Entrade Energiesysteme AG will sell electricity from 400 of its container-sized biomass-to-power machines set up in Fukushima Prefecture, said the Dusseldorf-based company’s Chief Executive Officer Julien Uhlig. The devices will generate 20 megawatts of power by next year and function like a “biological battery” that kicks in when the sun descends on the the region’s solar panels, he said.

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Total And Bill Gates Invest $14 Million In Biomass Conversion Technology For Biofuels

By Jennifer Hicks
Forbes Magazine
October 25, 2016
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: International

Biofuels and bioenergy have now become an essential component in the world’s renewable energy mix. Last month, French multinational energy company, Total (NYSE: TOT) and Bill Gates recently invested $14 million in a new biomass conversion technology from clean tech start up Renmatix. Renmatix is focused on the economical production of biochemicals and biofuels as an alternative to petro-driven fuels. Their Plantrose technology uses super critical water to reduce the costs associated in the conversion of biomass (wood or agricultural waste) to cellulosic sugars for biofuels. Biofuels and bioenergy are now a critical part of the world’s renewable energy mix.

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