Tree Frog Forestry News

Daily Archives: November 3, 2016

Froggy Foibles

The reign of the lumbersexuals

By Dick Callahan
Juneau Empire
November 3, 2016
Category: Froggy Foibles
Region: United States, US West

“Well honey, I think I might just grow out the beard and be one them lumbersexuals.” She gave me that look, as though I were a little kid and put my shoes on the wrong. “Lumbersexuals?” “Oh yeah.” I said, “You can look it up. All I need is a new flannel shirt and some work pants without holes in them.” Lumbersexuals aren’t logger guys named Kenny who are built like coke machines that got thrown down a cliff. Lumbersexuals are handsome. They iron their flannels. Their axes don’t have pitch on the handle or dings on the edge. Unlike jog-bra women in sportswear catalogs, they rarely peer into the distance. Lumbersexual male models peer through their foreheads directly at the camera, one shoulder forward, head cocked to the side, with a look that’s half “Beware, I’m feral” and half, “I can’t wait to kiss myself in the mirror.” Their essential accessory is the beard.

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Business & Politics

B.C. manufacturing ramps up shipments

By Bryan Yu
Business in Vancouver
November 1, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

August was a stellar month for B.C. manufacturing momentum. Following a 2.4% increase in July, shipments jumped again in August by 2.1% to push sales to a seasonally adjusted $3.89 billion. Year-over-year shipments rose 8.1% from a year ago. …Key B.C. drivers included a 33% increase in primary metals and a 12% rise for wood products. …In contrast, paper manufacturing sales fell 7.5% and were a key offset. The province’s manufacturing sector is benefiting from a positive environment for exports – namely a competitive exchange rate, mild expansion in the U.S. economy and, up until this month, the one-year grace period following the end of the expired softwood lumber agreement that allowed free exports to the U.S.

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From the Hill — Forestry and Trade Wars

By Dick Cannings, Member of Parliament for South Okanagan West Kootenay
The Nelson Daily
November 2, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

The forest industry has been a critically important sector in the BC economy for over a century, but it has been hit hard. A 30-year trade war with the United States cost our industry billions of dollars. The softwood lumber agreement did bring back certainty to lumber export access and costs, but the Canadian industry paid a very high price for that certainty, and many mills didn’t survive. In South Okanagan-West Kootenay, the Weyerhaeuser mill in Okanagan Falls closed in 2007, putting over 200 people out of work. The Pope and Talbot mill in Midway closed in 2007 as well, but fortunately has been reopened by Vaagen Brothers, who have invested in new equipment to create a highly efficient mill that uses the smaller logs that are easier to find in today’s wood supply. The Atco Wood Products company in Fruitvale closed its lumber operation at around the same time to concentrate on veneer products for plywood, which are not subject to softwood lumber quotas and tariffs.

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TimberWest Giving Event Recognizes Non-Profit Community Leadership in Lake Cowichan

By Monica Bailey
TimberWest
November 2, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

TimberWest is honoured to recognize and contribute to five non-profit community organizations for their continued service to the community of Lake Cowichan. The non-profit organizations receiving donations today volunteered at the TimberWest’s Lake Cowichan firewood lot. The 2016 firewood permit program was tremendously successful and TimberWest is donating its portion of the profit back to the Lake Cowichan community. “The success of our Lake Cowichan firewood permit program this year allowed TimberWest to donate even more funds to the community, and we love that!” says Domenico Iannidinardo, Chief Forester and VP Sustainability at TimberWest.

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JDI Donates $25,000 to Purchase Musical Instruments for Sistema Saint John

JD Irving
November 2, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada East, Canada

Saint John: This fall, children in the Sistema New Brunswick (NB) Saint John Centre are learning to play on brand new instruments thanks to a $25,000 donation from J.D. Irving, Limited (JDI). The contribution will purchase a timpani set for the Centre’s new percussion program plus ten cellos and four double basses for the strings program. “The gift of music is something that will stay with you forever, so JDI is delighted to make this investment in the talent and the potential of all of the young people involved in learning music through this wonderful program,” said Mary Keith, Vice President, Communications, JDI.

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Cause of Braxton Co. lumber plant fire unknown, worker released from hospital

By Renata Di Gregorio
WDTV News 5
November 2, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States, International

HEATERS, W.Va.There’s no word yet on the extent of the damage or what caused a fire at a Braxton County lumber mill Tuesday. The contractor who was taken to the hospital has been released. Public Affairs Manager Nancy Thompson for the engineered lumber mill Weyerhaeuser says the company is beginning to assess the damage. She also says the worker who was taken to the hospital was treated for minor burns and not for smoke inhalation as the Office of Emergency Management had said. Thompson says the company employs 163 people and they were all evacuated. She says the fire is out, but warm spots are being monitored. Workers are there helping assess the damage.

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Venerable Oregon Sawmill Shows Off Big History

Building-Products
November 2, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States, US West

Nearly 50 industry professionals recently toured the historic Hull Oakes Lumber Co. near Bellfountain, Or., as part of the Portland Wholesale Lumber Association’s annual Logs to Lumber mill tour.  Touring the 80-year-old big-log mill, which is on the registry of National Historic sites, was like stepping back in time. “We watched as the 72-inch de-barker was fed Douglas fir logs, that had been herded together by the little tug boat tending to the private pond,” recounted PWLA’s Dave McNabb, Kuzman Forest Products, Hillsboro, Or. “Next we viewed the 56-ft.-long, 14”-wide bandsaw slice through giant logs to produce behemoth timbers, up to 18”x20”x56’. These mammoth timbers are well short of the band saw’s maximum capacity of an 8-ft. diameter, 85-ft. length log, with bark on.”

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Rough and Ready Lumber closed for good, selling everything in auction

By Mike Marut
KTVL
November 1, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States, US West

Cave Junction, Ore. – After generations of business and nearly closing its doors multiple times, Rough and Ready Lumber, LLC is closing its doors with no chance of reopening – it’s auctioning off everything on the property on Nov. 2nd and 3rd. Secretary Treasurer Jennifer Phillippi Krauss says there’s no silver lining to this. “We’ve just given up,” Phillippi Krauss said. “We’ve done everything we know how, and we can’t think of anything else to do.” A few years ago, the business had hope because of laws requiring the Bureau of Land Management to bring them logs and winning some federal contracts. “Some other legal action happened and the BLM just came to a screeching halt,” Phillippi Krauss said. “We had been successful bidders on eight or nine federal timber sales and felt pretty good about things and then it all came to a stop and that volatility you can’t handle as a business.”

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Hancock Lumber Named ‘Best Place to Work’ in Maine for Third Consecutive Year

Lumber Building Material Journal
November 2, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: US East, United States

For the third consecutive year, Hancock Lumber has been named one of the ‘Best Places to Work’ in Maine. Hancock Lumber’s Director of Human Resources, Wendy Scribner, said, “This is so exciting for all of us and really says so much about our people, our teams, and our company culture as a whole. This is a tremendous accomplishment to be very proud of and speaks to our engagement efforts we all work on together. Thank you to our employees, customers, vendors, and community partners for helping to make Hancock Lumber a ‘Best Places to Work in Maine’!” The 2016 Best Places to Work in Maine list recognizes companies that establish and foster outstanding workplace environments. This year, the Best Companies Group (an independent survey organization) only selected 75 Maine companies to receive this honor. 

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Weyerhaeuser assessing damage from Tuesday fire

By Alex Wiederspiel
West Virginia MetroNews
November 2, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: US East, United States

HEATERS, W.Va. — There is no timetable for a return to the production lines for the 163 workers at the Weyerhaeuser Lumber Plant in Braxton County that suffered damage from a fire that began Tuesday morning. Nancy Thompson, Public Affairs Manager for Weyerhaeuser, said the company has begun the process of assessing damage, but said they are uncertain how much down time the fire will create for employees. Some fire crews on scene before 10 am Tuesday morning remained on scene as late as 3 am Wednesday morning. While firefighters are no longer on scene, Thompson said there are hot spots at the plant that will require additional monitoring.

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Wood, Paper & Green Building

On this day in history (Nov. 2) – Spruce Goose flies

The Herald Chronicle
November 2, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: United States

Hughes Flying Boat—the largest aircraft ever built—is piloted by designer Howard Hughes on its first and only flight. Built with laminated birch and spruce, the massive wooden aircraft had a wingspan longer than a football field and was designed to carry more than 700 men to battle. …Because of wartime restrictions on steel, Hughes decided to build his aircraft out of wood laminated with plastic and covered with fabric. Although it was constructed mainly of birch, the use of spruce (along with its white-gray color) would later earn the aircraft the nickname Spruce Goose. It had a wingspan of 320 feet and was powered by eight giant propeller engines.

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Hoopa Valley Tribe Inks Deal With Wood Products Manufacturer to Fill Old Hoopa Modular Facility

By the Hoopa Valley Tribe
Lost Coast Outpost
November 3, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: United States, US West

The Hoopa Valley Tribe (Tribe) announced today that it has agreed to enter into a strategic partnership with PJ Woodlands LLC, the owner of Altree™, a revolutionary wood-plastic composite (WPC), to build the first Altree™ production facility. Under a long-term lease of the 65,000 sq. ft. Hoopa Modular Facility (Facility), PJ Woodlands will repurpose the Facility to manufacture Altree™ WPC sheeting products. PJ Woodlands LLC will enter into an exclusive management agreement with the Tribe and will be solely responsible for all business management of a company to be created under Hoopa Tribal Law. 

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UMaine Research Leads to New Lumber Resource

By Caitlin Burchill
WABI TV 5
November 2, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: US East, United States

Research by some UMaine staff and students is expected to make a significant impact on the forest industry. For a year, they tested a newly harvestable species of tree for construction and industrial purposes. Now, the Norway spruce has been approved for use as lumber in these fields. The team at the Advanced Structures and Composites Center wrote the report for the Northeastern Lumber Manufacturers Association that was submitted to the American Lumber Standards Committee. “Wood is one of our specialties for sure, so to be doing work on wood grown in the state and in the region and derive these values and get it approved is a big thing for us,” said UMaine Wood Composites Manager Russell Edgar. We’re told as part of a federal government program, 113 million Norway spruce was planted during the Great Depression.

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Reimagining bikes made from trees, HTech Bikes blends wood and carbon

The Perth based start-up producing wooden race bikes
Bike Radar
November 2, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: International

Bikes made from wood are nothing new, and there’s no shortage of craftsmen out there making bikes with trees. However, a small outfit out from Western Australia is combining wood and carbon fiber to create boutique performance-oriented frames — yes, you read that right, wooden race bikes. Hayden Francis, HTech’s frame builder told BikeRadar: “Wood is a naturally stiff and strong material, one of the strongest found in nature. Today, with modern woodworking machines and extremely strong and durable adhesives, wooden bike frames can be made as strong and stiff as carbon frames with more comfort than a steel frame.”

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Forestry

Forest Industry Applauds Government’s Commitment to Trade Infrastructure

By FPAC
Forest Products Association of Canada
November 1, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada

OTTAWA: The forest products industry is pleased that today’s fiscal update underscored the importance of better trade infrastructure and “corridors” to service global markets as a means to help grow the economy and support middle class jobs. In his economic update to the House of Commons, the Minister of Finance, Bill Morneau, announced that Canada will be spending $10.1 billion over 11 years to “make strategic investments in trade and transportation projects that build stronger, more efficient transportation corridors to international markets and help Canadian businesses to compete”.

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U.S. Marketplace Urged to Protect Canada’s Boreal Forest

By Anthony Swift
Natural Resourced Defense Council
November 2, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, United States

The Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC) is calling on the U.S. marketplace to urge the logging company Resolute Forest Products (Resolute) to drop its litigation against public interest organizations and instead focus on demonstrating its commitment to sustainable forestry and conservation. NRDC has been engaged for over two decades in efforts to conserve Canada’s forests and assist its indigenous peoples in increasing control over their traditional lands. Canada’s boreal forest is one of the world’s last great forests, an ecological resource that plays a significant role in helping to regulate the global climate by holding at bay massive amounts of greenhouse gases in its trees and soils, provides habitat to thousands of plant and animal species, serves as a global freshwater storehouse, and is home to more than six hundred First Nations communities.

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A Forestry Issue & Science Based Forestry

November 3, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

A forestry issue: What an incredibly well-done opinion piece by Mike Parker in the Oct. 29 Herald (May the forest be with you). Too bad Department of Natural Resources management has no desire to provide any answers to those questions, since no “scientific” answers exist to justify their decisions.

Science-based forestry: Mike Parker and Bob Bancroft have it wrong! Forest policy and forestry operations in this province are based on science.

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Looking to the Future and Learning from the Past in our National Forests

Randy Johnson, U.S. Forest Service Research and Development Program
USDA Blog
November 1, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States


Forests are changing in ways they’ve never experienced before because today’s growing conditions are different from anything in the past. The climate is changing at an unprecedented rate, exotic diseases and pests are present, and landscapes are fragmented by human activity often occurring at the same time and place. The current drought in California serves as a reminder and example that forests of the 21st century may not resemble those from the 20th century. When replanting a forest after disturbances, does it make sense to try to reestablish what was there before? Or, should we find re-plant material that might be more appropriate to current and future conditions of a changing environment?

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American Tree Farm System Announces Oregon Family as National Outstanding Tree Farmers of the Year

from American Tree Farm System
PR Web press release
November 1, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States

Today, the American Tree Farm System (ATFS) announced the 2016 National Outstanding Tree Farmer of the Year award, will go to the Defrees family of northeast Oregon. Father and son duo, Lyle and Dean Defrees, along with their family, Sharon Defrees, Dallas Hall, Riley Hall, Nathan Defrees, Jess Defrees, Tyler Defrees and Max Patashnik, have been protecting their forested land, the wildlife habitat it provides, and the water supply that runs through it, for more than 100 years. “We’re truly honored to be chosen as the National Outstanding Tree Farmers of the Year,” said Lyle Defrees. “Our family has had a passion for our land and conservation for generations.

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USDA Grants $20.2 Million for Food and Forestry Research and Development Projects

United States Department of Agriculture
November 2, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States

WASHINGTON – Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack today announced that USDA will grant $20.2 million to help 34 small businesses move forward with innovative research and development projects to benefit food security, natural resources conservation and other agricultural issues. These competitive grants are made through the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program, which is coordinated by the Small Business Administration and administered by 11 federal agencies including the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA).

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DNR must rethink logging and landslides

November 3, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

TWO-and-a-half years ago, the Oso landslide killed 43 people in a tragedy that prompted questions about the role of logging. Recently, the day before a jury trial was scheduled to begin, and after spending $3 million of taxpayers’ money on hired-gun experts, the state settled with victims’ families for $50 million. Perhaps this had something to do with the way it might appear to a jury that these experts systematically destroyed emails pertaining to how they shaped their case. Now that the legal fight is over, I hope the state Department of Natural Resources and the Forest Practices Board will take a thorough and impartial look at what impact, if any, recent and past logging played in the disaster — and at the adequacy of DNR’s rules, guidelines and procedures for assessing potential impacts of timber harvest on landslides in general.

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Federal appeals court upholds decision to stop logging outside Bozeman, Big Timber

By Michael Wright
Bozeman Daily Chronicle
November 1, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

A federal appeals court has upheld a lower court’s decision to block two logging projects in the Custer Gallatin National Forest because of Canada lynx, siding with the environmentalists who sued over the projects. The Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals affirmed a U.S. District Court decision that blocked Forest Service proposals to log in the creek drainages that make up Bozeman’s water supply and along the East Boulder River southeast of Big Timber because the agency didn’t adequately analyze the potential impacts the projects would have on Canada lynx. Alliance for the Wild Rockies first sued over the proposed logging project in 2012.

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Daines ups heat to overturn lynx decision

by Rob Chaney
The Missoulian
November 2, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

After the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals blocked a pair of logging projects near Bozeman on Tuesday, Sen. Steve Daines has increased his effort to make Congress overturn the legal decision. Daines, R-Montana, sent a memorandum on Wednesday asking the Senate and House of Representatives to “promptly reverse” the Cottonwood Environmental Law Center vs. U.S. Forest Service ruling. Known as a “Dear Colleague” letter, Daines’ message asked for a statutory amendment codifying a different court’s decision. “Today’s disastrous ruling against a commonsense project to reduce wildfire risk and protect Bozeman’s watershed makes it even more urgent that we enact meaningful forest reform that will remove this sort of absurd regulatory burden,” Daines wrote in a Tuesday email.

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DNR must rethink logging and landslides

November 3, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

TWO-and-a-half years ago, the Oso landslide killed 43 people in a tragedy that prompted questions about the role of logging. Recently, the day before a jury trial was scheduled to begin, and after spending $3 million of taxpayers’ money on hired-gun experts, the state settled with victims’ families for $50 million. Perhaps this had something to do with the way it might appear to a jury that these experts systematically destroyed emails pertaining to how they shaped their case. Now that the legal fight is over, I hope the state Department of Natural Resources and the Forest Practices Board will take a thorough and impartial look at what impact, if any, recent and past logging played in the disaster — and at the adequacy of DNR’s rules, guidelines and procedures for assessing potential impacts of timber harvest on landslides in general.

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Court upholds decision blocking Montana logging projects

Associated Press in Billings Gazette
November 2, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

HELENA — A federal appeals court has upheld a decision blocking two Montana logging projects to protect the Canada lynx. The Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals affirmed a U.S. District Court decision that stopped the Forest Service’s plan to log in the Custer Gallatin National Forest. The court said the agency didn’t adequately analyze how the project could impact the lynx. The environmentalist group Alliance for the Wild Rockies sued over the logging proposal in 2012. The Ninth Circuit waited until the U.S. Supreme Court decided not to rule on a separate Canada lynx case before handing down its decision.

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Harry Merlo, last of the great timber chiefs, dies at 91

By Jeff Manning
The Oregonian
November 2, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Timber entrepreneur Harry Merlo, whose larger-than-life career was marked by great highs and lows, died Monday, Oct. 24. He was 91. The longtime Portland resident headed Louisiana-Pacific Corp. for more than two decades back when the timber industry was still the most powerful force in Oregon’s economy. He played a pivotal role in bringing the original Portland Timbers soccer team and other big-league sporting events to town. …In 1973, Georgia-Pacific spun off Louisiana-Pacific, and Merlo became its first chief executive. He ran the company for 22 years, much of it from his corporate suite atop the U.S. Bancorp Tower, one of the tallest buildings in town.

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Tall Timbers Trust buys nearly 300,000 acres in North Maine Woods

By Anthony Brino
Bangor Daily News
November 2, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

More than 290,000 acres of northern Maine forestlands in Aroostook, Penobscot and Piscataquis counties have been sold to Tall Timbers Trust, according to forestry consultant Gary Bahlkow. In the private transaction, the price of which has not been disclosed, Canopy Timberlands, LLC, sold two major blocks of forestland to Tall Timbers Trust, said Bahlkow, who is overseeing the transition of lands and the forestry and contracting teams for Tall Timbers. The deal closed Sept. 30, he said.

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Drought and wildfires plague a region typically known for its ‘rainforest-like’ climate

By John Hopewell
Washington Post
November 2, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

The Southeast is not a region that we tend to associate with wildfires. It’s humid, it’s wet, and twice this year deadly floods ravaged vast areas of two states — Louisiana and North Carolina. Yet here we are, talking about tinderbox conditions propelled by a historic drought and record-breaking heat. On Wednesday morning, there were 11 active, large fires burning across the region. There are at least 10 large fires burning in six states, according to the U.S. Forest Service. Dozens of smaller fires are smoldering across the Southeast, filling populated valleys with a hazy, brown smoke.

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Crews continue fighting forest fires, encourage safe burning practices

By Olivia Bailey
WCYB
November 2, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States


The lack of rainfall and constant winds have been creating a problem for fire crews in our area. According to our Stormtrack 5 meteorologists, the rainfall deficit for the Tri-Cities is more than seven inches. Right now, crews are battling at least three fires in our region. According to the Department of Forestry, there are two separate fires in Sullivan County which have burned 40 acres so far. Investigators believe arson is the suspected cause in both. However, the largest area fire is on Chimney Top Mountain covering land in Greene, Washington, and Hawkins Counties. That fire has now burned nearly 1,000 acres, but crews say it is fully contained.

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Ohio timber sales fund Adams, Highland county schools through Trees to Textbooks program

WCPO
November 1, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

COLUMBUS, Ohio – More than $2 million worth of timber sales from Ohio’s state forests will help 16 rural school districts and their corresponding counties and townships throughout southern and eastern Ohio. The Ohio Department of Natural Resources (ODNR) announced Tuesday that its Trees to Textbooks program shared $2,038,898 this year with a dozen counties around Ohio. ODNR Director James Zehringer recently visited the elementary schools of some districts receiving Trees to Textbooks funding, including Peebles Elementary School in Adams County, which received a check for $180,966 on Oct. 27. The students at these elementary schools attended assemblies where Smokey the Bear shared his wildfire safety message followed by a check presentation to the district.

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Vermont’s forestry industry in crisis

by Robert Audette
Brattleboro Reformer
November 1, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States


Brattleboro – Despite the importance of the forestry industry to Vermont’s economy, fundamental shifts in the market for low-grade wood threaten the survival of many small businesses and the viability of the state’s forests.  “We manage our forests for all kinds of things including durable wood products,” said Michael Snyder, Commissioner of Vermont Forests, Parks and Recreation. “We specialize in high-grade, high-value-added wood products. In fact, they are world renowned. But in order to grow that high-quality product, we need to manage the woods.” And managing the woods entails – just like cultivating a garden – pulling the weeds, said Paul Frederick, Wood Utilization and Wood Energy Project Leader for the Vermont Department of Forests, Parks and Recreation.

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Injured forestry worker airlifted to hospital by Palmerston North Rescue Helicopter

Stuff.co.nz
November 3, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: International

A 30-year-old forestry worker was rushed to hospital by helicopter, after being hit by a falling tree near in the central North Island on Thursday morning. Witnesses say the man was hit by the tree while logging in a forest roughly 10 kilometres north-west of Raetihi. The Palmerston North Rescue Helicopter was sent in to the area at 10am. He suffered serious injuries and was stabilised at the scene by St John paramedics, before the Rescue Helicopter flew him to Waikato Hospital.

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How trees make cities healthier

By Pascal Mittermaier
Times of Oman
November 2, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: International

Last May, I had the dubious fortune of visiting Mumbai, India during the city’s hottest month on record. Temperatures remained at over 40°C (104°F) for days at time. The difference between standing in the shade of a tree and standing in full sunlight was like night and day. …Trees and other vegetation naturally cool the air around them by shading surfaces and releasing water vapor. Moreover, their leaves act as filters, reducing PM levels in the surrounding 30 meters (nearly 100 feet) by as much as one-quarter. It is a one-two punch of environmental action. My organization, The Nature Conservancy, has carried out a study of 245 cities around the world that stand to benefit from tree-planting initiatives, estimating their potential return on investment in terms of both temperature and PM. 

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Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy

EPA should address burning biomass questions

by Ralph McDonald, member of the Eugene Sustainability Commission
The Register Guard
November 3, 2016
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: United States, US West

The cloud fronts rolling over Eugene demand frequent reassessment of what to wear for a walk outside. Likewise, this fall the front line against climate change is also morphing quickly. …Bill McKibben, a founder of 350.org., the influential group fighting climate change, stated bluntly (Sept. 8, Grist.org): “The trouble with the theory [of green biomass incineration] is it turns out to be wrong … you put a lot of carbon into the atmosphere right away, trapping heat at precisely the moment that we desperately need to be cooling the Earth.” …For Eugene’s Climate Recovery Ordinance and for the world’s atmosphere, the EPA needs to clear away junk science, dodge political prodding, and evaluate the whole cycle of biomass burning.

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Forward strides on biomass

White Mountain Independent
November 1, 2016
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: United States, US West

Using forest waste for energy is not a new concept. It was 2004 when the first biomass plant, located in Eagar, opened in Arizona — two years after the massive Rodeo-Chediski fire engulfed almost half a million acres of forest, destroying over 400 homes and causing over $43 million in damages. At the dedication for the Western Renewable Energy plant in Eagar, Corporation Commission Chairman Marc Spitzer called the plant a “win-win-win-win.” “It’s a win for the forest, it’s a win for clean air, it’s a win for cheaper energy and it’s a win for the rural economy.” The plant was the first in Arizona to find a commercially-viable use for scraps and small diameter wood, or biomass. ..Last week, as reporter Trudy Balcom reported in today’s Independent, Salt River Project became the first coal-fired power plant to use forest waste for fuel.

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Northern Forest Center studies GHG impacts of wood pellet heating

Biomass Magazine
November 2, 2016
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: US East, United States

The Northern Forest Center, a New England-based forestry advocacy group, recently released a study that analyzed the greenhouse gas (GHG) emission impacts of heating buildings with state-of-the-art wood pellet boilers. The results found a number of environmental benefits to using wood pellets for heating. For example, analysis showed wood pellet fuel reduces GHG emissions by more than half compared to fossil fuels—54 percent compared to oil and 59 percent compared to natural gas. For the investigation, NFC commissioned the Spatial Informatics Group-National Assets Laboratory to conduct a life-cycle analysis of wood fuels, compared to a life-cycle analysis of natural gas, propane and heating oil.

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Using forests to curb climate change threatens human rights

By Fred Pearce
Thomson Reuter Foundation News
November 2, 2016
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: International

Trees offer ways to help achieve “negative emissions”, but what does that mean for forest communities? The 2015 Paris Agreement on climate change was a landmark the world rightly applauded. Its pledge to limit global warming to well below 2 degrees Celsius – and preferably 1.5 degrees – lays down one of humanity’s greatest challenge for the 21st century. But how to achieve it?  Climate scientists say it is almost an impossible task if we only rely on reducing emissions from our power stations, transport systems and factories. Even ending deforestation will be insufficient. They say we will have to find ways of removing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere: “negative emissions” in the climate-change jargon. 

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A tree for every Kiwi to be planted in 2017

New Zealand Scoop
November 2, 2016
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: International

New Zealanders are being challenged to plant 4.7 million native trees next year – one for every person in the country. This is the first step in an ambitious plan to create a movement where all Kiwis come together to help restore and enhance our environment, encourage biodiversity in our cities, clean our air and waterways and make a difference to climate change. The challenge comes from Trees That Count; an innovative project being launched today (3 November 2016). Funded by The Tindall Foundation, and delivered by Project Crimson Trust in partnership with Pure Advantage and the Department of Conservation, Trees that Count aims to keep a live count of the number of native trees being planted across the country from 2016 and to set a new target each planting season.

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General

Department of Forestry proposes rule changes for stream buffers to protect fish

EMILY HOARD
The News-Review Emily Hoard
November 1, 2016
Category: Uncategorized

The colder the water, the healthier the fish. Oregon Department of Forestry has proposed changes in its rule making to increase stream buffers by 10 feet and approximately double the standards of trees left after harvest in order to protect salmon, steelhead and bull trout. “The goal is to make the streams cooler than what they have been in the past,” said Jay Morey, stewardship forester with the Oregon Department of Forestry’s Roseburg office. “The stream buffers will be wider and there will be more trees left in the buffers, providing more shade and potentially cooler temperatures.” This applies to small and medium fish-bearing streams west of the crest of the Cascades except the Siskiyou region. These streams include tributaries to the Umpqua River and must host salmon, steelhead or bull trout.

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A Forestry Issue & Science Based Forestry

November 3, 2016
Category: Uncategorized

A forestry issue: What an incredibly well-done opinion piece by Mike Parker in the Oct. 29 Herald (May the forest be with you). Too bad Department of Natural Resources management has no desire to provide any answers to those questions, since no “scientific” answers exist to justify their decisions.

Science-based forestry: Mike Parker and Bob Bancroft have it wrong! Forest policy and forestry operations in this province are based on science.

Read More