Tree Frog Forestry News

Daily Archives: November 7, 2016

Special Feature

Opinion: FPInnovations needs renewed government funding to help turn trees into airplane parts

by Derek Nighbor, CEO of the Forest Products Association of Canada
The Vancouver Sun
November 4, 2016
Category: Special Feature
Region: Canada

A world leading, Canadian-based partnership in research and innovation is behind remarkable technology that in the near future will give us the ability to make airplane parts and create material for bone replacement and tooth repairs out of trees. Yes, out of trees.  There’s only one thing that can stop such amazing advancements — the lack of a real commitment by governments for long-term and sustainable funding for innovation and research. ….FPInnovations, one of the world’s largest private-public partnerships, is jointly funded by government and industry. ….FPInnovations will see its federal funding expire in 2018. That funding of $100 million over four years is imperative if we are to see advancements that use wood to make life better, create green jobs in forestry and help Canada compete in the international marketplace.

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Business & Politics

Interfor Reports Q3’16 Results

Optimization Initiative Contributes to Record EBITDA(1) of $58.1 million; Net Debt Reduced by $49.0 million
MarketWired press release
November 3, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada

Vancouver BC – Interfor Corporation (TSX:IFP) recorded net earnings in Q3’16 of $15.1 million, or $0.22 per share, compared to $23.2 million, or $0.33 per share in Q2’16. Adjusted net earnings1 in Q3’16 were $22.8 million, or $0.33 per share, compared to $20.9 million, or $0.30 per share, in Q2’16. Adjusted EBITDA1 was $58.1 million on sales of $457.6 million in Q3’16, versus Adjusted EBITDA of $56.9 million on sales of $458.8 million in Q2’16. …Lumber production in Q3’16 was 628 million board feet versus 637 million board feet in Q2’16.

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Cut off from America, but not from the campaign

November 7, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

… British Columbians don’t get to vote in the U.S. election although the results are likely to have a major impact on varied issues germane to the province. Here are a few ways the outcome of Tuesday’s vote could affect B.C… Iain Black, president of the Greater Vancouver Board of Trade, says his members have been “increasingly concerned” about Mr. Trump’s anti-trade rhetoric… Gordon Giffin, former U.S. president Bill Clinton’s ambassador to Canada, said he expects the United States will work through the softwood issue regardless of who ends up as president. That said, he added that it is unclear whether a Trump presidency could attract top-notch talent to work out the details. Mr. Giffin, who is forthright in declaring his expectation that Ms. Clinton will win, said Mr. Trump’s views sound more protectionist than those of his Democratic rival.

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Mill workers in The Pas approve pension deal, mayor remains hopeful

Employees at Tolko Industries have given the OK to a three-year pension exemption for potential buyer
CBC News
November 5, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

Mill employees in The Pas have voted in favour of allowing potential buyers of the town’s kraft paper mill a break from pension solvency payments. The Manitoba government offered the mill’s prospective buyer, American Industrial Acquisition Corporation, a three-year break from the payments last month, which are used to top up pension funds. Now employees, who will receive the pensions, have given the deal the OK. The Pas Mayor Jim Scott said the deal is the first good news for the town in months.

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Paper mill one step closer to staying open

By Jim Bender
Winnipeg Sun
November 6, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

Jim Scott was anxiously awaiting confirmation that his town’s paper mill had been saved on Sunday. “I haven’t heard anything, either from the seller or buyer,” the mayor of The Pas said. “I’ve been waiting for my phone to ring. But, if it’s all true, what a wonderful thing this is.” Tolko Industries had announced that it would be shutting down next month, putting 320 full-time employees out of work. But those workers have now approved of allowing a prospective buyer – American Industrial Acquisition Corporation (AIAC) – a three-year exemption in making pension payments, Unifor national representative Paul McKie confirmed.

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United Way Benefits From Canfor Donation

250 News
November 6, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

Prince George, B.C. – Representatives of the United Way of Northern B.C. and Canfor were on hand at the Prince George Cougars’ game Saturday night for a special presentation. Since October 24th a committee at Canfor and Canfor Pulp in Prince George has been holding events including a barbeque and 50/50 draw and employees have had the option of making a pledge through payroll deductions. As a result of fundraising at its operations across the province, Canfor was able to present a cheque for $300,000 to the United Way for programs in communities across the north. The donation will support 200 organizations and 300 programs from Haida Gwaii to McBride to Fort St. John.

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Cut off from America, but not from the campaign

November 7, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

… British Columbians don’t get to vote in the U.S. election although the results are likely to have a major impact on varied issues germane to the province. Here are a few ways the outcome of Tuesday’s vote could affect B.C… Iain Black, president of the Greater Vancouver Board of Trade, says his members have been “increasingly concerned” about Mr. Trump’s anti-trade rhetoric… Gordon Giffin, former U.S. president Bill Clinton’s ambassador to Canada, said he expects the United States will work through the softwood issue regardless of who ends up as president. That said, he added that it is unclear whether a Trump presidency could attract top-notch talent to work out the details. Mr. Giffin, who is forthright in declaring his expectation that Ms. Clinton will win, said Mr. Trump’s views sound more protectionist than those of his Democratic rival.

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St. Landry Parish project will result in more than 65 new jobs

KATC
November 3, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: US East, United States

Today, Gov. John Bel Edwards and CEO Robert W. Latimer of Adobe Machinery Group LLC announced LeMoyen Mill & Timber LLC will acquire and invest an additional $2 million to develop a wood products manufacturing facility in LeMoyen, Louisiana. LeMoyen Mill & Timber, a wholly owned subsidiary of Adobe Machinery Group, will repurpose a lumber mill previously operated by Bayou State Lumber Co. The new company will acquire both standing timber and cut logs, saw boards and timbers and then assemble timber and laminated mats at the facility. LeMoyen Mill & Timber will create 32 new direct jobs, with an average annual salary of $35,000, plus benefits, while retaining 20 jobs from the Bayou State Lumber operation.

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New Wood Manufacturing Facility to Open in Louisiana

By Evelina Croitoru
Commercial Property Executive
November 5, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: US East, United States

Baton Rouge—Le Moyen Mill & Timber LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Adobe Machinery Group, revealed plans to acquire land in order to develop a wood products manufacturing facility in LeMoyen, La. Financial details of the transaction were not disclosed. Le Moyen Mill & Timber LLC intends to invest an additional $2 million for the development project. Le Moyen Mill & Timber LLC was formed to acquire and operate the sawmill’s land, buildings and equipment. The company will repurpose the lumber mill previously operated by Bayou State Lumber Co. In addition, it will purchase both standing timber and cut logs, saw boards and timbers and then assemble timber and laminated mats at the facility, according to Louisiana Economic Development.

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Forest Industries Association against log export tax

Pasifik News
November 7, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: International

THE PNG Forest Industries Association (FIA) has objected to the proposed changes to the log export tax, announced in the National Budget last Tuesday. Treasurer Patrick Pruaitch, in tabling the National Government’s money plan in Parliament, announced the reintroduction of the progressive log export tax on unprocessed old growth logs to capture the resource rent of varying log species. The treasurer said this tax measure was a deliberate policy measure to encourage downstream processing facilities and for additional spin-off economic activities. He said the government was looking to raise up to K620 million (US$195 million) from this and the other tax measures.

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Wood, Paper & Green Building

Hoopa Valley Tribe partners with PJ Woodlands LLC

Eureka Times Standard
November 5, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: United States, US West

The Hoopa Valley Tribe announced Wednesday it has agreed to enter into a strategic partnership with PJ Woodlands LLC to build the first Altree wood-plastic composite production facility. …The partnership with the Hoopa Valley Tribe provides PJ Woodlands with the manufacturing plant, access to the Hoopa Valley Tribal labor force, and woody biomass in sufficient quantity to scale the manufacturing operations over time. The partnership includes a multi-million dollar investment by the Hoopa Valley Tribe which will receive a significant minority equity stake in PJ Woodlands LLC.

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Zaha Hadid Architects to build wooden soccer stadium

by Lloyd Alter
TreeHugger
November 4, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: International

The words “sustainable” and “Zaha” were never heard together when the late Zaha Hadid was alive, but her firm has just won a competition to build a new soccer (which the English call football) stadium that they call “the greenest in the world.” …I would love to see the lifecycle analysis that comes up with that last statistic, Given the energy needed to light and heat a facility like this, as much as I love wood, that seems high. I also don’t think it is accurate to say that it is the first stadium to be made out of wood; historically they all were, and some were lost in tragic fires. However modern wood design of heavy timber is very different from what they used to do; Cross laminated timbers and glulam like you see in these illustrations is very resistant to fire.

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Forestry

Study shows that climate causes differences in Canadian and Scandinavian forests

by Akosua Adasi
The Gateway
November 6, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, International

New research has shown that Canada’s cold winters are what set the boreal forest apart from Scandinavian forests. There area a number of ecological differences between Canadian and Scandinavian forests: Canada’s predator-prey cycles are driven by snowshoe hares and lynx while those of Scandinavia are driven by voles and weasels. Scandinavia also has many more moose and a taller, denser tree canopy. Professor Stan Boutin, an ecologist with the University of Alberta, has found these differences come from differences in climate, and not climate change.

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President’s Perspective – An Ambitious, Transformational Partnership Worthy of Support

By Rick Jeffery
Coast Forest Products Association
November 4, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

I recently spent a week in Ottawa meeting with federal government representatives to discuss the forestry agenda in the lead up to the Federal Budget. As in previous budgets, the leaders of forestry associations across the country recognized that the best approach to advancing the industry was to forward a consolidated and comprehensive agenda with a singular and unified voice. My thanks to the Forest Products Association of Canada (FPAC) team for facilitating this process and assisting greatly in setting up meetings. At the end of the week, it became clear that our vision and plans for achieving them are highly aligned with the Government of Canada. And, just as importantly, that we must work together as partners to continue to deliver a myriad of benefits from the forest sector.

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Barkerville staff shifts to Tolko

Vernon Morning Star
November 6, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Barkerville’s loss is Tolko’s gain. Kiley Sales, the historic site’s commerce, partnership and giving officer, is leaving her position to take up an executive position at the Vernon-based forestry corporation. “I am very fortunate to have worked with Barkerville’s team and with the board,” said Sales. “The diversity of work that this position offered enabled me to create connections with not only the staff, but with the guests, stakeholders.” (END OF STORY)

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Piles of wood debris set to be burned in South Okanagan

Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations
BC Government
November 4, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

The BC Wildfire Service is planning to burn about 75 piles of wood debris in the Mount Kobau area, about 15 kilometres northwest of Osoyoos. These burns are scheduled to start on Monday, Nov. 7 and will be concluded by the end of December 2016. The pile burning will take place on Mount Kobau and also north along the ridge to Reed Lake. Smoke may be visible from Osoyoos and surrounding areas.  … These burns are being conducted as part of the rehabilitation process for the Testalinden Creek wildfire, which burned 5,202 hectares in August 2015.

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Logger using unsafe falling method when he died in accident

by Margaret Speirs
Terrace Standard
November 4, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

A FALLER killed here in 2012 when a tree fell on him was using a prohibited logging practice at the time, concludes a coroners report. Art Loring, 56, was using a method called domino falling in which a number of trees in a line are partially cut with a final one then being cut so that it can be pushed over to the next tree with the others then falling in sequence. In this circumstance Loring had planned to fall seven trees in all with this method. Instead, “he had his back to the partially cut and standing trees when one fell in an unintended direction and struck him in the back. He was pinned beneath the tree and later found deceased,” the coroners report said. “This practice is commonly known as ‘domino falling’ and is prohibited by the BC Faller Training Standard,” read the coroners report.

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Opinion: B.C. government fails to assess health of our forests

by Ben Parfitt, resource policy analyst, Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives.
The Vancouver Sun
November 4, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

When it comes to understanding the risks that B.C.’s forests and forest-dependent communities face, you’d be hard-pressed to find two more qualified individuals than Anthony Britneff and Martin Watts. Between them, the two have worked a combined 70 years in forestry, Britneff serving four decades in senior positions with the provincial forests ministry and Watts a respected consultant specializing in tree growth-and-yield. So when these men say something is wrong, perhaps seriously so, with how our government assesses the health of our forests, we ought to pay attention. In briefs filed with not one, but three different provincial bodies, the duo raises troubling questions about the quality of information the government relies on to make key decisions, the most important being how much forest it is ecologically sound to log.

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Cutting permit, patience expire for community forest

by LAURA KEIL
The Rocky Mountain Goat News
October 31, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Despite many changes at the McBride Community Forest Corp (MCFC) over the past year, members of the public voiced their frustration at the pace of change at last weekend’s annual general meeting. A year after consultants took over management of the McBride Community Forest to help “turn the ship around,” the new Community Forest board was once again appointed, not elected. …Right now they are working on a new Forest Stewardship Plan which they hope to have approved by January. McWilliams says they are trying to juggle balancing the books, supplying local cedar to mills with the reduced annual allowable cut – a difficult task. Community Forest consultant Susan Mulkey says changing the structure of the organization requires the shareholder, the public and several arms of the Province.

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Clear-cuts may work for caribou, not moose

Letter to the editor by Gordon Mackenzie
The Chronicle Journal
November 6, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

In response to your article Oct. 29 regarding the moose management report, yes, the MNRF has missed the mark. The single most likely cause of declining populations is the forest management mosaic emulation of large, progressive, continuous clear-cuts, designed to create caribou habitat where no such animals exist due to human intervention and residence. With over 30 years of experience in timber harvesting operations, I can attest to the success of former block cutting where the harvest area was limited to a maximum of 200 hectares in size and wild animal populations, including moose, were abundant. END OF STORY

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OPINION: A scientific approach to logging

by Lloyd Hines, minister of natural resources for Nova Scotia.
Chronicle Herald
November 5, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

Recently opinions (May the forest be with you, Oct. 29) have generated public discussion about a number of forest practices and have questioned the science behind timber harvesting on Nova Scotia’s government owned Crown land and land owned by private individuals. I am responding so Nova Scotians will fully understand that the decision making in my department is based on science and the natural resources stewardship that is mandated of it. Anyone looking at the workforce of the Department of Natural Resources will see that this is a science-based department — not an arm of industry, special interest groups, landowners, or otherwise. This is a department of professionals: biologists, geologists, surveyors, foresters, ecologists, soil scientists, hydrologists, entomologists, park planners, forest technicians, firefighters and other professions. These are Nova Scotians who care deeply about our land, water, and air, and a sustainable future.

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How planting trees in cities can save thousands of lives

By Chelsea Harvey
The Washington Post
November 2, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States

Yet another study has reaffirmed the idea that living near nature is good for human health — and can even save lives. A new paper, published Monday by the Nature Conservancy, suggests that planting trees in cities can result in cooler temperatures and reduced air pollution for millions of urban residents. The paper was released at the annual meeting of the American Public Health Association, but it has not been published in a peer-reviewed journal. The study indicates that a global investment of $3.2 billion throughout 245 of the world’s largest cities — that’s about $4 per resident — could reduce pollution-related mortalities by anywhere from 2.7 to 8.7 percent, saving up to 36,000 lives every year.

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America is a nation of laws

by Mike Garrity, executive director of the Alliance for the Wild Rockies
Helena Independent Record
November 7, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West


Sandy Compton’s recent opinion column in the IR complained that the Alliance for the Wild Rockies wouldn’t come to their collaborative meetings. But why would the Alliance, which is an organization that advocates for healthy forests and recovery of endangered species, want to conspire to help local people in the Kootenai National Forest figure out how to break federal laws? Compton’s collaborative group came up with a less-than-amazing plan where federal taxpayers across the nation would pay millions of dollars to subsidize clearcutting of lynx, grizzly bear and bull trout habitat on the national forests owned by all Americans, not just a handful in the Kootenai. And as the court ruling proved, their plan ignored the legal requirements of the Endangered Species Act.

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Campfire-caused wildfires burned 1.2 million acres in last decade

By Perry Backus
The Missoulian
November 6, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

In the decade between 2006 and 2015, humans started nearly half of the 73,110 wildfires on national forest lands. Campfires were responsible for one-third of the 33,700 human-caused wildfires in that decade. Those fires burned over 1.2 million acres. This year saw 8,500 acres burned in the Roaring Lion fire outside Hamilton. Four young people were charged last week with negligent arson, a felony, for allegedly leaving the campfire that started that wildfire, which destroyed 16 homes and cost $11 million to fight.

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Pioneer Fire finally 100 percent contained, Forest Service reports

Idaho Statesman
November 4, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

The fire, which had burned more than 188,000 acres since mid-July, was declared fully contained on Thursday, according to InciWeb statistics updated by Boise National Forest officials. Firefighters are collecting the last remaining equipment and signs, and less than a mile of dozer line repair work remains, the Forest Service reported, adding that the work should be complete by Saturday.

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As beetles ravage Western forests, the ancient bristlecone remains unscathed

By Brian Maffly
Salt Lake Tribune
November 4, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

The bristlecone pine is not only the world’s longest-lived organism, but it is also virtually immune to the pine beetle attacks that are decimating conifer forests around the West, according to new research from Utah State University and the U.S. Forest Service. In a study released this month, researchers concluded that the properties that help individual trees survive for up to 5,000 years on wind-hammered alpine ridges may also serve these pines well in repelling the beetle outbreak that scientists attribute to a warming climate. “Bristlecone grows in these extreme harsh environments. The ability to grow here and live a long time is enhanced by having high resin and dense wood. That happens to help against beetles,” said Barbara Bentz, an entomologist with the Forest Service’s Rocky Mountain Research Station in Logan.

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Congress must address dire condition of forests

Dale Bosworth, former chief of the U.S. Forest Service, and Jack Blackwell, former Pacific Southwest Region forester for the U.S. Forest Service.
Helena Independent Record
November 7, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Many of our National Forests are in dire condition, and Congress must take urgent action to address this worsening crisis. Catastrophic wildfires have once again wreaked havoc this year, leaving nearly 5 million acres burned, destroying hundreds of homes, unleashing untold amounts of carbon dioxide into the air, and, most tragically, claiming several lives. These unacceptable outcomes are hardly new; they have been harsh realities for many years running. And with tens of millions of dead and damaged trees across many National Forests, the problem will only grow worse. …While the Forest Service is working to increase treatments on at-risk acres, we urge Congress to address the many barriers to achieving the level of management that is necessary.

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Old friends clash in battle over old-growth logging in Tongass

By Elizabeth Shogren
Alaska Dispatch News
November 6, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

…The Tongass’ rainforests cover an archipelago of Alaska islands replete with waterfalls and glaciers, and DellaSala fell in love with the area while doing field research in the 1990s on the impacts of logging on wolves, Sitka black-tailed deer and songbirds. DellaSala now is promoting a plan — supported by many environmental groups and former Forest Service leaders — to phase out clear-cutting in five years. “It’s disappointing that we have a president who is so engaged on climate change and an agency that is so unsavvy,” DellaSala says. “It’s not in step with the rest of the administration’s global leadership on climate change.” A quicker end to clear-cutting old growth could also protect habitat for wildlife, including five species of salmon that are key to the region’s economy.

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State forests to see more cutting

by Lee Bergquist
Milwaukee Journal Sentinel
November 5, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

Wisconsin officials are earmarking nearly 40,000 more acres of state forestland for intensive logging — a move pushed by the Legislature to provide a fresh source of timber to the forest products industry. But opponents, which see the change as a major shift in the management of public forests, question the need for such action and are worried about the potential ecological harm that could come from more logging. They also criticized lawmakers for limiting public involvement in the process, including the role of the citizen-led Natural Resources Board to review changes in how timber is harvested in state forests. In 2015, lawmakers working on the state budget directed the DNR to increase acreage eligible for the most intensive timber cutting to 75% of northern state forests. That’s up from the current level of 66%.

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Fires burning in DeKalb, Forsyth counties

By Steve Burns
The Atlanta Journal-Constitution
November 4, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

 October was a record month for fire activity in the state—DeKalb County firefighters were battling a blaze Friday afternoon near the First Baptist Church in Lithonia, Channel 2 Action News reported. … There were 64 new fires reported statewide since Thursday, Georgia Forestry Commission spokeswoman Wendy Burnett said. In all, October wildfire activity in the state was more than 200 times the five-year average for the month, the GFC said in a Facebook post. “We are stretched with fires breaking out all over,” Burnett said, “but our folks are some of the most dedicated and professional that you could hope to meet. So we are confident when we say, ‘We’ve got this.’”

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Forestry says Lookout Mountain wildfire is growing, forcing road shutdowns

By Mary Howard
NewsChannel9.com
November 5, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

Lookout Mountain, GA — The Georgia Forestry Commission says a wildfire on Lookout Mountain is growing. Fire officials say the fire had been quiet for the past few days, but extremely dry conditions and windy conditions have fueled it. In addition, crews are dealing with steep terrain that makes fighting the fire difficult. “We do not have any access at all,” said Pat Stockett, with the Georgia Forestry Commission. “It is so steep. And it is so rocky. The only thing we can do right now is fight fire with fire. And use dozers where we can.” Crews use controlled burns – to control the fire. “All it does is remove the fuel between the fire and the fire break,” said Stockett. “So it actually increases our defensible space.”

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Koalas ‘under siege’ from policy changes set to destroy habitat, report finds The Guardian

By Michael Slezak
The UK Guardian
November 6, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: International

New South Wales government is failing to protect koalas by allowing further land clearing, logging and habitat destruction, National Parks Association says. Koalas are “under siege” across NSW, with three separate policies poised to be implemented set to destroy their remaining habitats, according to a briefing paper written by the National Parks Association of NSW. In light of the increasing threats, the paper calls on the NSW EPA to protect koala habitats. “The NSW government is completely failing to conserve and protect koala habitat,” the report says. “Koalas can lay claim to be the most poorly managed species in eastern Australia at present – which is hugely disappointing in light of their beloved status.”

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NSW joins fight against Bob Brown anti-protest law challenge

by Sean Nicholls
Sydney Morning Herald
November 5, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: International

Days after proclaiming harsh new anti-protest laws, the NSW government has intervened in a High Court challenge to similar Tasmanian laws by former Australian Greens leader Bob Brown. A notice filed to the High Court on Monday by Crown Solicitor Michael Sexton reveals NSW Attorney-General Gabrielle Upton is seeking to support the Tasmanian government. In January, Mr Brown was among five people charged under Tasmanian anti-protest laws while protesting the logging of 49 hectares of the Lapoinya forest in the state’s north-west.

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Canadian fights for tropical dry forests at UN meeting

by Bob Weber
Canadian Press in CTV News
November 6, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: International

EDMONTON — A Canadian scientist plans to warn the world’s policy-makers they can no longer ignore that the effects of climate change on a type of tropical forest are already forcing mass migrations of people. “The tropics are not just the Amazon,” said Arturo Sanchez, who has been invited to appear this week before a United Nations-sponsored climate change meeting in Marrakech, Morocco, to speak about the tropical dry forests of Central America. The lush green carpet of the Amazonian basin is what leaps to mind when tropical forests are mentioned. But Sanchez says the dry forests — where torrential rainy seasons alternate with a long arid season — are the most endangered forest ecosystem in the tropics.

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Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy

Missouri researchers say biomass mix can cut emissions at some coal plants

By Karen Uhlenhuth
MidWest Energy News
November 3, 2016
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: US East, United States

Burning woody refuse from logging and forest-products manufacturing could, at low cost, help coal-dependent Midwestern power plants meet the carbon-emission reductions mandated in the Clean Power Plan, according to the findings of a pair of researchers from the University of Missouri. Furthermore, the researchers proposed that carbon reductions would be greatest, and the cost lowest, if states shared those resources. A heavily-forested state, such as Minnesota, for example, could make most-efficient use of biomass, and could in essence “sell” those carbon savings to a state with less available forest waste, such as Missouri.

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