Tree Frog Forestry News

Daily Archives: November 8, 2016

Business & Politics

Stella-Jones Reports Strong 2016 Third Quarter Results

MarketWired press release
November 8, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada

MONTREAL, QUEBEC– – Stella-Jones Inc. (TSX:SJ) today announced financial results for its third quarter ended September 30, 2016. “Stella-Jones’ sales and net income growth in the third quarter reflects the contribution from acquisitions and our greater reach in the residential lumber product category. As anticipated, year-over-year railway tie sales were lower following strong demand in the previous twelve months, while market conditions remained relatively soft in the utility pole category. Still, improved working capital resulted in a solid cash flow generation that we directed towards reducing our debt,” said Brian McManus, President and Chief Executive Officer.

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Canadian business warily eyes US election pitfalls while Trudeau preaches calm

By Bruce Cheadle
Canadian Business
November 7, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada

…Canada is vulnerable to any thickening of U.S. border security, a constant Trump theme. Canada requires policy collaboration on climate change, especially given the looming national carbon price starting in 2018. The country will need to find some U.S. goodwill to resolve the never-ending softwood lumber dispute and Canada must also fend off any new Buy American provisions — to name just a few bilateral issues. Craig Alexander, chief economist at the Conference Board of Canada, said financial markets “would unambiguously prefer a Clinton victory and a Republican Congress” — thus ensuring the greatest likelihood of policy continuity. Trump is the wild card. “The financial market reaction would likely be enormously negative in a knee-jerk fashion.”

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TimberWest Donates Entire Somenos Lakebed to Ducks Unlimited

TimberWest
November 7, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

North Cowichan, BC: Today, TimberWest and Ducks Unlimited Canada celebrate a momentous occasion for conservation on Vancouver Island with the announcement of TimberWest’s donation of the entire Somenos lake bed to Ducks Unlimited Canada. This generous donation will benefit the over 200 species of birds and waterfowl that call the area home. “Never has an entire lakebed been legally surveyed and donated to a single non-government organization,” says Leslie Bogdan, Director of Regional Operations BC/Boreal Region, Ducks Unlimited Canada. “This is a testament to the fifteen-year long partnership cultivated between TimberWest and Ducks Unlimited Canada.

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Pope Resources Reports Third Quarter Income Of $2.0 Million

PR Newswire
November 7, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States, US West

POULSBO, Wash. — Pope Resources (NASDAQ: POPE) reported net income attributable to unitholders of $2.0 million, or $0.45 per ownership unit, on revenue of $13.2 million for the quarter ended September 30, 2016. This compares to net income attributable to unitholders of $615,000, or $0.13 per ownership unit, on revenue of $15.2 million for the comparable period in 2015. Net income attributable to unitholders for the nine months ended September 30, 2016 totaled $1.4 million, or $0.30 per ownership unit, on revenue of $37.0 million.

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Forestry Company fined over environmental issues

Scoop.co.nz
November 8, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: International

A forestry company, Forest Owner Marketing Services, has been fined $33,520 as a result of environmental issues that arose during its forest harvesting operation on land south-east of ?p?tiki. Two contractors engaged by Forest Owner Marketing Services were also fined for their role in the offending. Gaddum Construction Limited was fined $15,000 and Chance Brown was fined $10,500. The charges are related to unlawful sediment discharges to land in circumstances that may have resulted in that sediment entering streams in the forest. The offending occurred between 23 October 2014 and 28 May 2015 when the defendants were carrying out forestry harvesting work and associated earthworks in a pine forest at Tirohanga.

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Institute of Chartered Foresters National Conference 2017: Trees, People and the Built Environment 3

Institute of Chartered Foresters
November 7, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: International

The triennial urban trees research conference, Trees People and the Built Environment 3 will take place next spring, following on from acclaimed events in 2011 and 2014. This year the conference will focus on two significant areas of research; Day 1: Roads to Place – Why trees are an integral part of highway transport design; Day 2: The Health Crisis – the role of trees in improving human health (Mental, physical, social and cultural). The event will provide a platform for UK and international researchers and practitioners to showcase their vital work in these areas, and help both built and natural environment professionals turn this research into action.

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ForestrySA boss’s attempt to fix contract error led to dishonesty charge, court told

By Candice Prosser
ABC News, Australia
November 8, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: International

ForestrySA’s former chief executive, who made the “wrong call” by giving a sawmill an small discount to square a mistake in a sales contract, has paid a big price for a minor error, a court has heard. Adrian Hatch, 58, was due to stand trial in the District Court in Mount Gambier last month for abuse of public office, but pleaded guilty to the downgraded charge of dishonestly performing duties. The court heard the offending related to a $20,000 grant that Forestry SA had agreed to pay a sawmill to help subsidise a software upgrade for a log scanner.

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Forestry

The Hungarian refugees who helped shape Canada’s forests

By John Kurucz, of Hungarian descent and related to four of the Sopron alumni 
Vancouver Courier
November 4, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

More than 200 students, faculty and family members fled Hungary 60 years ago. Alongside 30 classmates armed with rifles and anti-tank cannons, Antal Kozak barrelled down a stretch of highway in western Hungary prepared to fight against a combat juggernaut immeasurably more powerful than his own. The date was Nov. 4, 1956 around 4 p.m. Kozak was in his early 20s and studying forestry at the University of Sopron, located roughly 15 kilometres from the Austrian border. His home country was in the midst of a two-week uprising against Soviet rule that was on the precipice of total collapse and defeat. It began on Oct. 23, now recognized as a national holiday in Hungary, when more than 20,000 protesters demanded democratic reform and freedom from Communist rule in the nation’s capital of Budapest. “It was a very, very difficult time in my life,” Kozak recalled.

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Park could limit public access

letter by Glen Bonderud, president, SC Community Forest
Coast Reporter
November 3, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

First of all, thank you Minister Thomson for stating the government’s position on the expansion of Mount Elphinstone Provincial Park, as published in Coast Reporter on Oct. 7. The Sunshine Coast Community Forest is very concerned about another 1,500 to 2,500-hectare park. The loggers in particular are being portrayed as uncaring and insensitive to community wishes, yet the logging industry helped build and continues to contribute to our communities. …For the past couple of years, ELF has been lobbying our local politicians and the B.C. government, stating that their wishes represent the wishes of the whole community. That is simply not the case. – …I am not against parks, but we need a balance of jobs, recreation and amenities for a community to prosper and deliver fair opportunities to all.

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Attack strategy against killer looks familiar

The Chronicle Journal
November 7, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

Thunder Bay may soon have a strategy to battle the tree-killing emerald ash borer. The price tag for any of the options will be between $6 to $7 million. During the summer, city council was presented with a number of options to deal with the invasive species. Instead of adopting one of the ideas, council told city administrators to look at alternatives. The recommendations to be presented to councillors today don’t appear to have changed since they were first put forward. The recommendation is for the city to take an active management approach where 50 per cent of ash trees would be saved through chemical treatment. The infected trees would be removed as they die. The cost for this option ranges between $6.3 to $6.8 million.

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Friends of Redtail worry cutting will hurt moose habitat

By Carol Dunn
New Glasgow Nova Scotia
November 7, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

Members of the Friends of Redtail Society are worried about an endangered species after forest was cut near lands they own in Scotsburn. Group members found fresh mainland moose tracks on Crown land crossing the spot where FRS member Billy MacDonald spent a month camping this spring to encourage people to take an interest in government-owned lands. “They’ve scared this moose out of there,” said MacDonald. “This is one of the reasons we don’t want cutting there. It’s a natural corridor for the moose.” He describes the cutting as “quite aggressive,” and said his group would like to see closer monitoring by the provincial government regarding activity on Crown lands.

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Council approves $6.3-million emerald ash borer plan

by: Jon Thompson
TB Newswatch
November 7, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

THUNDER BAY — It has been six months since the emerald ash borer was first discovered in Thunder Bay but city council finally unanimously supports a plan to confront the invasive species. On Monday, council voted to commit $550,000 of its 2017 budget to efforts it hopes will absorb the pest’s impact. The payment will be the first in a $6.3-million, 10-year fight that will likely wipe out the city’s 6,300 ash trees. “We’re pleased city council has endorsed our recommendation,” said city urban forest program specialist Rena Viehbeck, whose office estimates the emerald ash borer infestation is in its second or third year of an anticipated nine.

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‘On the cutting edge’: Health drink made from birch sap brings new life to Benton forest

By Ryan Cooke
CBC News
November 7, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

A partnership between Rodrigues Winery and a natural health company stands to bring two dozen jobs to the province and launch a Newfoundland-made product into European markets. The winery and distillery will partner with Semintha Nutraceuticals to use birch sap from Home Pond, near Benton, to produce a health drink for global distribution. The end product will be a cranberry or blueberry drink using the sap’s natural sweetness. “We’ve been trying to develop this business in Newfoundland for two or three years,” said Semintha chairman Nicholas Katsepontes.

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Daines and the missing lynx

by George Ochenski
The Missoulian
November 7, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

When Montana’s Democrat U.S. Sen. Jon Tester pulled wolves off the Endangered Species List by congressional fiat using a rider on an unrelated spending bill, a chill went through the conservation community. It was unprecedented in the nearly four decades since the Endangered Species Act was signed into law and many predicted other politicians would follow Tester’s example if and when any endangered plants or animals got in the way of resource extraction. Last week those fears that politics would again trump science came true as Montana’s Republican U.S. Sen. Steve Daines announced his plan to urge Congress to overturn a judicial ruling that protected dwindling populations of Canada lynx.

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Variable tree growth after fire protects forests from future bark beetle outbreaks

by Kelly April Tyrrell
Phys.org
November 7, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Do severe wildfires make forests in the western United States more susceptible to future bark beetle outbreaks? The answer, in a study published Monday (Nov. 7, 2016) in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, is no. By leading to variability in the density and size of trees that grow during recovery, large fires reduce the future vulnerability of forests to bark beetle attacks and broad-scale outbreaks. “Fire creates a very heterogeneous landscape,” says study co-author Kenneth Raffa, professor of entomology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. “Beetles can only reproduce in an individual tree once, so they take advantage of this patch of trees and that patch of trees as they become available, but when the number and size of trees vary a lot, it’s hard for a large outbreak to develop.”

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Enviromentalists Object As Wash. Readies Release of Long-Awaited Marbled Murrelet Conservation Plan

knkx.org
November 2, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West


Washington’s Department of Natural Resources will soon release a draft environmental impact statement on its long-term strategy for the marbled murrelet. But some conservation groups are crying foul. …Several conservation groups are raising concerns about the state’s plan. Peter Goldman is director of the Washington Forest Law Center.   “It is ill advised for the Department of Natural Resources to be releasing an environmental impact statement at this time because the DNR is essentially tying the hands and making decisions on behalf of future decisions makers,” Goldman said. Goldman echoed that sentiment in testimony delivered Tuesday at a meeting of the agency’s board.

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The Path Ahead

By Kootenai Forest Stakeholders Coalition Executive Board
Flathead Beacon
November 6, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

The Kootenai National Forest is one of Montana’s hidden secrets. Productive forests, soaring peaks, rushing water, and small communities are around each bend in the road. Even with so much going on to support communities and the land in our area, there’s a lot that is still as it should be. Folks still cut their own wood to heat their homes each winter. They fill their freezers every fall with venison or elk, and they prefer to work out their differences together instead of in the courtroom. It’s in this spirit that a group of business owners, community leaders, mill operators, and conservationists hashed out a plan over time that will provide a more predictable flow of timber, protect access for recreationists, and secure some of the best big game habitat for future generations.

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Mayor declares state of emergency as Lake Lure wildfire spreads

WLOS
November 7, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

LAKE LURE, N.C. — The mayor of Lake Lure has declared a state of emergency after a forest fire that started over the weekend continues to spread. In a press release, the town says the Party Rock Fire that began Nov. 5 at Rumbling Bald Mountain has crossed over some of the established fire lines. As a result, it has now spread beyond the initial 60 acres and is moving north toward some areas of Rumbling Bald Resort. Residents in the Quail Ridge area, including Huntington Road, may be asked to evacuate in the next 24 hours to 48 hours. The town says changing weather conditions and challenging topography have allowed the wildfire to spread, despite efforts from firefighters to contain it.

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Georgia fires continue to burn at alarming rate

WRCBTV
November 7, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

Monday marked yet another day of wildfires around the Tennessee Valley. On Monday, the Georgia Forestry Commission said there were 19 new fires logged into their system Sunday, with one fire Monday morning. The Rocky Face Mountain fire is still holding within the containment lines. Crews continue to monitor the fire for interior burning as well as smoke issues that might be present. The Rough Ridge fire in the Cohutta Wilderness Area on the Chattahoochee National Forest has burned 3,923 acres, and is attributed to lightning. It is considered to be 10% contained as of 10:00am Monday morning. The entire Cohutta Wilderness area is closed, according to the U.S. Forest Service.

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Chattanooga area wildfire smoke triggers ‘Code Red’ air alert

By David Cobb and Steve Johnson
Chattanooga Times Free Press
November 8, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

Expansive wildfires continued burning on the rocky cliffs surrounding the area Monday, with little imminent hope for the rainfall so desperately needed to relieve the hundreds of firefighters tasked with controlling the flames throughout the region. Apart from a few homes in Sequatchie County that were briefly threatened Monday before firefighters pushed the flames back, no other homes or lives were at risk, according to fire officials. However, the smoke that descended on the city proved to be one of the most widespread public nuisances to date, coming on the heels of a roughly month-long series of drought-spurred fires. A Code Red air quality alert is in effect for most of East Tennessee, including the Chattanooga area, until 4 p.m. Wednesday, according to the National Weather Service.

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GIS team selected to aid state forestry commission

by Mike Marshall
University of North Georgia
November 7, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

The Georgia Forestry Commission wants to know how much tree canopy the state had in 2015, and they are contracting a team from the University of North Georgia’s (UNG) Lewis F. Rogers Institute for Environmental & Spatial Analysis (IESA) to conduct the study. Dr. Allison Bailey, associate professor in IESA, is the principal investigator of the project leading a team of students to quantify the amount of canopy observed in high-resolution satellite photos taken this past year. “Urban areas and the amount of tree canopy affect our environmental conditions,” Bailey said. “It’s incredibly useful to know how Georgia’s canopy has changed over time.”

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$7,5000 Awarded to Conservation Innovators

By World Wildlife Fund
New Zealand Scoop
November 8, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: International

Using drone trackers for wildlife research, monitoring health of waterways and developing an app to help Kauri conservation – these are the winning ideas of WWF’s 2016 Conservation Innovation Awards, announced today. The Kiwi innovators behind these ideas will each be awarded a $25,000 grant to recognise their contribution to innovation in conservation. The three winners will be congratulated at an event in Wellington tonight, MCed by journalist and public speaker, Rod Oram, and with Hon Steven Joyce, Minister of Science and Innovation, as the keynote speaker.

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Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy

Planned biomass plants still simmering for Central Oregon

By Hilary Corrigan
The Bend Bulletin
November 8, 2016
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: United States, US West

While two firms continue to develop plans for new biomass facilities in Central Oregon that would produce power and fuel, a utility continues researching whether biomass could run its coal-fired power plant in the region. Biogreen Sustainable Energy Co., based in Vancouver, Washington, still plans to build a 25 megawatt facility — first suggested in 2009 — on a nearly 20-acre site in La Pine’s industrial park. “We’re just on hold,” said Rob Broberg, president of the firm. Building the $75 million project depends on securing a contract to sell the power, likely to a utility in Oregon or California trying to meet requirements for renewable energy. “I think this winter’s going to be very interesting,” Broberg said of progress on contracts.

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Maine ports gearing up to export wood chips to Europe

By Tux Turkel
Portland Press Herald
November 8, 2016
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: US East, United States


Maine is poised to finally begin shipping wood chips to Europe for power generation next year if plans underway at Eastport and Searsport stay on schedule. After years of false starts, these developments would be especially welcome now, as the ongoing decline of the paper and in-state biomass power industries has hit hundreds of loggers and truckers who used to harvest and move fiber to Maine mills and generators. The value of U.S.-based wood fuel sent to the European Union in 2015 exceeded $684 million, according to export research firm WISERtrade, but none of it came from Maine. The state’s first opportunity could come next year in Eastport, where the port authority has been working on export plans since 2009.

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