Tree Frog Forestry News

Daily Archives: November 14, 2016

Business & Politics

Trump presidency could devastate Canada-U.S. trade: expert

by Cindy E. Harnett , Andrew Duffy
Victoria Times Colonist
November 10, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, United States

Donald Trump’s threats to rip up trade agreements could be devastating to Canada, but could also send more tourists, professionals and students north, say business leaders. His platform promises, including ripping up the North American Free Trade Agreement, which governs trade among the U.S., Canada and Mexico, hang in the air. Saul Klein, dean of the Gustavson School of Business at the University of Victoria, said the Trump presidency could be devastating for Canada’s trade with the U.S. Klein said soon after Trump takes office in January, he would expect the negotiating climate on trade files to take on a much darker tone — “our way or the highway.”

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Kelowna leaders discuss year ahead and a Trump presidency

By Alex Soloducha
Kelowna Now
November 10, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

Kelowna Chamber of Commerce members were treated to a special lunch on Wednesday, where local MPs and MLAs talked future plans and addressed “the elephant in the room.” President elect Donald Trump was on everyone’s minds after his unexpected win. …As the Minister of Forests for B.C., Kelowna-Mission MLA Steve Thomson, said he is working with the federal government to get a new softwood lumber trade agreement with the U.S., something many are skeptical of with a Trump government. Because B.C. produces 55 per cent of softwood lumber production in Canada, Thomson said the agreement is crucial and will be reached despite Trump’s seemingly anti-trade mentality.

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Will Trump pull out of NAFTA, and what would happen to B.C.?

By Simon Little
AM 630 News
November 10, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

“NAFTA is the worst trade deal maybe ever signed anywhere.” Those are the words of the man now at the helm of Canada’s biggest trading partner, worth nearly $900-billion a year in some estimates. On the campaign trail, Donald Trump pledged to renegotiate the North American Free Trade Agreement, or pull the U.S. out of it completely if he didn’t get what he wanted. So will he pull the trigger? “We are in uncharted territory and to deny that would be dishonest,” says Keith Head with the UBC Sauder School of Business, adding there’s nothing to stop the U.S. from leaving NAFTA with six months notice. Head says Trump is the ultimate wildcard, and that no one knows what he will actually do now that he’s taking office. But he says despite that uncertainty, he doesn’t think we’ll see change any time soon.

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Tolko mill officially sold to Canadian Kraft Paper Industries

Agreement reached Thursday says all current Manitoba employees to stay on at mill
CBC News
November 10, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

The Tolko paper mill in The Pas, Man. has officially been sold to Canadian Kraft Paper Industries Limited. On Thursday the Manitoba government said the sale was completed after being in the works for several weeks. The purchaser is affiliated with the turn-around company American Industrial Acquisition Corporation. “This is just like the best news you could ever have in a lifetime,” said The Pas Mayor Jim Scott. Scott said not that long ago, the town was told there was no hope for a buyer. “And yet here we are. The deal is done,” he said.

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Northern Manitoba mill gets new owner after deal with workers, province

Canadian Press in CTV News
November 10, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

THE PAS, Man. – Just weeks before it was to close, Manitoba’s northern pulp and paper mill has a new owner. Tolko Industries Ltd. announced plans in September to close the mill in The Pas next month because it was no longer financially viable. That would have thrown 300 people out of work. American Industrial Acquisition Corporation then sent Tolko a letter of intent to purchase the mill, subject to several conditions. Workers at the mill have voted to accept a 10 per cent wage rollback for five years and given the new owners a three-year holiday from making pension solvency payments. The province is allowing the mill’s new owners to defer pension contributions for three years while the town has also agreed to a tax holiday.

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Media Statement from the BC Lumber Trade Council on the U.S. Election

BC Lumber Trade Council
November 9, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

VANCOUVER, B.C. – Susan Yurkovich, President of the BC Lumber Trade Council (BCLTC) issued a statement today: “BC lumber producers greatly appreciate the leadership of the Prime Minister, Minister Chrystia Freeland, Premier Christy Clark and Minister Steve Thomson on making softwood lumber a priority issue with the U.S. We don’t expect the results of the U.S. election to change this priority. Access to the U.S. market for Canadian softwood lumber has been the subject of trade talks and litigation between the governments of Canada and the U.S. spanning generations, and both Republican and Democratic administrations in the United States. Canada is an important supplier of lumber products to the U.S. With the U.S. economy growing, and housing and construction starts on the rise, the U.S. lumber industry alone cannot meet the needs of its domestic consumers and relies on Canadian lumber products.  

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Trump & softwood lumber

By Wayne Moore
Castanet Kelowna
November 10, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

Tuesday night’s election of Donald Trump as president-elect of the United States could have disastrous consequences for softwood lumber exports from B.C. The softwood lumber agreement between Canada and the U.S. ran out more than a year ago, and negotiations to come up with a new deal have yet to be successful. Recently, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and outgoing President Barack Obama vowed to get a deal done. …Thomson said there’s still time to get a deal done with the current administration, but that it has been a challenge. “We still have an opportunity to do that, but it takes engagement and it takes a willing partner at the table in terms of negotiations. We are continuing to push for that.

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Sale of Tolko mill complete

by David Larkins
Winnipeg Sun
November 10, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

A paper mill that serves as a key economic driver in northern Manitoba has received an 11th hour rescue, less than a month before it was slated to be shut down. Tolko Industries announced Thursday it has completed a sale of its pulp, paper and saw mill in The Pas to Canadian Kraft Paper Industries, a move that will spare more than 300 jobs. Swampy Cree Holdings, an economic conglomeration of eight First Nation communities, was also pivotal in the joint agreement, which avoids a scheduled Dec. 2 shutdown of the mill.  As part of the deal, workers agreed to a 10% wage rollback for five years and a three-year relief on pension solvency payments.

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Wynne calls Trump’s trade plans ‘dangerous’ for Canada

By Adrian Morrow
Globe and Mail
November 10, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada East, Canada

Kathleen Wynne says U.S. president-elect Donald Trump’s promise to tear up trade deals is “dangerous” for Canada and his racially charged election rhetoric “very disturbing.” …She cited forestry as just one area where Mr. Trump’s policies could be an economic roadblock to Ontario. “Will we ever get a softwood lumber deal? I don’t know. I’m very worried about that because our forestry industry has a lot of capacity, and if we don’t have access to markets, then that’s a dangerous thing,” she said. Mr. Trump rallied disaffected voters with a campaign pitch that included building a wall along the U.S.-Mexican border, rounding up and deporting 11 million illegal immigrants and banning Muslims from entering the country.

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Crumbling timber industry puts rural Idahoans at crossroads

By Elaine Williams
Idaho Statesman
November 12, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States, US West

OROFINO, IDAHO – David Bartlett stopped frequently to chat with friends as he made inquiries with employers at a recent Idaho Department of Labor job fair in Orofino. The nonchalance of the former Tri-Pro Forest Products employee and father of five children disguised very real stress. “My last paycheck is coming up,” said Bartlett, of Kooskia. “After that, I don’t know what I’m going to do. I hope I find something.” …Clearwater County’s unemployment rate was 7.4 percent in September, the most recent month for which numbers are available. That figure doesn’t fully describe how tough Clearwater County’s job market is. It doesn’t account for the jobs lost at Tri-Pro, which continued a trend that started in 2000 when Potlatch closed its Pierce plywood mill.

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Trump’s presidential victory brings optimism to Oregon’s timber industry, worry to environmental groups

By Dylan Darling
The Register-Guard
November 13, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States, US West

When he visited Eugene last spring, Donald Trump promised to revive Oregon’s timber industry, which for decades has been hamstrung by severe curbs against logging in federal forests west of the ­Cascades summit. “Timber jobs (in Oregon) have been cut in half since 1990,” he said during his May 6 stump speech to a revved-up crowd at the Lane Events Center. “We are going to bring them up, folks, we are going to do it really right, we are going to bring them up, OK?” Trump didn’t offer specifics as to how — or how much — he would revive logging and milling, but he alluded to ­loosening federal restrictions. Now, Trump supporters and critics in Oregon will see if he can live up to his promise.

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Buyers of North Woods lands hopeful about future of Maine forest products

By Darren Fishell
Bangor Daily News
November 13, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: US East, United States

PORTLAND, Maine — The private family trust buying up massive tracts of Maine’s North Woods views the acquisitions as long-term investments in the evolution of the state’s forest products industry. Gary Bahlkow, a forestry consultant managing more than 290,000 acres purchased by the Tall Timber Trust, said the land would largely remain working forest, though the family trust has split off specific parcels in transactions with the Nature Conservancy.

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Investors build wood-pellet plant in Arkansas, possible spur for northern Minnesota economy

By Adam Belz
Star Tribune
November 12, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: US East, United States

A group of International Falls businessmen will open a brand-new $230 million wood-pellet plant in Arkansas next week that could offer a blueprint for economic development in northern Minnesota. Highland Pellets will begin churning out 600,000 metric tons of pellets per year for a wood-fired power plant in England. The company is run by, among others, Dennis Wagner, the president of Wagner Construction, and Marty Goulet, its chief financial officer. A Thursday ribbon-cutting for the factory in Pine Bluff, Ark., will be attended by Arkansas Gov. Asa Hutchinson. 

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Forestry

Remembering the Canadian Forestry Corps

By Derek Nighbor, CEO of the Forest Products Association of Canada
The Hill
November 11, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada

November 11th marks Remembrance Day, a time to remember those who have served in the armed forces—including a little known group called the Canadian Forestry Corps. …On February 16, 1916 British Colonial Secretary, Andrew Bonar Law, made a request of the Governor General of Canada to deploy Canadian lumbermen to aid in the cutting and processing of timber. Later that year, the Canadian Forestry Corps was created. The request was an unusual one—regularly Canada would ship processed timber across the Atlantic to Britain. However, due to the high risk of travelling overseas from German U-boats, it was deemed safer to bring the manpower to work in the forests of Britain and continental Europe.

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Canada’s Choosing A National Bird (And It’s Surprisingly Suspenseful)

By Jeff Wells, Senior Scientist, International Boreal Conservation Campaign
Huffington Post Canada
November 11, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada

Ask any American what their national bird is and they’ll be sure to tell you it’s the Bald Eagle. Ask a Canadian the same question and they’re likely to shift the conversation to the weather or last night’s hockey game. Why? Because Canada doesn’t have a national bird. That’s about to change. And unlike in the United States, everyday Canadians are playing a role in the selection. Canadians cast their votes in a recent public poll asking which bird would best represent the nation. On November 16th, the Royal Canadian Geographical Society will announce their official recommendation for the national bird, based on the public poll, an expert panel and other input.

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Bring On the Drones

By Tyler Hooper
The Tyee
November 12, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

This past March, B.C. conservation photographer TJ Watt captured something incredible on camera: the ascent of three climbers up Canada’s second-largest known Douglas-fir tree. The tree, affectionately known as “Big Lonely Doug,” 216 feet high and 12.4 feet in diameter, stands in a clear-cut north of Port Renfrew on Vancouver Island in a place known as Eden Grove. “[Doug] highlights both the magnificence of B.C.’s old-growth forests, just with its sheer grandeur and scale, and also the destruction of these ecosystems,” Watt said. In 2012 the area around Doug was clear-cut by logging company Teal-Jones. Doug was spared only due to a sympathetic logger.

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Premier to talk trade, meet Queen, on visit to London

By Rob Shaw
Vancouver Sun
November 13, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

VICTORIA — B.C.’s premier will get an audience with the Queen at Buckingham Palace this week, as part of trip the United Kingdom to honour the Great Bear Rainforest that could also potentially boost provincial trade with Great Britain. …The Queen will formally induct B.C.’s Great Bear Rainforest into the Queen’s Commonwealth Canopy, a program that promotes the conservation of indigenous forests for future generations. …Trade between the U.K. and B.C. is relatively small, compared to the U.S. and China. Tourism remains perhaps the largest economic link. Lumber and fuel wood make up the bulk of B.C.’s almost $400 million in commodity exports to the U.K. in 2015.

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Opinion: A contractor’s perspective on forestry

By Calvin Archibald, president, Next Generation Forest Management Ltd.
Chronicle Herald
November 12, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

Nova Scotians are sometimes negative towards necessary, commonly accepted and approved forest sustainability practices. In the press there appears to be a persistent anti-forestry-resource-management bias. If the growing lake-cottage community finds a lake becoming stagnant, a drone is sent up to find a clear cut and some will forever believe that is the cause. Earlier this month, I joined other industry people from across Canada at a UBC Faculty of Forestry site in B.C. UBC has record undergraduate enrolment in their forestry faculty, whereas, in Nova Scotia, interest in a forestry career can be unfairly maligned.

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Battle ramps up against invasive species

Chronicle Journal
November 12, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

Ontario is taking more steps to protect the environment and w ildlife by banning damaging invasive species. The province is prohibiting and restricting 19 invasive species to prevent their arrival and control their spread, the Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry said. New regulations under the Invasive Species Act that are in effect ban the import, breeding, purchase and sale of 19 invasive species, including Asian carp and phragmites. The new rules also allow the government to establish special restrictions in certain areas of the province if these species are discovered, and to enforce strong penalties for individuals who knowingly bring these species into Ontario.

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Kissing our ash goodbye

Letter by Fredrick Johnson
Chronicle Journal
November 10, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

The spread of the emerald ash borer was facilitated by the overuse of green ash to replace elms that had died in the central United States. Unfortunately for us, in Thunder Bay green ash represents about 25 per cent of city trees whereas it has been suggested not more than 7 per cent is the ideal percentage to ensure tree diversity. It only makes sense to reduce the percentage by cutting down infected ash trees and replacing them with less vulnerable species. Since millions of dollars have been spent by our neighbours to the south without any real success, why does this city feel we can succeed where others have failed?

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Asian Long-Horned Beetle Genome Sequenced

GenomeWeb
November 11, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States

NEW YORK – A team reporting in Genome Biology today has sequenced the genome of the Asian long-horned beetle, Anoplophora glabripennis, uncovering genes suspected of contributing to the insect’s destructive wood-feeding ways. …The Asian long-horned beetle is getting more and more attention for its ability to spread to sites around the world, the team noted. As they systematically bore and tunnel into wood from ornamental, orchard, and forest trees, the beetles leave huge economic losses behind them, in the US and beyond. In an effort to better understand how beetles feed on — and derive nutrition from — woody plants, the researchers used the Illumina HiSeq 2000 to sequence DNA from female Asian long-horned beetle larvae with libraries containing four insert sizes.

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The future of timber: a forecast

by APRIL EHRLICH
The News-Review
November 11, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West


Wood is cool again. Those words offered a glimmer of hope to attendees of the Roseburg Area Chamber of Commerce’s Economic Forecast conference in Canyonville on Thursday morning. Guest speaker Travis Joseph, president American Forest Resource Council, told attendees that the timber industry is making a comeback. That is, once the federal government loosens its grip on logging regulations. “Wood is cool again,” he said. “It is. People are starting to really realize how important wood is in our economy and our communities. People are thinking, ‘Oh, we could be building buildings out of wood.’”

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Scientists finish forest plan review

By Bennett Hall
Gazette Times
November 12, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

The U.S. Forest Service has completed a scientific report that could form the basis for changes to the Northwest Forest Plan and is taking public comment on the document. Intended to protect old-growth forest habitat for the northern spotted owl and other threatened species while providing a predictable flow of logs to the timber industry, the plan has governed federal forest policy throughout the region since 1994 and remains a source of controversy more than 20 years later. Early last year federal officials held a series of “listening sessions” to gather public input on how to go about revising management plans for the 17 national forests and seven Bureau of Land Management units within the Northwest Forest Plan area, which covers some 24 million acres of public lands in Oregon, Washington and Northern California.

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Hundreds of acres to be thinned for elk habitat near Mount St. Helens

Longview Daily News
November 10, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Thanks to $40,000 from the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation, the state will thin hundreds of acres in the Mount St. Helens Wilderness for elk habitat preservation beginning in the spring. The state Department of Fish and Wildlife’s $80,000 project will thin between 300 and 500 acres in the Hoffstadt and Mudflow units of the Mount St. Helens Wildlife Area, helping turn what had been a tree farm into a diverse wildlife habitat. Trees and shrubs have also been planted along three miles of Bear Creek in the Mudflow area to help prevent erosion.

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Opinion: Expansion planning excluded county officials

By Colleen Roberts – a Jackson County commissioner
Mail Tribune
November 13, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

There is a recent push to garner support for an expansion to the Cascade-Siskiyou National Monument; not simply an expansion, but a doubling of its size. There are many concerns regarding this proposal: the process of the plan, the plan itself and the reasoning behind the proposal. The planning process to consider such an increase to the existing monument is flawed. First of all, most of this expansion lies in Jackson County, and yet, Jackson County has not been included in the planning process. Instead, legislators have written letters behind the backs of your local elected representatives to the secretary of the interior, circumventing the inclusion and authority of your local government.

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Forest health concepts out of date

By George Wuerthner – ecologist and author of 38 books, including “Wildfire: A Century of Failed Forest Policy.”
Helena Independent Record
November 13, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

In a recent IR editorial, former Forest Service foresters, Dale Bosworth and Jack Blackwell, promoted numerous out-of-date concepts and paradigms about forest health and management. Their editorial demonstrated that they are unfamiliar with the latest science regarding the ecological value of large wildfires, bark beetles and other natural ecological disturbance processes. Ecologists view large mixed to high severity fires, bark beetles, and other natural processes as critical to maintaining healthy forest ecosystems. The dead snags and down wood produced by such events are vital to many wildlife and plants. Indeed, some 2/3 of all wildlife species depend on dead trees at some point in their lives.

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Manage forests for future generations

Roman Zylawy, Mineral County commissioner and Jim Arney, Ph.D in forestry
The Missoulian
November 10, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Regarding the Oct. 12 opinion written by Paul Edwards of the Alliance for the Wild Rockies, we would like to respond. We all enjoy Montana for its forests, rivers and wildlife. So when one speaks of defending our remaining forests and preserving it for the entire population of this country, I have to remind everyone that forests don’t stay preserved forever. …I believe it’s unfair to categorize forest management as “an extractive industry” because that implies removing something from the earth forever. Trees don’t last forever and can’t ever be preserved as they are; they can only be groomed, thinned and managed. Many environmentalists dislike waste and they advocate habits to help conserve, like recycling. Why not apply that premise towards our beautiful forests and stop wasting them?

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Forest fires

Letter by Don Adair, Boise
Idaho Statesman
November 10, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

The results of the Pioneer Fire this year point an accusing finger at current wildfire management practice. And Pioneer is not an isolated instance, as we all know. The modern idea seems to be that fires are good for the forest and that we should have more rather than fewer of them. And when a really big fire gets going the blame of course lands squarely on fire suppression practices of the past. Those were years when Idaho’s forests were considered more valuable for the products they supplied than for justifying the hire of thousands of bodies and machines and toasting marshmallows. …It is unfortunate in my opinion that the modern idea seems to be to burn (hooray) rather than use (boo) our forests. What arrogance.

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Flathead National Forest Management Plan Revisions

By Dan Roper
Flathead Beacon
November 11, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Let me begin by stating that I am not a Montanan. I wasn’t born there, haven’t made it my home, yet the Flathead National Forest is dear to my heart. It was there that I learned to work a crosscut saw, to fall a tree with an axe, and to build trails with a shovel and pulaski. … I want to see a Flathead National Forest management plan that conserves key fish and wildlife habitat, improves habitat connectivity, and recommends substantial wilderness additions. I also hope this plan restores fire-resistant forests, reduces wildfire risks in the wildland-urban interface, and limits motorized travel when it conflicts with wildlife and non-motorized recreation opportunities.

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This land is your land? The battle over a state-owned forest

by SAPHARA HARRELL
Coos Bay World
November 12, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

ELLIOTT STATE FOREST — Mist wisps through the Douglas firs and evaporates along the hillsides as Joe Metzler and Elizabeth Roberts drive down the gravel roads that wind through the Elliott State Forest. The unmarked roads and frequent forks could prove difficult for someone who has never set foot in the forest, but the pair knows the area well. Metzler, the wiry retired Coast Guard rescue swimmer, has been coming to the Elliott for three decades. Behind the wheel, Roberts discusses potential alternatives to the pending sale of the state land. “That’s way over my head,” Metzler retorts, “I’m just a guy who likes to go in the forest.” In December, the Oregon State Land Board will meet to announce the fate of the Elliott State Forest after public testimony.

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Northern State Forests Set For More Timber Harvests

By Danielle Kaeding
Wisconsin Public Radio
November 10, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

Under the last state budget, lawmakers directed the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources to make more northern state forestland available for timber harvests. Supporters say it will benefit the forest products industry. Yet, some fear the change may upset the balance between industry and wildlife. …Currently, about 66 percent of state forests are set aside as forest production areas. Ron Eckstein, chairman of the forestry issues committee for the Wisconsin Chapter of The Wildlife Society, said northern state forests could probably absorb the 9 percent increase in woods that will see a more intensive logging cycle. “I don’t know if it’s really good for wildlife habitat, aesthetics, and biodiversity if in that 75 percent we maximize timber production,” Eckstein said. “That’s the concern.”

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Forest Fires Sweep Across U.S. Southeast

People flee homes as extreme drought conditions feed fires
Associated Press in the Wall Street Journal
November 10, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

ATLANTA—Unseasonably warm, dry weather has deepened a drought that is igniting forest fires across the southeastern U.S., forcing people to flee homes in the Appalachian Mountains and blanketing Atlanta in a smoky haze. Thursday’s national drought report shows 41.6 million people in parts of 15 southern states living in drought conditions. The worst drought is in Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi and Tennessee, but extreme drought also is spreading into the western Carolinas, and Kentucky and Tennessee had the most fires. All but two of the 61 active large wildfires nationwide Thursday were in the Southeast, according to the U.S. Forest Service. Nearly a dozen large fires were uncontained, with 14 more breaking out Thursday alone.

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Old-growth lands, islands donated to WV land trust

By Rick Steelhammer
Charleston Gazette-Mail
November 13, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

Two islands in the Ohio River and a 200-acre tract of wooded land in Doddridge County encompassing a rare, 15-acre stand of old growth forest have been donated to the West Virginia Land Trust for use as public nature preserves. Gallipolis Island was donated to the Land Trust by its former owners, the City of Gallipolis, Ohio, and private landowner Michael Hoeft of Milton. While the 5-acre island lies a short distance off the Gallipolis shoreline, it remains a part of West Virginia, which owns the river to the low-water points along the Ohio shore. The narrow, wooded island once included 80 acres of land, and in the 1840s was the site of a park with picnic tables, beaches and a playground.

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Southerners donning masks as suspected arsons lead to dozens of wildfires

CBS News
November 13, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States


ATLANTA – Wildfires near the Georgia-North Carolina line are spewing smoke so thick that residents are being urged to wear special masks if they must do outdoor activities. The fires – many of them suspected arsons – have prompted evacuations in Georgia, North Carolina and Tennessee in recent days. The largest of dozens of ongoing wildfires in the South has now burned 13,300 acres, more than a third of the vast Cohutta Wilderness area, in the north Georgia mountains just south of the Tennessee line. Fire managers said Saturday that the blaze, believed to have ignited from a lightning strike in mid-October, was only 20 percent contained. …More than 1,000 firefighters are now battling the wildfires that have burned more than 23,000 acres in western North Carolina, officials said Saturday afternoon.

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Alabama Forestry Commission cuts affect forest fire coverage

by Olivia Steen
WHNT
November 11, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

DEKALB COUNTY, Ala. – The Alabama Forestry Commission says they haven’t seen a wildfire season like this one in about three or four years.The recent budget cuts that were made have affected their performance this year. “We were relying on some resources from South Alabama, but now that they’re under the drought emergency there too… we were having to put a lot of those resources back into their home counties in South Alabama,” Terry Ezzell, North Regional Forester of the Alabama Forestry Commission. With man power cut, their response time to fires has taken more time and causes more damage.

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Forest safety leaders look to culture and technology solutions

By Forest Industry Engineering Association
New Zealand Scoop
November 11, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: International


A wide range of forest safety experts are making positive change in New Zealand’s forestry workplace, using peoples’ minds to bring safety culture change to their work situations and combining that with technology to make their job safer. Workers and safety champions in the forest industry around the country have been working hard to improve safety in the workplace. Workers have responded with enthusiasm to help re-write safety rules to keep everyone aware of risks and how to minimize them. With workplace safety improvements getting harder to make since the 2013 crisis, forest industry safety leaders are looking to new techniques. Industry leaders say growing safety culture among workers is proving to be valuable for gains in both safety and productivity at the same time.

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Thirst for Life as a Forester

By Carl Fallowfield
Cumbria Crack
November 11, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: International

Interest in careers in forestry is running high among young people in Cumbria with more than 320 taking part in a week of events based at the Forestry Commission’s Whinlatter Visitors Centre. The Royal Forestry Society (RFS), Forestry Commission England, Newton Rigg College and the University of Cumbria joined forces for the Forestry and Woodlands Careers Week. It was the first time such an event had been held and RFS Future Foresters Officer Adam Todd said: ” This was an opportunity to talk to a range of young people – from those yet to make GCSE subject choices to those considering going on the college or university. ”

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Forestry industry at loggerheads

by SALLY GLAETZER
The Mercury
November 14, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: International

…Gay is pale and clearly fatigued late on this Friday afternoon when we meet as planned in the company’s tiny, bare-walled conference room. Gone is the bolshie businessman I spoke with earlier in the week by phone when he told me – with good humour – he had no desire to participate in a profile article for TasWeekend. “If you lose a grand final, that’s it,” Gay had said. “You can’t go back and play it again.” This is Gay’s admission that the other side has won, referring to what he calls “the extreme green groups” who undermined his plans for a pulp mill and – he says – manoeuvred behind the scenes to have him ousted from Gunns, the once-mighty timber giant he ran for nearly four decades. He similarly blames outside forces for his criminal conviction for insider trading in 2013.

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World’s Tallest Tropical Trees Discovered

By Kevin McLean
National Geographic
November 10, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: International

The tallest tropical tree in the world is right where we thought it was—in a protected forest reserve in the state of Sabah, Malaysian Borneo. But it’s not the one we thought. Greg Asner of the Carnegie Airborne Observatory (CAO) revealed the new record holder this week in his keynote speech at the 2016 International Heart of Borneo Conference. … However, concurrent laser scanning in May 2016 across a broad swath of Sabah’s forests conducted by Asner shows that one behemoth tree on a hillside in Danum Valley, another protected reserve, measures 94.1 meters (308.7 feet), surpassing the Maliau specimen for the honor of the world’s tallest tropical tree.

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Outsourcing of contentious Tasmanian forest logging could spark community backlash, sawmiller warns

By Pablo Vinales
ABC News, Australia
November 12, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: International


A Tasmanian sawmiller fears Government plans to outsource felling in contentious forestry reserves could spark anti-logging protests. The Tasmanian Government intends to contract out logging to private companies, hoping it will improve the chances of a bid by its state-owned company Forestry Tasmania (FT) to get Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) certification FSC is a world-recognised branding that the timber has been sourced sustainably. …Timber Company owner Matthew Torenius said the changes would be contentious, especially in areas of the currently quarantined forests. “I think it’s unlikely you’re going to get all parties together on that one,” he said.

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