Tree Frog Forestry News

Daily Archives: November 15, 2016

Business & Politics

Is Free Trade With The U.S. In Jeopardy?

November 15, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada

One of the most surreal and nasty U.S. presidential election campaigns has finally come to an end. But for Canadian industries, trade negotiators, and diplomats, the hard work is just beginning. …Anything that makes the border harder to get across for people and goods has a direct impact on Canadian workers and on our standards of living. The softwood lumber industry is a case in point. The tariff barriers imposed on Canadian softwood lumber threaten nearly 22,000 jobs throughout the country. The tariffs applied following the latest deal cost Canadian producers over $2 billion — and American consumers $6.36 billion. American producers, for their part, are still calling for the imposition of limits and tariffs (up to 25 per cent) on Canadian imports.

Read More

Softwood, climate change Trumped by U.S. election

By Nelson Bennett
Business in Vancouver
November 15, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, United States


In the wake of last week’s shocking U.S. presidential election outcome, political and business observers scrambled to make sense of what a Donald Trump presidency will mean for Canada. If Trump makes good on his promises, trade relations could be strained, B.C.’s forestry sector could be in for some pain, Canada will move forward on climate change and carbon pricing while its next-door neighbour moves backwards, and Ottawa may be forced to increase military spending to stay in America’s good graces as a member of NATO. …B.C. could be hard hit under a Trump presidency, since his protectionist bent bodes ill for getting a new softwood lumber agreement with the U.S. Forestry products are B.C.’s No. 1 export and the U.S. is its biggest customer.

Read More

Is Free Trade With The U.S. In Jeopardy?

November 15, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada

One of the most surreal and nasty U.S. presidential election campaigns has finally come to an end. But for Canadian industries, trade negotiators, and diplomats, the hard work is just beginning. …Anything that makes the border harder to get across for people and goods has a direct impact on Canadian workers and on our standards of living. The softwood lumber industry is a case in point. The tariff barriers imposed on Canadian softwood lumber threaten nearly 22,000 jobs throughout the country. The tariffs applied following the latest deal cost Canadian producers over $2 billion — and American consumers $6.36 billion. American producers, for their part, are still calling for the imposition of limits and tariffs (up to 25 per cent) on Canadian imports.

Read More

Strange partners

By Neil Godbout
Prince George Citizen
November 14, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

…Unfortunately, the softwood lumber file is far more unpredictable. One one hand, it’s easy to imagine a short, harsh meeting between Trump, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and Premier Christy Clark, where Trump would put his fist on the table, demand significant tariffs and tell them if they don’t like it, they have the option of shoving their Canadian lumber where the sun don’t shine or selling it to the Chinese. Then Trump would go before the cameras and say he put America first and Canada won’t be dumping its subsidized lumber onto the American market on his watch without paying a big price. American lumber producers will have a better chance of growing their businesses and creating new jobs, he will add.

Read More

Jeld-Wen remains committed to Klamath Falls

November 15, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States, US West

Jeld-Wen does not have plans to move employees “en masse” from its Klamath Falls plants to North Carolina, according to the company’s President and CEO Mark Beck. The global firm that was once headquartered in Klamath Falls, recently announced it will be building a new, multi-million-dollar training center and business campus in Charlotte, N.C. It noted that it will create some 200 jobs at the center and some employees may transfer to the operation.  …Klamath Falls is also a very important manufacturing site for Jeld-Wen including its sawmill, wood components plant and patented AuraLast wood treatment facility, the release said.

Read More

Questions over new tax rate for PNG log exports (audio)

Radio New Zealand
November 15, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: International

Forestry sector figures in Papua New Guinea are angsting over a move to raise tax on log exports. The recently passed national budget for 2017 found the government re-introducing a progressive log export tax, ostensibly part of moves to promote downstream processing in the forestry sector. However, as Johnny Blades reports, questions loom over the government’s commitment to holding the logging industry to account.

Read More

Wood, Paper & Green Building

USDA, Partners Celebrate First Wood-to-Jet-Fuel Commercial Flight

United States Department of Agriculture
November 14, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: United States

WASHINGTON – Alaska Airlines today landed the first commercial flight powered in part by a new renewable fuel made of wood waste salvaged from private lands in Washington, Oregon and Montana. Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack greeted the passengers for flight AS-4 arriving from Seattle at Washington Reagan National Airport to highlight this breakthrough in bioenergy that supports jobs and rural economies by developing a sustainable bio-products industry in the Pacific Northwest utilizing wood harvest left-overs that would otherwise go to waste. This flight is the culmination of a five-year, $39.6 million research and education project supported by USDA’s National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA), and led by Washington State University and the Northwest Advanced Renewables Alliance

Read More

Alaska Airlines makes first commercial flight using fuel made from trees, forest residuals

by Lee Stoll
KOMO News
November 14, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: United States

SEA-TAC AIRPORT, Wash – Alaska Airlines made history on Monday with the first commercial flight that used renewable, alternative jet fuel made from forest residuals. The Boeing 737 jet flew from Sea-Tac Airport to Reagan National Airport in Washington D.C. with fuel made from a blend of tree limbs and branches. “The jet fuel itself is 20 percent blend of petroleum and renewables,” said Glenn Johnston from Gevo, Inc. “This is the future of being able to reduce our greenhouse gas footprint.” The material is the byproduct of a timber harvest and usually heads for the burn pile with other waste. The fuel for the flight came from local tribal lands and private forest operations and was produced through the efforts of Washington State University and the Northwest Advanced Renewables Alliance (NARA).

Read More

A plane full of people just flew cross country on wood-based fuel made by a Colorado company

By Aldo Svaldi
The Denver Post
November 14, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: United States, US West

Alaska Airlines flew a commercial flight on Monday from Seattle to Washington, D.C., using jet fuel that Gevo, a Douglas County biofuels producer, made out of alcohol derived from wood scraps. “A plane flying on wood — it is a paradigm breaker,” said Pat Guber, CEO of Gevo Inc., which refined cellulosic renewable alcohol into jet fuel in partnership with the Northwest Advanced Renewables Alliance. Monday marked the first time a plane full of passengers went cross country using wood-sourced jet fuel. It follows flights Alaska Airlines made this summer using a corn-based jet fuel from Gevo. …Wood is more expensive to convert, but the technology continues to advance and in some areas it is the most available resource. Plus, it doesn’t generate the same complaints that arise in using edible crops or land that could be used to raise food.

Read More

Forestry

Canadian and European boreal forests differ but neither is immune to climate change

from University of Toronto
EurekaAlert!
November 14, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, International

Rudy Boonstra has been doing field research in Canada’s north for more than 40 years. Working mostly out of the Arctic Institute’s Kluane Lake Research Station in Yukon, the U of T Scarborough Biology Professor has become intimately familiar with Canada’s vast and unique boreal forest ecosystem. But it was during a trip to Finland in the mid-1990s to help a colleague with field research that he began to think long and hard about why the boreal forest there differed so dramatically from its Canadian cousin. This difference was crystallized by follow-up trips to Norway. “Superficially they look the same. Both are dominated by coniferous trees with similar low density deciduous trees like aspen. But that’s where the similarities end,” he says.

Read More

‘We’re waiting for a frost’: northeast B.C. loggers, truckers at standstill as muddy roads cause problems

By Andrew Kurjata and Ash Kelly
CBC News
November 14, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Loggers, oil and gas workers and truckers in B.C.’s Peace region are waiting for a frost to unfreeze the economy in northeast B.C. “We’re really seeing all those industries right now in a wait-and-see and waiting for frost,” said Kathleen Connelly of the Dawson Creek Chamber of Commerce. “I hate to say it, but we need snow and we need some cold.” Cold weather is needed to freeze the dirt service roads that connect highways to remote logging sites and oil and gas fields. Without sub-zero temperatures, the roads have turned to mud, making them too difficult for large trucks and heavy equipment to navigate.

Read More

Queen Elizabeth invites Premier Christy Clark to forest ceremony

By Tom Fletcher
BC Local News in The Comox Valley Echo
November 14, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Premier Christy Clark has been invited to Buckingham Palace for a recognition ceremony Tuesday to mark the preservation of rainforest on the B.C. Coast. The reception is to honour projects recognized by the The Queen’s Commonwealth Canopy Initiative, a global project to preserve forests that began in 2015. Prince William announced that the region now known as the Great Bear Rainforest would be part of he initiative during his visit to B.C. in September. The premier’s office says this is the first time in more than 40 years that a B.C. premier has been invited to an official function at Buckingham Palace.

Read More

Nova Scotia drought blamed for Christmas tree seedling die-off

By Katy Parsons
CBC News
November 14, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

Drought conditions this summer took a toll on Christmas tree seedlings planted by some growers in Nova Scotia, although more mature balsam firs made it through fairly unscathed. Richard Levy, who has been growing Christmas trees with his brother for more than 40 years, said at least 20 percent of his seedlings died off because of the extremely dry weather. He typically sees only a five percent loss. “It’s a very rare thing,” he said. “This was an exceptionally dry year.” Levy lives in Bridgewater, and is president of the Lunenburg County Christmas Tree Producers Association. He and his brother manage 43 acres of tree land near the Kings County community of White Rock, near Wolfville.

Read More

Restoring US Forests by Mid-Century

By Doug Boucher
The Equation: Blog of the Union of Concerned Scientists
November 14, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States

As both scientists (in many published papers) and political leaders (in the Paris Agreement) have now recognized, to stop global warming—to keep the global temperature from increasing indefinitely—we need to peak and then reduce emissions rapidly.  …Although the U.S. mid-century vision may be delayed because of the outcome of this week’s elections, we anticipate that when it comes out it will recognize how our forests can play a key role on the sequestration side—both preserving our current forest “sink”, which removes about three-quarters of a billion tons of CO2 from the air each year, and by reforesting to increase that sink over the next three-plus decades.

Read More

Legislative path outlined for state acquisition of federal land: Goals of public land transfer reaffirmed at national conference

by Jennifer Fielder, state senator from Thompson Falls
The Missoulian
November 14, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Don’t we all we want healthy air, water and wildlife, abundant outdoor recreation and safe, vibrant communities? Wouldn’t it be good to manage our public lands with these priorities at the forefront of every decision? Unfortunately, Washington D.C.’s out-of-touch style is increasingly blocking public access, allowing pests and wildfires to ravage our environment, and killing rural communities. Last month, leaders from around the nation gathered for the American Lands Council annual conference and, once again, unanimously reaffirmed support of ALC’s public policy statement which “urges timely and orderly transfer of federal public lands to willing states for local control that will provide better public access, better environmental health, and better economic productivity.”

Read More

Roaring Lion Fire tested drones as a fire management tool

by HENRY WOROBEC
The Missoulian
November 14, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West


Four days earlier, their house was the second of 16 to be taken by this summer’s Roaring Lion Fire southwest of Hamilton. Despite the devastation on the ground, the incident mobilized an unprecedented approach to wildland fire monitoring. After the fire ran its course, a test flock of drones flew over the Coughey property and into the mouth of Roaring Lion Canyon. Pilots tested the ability of the drones to spot hotspots within the fire site with their 4k and infrared cameras. They looked like something you would buy at RadioShack. One crashed into the hillside.

Read More

Logging proposed along scenic Wyoming route to Yellowstone

by BRETT FRENCH
Billings Gazette
November 13, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Touted in travel and promotional journals for its jaw-dropping beauty, the Chief Joseph Scenic Byway that winds through the mountains between Cody, Wyo., and Yellowstone National Park is being recommended for a haircut of sorts. The Shoshone National Forest is proposing to log 2,000 acres along about 9 miles of Highway 296 near Crandall, Wyo., to remove dead and dying trees. The trees are under attack by the western spruce budworm — an insect the Forest Service has dubbed “the most widely distributed and destructive defoliator of coniferous forests in Western North America.” “Spruce budworm has devastated that corridor,” said Amy Haas, Shoshone forester. “Usually budworm does its thing and the trees recover. But we’ve had four years of it.”

Read More

MRC responds

Letter from John Andersen, Director, Forest Policy, Mendocino Redwood Company
Ukiah Daily Journal
November 13, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

A Letter to the Editor, titled “Stop Hack & Squirt” by Steph Darling contained a number of comments that would benefit from correction, clarification or commentary .Measure V was a ballot measure to address fire safety and unrelated to the use of herbicides. The author’s estimate of 5 million treated tanoak trees substantially exceeds anything that has occurred on the MRC ownership. Over 18 years about one (1) million tanoak trees have been treated resulting in more than 14 million additional redwood and Douglas fir trees. MRC is regulated by seven (7) state and federal agencies, including CalFire. Among many things, CalFire reviews THPs for fire safety and requires mitigations where appropriate.

Read More

Draft of Northwest Forest Plan released

By KIMBERLY CAUVEL
Skagit Valley Herald
November 12, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

The U.S. Forest Service released this week a draft update to the Northwest Forest Plan, and is accepting public comments on the update through Jan. 6. The plan covers the Forest Service’s Pacific Northwest and Pacific Southwest regions, which includes land in Washington, Oregon and California. The plan guides how resources are managed in 17 national forests for up to the next 20 years. Parts of eastern Skagit County lie within the Mount Baker Snoqualmie National Forest, which is managed under the Northwest Forest Plan. …The draft plan updates what is known about how protected species have fared in federal forest lands since the original plan was created, and addresses new concerns that have emerged including climate change.

Read More

Transfer of national forests to state is un-American

Margaret Gorski, retired from a 30-year career with the U.S. Forest Service
The Missoulian
November 14, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

There she goes again. State Sen. Jennifer Fielder just returned from the annual meeting of the American Lands Council and is proselytizing across the state to “transfer federal lands to willing states for local control.” …Fielder contends that some other kind of local control will provide “better” decisions. I can only assume that her definition of “local control” means giving decision authority to the board of county commissioners? I find that idea problematic given that elected county officials are often politically motivated by short-term economic needs and not long-term sustainability. Suggesting that our national forests would be “better” managed by counties is akin to the fox guarding the hen house.

Read More

Fast-moving wildfire erupts near California’s Angeles National Forest?

By Allen Cone
United Press International
November 14, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

TUJUNGA , Calif., — Fire crews were battling a fast-forming fire on the edge of the Angeles National Forest, the Los Angeles Fire Department said Monday. The fire, dubbed the Marek Fire, started at 5:41 a.m. in about a quarter of an acre in Tujunga Canyons, about 35 miles north of Los Angeles International Airport. It grew a few hours later to 25 acres and was moving southeast through drought-parched grass and brush, according to InciWeb, the national incident information system for wildfires. It was considered 50 percent contained. Structures in the Kagel Canyon were threatened by the fire, according to the Los Angeles Fire Department. Precautionary evacuations were ordered for residents above the fire site and nearby Wildlife Waystation, according to the Angeles National Service spokesman Nathan Judy.

Read More

Sudden oak death intensifies

By Mark Freeman
Mail Tribune
November 13, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

BROOKINGS — The banks of the Chetco River next week will be the latest locale where state and federal foresters will fight the sudden oak death pathogen that already has killed hundreds of thousands of tanoaks in Curry County and appears to be intensifying, scientists say. Crews will cut and burn infected tanoaks and the surrounding trees and brush on 26 acres of federal and private land along the Chetco’s North Bank Road to destroy recently discovered SOD-infected trees, whose presence threatens oak stands and the nursery industry. The effort comes as forest pathologists log increases in the number of tanoaks known to be infected with the airborne pathogen, as well as the confirmation of a second case of infection by a European strain of SOD found last year in Curry County, the only place in North America it has been detected.

Read More

Under Trump, environmental fight on horizon

By Hilary Corrigan
The Bend Bulletin
November 12, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

…“The environment is going to become a war zone,” said Char Miller, the director of the environmental analysis program and a professor at Pomona College in California who has written several books on public lands issues and environmental history in the West. “Whether it’s inside the Beltway or out in the Cascades, the fight is on.” Miller expects to see more cattle grazing, more forest logging, more mining and more extraction of natural resources on public lands and possible reinterpretation of laws like the Clean Water Act, Clean Air Act and Endangered Species Act. He called the Trump administration “the greatest nightmare of a generation” for environmentalists. Mary Wood, a law professor and faculty director of the Environmental and Natural Resources Law Center at University of Oregon, expects that “regulatory protection in environmental law just flew out the window.”

Read More

Forest fires in Sierra Nevada driven by past land use

from University of Arizona
Phys.org
November 14, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Forest fire activity in California’s Sierra Nevada since 1600 has been influenced more by how humans used the land than by climate, according to new research led by University of Arizona and Penn State scientists. For the years 1600 to 2015, the team found four periods, each lasting at least 55 years, where the frequency and extent of forest fires clearly differed from the time period before or after. However, the shifts from one fire regime to another did not correspond to changes in temperature or moisture or other climate patterns until temperatures started rising in the 1980s. “We were expecting to find climatic drivers,” said lead co-author Valerie Trouet, a UA associate professor of dendrochronology. “We didn’t find them.”

Read More

Firefighters deploy air tankers against stubborn inferno

By Mark Washburn
The Charlotte Observer
November 14, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

An air war resumed Monday against a fierce wildfire ravaging thousands of acres near Chimney Rock. A smoky shroud covering a thousand square miles lifted Monday morning, allowing firefighters to unleash helicopters and air tankers, said Carrie Harmon of the N.C. Forest Service. Visibility was so limited Sunday that aircraft were grounded, she said. Reinforcements flowed in by the dozens to battle the stubborn inferno, which grew about a third to nearly 3,500 acres on the peaks near Lake Lure. By Monday, about 350 firefighters were laboring in the rugged slopes on the blaze, which was considered only 15 percent contained.

Read More

‘The Worst I’ve Ever Seen’; Fires Sweep Through Southeastern U.S.

by Rebecca Hersher
National Public Radio
November 14, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

“No one can remember a wildfire as peculiar as the monster gnawing through the gorge above the village of Chimney Rock,” began an article Monday in the Charlotte Observer. The blaze in question is one of dozens of partially contained wildfires, some of them suspected cases of arson, burning across the Southeast. In Alabama alone, there are currently 20 fires burning, and more than 1,500 blazes have burned there since October 1, according to the Alabama Forestry Commission. People are being evacuated in North Carolina, Georgia and Tennessee, including in and around Chimney Rock, N.C., where the erratic fire described in the Observer has enveloped some 3,000 acres since Saturday, according to the U.S. Forest Service. As of Monday afternoon, that blaze was only 15 percent contained.

Read More

Peculiar Chimney Rock fire perplexes the experts

By Mark Washburn
Charlotte Oberserver
November 13, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

BAT CAVE – No one can remember a wildfire as peculiar as the monster gnawing through the gorge above the village of Chimney Rock. It burrows beneath swaths cut to contain it. It conjures unforeseen winds from the steep terrain. It dashes erratically this way and that, like a running back punching for open field. And never mind the frustration of fire managers – it has even spooked the hardy, reclusive mountain coyotes. “We’ve had sightings of them from several people,” Carrie Harmon of the N.C. Forest Service said Sunday. …No one will hazard a guess on when the unpredictable blaze will be tamed – it had munched through 3,400 acres and was considered only 15 percent contained Sunday. It was still feasting avidly on years of crisp detritus cast by trees to the forest floor.

Read More

Firefighters from across Georgia deploy to fight wildfires

By Michelle Heron
WRCBTV
November 14, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

DADE COUNTY, GA – An orange glow reflects off the soot covered faces of firefighters. Through smoke, they ignite a line of flames with each step. Georgia Forestry crews use the overnight hours to burn areas like this on purpose. Controlled burns protect homes on Lookout Mountain. This area of Dade County is where two fires merged into one burning more than 1300 acres. Firefighters use the daylight to do work like this, moving anything away that could catch homes on fire. “We’re taking backpack blowers and we’re blowing all the leaves and pine needles, anything that we think might burn and we’re trying to blow out about a 60 foot circle around every structure,” Charles Price with Georgia Department of Corrections Fire Services said.

Read More

Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy

Forest Value Must Be Defined To Implement Paris Agreement

Blue & Green Tomorrow
November 14, 2016
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: International

A new approach to valuing the services provided by nature is the key to protecting the world’s rainforests whilst reducing greenhouse gas emissions. Achieving this is one of the key steps towards transforming the Paris Agreement on climate change into visible action. To meet this goal the High Carbon Stock Approach (HCSA) must play a more prominent role in developing climate finance opportunities by making the value of forests clear, and linking them with both carbon targets and climate finance goals, proposed Aida Greenbury, Managing Director Sustainability, Asia Pulp & Paper Group and Co-Chair of the HCSA Steering Group during a HCS Steering Group event at COP22 in Morocco.

Read More

General

Jeld-Wen remains committed to Klamath Falls

November 15, 2016
Category: Uncategorised

Jeld-Wen does not have plans to move employees “en masse” from its Klamath Falls plants to North Carolina, according to the company’s President and CEO Mark Beck. The global firm that was once headquartered in Klamath Falls, recently announced it will be building a new, multi-million-dollar training center and business campus in Charlotte, N.C. It noted that it will create some 200 jobs at the center and some employees may transfer to the operation.  …Klamath Falls is also a very important manufacturing site for Jeld-Wen including its sawmill, wood components plant and patented AuraLast wood treatment facility, the release said.

Read More