Tree Frog Forestry News

Daily Archives: November 22, 2016

Special Feature

Well known furniture designer Judson Beaumont’s new book

McKellar & Martin Publishing
November 22, 2016
Category: Special Feature
Region: Canada, Canada West

Welcome to the first title in the “Timbertown Tales” series, which features award-winning designer Judson Beaumont’s fantastic pieces as characters who definitely have lives of their own… Chester O’Drawers Teakson wants a pet, but his parents just don’t think he’s old enough yet. So, Chester has to find a way to prove that he’s ready and responsible. Then along comes Sandy. Is she a kitten? No. Is she a goldfish? Nope. But she does have four legs, a lovely smooth finish, and a whole lot of puppy-like energy. Now Chester realizes that maybe — just maybe — his parents were right! From the magical minds of Judson Beaumont and Joanna Karaplis comes a unique and very funny story about a child’s first pet. Breanna Cheek’s delightful illustrations bring this wonderful and inviting world to life.

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Business & Politics

Canada’s neglect of natural resource industries will hurt trade talks, David Emerson warns

by Ian Vandaelle
Business News Network
November 21, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada

Former International Trade Minister David Emerson is warning Canada’s small population base and neglect in supporting its natural resources industry will put it at a disadvantage in bilateral trade talks. In an interview on BNN, Emerson said Canada is liable to be bowled over by the negotiating strength and force of will of the United States due to that confluence of factors. “We’ve not been very supportive of our natural resource industries, which have been really the source of Canadian wealth generation for the last several decades,” he said on Monday. “We don’t approve projects anymore: we hate pipelines, we don’t like carbon fuels, softwood lumber is going to get kicked in the teeth, coal is going down the chute.” Emerson said Canada should be aggressive in pursuing multi-party trade deals, where there are more variables in play than bilateral negotiations.

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Appointment Notice: Jake Kerr

The Globe and Mail
November 10, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

TimberWest President & CEO Jeffery Zweig is pleased to announce the appointment of Jake Kerr to Chair of the Board of Directors of TimberWest Forest Corp. Mr. Kerr joins the Board with decades of executive leadership experience in forestry. For 35 years he was Chairman and CEO of Lignum Ltd., one of Canada’s largest independent forest companies. In addition he is past Chair of the Canadian Lumber Council and was a key negotiator on softwood issues since the 1980s. Mr. Kerr also brings substantial governance experience including Board positions at ScotiaBank, TeckCominco, and Louisiana Pacific among others. 

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Forestry faces new uncertainties

By Alan S. Hale
Timmins Press
November 21, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada East, Canada

TIMMINS – With the election in the United States now over and the incoming administration of Donald Trump beginning to take shape, industries across Canada are trying to figure out what the president-elect’s promise to overhaul the United States’ trade deals and relationships for his country’s benefit will mean for them. This is true for the lumber industry in Northern Ontario, which sells a great deal of its product to the United States to fuel the housing industry there. Industry groups are treading carefully, with the Ontario Forest Industry Association flatly refusing to discuss Trump or his trade policies when contacted Monday by The Daily Press.

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Northwest towns expect new timber jobs under Trump: How that might happen

By Hal Bernton
The Seattle Times
November 20, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States, US West

…So in the aftermath, what would it take for Trump to make good on his campaign talk, at least in this sliver of rural America, and bring the Home Valley mill back into operation? That question revealed some unexpected common ground between a vice president of the timber company that owns the veneer plant and a conservation biologist who watchdogs federal timber harvests. They both want the mill, shut down in 2008, to reopen. They both believe that can happen without gutting the rules that protect the spotted owl and other forest creatures, and without reigniting a war in the woods.

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A new vocation: Jay Healy talks about life at the Sawmill

By ANDY CASTILLO
The Recorder
November 17, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: US East, United States

CHARLEMONT — Former state legislator and Agriculture Secretary Jay Healy stands in cascading sunlight, pouring through a small window in a storage barn at The Sawmill at Hall Tavern Farm, just off Route 2. “We have some of the best pine trees in the state,” Healy says, referring to the roughly 500 acres of land on his family’s 100-year-old farm in East Charlemont — the oldest privately-owned tree farm in the state. …In the storage barn, Healy explains that as the economy has changed, The Sawmill at Hall Tavern Farm has created a market for itself by selling products customers can’t purchase elsewhere. “You can’t buy these in a store,” he continues, gesturing to a stack of “niche boards” — cut in random widths to use the whole tree.

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Weyerhaeuser relocating regional office to Ruston

KNOE.com
November 21, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: US East, United States

RUSTON, La. – The City of Ruston and regional partner North Louisiana Economic Partnership are excited to announce that Weyerhaeuser intends to relocate a regional office to Ruston, LA. With this relocation, Weyerhaeuser will bring approximately 20 jobs to the Ruston market. The project will include $1 Million capital investment for a build to suit 7,500 square foot office building, built by a third-party and leased by Weyerhaeuser. Since merging with Plum Creek Timber Company Inc. in February 2016, the company’s planned synergies included consolidating several offices located across north Louisiana. Ruston was selected in part due to its location and ease of access to their primary markets.

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Rock Wood Products to invest $8.75 million in sawmill expansion

Lesprom
November 17, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: US East, United States

Rock Wood Products of Dillwyn, Inc. will invest $8.75 million to expand their sawmill operation in Buckingham County, Virginia. The company will create 12 new jobs in the county and source 100% of its timber needs from Virginia land owners. Rock Wood Products of Dillwyn will supply John Rock’s manufacturing facility with the lumber it needs for pallet production. The company also supplies materials for construction mats, railroad ties, and the flooring industry. The updated technology at the new facility will allow the company to significantly increase production.

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Upgrade of FTA with China offer boost for timber industry

from NZ Forest Owners’ Association
Scoop Independent News
November 22, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: International

News of plans to upgrade New Zealand’s free trade agreement with China should open trade doors for more timber exports to China, and more employment in New Zealand, according to the Chair of the New Zealand Wood Council, Brian Stanley. The Prime Minister, John Key, says New Zealand’s main aim in the China FTA upgrade is to reduce dairy quotas, but he also emphasised other improved trade prospects in China, including timber exports. New Zealand dairy exports to China are presently worth $2.9 billion a year, while forest products are New Zealand’s second most important export to China, at $1.8 billion a year. Brian Stanley says the New Zealand negotiators will be looking at current non-tariff barriers for New Zealand timber exports to China.

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Environmental expert calls to block Dai Duong paper factory

VietNamNet Bridge
November 22, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: International

In the petition submitted to the Tien Giang authorities, Le Trinh, deputy head of the Vietnam Association for Conservation of Nature and Environment, said that the paper production industry creates a large volume of wastewater rich in hard-to-treat toxic organic chlorides. In addition, in case the factory uses chlorine dioxide for pulp whitening, it only helps to decrease the dioxin volume of the wastewater, instead of absolutely removing dioxins. Trinh added that the wastewater treatment capacity of Long Giang IP is unable to thoroughly treat the toxins. Thus, it is impossible not to worry about the Dai Duong factory, especially when it dumps as many as 4,950 cubic metres of wastewater a day.

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Wood, Paper & Green Building

Tall Timber Buildings- How tall should we go?

By Valerie Boutin
NFPA Xchange
November 21, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: Canada East, Canada

Tall timber buildings are a hot topic these days. There was even a TED talk on why we should build wooden skyscrapers. A quick search for tall timber buildings shows quite a few in the design phase both in the United States and in other parts of the world. Before getting into the pros and cons of tall timber buildings, it is important to understand the type of timber that would be used. …There are numerous studies underway to look at the fire risk of mass timber buildings. The Fire Protection Research Foundation is working on phase two of their study. Phase one, a literature review can be found here. NEWBuildS of Canada has also done research into mass timber buildings. They have a lot of information available on their website. [Note: commenting at the end of the story is the Ottawa fire chief who cautions that Fire Codes need to change along side building codes]

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Build your own tiny house with Bunk Box plans

By Adam Williams
News Atlas
November 21, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: United States

If interested in owning a tiny house, you could purchase one from a specialist firm, but for handy types happy to roll up their sleeves, PAD (Portland Alternative Dwellings) has collaborated with Shelter Wise to offer plans for its Bunk Box. On the small side, even for a tiny house, this model looks best suited as a weekender, second home, or perhaps a guest home. …The interior decor is pretty odd as it isn’t finished with wood paneling or drywall, leaving the framing exposed. According to PAD, this adds an extra 7 in (17.78 cm) in width of usable space. Since there’s no insulation stuffed in the walls, the firm instead wrapped the Bunk Box in 2 in (5.08 cm) of closed-cell foam insulation.

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Free carbon calculator shows how much CO2 wood construction saves

By Bill Esler
woodworkingnetwork.com
November 22, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: US East, United States

WASHINGTON, D.C. – WoodWorks, a proponent of large-scale wood construction in the U.S., launched an updated version of its free carbon calculator, adding more options for buildings made from cross-laminated timber (CLT) and other mass timber products. The addition reflects rising interest in large scale wood building construction.  WoodWorks, which receives finding from the U.S. Department of Agriculture as well as timber companies and forest products manufacturers, promotes use of wood products as a means to store carbon, instead of building materials such as cement and steel that require fossil fuel energy to manufacture, a move that can help reduce greenhouse gases.

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Cement may not be as environmentally damaging as thought

by Cameron Jewell
The Fifth Estate
November 22, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: US East, United States

Carbon emissions from cement could be almost 50 per cent less than previously thought, according to new research published in Nature Geoscience. According to the research 43 per cent of the carbon emissions released from the production of cement between 1930 and 2013 has been offset by the process of “carbonation”, where cement products absorb carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. …While cement doesn’t have the carbon sequestering benefits of wood (and the carbon in wood also doesn’t affect structural properties), it’s still reassuring news that our buildings may not be as environmentally unfriendly as previously thought.

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Forestry

Province will not allow commercial cutting of Home Pond birch stand

By Ryan Cooke
CBC News
November 21, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

Cabin owners at Home Pond got a win on Monday, as the province announced it will not allow a large birch stand to be cut down. The provincial government had included the stand in a five-year management plan, which drew the ire of many cabin owners in the area, as well as a nutraceutical company tapping the trees for sap. However, Forestry Minister Steve Crocker (left) said the area is no longer included in any plan for harvesting in the next five years. “At this current time, we’re not going to be submitting the Home Pond area for environmental assessment with regards to commercial harvesting,” Crocker told the Central Morning Show. The land was formerly designated as a reserve by Corner Brook Pulp and Paper while under the company’s control.

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New urban logging case highlights need for strict new rules, councillors say

By Michael Smee
CBC News
November 22, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

Just months after a developer made headlines for taking down 40 mature trees on a North York building site, CBC Toronto has learned of a second illegal “clearcut” – this time in an affluent Etobicoke neighbourhood. Coun. John Campbell (Ward 4, Etobicoke Centre) and city forestry officials say that in September, a homeowner on North Drive cut down 34 trees in his backyard without a permit. The cutting happened in a part of his backyard that’s been designated a ravine area by the city, which means no trees can be removed without permission from the urban forestry department, Campbell said.

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Few women fight wildfires. That’s not because they’re afraid of flames.

By Darryl Fears
The Washington Post
November 20, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States

WHISKEYTOWN, Calif. — The burn boss scanned the snaking trail of the Swasey Recreation Area through thick black sunglasses. She saw firefighters scurrying on a hill above in a smoky blue haze. They were setting dozens of fires to burn away piles of sticks and shrubs that a lightning strike or cigarette butt could use to grow into a wildfire. Their work was part of a key prescribed burn training that could help them move up in rank. But there was a much deeper meaning for burn boss Erin Banwell and the firefighters in the haze. All but a few were women, and they were taking part in the first majority-female training exchange, called WTREX, in a profession that is known for shunning women.

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Idaho’s Forest Families: Tera King

by Jim Petersen
Evergreen Magazine
November 20, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

“I would absolutely encourage anyone to pursue a career in forestry or any other natural resource-based career. In fact, that’s exactly what the Clearwater Basin Youth Conservation Corps is trying to do. The more we can introduce local kids to the career opportunities available in their backyard, the better. There are currently over 40 vacancies on the Nez Perce – Clearwater National Forests and more retiring all the time. There’s also a shortage of professional truck drivers. We need young people to bring their families back to their hometowns to fill those jobs, especially in light of recent mill closures that will have serious social and economic impacts on communities.”

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Sierra trees may be dead, but they’re bringing new life to local businesses

By Marc Benjamin
The Fresno Bee
November 20, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West


FISH CAMP – The Sierra hills are alive with the sound of chainsaws attacking dead trees. Contractors are rushing to finish chopping dead trees before weather stops them. That leaves chainsaws buzzing in a 10-county stretch of hilly terrain from the Kern-Tulare county line northward into the mountains east of Sacramento as trees are felled along roadsides, near homes and in the path of electrical lines. Local counties, the U.S. Forest Service, Caltrans, Cal Fire, Pacific Gas & Electric and Southern California Edison are spending millions of dollars to ensure that dead and dying trees don’t lead to traffic obstructions, fires, damaged homes or injuries.

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North Coast Land Conservancy advances plans to conserve 3,300

From the North Coast Land Conservancy
Tillamook County Pioneer
November 21, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

MANZANITA, Ore. – On Friday, Nov. 18, North Coast Land Conservancy took the first steps toward the acquisition of approximately 3,300 acres of timberland between Arch Cape and Manzanita, Oregon, marking the single largest conservation initiative in the Conservancy’s history. The agreement with Onion Peak Holdings, a private investment entity, gives NCLC a unique opportunity to arrange the financing required to acquire the property in phases within the next five years. The transaction is on track to becoming the largest single private acquisition of land for conservation in western Oregon.

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Scientists offer front-lines look at California’s tree mortality epidemic

by Emily Guerin
89.3 KPCC
November 21, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Nate Stephenson got into forest ecology because he was looking for an excuse to go backpacking. …In 2014, Stephenson started noticing that oaks were dying in the foothills around Three Rivers, where he lives with his wife. He’d never seen that before – and he would notice, because he is always on the lookout for dead trees. …When trees began dying, Stephenson wanted to know what precisely was killing them. …To figure it out, he started doing autopsies. …After discovering a tree had died, Stephenson or a colleague would hack away the bark with a hatchet and peel it back, exposing the smooth wood beneath. On a recent visit to the park, he showed me one such wound, pointing with the tip of his knife at the grooves that bark beetles had eaten through the wood.

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Oregon far behind in restricting aerial spraying

by Shawn Donnille, co-owner and vice president of Mountain Rose Herbs
The Register-Guard
November 21, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

When my partner Julie and I relocated our business, Mountain Rose Herbs, to Lane County more than 15 years ago, we were attracted to Oregon’s spectacular wilderness areas, rivers and wildlife, and to its reputation as an environmental leader. Those values have been important to our success, and to the 200 full-time jobs we have brought to the community — but increasingly, Oregon is losing its lead on the environment, and it is putting organic products businesses and our quality of life at risk. …This may be why the Supreme Court of Washington recently found that aerial application of pesticides is “an abnormally dangerous activity,” and even Idaho requires a half-mile between aerial pesticide sprays and farming operations like mine.

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State forests shouldn’t be logged

by David A. Lipstreu. certified professional public-sector land planner and environmental advocate.
Cincinnati.com
November 21, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

It’s time to stop logging in Ohio’s state forests.The small economic benefit to the state is nothing compared to the ecosystem services and quality of life attributes enjoyed by the citizens who rightfully own them. With climate change an established fact, a critically important function of forests is their ability to store large amounts of carbon, a major contributor to global warming.This key ecosystem service, now identified as decreasing the effects of climate change, is not currently incorporated into the Ohio Division of Forestry’s “Five Year Management Plan for State Forests.” This fact is noteworthy when it is acknowledged in the part of the plan devoted to climate that “The climate in Ohio is expected to change … and very likely at an accelerated pace.”

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Timber industry is burning in Alabama, drought hampering future

by Debra Davis, ALFA
Southeast Farm Press
November 21, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

In addition to thousands of timberland acres blackened by wildfires, drought effects on Alabama forests are taking a toll on future production of the billion-dollar industry. “Wildfires destroyed valuable timber, and the drought has caused interruptions for landowners who intended to plant new trees this year,” said the Alabama Farmers Federation’s Rick Oates. “Preparation for timberland that’s been harvested with plans to replant often includes a controlled burn of the area. That work has been delayed, and planting young trees may be postponed since low soil moisture greatly reduces seedling survival. A drought of this magnitude has a trickle-down effect, said Oates, who is the Federation Forestry Division director.

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Monday wildfire update for northwest Georgia

by Collins Parker
WDEF News 12
November 21, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

ATLANTA, Georgia – Georgia Forestry and local firefighters responded to another 14 new fires on Sunday, and expect another active one today. Most of the Sunday fires were quickly contained, but a fire on Sarah Chapel Road in Dade County kept firefighters busy into the early morning. It is now under control. Forestry officials say winds on Monday will be out of the Northwest at 8-12 mph with a low relative humidity of 17%-19%. …The fire on Tatum Gulf (2336 acres) on Lookout Mountain joined with what was the Cloverdale Fire (500 acres) and is currently 65% containment. The total fire acreage should not increase from the current 2836 acres.

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Georgia wildfire spreads to WNC; Macon County watching carefully

By Rex Hodge
WLOS
November 21, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

RABUN COUNTY, G.A. — The Rock Mountain wildfire that started in Georgia is spreading into Macon County, and firefighters are concerned about its quick growth due to dry, windy conditions. “Our meteorologist mentioned that we were going in the single digit relative humidities,” Fire Information Officer Stan Hinatsu said. The fire covers nearly 13,000 acres and is 30 percent contained. But fire officials say it’s moving a half mile to a mile every day, mainly in rural National Forest land. It spread into Macon County a couple of days ago. No structures have burned, and no one has been hurt. But residents remain on alert. “

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CSI trees: how forensic science is helping combat illegal logging

by Eleanor Dormontt, Postdoctoral Researcher in Timber Forensics, University of Adelaide
The Conversation
November 22, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: International

Forensic science has achieved infamy, thanks to television dramas like CSI. But it isn’t just about solving human crimes. Scientists are also using evidence from wood to help solve murders, but in this case the victims are the trees themselves, and the crime is illegal logging. …Timber is notoriously hard to identify, even for experts. By looking at the structure of the wood alone, it is usually only possible to identify it to the genus level, rather than the species itself. This is a problem because most timber laws protect individual species, and often only part of the range of that species. This means that law enforcement must rely on the paper trail that accompanies timber shipments, which is open to fraud.

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Believe it or not – ten amazing facts about mechanized timber harvesting

Finnish Forest Association
November 18, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: International

There are many beliefs concerning mechanized timber harvesting – and many of them are negative. In reality, however, things are mostly better than people usually think. One of the most widespread myths about harvesters is that they are heavy. In actual fact, a harvester is light in weight. The pressure caused by the harvester’s wheels on the soil is about the same as that of your foot. In contrast, a skidder loaded by timber often weighs more, but this is fortunately something that harvesters can also help with. Since the harvester operator is able to decide where to debranch the tree trunk, it can also be done on top of the route used by the forestry machines, called the strip road. Leaving the branches on the strip road protects the terrain from being deeply indented by the machinery.

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