Tree Frog Forestry News

Daily Archives: December 5, 2016

Business & Politics

World has changed since last flareup in Canada-U.S. lumber war

By Gordon Hamilton
Business in Vancouver
December 5, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, United States

When the U.S. Lumber Coalition petitioned its government November 25 to impose duties on Canadian imports, it kicked off a new round in what has become the longest and most bitter trade war between the two nations. …A new president in the White House who campaigned on an anti-trade platform, new markets for Canadian wood products in Asia that reduce dependency on the U.S. and an ownership flip that has seen Canadian forest companies buy a significant number of American mills all bring new wrinkles to the perennial softwood battle. “It’s a completely different world,” said Keta Kosman, publisher of the Vancouver-based trade journal Madison’s Lumber Reporter. The U.S. lumber industry, she said, is strongly motivated to see duties imposed that seriously hurt the Canadian industry. At the same time, B.C.’s Big Three forest companies – West Fraser Timber, Canfor and Interfor – all own sawmills in the U.S.

Read More

American consumers would be hurt by lumber duties, say U.S. housing groups

By Ross Marowits
The Canadian Press in Canadian Business
December 5, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada

MONTREAL – The imposition of import tariffs on Canadian softwood lumber will place a heavy burden on consumers and U.S. workers, a leading American voice for free trade with Canada says. The U.S. National Association of Home Builders says duties or volume caps on imported lumber will raise the price of lumber, adding more than $1,300 to the cost of a new single family home. It also forecasts higher lumber prices will result in a net loss of almost 8,000 jobs if 25 per cent of duties are imposed on Canadian lumber flowing into the U.S. About US$450 million in wages would be lost along with US$320 million in government taxes. The impact would mainly be felt by the construction industry, but also hit other sectors including mattress firms that use Canadian lumber in bed frames, transportation, finance, insurance and real estate.

Read More

A long history of ‘subsidized’ timber

By Harry Gairns, RPF, P.Eng, retired
Prince George Citizen
December 2, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

The long running dispute between Canada and the U.S. over lumber in Canada being a “subsidized” product is now a hot issue again. This has been going on even longer than most people realize… During my nearly 40 year career with IFS, I was twice part of the group that prepared a defense against new proposed lumber duties. In both cases we found that the claims of the U.S. lumber lobby were not supported by the facts…The problem is not subsidization – it is simply the advantage we have when the U.S. dollar appreciates in relation to the Canadian dollar. When the U.S. and Canadian dollar are at par there is never any complaint from the U.S. about subsidization, but when the Canadian dollar sinks to levels like it is now, costs in B.C. remain much the same in Canadian dollars, but are significantly less in U.S. dollars, and the countervail duty problem arises again.

Read More

Judge differs with Canfor in stumpage rate fight

Prince George Citizen
December 4, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

Canadian Forest Products Ltd. has failed to convince a B.C. Supreme Court Justice it deserves a break on stumpage for timber it had been harvesting in the vicinity of Williston Lake. The concept of “cycle time” played a significant role in the decision, issued Nov. 25 by Justice Bruce Butler. In essence, the longer it takes for the timber to be hauled from where it was cut to where it can be appraised, the lower the stumpage. Canfor had been using logging trucks to transport the timber around Williston Lake to Mackenzie for appraisal but was being charged as if the logs were being hauled by barge or a boom and tow along the lake, a significantly quicker trip.

Read More

Four life sentences for man who fatallly shot two former co-workers at Nanaimo sawmill

December 5, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

NANAIMO — A man who fatally shot two former co-workers and injured two others at a sawmill in Nanaimo has been handed four life sentences. Kevin Addison, 50, was found guilty of two counts each of first-degree murder and attempted murder after using a sawed-off shotgun at Western Forest Products on the morning of April 30, 2014. Addison, who will not be eligible for parole for 25 years, declined to address B.C. Supreme Court on Friday when Justice Robin Baird asked if he had anything to say. His defence lawyer had told the court his client suffered from depression, but Baird called the killings planned, systematic and ruthless, adding depression alone does not explain Addison’s actions.

Read More

Brazil’s exports of all wood products decreased by 10.4% in September

Lesprom
December 2, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: International

Brazil’s exports of all wood products amounted to $201.4 million in September 2016 representing a 10.4% decline compared to a month earlier. Imports of wood products totalled $8.7 million in September down just under 1% from the previous month.The corresponding improvement in the wood product trade balance was almost 11% in September 2016, ITTO reported. Between January to September 2016 wood product exports totalled $1,742.5 million up 0.4% year on year. Imports over the same period totalled $74.1 million and were 16% lower compared to the same period in 2015.

Read More

Wood, Paper & Green Building

Prefabricated wood project highlights final leg of Asia trade mission

By Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations
BC Government News
December 3, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: Canada, Canada West

The 2016 Forestry Asia Trade Mission has come to an end following three stops in Nanjing in Jiangsu Province. The first stop was a meeting with Jiangsu Province’s Minister of Housing Urban and Rural Development to discuss progress on a memorandum of understanding that Thomson signed with the minister in 2014. The agreement includes enhanced co-operation and communication between the two governments, and commitments to research opportunities and locations for wood-frame construction in Jiangsu Province. Building on the successful re-roofing initiatives in the Jiangsu cities of Nanjing and Zhenjiang, the two ministers discussed the potential for wood infill wall systems. 

Read More

Canadian Hardwood Lumber Manufacturer Expanding Their Export Market Focus for 2017

By DZD Hardwood Export
Satellite PR News
December 5, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: Canada East, Canada

Montreal, Quebec Canada — DZD Hardwood Export, a Canadian manufacturer of hardwood products exporting across Canada and Europe plans to expand its export portfolio into the northeastern USA such as Massachusetts, New York, New Hampshire and Connecticut. Sefi Dollinger, owner of DZD Hardwood comments,”We are a family owned hardwood products manufacturer since 1983, located just north of Montreal, Quebec. We have been producing quality hardwood products such as white oak, red oak, cherry, soft and hard maple, white ash, walnut, beech, basswood, poplar and most other species native to North America. We have been exporting our products overseas to areas such as Europe and now we are focusing our sales and export strategy to the north-eastern USA.”

Read More

Research details developments in the global cross laminated timber (CLT) sales market forecast to 2021

The Markets Report
WhaTech
December 5, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: United States

Global Cross Laminated Timber (CLT) Sales Industry 2016 Market Research Report provide the details about Industry Overview and analysis about Manufacturing Cost Structure, Revenue, Gross Margin, Consumption Value and Sale Price, Major Manufacturers, Distributors, Industry Chain Structure, New Project SWOT Analysis with Development Trends and Forecasts 2021. The Global Cross Laminated Timber (CLT) Sales Industry 2016 Market Research Report is a professional and in-depth study on the current state of the Cross Laminated Timber (CLT) Sales industry. With around 150 tables and figures this report provides key statistics on the state of the industry and is a valuable source of guidance and direction for companies and individuals interested in the market.

Read More

Oakland warehouse was a cluttered ‘death trap’ filled with pianos, RVs, but no fire sprinklers, former residents say

By Liam Dillon, Ben Poston, David Zahniser and Laura J. Nelson
Los Angeles Times
December 3, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: United States, US West

…”It was a tinderbox,” said Brooke Rollo, 30, who did not attend Friday’s event but had gone to parties there previously. … Behdad [development consultant Hamid Behdad, who supervised L.A.’s effort to convert commercial buildings to lofts and apartments] also said the state’s building code prohibits the use of wood and other combustible materials for staircases in buildings that stage events with more than 49 people, he said. “Wood stairs, my God,” he said. “Any way you look at, this was a recipe for disaster.” Photos on the warehouse’s Tumblr page show a maze of rooms, with walls and dividers made from pianos, boxes, salvaged doors and other materials. Wooden rafters were adorned with hanging lanterns, holiday lights, bicycles, stereo equipment and exposed wiring.

Read More

A call for checks and balances on timber fire retardants

Building Talk
December 2, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: International

The inability of UK Government to enforce the Construction Products Regulation (CPR) relating to fire retardant treatments for wood is an open door for products of dubious performance. The situation is acute says lead industry body the Wood Protection Association (WPA). Lives, property and jobs are at serious risk from the lack of adequate resources to take action on breaches of CPR compliance. …Timber is growing in popularity as a construction material. This growth is driven by the sustainable and environmental benefits of timber compared with man-made materials. Building Regulations often call for timber and wood-based panels used in construction to have an appropriate reaction to fire performance. The safety of those who will use the structure is the overriding objective.

Read More

Shortage of workers hampers growth of furniture exports

The Star – Malaysia
December 5, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: International

PETALING JAYA: The value of Malaysia’s furniture exports in the first eight months of this year stood at RM4.84bil, said Plantation Industries and Commodities Minister, Datuk Seri Mah Siew Keong. He said the RM10bil furniture export target was unlikely to be achieved this year due to the shortage of workers in the industry. “Some furniture orders were lost and some delayed because of the shortage of workers to do hand-crafting to add value to the products,” he said. Mah said this to reporters after the launch of Tanggam Design Centre (TDC) in Petaling Jaya on Monday.

Read More

Forestry

Fort Nelson to study the feasibility of harvesting aspen for more uses

By Chris Newton
Energetic City
December 4, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

FORT NELSON, B.C. – The Northern Rockies Regional Municipality is going to be partnering with FP Innovations to study the feasibility of harvesting aspen trees in the area as a more lucrative resource. The municipality announced in a press release that the study is being financed both by them and by the Northern Development Initiative Trust. Aspen trees are one of the prefereed trees for the manufactured of oriented strand board, however there has been little demand for the trees since the Canfor PolarBoard OSB Mill was permanently closed in June 2008… While Fort Nelson claims that the aspen trees in the area is recognized as being of “high quality” they have embarked on the study in order to back up this assertion, and to investigate other markets for the trees.

Read More

Politics, Poverty, Privatization and Globalization Big Issues for BC’s Union Movement

By Linda Givetash
The Tyee
December 2, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Many delegates expressed anger over the closure of lumber mills and other industries as jobs move overseas. Some called for more government support and investment in these local industries and advocated for tossing out international trade deals such as the pending Trans-Pacific Partnership and recently approved Canadian-European Union trade agreement. Shirley Ackland, mayor of Port McNeill, said mill closures have devastated her community as the forestry industry shifted from processing timber locally to shipping raw logs to foreign mills. “I watch millions of dollars every day drive out of my community to be loaded on ships that go overseas,” she said. “We have some of the most stringent forest practices in the world… We need to showcase what we do in the forest industry, do it here, do it well and stop sending the logs out of this province.”

Read More

‘Best management practices’ an insult

December 5, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

Why do government and industry think they can insult our intelligence time and again by defending the devastation inflicted upon Nova Scotia’s woodlands as “best management practices in forestry” when really it is ecocide? Controversial harvesting practices such as clear-cutting continue unabated. This is despite promises in The Path We Share: A Natural Resources Strategy 2011-20 that changes would be “phased in over five years and set in regulation” to reduce clear-cutting from 96 per cent to “no more than 50 per cent of all harvests” on Crown lands. In September, during National Forest Week, Natural Resources Minister Lloyd Hines wrote, “The status quo is not an option was the clear call of the natural resources strategy.

Read More

Pictou Landing man wins forest industry award

The News
December 2, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

Christian Francis received the Skills Award for Aboriginal Youth earlier this week in Ottawa from the Forest Products Association of Canada (FPAC), in partnership with the Canadian Council of Forest Ministers (CCFM).  …Francis previously earned a diploma in Plant Science from Dalhousie University, and is currently enrolled as a third year student at Dalhousie University, working towards a Bachelor of Science with a major in Environmental Science. “I am hopeful that my valuing of education and my developing experience with the forestry and land management industry will enable me to someday find and create opportunities for economic growth in my home community,” he said. “Someday I hope to do my part in helping First Nations people as a whole.”

Read More

Lynx, loggers, and laws: Threatened and endangered players in the timber policy debate

By Rob Chaney
KPVI Channel 6
December 2, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States

Spotted owls don’t fly in Montana. But like the proverbial butterfly wingflap in Brazil stirring up a tornado in Texas, spotted owls in Oregon blew down the timber industry in Montana. A quarter-century later, people see the spotted owl storm in one of two very different ways. …“There have been hundreds of lawsuits against vegetation management projects over the past decade, and this litigation – and fear of litigation – has slowed or altogether blocked timber sales and helped bring about what former Forest Service Chief Dale Bosworth called excessive and inefficient process, or ‘analysis paralysis.’ …But is the problem in protecting endangered species or in the way we fight over that protection? In Montana, the Endangered Species Act struggle focuses on a different threatened animal – the Canada lynx. In what’s known as the Cottonwood decision, the U.S. Supreme Court declined to review a U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals ruling ordering the Forest Service to re-consult with U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service about lynx on its top-level forest plans.

Read More

Message to new president on our dying forests

By Healthy Forests, Healthy Communities
Natural Resources Report
December 5, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States

OUR DYING NATIONAL FORESTS; A DISASTER OR PERFECT OPPORTUNITY FOR BOLD ACTION BY A NEW PRESIDENT. Prior to the 1980s, the U.S. Forest Service was a world leader and champion of forest science; the management of America’s forests were widely acknowledged as the best managed Forests in the World. Active management of our nation’s forests was mandated by the authorizing legislation that set aside our “Forest Reserves” in the Organic Act of 1897. Specifically, the intention of the Forest Reserves was “to improve and protect the forest within the reservation…securing favorable conditions of water flows, and to furnish a continuous supply of timber for the use and necessities of citizens of the United States.” For nearly 100 years, the Forest Service managed the Forest Reserves (now the National Forest System) to meet the demand for housing products and aid in economic recoveries from domestic recessions by providing a stable supply of forest products.

Read More

Can Montana’s timber industry outgrow its history?

By Rob Chaney
The Missoulian
December 4, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States

With trees everywhere on the horizon, why can’t Montana sawmills find enough wood to cut? To answer this question, Missoulian reporter Rob Chaney gathered the stories of the “Timber Wars” that closed out the 20th Century, with the hope of illuminating what the future timber industry might look like. 

Here is the complete series exploring Montana’s state’s timber past and future (eight stories)

Read More

Chronic wasting disease spreads west across Wyoming

By Bob Zellar
Billings Gazette
December 4, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

CASPER, Wyo. — Chronic wasting disease is spreading west. Wildlife officials find new cases each season of the deadly illness in deer and elk moving closer and closer to the state’s feed grounds. And recent research shows it could be a bigger deal than biologists originally thought. “CWD is a significant concern for Wyoming’s wildlife — particularly for our deer populations,” said Dr. Mary Wood, state wildlife veterinarian for the Wyoming Game and Fish Department. “As prevalence increases in southeastern Wyoming, we are now seeing negative impacts in some of our deer herds from CWD.” Because many experts fear the disease’s arrival on the feedgrounds could cripple western Wyoming’s elk herds, the National Elk Refuge is hosting a forum explaining the illness. The talks, scheduled for Wednesday, will explore the science behind the disease with information from experts like Wood.

Read More

Forests of the future: local or national control?

By George Ochenski
The Missoulian
December 5, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Montana, like most of the West, continues to struggle with the question of how its massive federal lands should be managed. While collaborator groups and the timber industry have been very busy suggesting management plans that primarily benefit local economies and desires, an outpouring of support for continued federal management of the 2.4 million acre Flathead National Forest from across the nation once again reminds us that these are lands and resources owned by all 323 million Americans, not just a handful of local interests or politicians. In the recently closed public comment period on the Flathead National Forest’s draft environmental impact statement and draft revised forest plan, a rather astounding 34,409 comments were submitted by members of the Sierra Club, Wilderness Watch and WildEarth Guardians.

Read More

Department of Natural Resources offers draft plans for comment on harvest, seabird

By Rob Ollikainen
Peninsula Daily News
December 4, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

PORT ANGELES — The state Department of Natural Resources has released draft environmental impact statements on the agency’s 10-year sustainable harvest calculation and its marbled murrelet long-term conservation strategy. Public comment will be taken until 5 p.m. March 9 on both documents, DNR spokesman Bob Redling said. Public meetings and webinars are planned next month.

Read More

Rare weasel returns to historic range in Washington state

By Phuong Le
Washington Post
December 4, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

MOUNT RAINIER NATIONAL PARK, Wash. — The elusive weasel-like mammal poked its head out of the wooden crate, glanced around and quickly darted into the thick forest of Mount Rainier National Park — returning to a landscape where it had been missing for seven decades. One by one, 10 Pacific fishers that had been trapped in British Columbia were set free at the park south of Seattle as part of a multiyear effort to reintroduce the native species to its historic range… Fish and Wildlife had proposed listing the forest-dwelling mammal as threatened in 2014 over concerns about logging practices, illegal pesticide use by marijuana growers and other threats.

Read More

Yes — protected landscapes are good for the economy

By George Wuerthner
Herald and News
December 4, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

President Obama should heed the call to expand Cascades Siskiyou National Monument. Expansion would protect some significant old growth forests, portions of functioning streams, and enhance the biodiversity value of the existing monument. Opposition based on the presumed negative impacts of national monument designation on regional economies are groundless as a quick review of the history of national monuments demonstrates. Opponents to national monument expansion are looking backwards in a rear-view mirror of their economies. The future does not lie in expansion of logging, grazing or mining.

Read More

‘Tree hugger’ has burning passion for forest health

By Staci Matlock
Santa Fe + New Mexican
December 4, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

PEÑASCO — Hart Allex slopped a dollop of gasoline on a jumbled pile of snow-dampened ponderosa pine branches and pitched a match on it. The flames sputtered, then suddenly flared up with a crackle. A crew of local men he’s hired monitored the burning piles in the swath of forest Allex owns on a mountainside flanking this Northern New Mexico village… Earlier this year, Hart and Utilia Allex were named the 2015 New Mexico Outstanding Tree Farmers of the Year for their work thinning and burning in their forest… These forests, most of them ponderosa pine, historically had natural low-intensity, ground-level fires sweep through periodically, according to tree ring scientists and Southwest foresters. 

Read More

UCD ecologist wins award to study how megafires impact forest food web

By Kat Kerlin
The David Enterprise
December 4, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

As the severity of wildfires increases each year across the West, how megafires affect forest ecology is an increasingly urgent question. Now, UC Davis assistant professor Rahel Sollmann will be able to explore that question more broadly. She was one of three recipients of the 2017 Research Catalyst Awards announced last week by University of California President Janet Napolitano… “Forests are really at the heart of California economy, culture and its ecological heritage,” Sollmann said. “The Forest Service has identified these large fires as the major threat to the integrity of California forests. We really hope to understand how large fires change forest pollination and food networks.”

Read More

An ‘Unprecedented’ 102 Million Trees Have Died In California’s Drought-Stricken Forests

By Dominique Mosbergen
Huffington Post
December 4, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

In California’s drought-stricken forests, trees are dying at an “unprecedented” rate, according to officials. The U.S. Forest Service said last month that 102 million trees have died across the state since 2010, including 62 million dead trees in 2016 alone. And the die-off is showing no signs of slowing. “Millions of additional trees are weakened and expected to die in the coming months and years,” said the Forest Service. “The scale of die-off in California is unprecedented in our modern history,” Randy Moore, a forester with the agency, told the Los Angeles Times. Trees are dying “at a rate much quicker than we thought.”

Read More

Oregon To Create Murrelet Protection Plan For State, Private Lands

By Jes Burns
Oregon Public Broadcasting
December 2, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

A threatened sea bird that relies on coastal old growth forests to nest will be getting further protections in Oregon. This week, the Board of Forestry agreed to join with other state agencies to create a plan to conserve marbled murrelet habitat on state and private lands. Environmental groups petitioned the state earlier this year to protect the murrelet, which is on both the federal and state endangered species lists. The Oregon Board of Forestry initially said “no,” but reversed its decision after the groups went to the courts. Now state agencies will start developing a plan to identify and protect murrelets.  

Read More

Who is to blame for disastrous fires raging in our forests?

By Jay North – author, environmentalist, social activist and organic gardener
The Hill
December 2, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Those who have been following the news for the past several months will recall the horrific wildfires that occurred in the Western states this past summer …But there are other issues at play here that the media is conveniently ignoring in favor of more palatable information. The truth is, the U.S. Department of Forestry is in over their heads, and they know it. It should not be surprising to learn that these wildfires are claiming lives, but the actual number of fatalities is higher than many Americans might assume. …Vilsack shared some more disquieting news. For the past six out of ten fire seasons, the U.S. Forest Service quickly found themselves running low on funds. …But now things appear to be changing. Loggers from the U.S. Forest Service, who believe that forest thinning can prevent wildfire and keep both animals and people safe, tax locals up to $1,200 per acre to essentially destroy the landscape that Colorado residents call home.  

Read More

Editorial: Elliott plan worth a try

By The Editorial Board
The News-Review
December 3, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

It’s long past time that conservationists and timber interests start sitting down at the table together and compromising on solutions for how our government-owned timberlands should be managed. So we were encouraged to hear that’s the kind of work that’s been done behind the scenes of the sole bid to purchase the Elliott State Forest from the state. The difficulty with Elliott mirrors the difficulty with federal timberlands that take up large swaths of Douglas County. On the one hand, we have a historic, legal obligation to raise money on state and federally owned lands through harvesting the trees that grow naturally in our rich Western Oregon soil to pay for vital services like schools and sheriff’s patrols. 

Read More

Threat to stressed trees: After storms, drought, fire, pine beetles can be fatal

By Jim Melvin, Clemson University
The Times and Democrat
December 5, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

CLEMSON — For about 15 years, the state’s most destructive forest insect has been lying low in South Carolina. But damage caused by recent droughts, storms and fires raises the specter of a resurgence. Sizable infestations of Southern pine beetles have been few and far between since the last major outbreak in 2000-2002, when the tiny but voracious creatures caused about $1.5 billion in damage in the Southeastern United States to loblolly, shortleaf, longleaf, pitch, pond and Virginia pines. But with most of South Carolina’s current crop of pine trees now stressed by weather-related catastrophes in recent years, the potential for statewide infestation has taken a step in the wrong direction.

Read More

Boreas Timber

By Kim Dedam
Sun Community News
December 5, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

New York State — The Boreas Ponds Tract has a long storied history of logging operations over the past century. The early years of logging at Boreas drew much local attention and renown. Newspapers faithfully reported the launch of winter timber operations, usually in the second or third week of January. The cycle of work fit the seasons, with cutting and barking done in summer, hauling and stacking done in winter and the river runs done with snowmelt in the spring. On Oct. 17, 1895 the Essex County Republican newspaper announced J.W. Finch stopped at the Lee House in Port Henry.

Read More

The world’s biggest forest destroyers don’t even know which forests they’re destroying

By Cassie Werber
Quartz
December 5, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: International

Here’s a conundrum faced by everyone who wants the world’s forests to be preserved. When you pick up a bottle of shampoo or a takeaway meal, how can you make a choice that isn’t going to spur deforestation? We know growing palm oil, to take one much-used example, can and does lead to rainforest devastation, but any information linking that with the chocolate or toothpaste on a supermarket shelf (both of which often contain palm oil or its derivatives) seems so opaque, the supply chains so endless and twisting. …“We’re talking about supply chains that are really vast,” said Katie McCoy, head of forests at CDP. The big deforestation products are cattle, palm oil, soy, and timber. 

Read More

How Big Banks Are Putting Rain Forests in Peril

By Hiroko Tabuchidec
New York Times
December 4, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: International

In early 2015, scientists monitoring satellite images at Global Forest Watch raised the alarm about the destruction of rain forests in Indonesia. Environmental groups raced to the scene in West Kalimantan province, on the island of Borneo, to find a charred wasteland: smoldering fires, orangutans driven from their nests, and signs of an extensive release of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere. “There was pretty much no forest left,” said Karmele Llano Sánchez… The year before the clearing of trees in West Kalimantan, Rajawali’s plantation arm secured $235 million in loans — funds that the Indonesian company used to buy out a partner and bolster its landholdings — from banks including Credit Suisse and Bank of America.

Read More

Governments, businesses must integrate biodiversity into their practices to halt degradation, UN conference hears

United Nations News Centre
December 2, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: International

The UN Biodiversity Conference today opened in Cancun, Mexico, with a call to governments and businesses to integrate biodiversity into their practices if countries are to halt further environmental degradation and ensure the well-being and prosperity of future generations. “We have a tendency to look at issues in an isolated way, to seek solutions without studying the implications in other fields, to undertake quick fixes that disregard the consequences,” the Executive Director of the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD), Dr. Braulio Ferreira de Souza Dias, told the High-Level Segment of the 13th Conference of the Parties of the CBD, also known as COP 13.

Read More

Concerns over forest plan’s impact on endangered species

By David Killick
The Mercury Australia
December 3, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: International

LARGE areas of forestry coupes proposed for logging in the next three years could be home to endangered species or be subject to other conservation concerns, the Wilderness Society says. An analysis of Forestry Tasmania’s three-year wood prod­uction plan revealed 74 native forest coupes that might contain nesting or foraging habitat for the critically endangered swift parrot, another 166 coupes that could be the habitat of the vulnerable masked owl and up to 27 coupes where the endangered grey goshawk may be present. As well there were potential impacts on the habitat of giant freshwater lobsters and large areas of old-growth forest. Wilderness Society spokesman Warwick Jordan said that while there were limitations to the computer-based analysis, it was clear some areas slated to be logged were especially sensitive.

Read More

Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy

Rolling Stones Pianist Chuck Leavell Worries About Climate Change, Hopes Trump Does The Right Thing

By Jim Clash
Forbes Magazine
December 3, 2016
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: United States

The great Rolling Stones and Allman Brothers keyboardist Chuck Leavell gives insight about the impending Trump administration and its possible impact on the environment, how he deals with fear, a new TV series he’s planning and more. Following are edited excerpts from a longer conversation. …JC: You’ve done a lot of cool stuff in your life. What’s left on your bucket list? CL: I’m looking at the possibility of a TV series. We’ve finished a pilot called, “America’s Forests With Chuck Leavell.” The idea is to go around our country and find stories connected with forests – and there are many, many to be told. The pilot filmed a lot in Oregon, talked a lot about cross-laminated timber. We went to an architect who’s using this concept and to the first mill in the country where CLT is being manufactured. We met with forest managers who have to deal with the catastrophic threat of wildfires and how to prevent them. And finally, we had a segment concerning endangered species, those at risk which depend on the forests to live and thrive. Back in the seventies, we had confrontations about this. Now you see environmental groups working with forest managers to do the right thing, prevent declines in some species. So that’s on my bucket list – I want to have a TV show [laughs].

Read More

Biomass burning is not carbon-neutral

By Alan RP Journet
Mail Tribune
December 5, 2016
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: United States, US West

We now have to ask ourselves about the source of our energy, and the impact of its generation on greenhouse gas emissions… Our state’s last coal-fired power plant in Boardman, operated by PGE, is slated to close in 2020. PGE is exploring the use of wood and energy crops, also known as biomass, instead of coal. If successful, the utility will consider a full transition to biomass feedstock, which would make the Boardman facility the largest biomass project in the country. While the idea of using a renewable resource such as wood to generate power seems attractive, wood is not a clean energy source. The first problem with wood as a resource is that burning it produces considerably more carbon dioxide per megawatt hour generated than burning coal. This is because wood is not an energy-efficient resource.

Read More

Carbon feedback loop a big concern for environmentalists

By Joseph Scalise
Science Recorder
December 2, 2016
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: US East, United States

Large amounts of carbon stored inside the Earth may seep back out into the atmosphere, a recent study published in the journal Nature reports. Researchers at the Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies found that climate change has created a feedback loop that could cause a massive amount of underground carbon to come back into the atmosphere in the form of greenhouse gas. This output would be the equivalent of adding the emissions of another fully industrialized country the size of the United States and could be a major obstacle in the future fight against global warming. 

Read More

General

Port Hawkesbury Paper celebrating forest management audit results

Cape Briton Post
December 4, 2016
Category: Uncategorised
Region: Canada East, Canada

PORT HAWKESBURY, N.S. — Port Hawkesbury Paper is celebrating one of the best third-party forest certification audit results in the company’s five year history. “We are pleased with our progress and the forest management we carry out,” said Derek Geldart, the woodlands manager for the paper company, in a press release… The Cape Breton paper company says it is the only industrial company in the Maritimes that’s independently certified to the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) and Sustainable Forestry Initiative (SFI) Forest Management Standards. 

Read More