Tree Frog Forestry News

Daily Archives: December 14, 2016

Today’s Takeaway

Learning from the past to improve our future

Tree Frog Forestry News
December 14, 2016
Category: Today's Takeaway

The Canadian federal government has awarded a settlement to Vancouver Island Huu-ay-aht First Nation—after a tribunal found that in the early part of this century, the federal government authorized “logging activity [on the reserve] without following proper procedure”.

Prince George journalist Peter Ewart takes another look at how the softwood lumber agreement will fare under Trump’s leadership. Using data from Paul Quinn he emphasizes that it’s imperative that Canada not cave to the US imposed limitations, as “to do so will be to surrender our sovereignty as a country”.

Once again, we draw your attention to the wood section where support for wood framing is dampened by fire. BC building codes may have contributed to a multi-family wood-frame fire in Langley this week. “In the future, absolutely we’ll put sprinklers on balconies,” said BC Housing Minister Rich Colman. In Tennessee, risk mitigation is focused on protecting homes from wildfire, looking at codes that prescribe fireproof roofing and siding.

But, the “honeymoon” for wood is far from over, as CLT and new wood structures continue to capture the imagination of architects and governments around the world.

Read More

Business & Politics

Fire crews investigating Terrace sawmill fire

Terrace Standard
December 13, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

A fire broke out at the planer at Skeena Sawmills just after midnight. A patrolling security officer noticed the planer stacker engulfed in flames, and called 9-1-1. The Terrace Fire Department rushed to respond with three trucks and 16 firefighters. They battled the flames and extinguished the fire in approximately one hour, according to a recent press release. The Thornhill Fire Department was requested to attend with their aerial unit, but in the end the unit was not required. Production supervisor Ravi Sandhu says the fire is out and electricians are now investigating. No one was on shift at the planer at the time, just a clean up crew, and no one was injured. END OF STORY

Read More

FPInnovations is Opening Doors

Coast Forest Products Association
December 13, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

In a recent parliamentary ceremony entitled Opening Doors – A Coming Together of Traditional Indigenous Culture and Advanced Technology, FPInnovations showcased coastal BC artwork that combined ancient tradition with new technology. At that time, a new generation of young Indigenous artists from nine B.C. coastal communities were tasked with creating hand-carved western red and yellow cedar doors. Those who took part retained complete intellectual property on their designs as well as the cedar door panels themselves.

Read More

Small is beautiful for northern mill owners

By Tom Fletcher
BC Local Views
December 13, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

TOKYO – Which B.C. forest products company was first to sell two-by-fours to the picky buyers of Japan? How about high-grade wood pellets for home heating in Italy? It was Nechako Lumber, a privately owned forest products company in the northwestern B.C. community of Vanderhoof, says CEO Alan Fitzpatrick. And he has other examples of where his small company with a timber supply of small trees blazed a trail for bigger producers to compete on the world stage. Skinny pine trees turned out to have an advantage, Fitzpatrick said in an interview during the recent B.C. forest industry trade mission to Japan and China. Japanese builders have insisted on only the finest wood for centuries, and Nechako has long been a brand of choice.

Read More

Resolute observes employee safety with pair of donations

By SARALYN?NORKUS
Cleveland Daily Banner
December 12, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: US East, United States

CALHOUN?— Resolute Forest Products crossed another safety milestone recently, having gone 500,000 hours injury free at the construction site for its new tissue division. “It’s a great achievement,” declared André Piché, senior vice president for the Tissue Group. “That achievement is not hurting people.” With production at the $270 million tissue plant projected to begin in the first quarter of 2017, Gordon Cole, VP for Operations with the Tissue Business Group, believes the site still has the chance to reach 1 million hours incident free in the project’s final eight weeks. “We do not have the right to injure anyone,” Cole stated.

Read More

The Global Forest Industry in the 3Q/2016

Excerpts from Wood Resource Quarterly
American Journal of Transportation
December 13, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: International

Global sawlogs prices fell again in the 3Q/16 after a temporary increase in the 2Q/16, following an almost two year-long downward trend. The Global Sawlog Price Index (GSPI) has fallen by 14.3% in two years and currently is almost 12% below the ten-year average. In the 3Q/16, the European Sawlog Price Index (ESPI-€) fell by 0.5% from the previous quarter to €83.40/m3. The Index has trended downward for the past few years, and in 2016, was at its lowest level since 2010. Much of the recent decline has been the result of reduced demand for lumber in some markets and generally lower lumber prices in both domestic and export markets.

Read More

Wood, Paper & Green Building

B.C. housing minister says more sprinklers likely after Langley fire

By Rob Shaw
Vancouver Sun
December 13, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: Canada, Canada West

VICTORIA — Rich Coleman said Tuesday he’ll change B.C.’s building code to mandate sprinklers on balconies for any new wood buildings of four storeys or smaller. It was recommended by Ottawa as part of national building-code requirements, but B.C. will do it anyway, he said. “In the future, absolutely we’ll put sprinklers on balconies,” said Coleman. “That’s a no-brainer for me.” The Fire Chiefs Association of B.C. said balcony sprinklers could have prevented extensive damage Sunday to a Langley condo complex, called Paddington Station, that displaced dozens of residents. Five- and six-storey, wood-construction buildings in B.C. are required to have sprinklers on balconies and in attic spaces. B.C. approved six-storey, wood-frame construction in 2009.

Read More

Templar Flats wins for wood-frame construction

By Molly Hayes
Hamilton Spectator
December 13, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: Canada East, Canada

Hamilton’s The Templar Flats has been recognized as the first six-storey wood-frame building in the province. The unique infill housing and restaurants project on King William Street, between James and Hughson, is a hybrid of history and modernity — sandwiching a hip new structure between two restored heritage buildings. At street level it houses four new restaurant spaces, with an additional 25 rental apartments upstairs. By providing high-density housing and revitalizing existing infrastructure, the project “exemplifies urban development ideals,” says Sarah Hicks, spokesperson for the Canadian Wood Council.

Read More

Did Building Codes Contribute to Tennessee Wildfire Damage?

By Jim Gaines
Knoxville News-Sentinal in Firefighter Nation
December 13, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: US East, United States

Several Sevier County commissioners said last week they doubted any construction standards would have mitigated loss from a fire as big and fast-moving as the one that devastated Gatlinburg, killing 14 people and damaging or destroying more than 2,400 structures. But research says the choice of materials, distance from trees, and accessibility to firefighters can greatly increase survival of people and buildings. Most of those are not mandated in Sevier County, though some are recommended… Houses with nonflammable roofs, such as corrugated metal, survive forest fires 70 percent of the time; while houses with wood-shingled or other flammable roofs only survive 19 percent of the time, Cohen found.

Read More

Gorgeous little office building is built of Cross Laminated Timber

By Lloyd Alter
Treehugger
December 13, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: International

We get all excited in North America when we see cross-laminated timber (CLT) or other fancy solid wood technologies, but in Europe, they have been doing it for years. Here is a small office in Bischofsheim, Germany that shows how it’s done with CLT from KLH, the Austrian company that was a pioneer in the industry (it supplied the CLT for the first wood tower we ever showed on TreeHugger). The architects, Mind Architects Collective, describe the project: The dream of the client was also to move his office back to where he lived and to nevertheless take advantage of all the urban possibilities of modern, contemporary work (co-working) in a small space and in a small village. In addition, the new structure was expected to offer cost security, also with a view to a potential later sale or a reduction in the size of the office. Sustainability was to be a key consideration in all areas.

Read More

Sky Views: Let’s build skyscrapers out of wood

By Tom Cheshire
Sky Views
December 13, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: International

Don’t giggle, because this is serious: we need to talk about the Undershaft. This preposterously named building is a preposterously massive skyscraper proposed in the heart of London. Standing 294.6m high, nearly as tall as the Shard, it will sit next to 22 Bishopsgate, another stolid lump of glass and metal only 40m shorter. There are many reasons why London’s skyline is being destroyed – a combination of policy, planning and development – but it’s also a failure of innovation… Architects are now proposing we build skyscrapers out of old-fashioned wood. Well, not quite old-fashioned. Kevin Flanagan, an architect at PLP Architecture, is the designer of a 300m tall tower called Oakwood, made from timber and proposed for a site near the Barbican.

Read More

BC Views: China’s worst addiction isn’t coal

By Tom Fletcher
BC Local News
December 13, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: International

NANJING, CHINA – …China is confronting its coal addiction. The National Energy Administration officially booked into rehab in April, announcing that the next 200 planned coal power plants may not be built, and those already approved will be postponed until at least 2018. …At Nanjing Tech University, engineers are working on advanced wood construction techniques. Working with Canada Wood, the industry-government agency with trade offices in Asia, they are building arched bridges and public buildings to demonstrate the stylish carbon sinks that can replace concrete. Nanjing is the commercial centre of Jiangsu, designated as the pilot province for residential and commercial wood construction.

Read More

Forestry

Huu-ay-aht awarded $13.9 million in battle over timber rights

by Amy Smart
Victoria Times Colonist
December 13, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

A Vancouver Island First Nation has been awarded $13.9 million in compensation after a tribunal found the federal government failed in its duty to the community relating to historical logging. The specific-claims tribunal, which hears claims by First Nations against the federal government regarding past wrongs, found Canada had breached its duty to the Huu-ay-aht First Nation between 1948 and 1969. In 1938, Huu-ay-aht surrendered all salable timber on its largest reserve to the federal government, during a time of economic hardship. The federal government was to sell the timber on terms “most conducive to our welfare.” Chief Coun. Robert Dennis said the federal government authorized logging activity without following proper procedure.

Read More

Sex lives of insects study could stave off invasive species

by: Rob O’Flanagan
Sudbury.com
December 13, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

Luring insects with the scent of sex might be an excellent way to find out if you have an invasion on your hands. University of Guelph molecular and cellular biology professor Peter Krell has received a two-year, $234,000 grant from Genome Canada to study the use of sex pheromones to detect the presence of invasive insect species. Early detection, Krell said in an interview, could help in the development of strategies to keep invasive insect species from wreaking havoc on the environment and the economy. An invasive species like the emerald ash borer has decimated forests. Managing the invasion costs hundreds of millions of dollars each year in Ontario and Quebec.

Read More

Environmental groups ask Supreme Court to hear Ontario endangered species case

By Liam Casey
Canadian Press in The Waterloo Record
December 13, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

TORONTO — Two environmental groups are taking their fight against Ontario’s endangered species regulations to the country’s highest court. Ontario Nature and Wildlands League argue that some regulations in the province’s Endangered Species Act exempt harmful industrial activities, leaving 167 species without statutory protection against being killed and their habitats destroyed. In October, the Court of Appeal for Ontario upheld a lower court decision that found the provincial Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry was within its rights to grant exemptions to industries such as forestry, oil and gas and mining under changes made to the Endangered Species Act in 2013.

Read More

Farm Service Agency Announces Incentives to Manage Forest Lands

By Greg Sapp
97.9 Effingham WXEF
December 13, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States

In an effort to improve wildlife habitat and the health of private forest lands, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Farm Service Agency (FSA), announced additional incentives available for Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) participants to actively manage forest lands enrolled in the program. “Many CRP forests were initially established to conserve soil and protect water quality, but there is also a critical need to restore wildlife habitat” said Brad Pfaff, FSA Deputy Administrator for Farm Programs. “Over the years as trees grow and the forest canopy closes, the quality of wildlife habitat for many species declines. These new incentives are intended to reverse that trend, while also maintaining healthy forests.” The announcement was made at a CRP forest site near Jackson, Mississippi on Friday.

Read More

This Northwest timber county hadn’t voted GOP since Herbert Hoover. But times have changed

by William Yardley
Los Angeles Times
December 11, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

…For the first time since Herbert Hoover won the White House in 1928, Aberdeen and the other small outposts that make up Grays Harbor County here on the Washington coast did not vote for a Democrat for president. This year, they chose Donald Trump. ….Throughout the Northwest, from Washington to Northern California, historic timber-producing counties voted for Trump. Some had been Republican for years, while others had swung back and forth. …Can Trump restore the timber industry to its former glory? As with coal mining and manufacturing jobs, market forces create long odds.

Read More

California: Why tiny insects are tearing up Sierra forests

By Ula Chrobak
The Mercury News
December 13, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Western pine beetles, native inhabitants of Sierra Nevada forests, typically go unnoticed. The grain-of-rice-sized insects live a quiet life, spent mostly beneath the bark of weak, diseased or injured trees. But the beetles of late have been causing an uproar. They have been decimating ponderosa pine trees throughout the central and southern Sierra, turning entire hillsides red — the color the pines turn just before they die. Last month, the U.S. Forest Service reported that there are over 100 million dead trees in the Sierra — more than double the amount in 2015, when the dying trees prompted Gov. Jerry Brown to declare a state of emergency. Nobody has seen the scale of this kind of mortality before in the state, where all of the host trees of a susceptible size are completely dead,” said Jodi Axelson, a specialist in forest health at UC Berkeley.

Read More

Advocates blast feds’ management plan for forest land near Nederland

By Charlie Brennan
Daily Camera Boulder County News
December 12, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

The Magnolia Forest Group is charging in a news release that the United States Forest Service’s Forsythe II forest management project on 2,855 acres of national forest land between Nederland and Gross Reservoir will not reduce risk of wildfire, but will destroy important wildlife habitat and permanently amend the Arapaho Roosevelt National Forest Plan to allow devastation of wildlife habitat now and during future projects. The nonprofit citizens’ advocacy group stated in its release, “The project’s emphasis on removing mature, timber-sized trees, while increasing surface and ladder fuels that will carry the very fires the plan aims to reduce, is counter to recommendations of nationally recognized fire scientists and the USFS’ own research.

Read More

Myths behind the clearcuts

By Mike Garrity, executive director of the Alliance for the Wild Rockies
Montana Standard
December 14, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

When the Missoulian’s new-to-Montana editor asked “With trees everywhere on the horizon, why can’t our local sawmills find enough wood to cut?” it prompted Rob Chaney’s excellent series on the history of the timber industry and forests in Montana. One problem with Chaney’s series, however, was his editor’s question, which reflected the myth that the timber industry in Montana can’t find enough timber to cut. The fact that Chaney omitted is that approximately 16 percent of the total volume of timber offered up for sale during fiscal year 2016 received no bids from the timber industry. Simply put, the Forest Service offered more trees for logging than the timber industry wanted. As Chaney correctly pointed out, the timber industry has now mostly moved on to the rainy, warm southeastern United States and its fast-growing tree farms rather than the slow-growing natural forests of the dry and cold Rocky Mountains.

Read More

Does salvaged sound better? Guitar maker opts for more sustainable spruce

By Elizabeth Jenkins
KTOO.org
December 13, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

A little piece of Alaska has helped create some of the music industry’s biggest hits. Sitka spruce is a prized “tonewood” used to make guitars and violins. But one guitar company is pushing back and asking the feds and music insiders to reconsider clear cut logging in the Tongass National Forest. Tom Bedell thinks when most musicians pick up an acoustic guitar, they don’t realize they’re strumming on wood — likely harvested from old growth clear cut logging. “If they knew that, they’d be outraged,” he said. “But they don’t. They don’t think to ask.” He says 80 percent of the world’s guitars are built, in part, with Sitka spruce, harvested from the forests of the Pacific Northwest and Southeast Alaska.

Read More

Prince of Wales forest land planning effort under way

By Joe Viechnicki
KFSK
December 13, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

The U.S. Forest Service is holding meetings this week in several communities on Prince of Wales Island to gather input on possible timber sales, tree thinning, stream restoration and recreation projects. A group of island residents is also gathering to learn what work could be happening on federal lands managed by the Forest Service and make recommendations to the federal agency. The Forest Service is planning to publish an environmental review of possible projects that could happen on National Forest land on Prince of Wales in the next 10-15 years. The agency is seeking input from residents and others who visit the island.

Read More

Oregon Governor Calls For A ‘Plan B’ For The Elliott State Forest

by Cassandra Profita
Oregon Public Broadcasting
December 13, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Gov. Kate Brown on Tuesday sought an new alternative to selling a state forest in southwest Oregon to the only bidder to offer the full asking price. At a meeting of the Oregon State Land Board, Brown called for setting aside $100 million in state bonding authority to allow for a new proposal on how the state should manage the Elliott State Forest going forward. Brown thanked the sole bidder in the state’s effort to sell the Elliott State Forest before asking Oregon Department of State Lands Director Jim Paul to proceed with developing a direct offer of sale to Lone Rock Timber of Roseburg and the Cow Creek Band of the Umpqua Indians. The timber company and tribe submitted the only bid of $220.8 million for the 84,000-acre forest. The governor also said she wants the land board to have another option on the table at its next meeting in February. 

Read More

State grants seabird “endangered” status

by Tristan Baurick
Kitsap Sun
December 13, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West


OLYMPIA — A seabird that could soon disappear from Puget Sound was granted top-tier status on the state’s endangered species list. The state Fish and Wildlife Commission on Friday unanimously approved moving the marbled murrelet from “threatened” to “endangered” species status. Efforts to save the tiny seabird have had little success. “Despite past (conservation) management, we are seeing a 44 percent decline since 2001,” Hannah Anderson, the state Department of Fish and Wildlife’s listing and recovery section manager, told the commission. The “uplisting” raises the murrelet’s profile but it comes with no added protections or funding. Anderson says the move could be a “call to action” for state agencies and lawmakers

Read More

Sugar makers, foresters say thanks for battling Asian longhorned beetle

By Cyrus Moulton
Worcester Telegram
December 13, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

WORCESTER – The loss of more than 35,000 trees because of the Asian longhorned beetle was a bitter experience for many area residents. But a pancake breakfast hosted by Vermont foresters and maple sugar industry representatives Tuesday made that loss at least a little bittersweet. “The point is just to say thank you to the people around here who were able to make this [eradication effort] a success,” said Barbara Schultz, Forest Health Program manager at the Vermont Department of Forests, Parks and Recreation…. Asian longhorned beetles were first detected in the Burncoat neighborhood in 2008, and the ensuing infestation has resulted in the loss of more than 35,000 trees and the replanting of another 30,000 trees within a 110-square-mile quarantine zone as part of an estimated $180 million eradication effort.

Read More

Indiana at 200: Meltzer Woods was a bicentennial gift to Hoosiers

By Andrea Neal
News Sentinel
December 14, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

Eight miles from Shelbyville at a place called Meltzer Woods, a remnant of old-growth forest thrives untouched by human development. It’s an oasis of tall trees in the midst of some of the most fertile farmland anywhere. The 48-acre expanse is a powerful reminder that our history is older than our state. Many of these trees predated the writing of Indiana’s 1816 constitution; some are older than the Declaration of Independence. …Meltzer Woods was a priority project, Chapman explains, because there’s so little old-growth forest left. It’s what Indiana looked like before the pioneers – a time when 87 percent of our state was covered with hardwoods, compared to 20 percent today.

Read More

Forestry response deserves scrutiny

Letter from Charlie Cole
Brown County Democrat
December 13, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

As Ben Kibbey’s recent article on Indiana’s state forests points out, a scant 18.9 percent of Indiana’s land is in forest cover (ranking us 34th among states — even Ohio has more forestland at 28.9 per- cent). In the Midwest, only the prairie states of Iowa, Kansas, and Nebraska have less woodland acres than Indiana. Barely 20 percent of Indiana’s extant 4.7 million acres of forest, 800,000 acres or so, are publicly owned. Of that, roughly 155,000 acres are managed by the Indiana Division of Forestry of IDNR. So, one must ask, with such a tiny fraction of such a miniscule remnant of what was once a majestic hardwood forest actually remaining in the “commons” — belonging, that is, to all the citizens of Indiana — why does the state insist on logging every square inch of it?

Read More

Devastating wildfires in Eastern forests likely to be repeated, expert warns

by Jeff Mulhollem
Phys.org
December 14, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

The intense wildfires that swept through the Smokey Mountains in Tennessee late last month were a tragic melding of the past and the future, according to a researcher in Penn State’s College of Agricultural Sciences. And the fast-moving, wind-whipped blazes that burned more than 150,000 acres, killed 14 people and damaged 2,400 structures in Gatlinburg and Sevier County may be a portent of things to come, he warned. “Many people have been lulled into believing that it is just the West that is prone to devastating wildfires, but that’s not true,” said Marc Abrams, professor of forest ecology and physiology, who for three decades has studied the historic role of fire in Eastern forests. …Now, Eastern forests, when faced with prolonged drought, are more vulnerable to hotter-burning, terribly destructive wildfires.”

Read More

Georgia wildfires contained, drought persists despite rain

By Mark Davis
Atlanta News
December 13, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

… The U.S. Forest Service said all roads, trails and areas previously closed due to fires are now reopen to public use, including the Appalachian Trail. “Thanks to the hard work of firefighters and the recent rains, all wildfires on the national forest are contained and closed areas are now open for public use and enjoyment,” said Chattahoochee National Forest Supervisor Betty Jewett. The precipitation began with a light rainfall just before Thanksgiving. More came in early December… The rain hardly means we are out of a drought, either. The National Weather Service estimated that Georgia’s rainfall total for this time of year is about nine inches lower than normal. Nine inches of rain is enough to slosh over your ankle boots.

Read More

Nature’s remedy for blocking noise? Trees

By Dean Fosdick
Washington Post
December 13, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

Landscape designers in cities are creating quieter living spaces by using trees to mute loud noises like sirens and air brakes. It’s called “soundscaping,” and it aims to restore peaceful, natural sounds like wind whispering through leaves, birds chirping or rain dripping from branches. “Massive walls are often installed to quiet freeway noise in major cities, but there are more aesthetic ways to handle it,” said Tim Moloney, who teaches landscape design at the University of Missouri. “Use vegetation for minimizing the background clatter.”The denser a tree’s lower branches, the better it masks or deflects bothersome noise, Moloney said. 

Read More

Matakana forest blaze brought under control by multiple fire crews

by KELLY DENNETT, DELWYN DICKEY
Stuff.co.nz
December 14, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: International

Fire crews and helicopters battled a large forest fire in Matakana on Wednesday afternoon. Crews left the scene about 9pm on Wednesday but were set to return on Thursday morning to dampen down hot spots. One household was evacuated and other residents were asked to leave their homes, after the fire began about 2pm and spread to cover three hectares. It’s understood the fire started after a beekeeper set a fire to burn off an infected hive. Two helicopters, 70 firefighters and 17 fire trucks were called to Wright Rd in the Rodney district.

Read More

Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy

Are Athens-Area Wood Pellet Plants Clean Energy Producers or Polluters?

By Kat Khoury
Flagpole
December 13, 2016
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: US East, United States

Three proposed facilities near Athens that turn trees into fuel for power plants could contribute to climate change, according to environmental groups, but other experts call wood pellets a renewable, cleaner alternative to coal. The Dogwood Alliance, an Atlanta-based nonprofit dedicated to saving and sustaining forests, is organizing Athens residents against the three facilities. A company called E-Pellets recently acquired the old Louisiana Pacific particle-board factory off U.S. Highway 441; it has secured permits from the Georgia Environmental Protection Division and is awaiting a Jackson County Industrial Development Authority vote on a $110 million bond issue. 

Read More

How Do Trees Respond to Climate Change? Clues from an Arboretum

By Ula Chrobak
EOS – Earth and Space Science News
December 13, 2016
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: US East, United States

The rich diversity of trees at arboreta may allow scientists to home in on the specific traits that allow trees to grow faster or slower in response to warming temperatures… Looking at a variety of trees in arboreta could reveal clues about which trees grow faster or slower when temperatures warm.Ettinger and fellow scientists spent 2014 taking advantage of the vast diversity of tree species at the Arnold Arboretum of Harvard University in Boston… Their goal was to understand whether trees’ traits can predict how they will respond to warming temperatures. The team found that looking at a variety of trees in arboreta could reveal clues about which trees grow faster or slower when temperatures warm.

Read More

Denmark’s largest coal plant fully converts to biomass

By Diarmaid Williams
Decentralized Energy
December 13, 2016
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: International

The Avedore CHP plant in Copenhagen, Denmark, once the country’s largest coal-fired station is now completely fuelled by biomass. Coal has been replaced entirely by wood pellets and straw as two energy companies, Vestegnens Kraftvarmeselskab (VEKS) and Dong Energy combined to contribute to the city’s district heating initiative. …The conversion, part of a heat agreement between the two Danish energy companies, aims to provide green district heating to VEKS’ customers in the Greater Copenhagen area. The change from coal to sustainable wood pellets means CO2 emissions are reduced by about 500,000 metric tonnes per year, equivalent to the annual emissions from 255,000 cars.

Read More

General

Softwood Lumber – Trump admin to further squeeze Canadian manufacturing?

By Peter Ewart
250 News
December 13, 2016
Category: Uncategorised

Are the current softwood lumber trade negotiations between Canada and the US just another predictable chapter in the long history of softwood disputes? Or is there more going on here? Certainly, the election of Donald Trump as US president has added some new features to the dispute in which the US side claims (despite being repeatedly overruled by NAFTA and WTO panels) that Canada is subsidizing its lumber exports. … However, now that the Trump administration will be taking power instead of Clinton, Quinn has ramped up his prediction to 30 to 40%, duties that would hit the BC and Canadian industry extremely hard and would likely result in more mill closures, job losses and challenges for communities (2).

Read More