Tree Frog Forestry News

Daily Archives: December 23, 2016

Business & Politics

J.D. Irving, Limited Forecasts Hiring Over 8,600 between 2017 and 2019

JD Irving
December 22, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada East, Canada

Over the next three years, we are forecasting over 8,600 hires across our operations in Canada and the U.S. The forecast is the result of retirements, anticipated business growth, and normal workforce turnover. 89% of jobs in Atlantic Canada “When we look at our three-year forecast from 2017-2019, 89% of the jobs we need to fill are in the Atlantic provinces,” said Jeff Green, Director, Talent Recruitment with JDI. “70% of those jobs are in New Brunswick and Nova Scotia alone.” Across our organization, the operations with the highest number of job opportunities include retail business, manufacturing shipbuilding, shipping, supply chain and logistics, and engineering. 

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Current Use ruling sets dangerous precedent for landowners, experts say

By Emma Lamberton
Vermont Watchdog
December 22, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: US East, United States

Foresters say Weyerhaeuser Co.’s recent loss at the Vermont Supreme Court will affect large and small property owners alike and set a dangerous precedent of courts deferring to government agencies. In September, the high court ruled that Plum Creek, recently bought by Weyerhaeuser, violated state Current Use guidelines on a small section of its enrolled property. As a result, the company’s 50,000 acres may be removed from Vermont’s tax deduction program, resulting in a charge of over $1 million. While the state targeted Vermont’s largest landowner, Jonathan Wood, a private forester and former secretary of the Vermont Agency of Natural Resources, says the case has implications for others.

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VicForests extended AFS certification to its western forestry operations in Australia

Lesprom Network
December 22, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: International

VicForests has successfully extended its certification to the Australian Forestry Standard (AFS) to include community forestry operations in western Victoria, Australia, as the company said in the press release received by Lesprom Network. Nathan Trushell, Acting CEO VicForests, said that this is the first time VicForests has sought certification for its community forestry operations. There are nine criteria that forest managers must meet to receive certification including the need to protect biodiversity, maintain forest health, protect soil and water and to maintain and enhance social and economic benefits. VicForests is audited every nine months by accredited auditors in order to maintain its certification.

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Wood, Paper & Green Building

Former Hearst student recognized for wood research

Northern Ontario Business
December 22, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: Canada

A former Hearst resident is the recipient of a prestigious scholarship from the Canadian Wood Council (CWC) for his studies in wood. Daniel Lacroix was born and raised in Hearst, but is completing his doctoral research at the University of Ottawa. According to the CWC, Lacroix’s work “investigates the behaviour of glulam beam and column structural elements subjected to simulated blast loading and potential glulam reinforcement options.”… Established 13 years ago, the memorial scholarship is awarded yearly to graduate students whose wood research exemplifies the same level of passion that Catherine Lalonde championed relentlessly for the wood/wood products industry as a professional engineer and president of the CWC. 

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4 lumber defects that could lead to roof frame failures

By Charles C. Roberts
PropertyCasualty360
December 22, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: US East, United States

Wood used in roof framing is not a homogeneous material. Various defects are present depending on the grade and method of cutting: plain sawn, quarter sawn and rift sawn. Plain sawn (also known as flat sawn) is the type of cut most commonly found in lumber and the least expensive way to turn logs into lumber. The rings comprise 30 degrees or less of the board face. In quarter sawn wood, the rings in the wood intersect at a 60 to 90-degree angle, creating an intersecting design in the wood.

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Weyerhaeuser contributes to Clemson Wood Utilization and Design Institute

By Denise Attaway
Clemson Newsstand
December 22, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: US East, United States

CLEMSON — The Clemson University Wood Utilization and Design Institute continues to add to its cadre of founding partners and has received a $50,000 boost to help support the advancement of the South Carolina wood industry. The gift comes from the Weyerhaeuser Company. The money will be used to help fund the institute, which brings together foresters, architects, engineers, constructors and building industry stakeholders to design advances in wood-based products through education and training, product research and development, as well as development of technical and design solutions. “This gift will be used to support our institute as we go forward,” said Pat Layton, director of the Wood Utilization and Design Institute. A Weyerhaeuser representative will serve on the institute’s advisory board and will work with other board members to shape the direction of the institute.”

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Extend Wood Pole Life

Transmission and Distribution World
December 22, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: International

…Rovakaira considers the failure of wood poles from ground rot a major problem, as it is more likely to occur during the severe winter conditions because of excessive ice loading and trees falling on overhead line conductors. The average life of wood poles in Finland is more than 50 years. Current utility practice is to replace overhead lines supported by time-expired wood poles with underground cables or, in some instances, with new overhead lines constructed adjacent to roads for ease of access… Based on the research, it was evident to Rovakaira that using additional protection against decay on the vulnerable ground line section of the pole would help to reduce outages from pole failures while significantly extending pole life, resulting in excellent cost savings.

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Forestry

Wood Business – Editor’s Picks 2016

Wood Business
December 22, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada

Introducing the top 10 Editor’s Picks of Canadian Forest Industries stories from 2016!  

  1. Top 10 Under 40 – From a logging operations supervisor in Nova Scotia to an accountant in Vancouver
  2. DEMO International – Thousands converged in Maple Ridge, BC
  3. Made in the grade – The original Gorman Bros. office after 60 years
  4. Canada’s 2015 wildfire season burned over three million hectares 
  5. Port Alice family perseveres in face of tragedy 
  6. Carrot River Optimized: Saskatchewan sawmill gets $25M upgrade
  7. Contractors share views (survey results)
  8. Weathering the softwood storm – the softwood lumber war 
  9. Optimized for change: Teal Jones’ new trimmer optimizer
  10. Boisaco sawmill’s journey to success after three bankruptcies

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Cranbrook property protected as part of $1-million conservation commitment

Boundary Sentinel
December 22, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

A Cranbrook area property home to a wide variety of wildlife has been acquired by the Province, thanks to a partnership with the Nature Conservancy of Canada (NCC). The property consists of: 0.6 hectares at Elizabeth Lake Conservation area near Cranbrook, which includes a bird sanctuary, hiking trails and wetland and shoreline habitat. It is among four ecologically-sensitive properties the Province recently assumed ownership of through the partnership with the NCC. These properties all contain diverse habitats. “It was important that the Province stepped in with the funds to ensure that Elizabeth Lake remains undeveloped,” said Bill Bennett, MLA Kootenay East.

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Great Fire of 1886 gave birth to 2016’s tallest Vancouver tree

by Kent Spencer
The Vancouver Sun
December 22, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Vancouver was razed to the ground during the Great Fire of 1886, but the city and its people came back stronger than ever. So has Mother Nature. A Douglas fir, spawned in the charred remains of Stanley Park about 129 years ago, is now the city’s tallest tree at 63 metres (206 feet), outpacing nearby giants which are at least 300 years older. “I was stunned when I heard. It’s pretty neat,” said Paul Lawson, director of the UBC Malcolm Knapp Research Forest in Maple Ridge. “Fire is nature’s way of cleaning. The soil is sterilized and diseases removed. It’s a rejuvenating force.” The fir is part of a tall, thin stand south of Beaver Lake which has shot upward to capture as much of the sun’s energy as possible. The city’s highest tree was identified by Ira Sutherland, a research forest employee who fancies himself an evergreen enthusiast and big tree hunter.

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The crisis condition on national forests

Helena Independent Record
December 22, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States

Dale Bosworth and Jack Blackwell correctly stated the crisis condition that exists on many of our national forests. They recommended that Congress should provide USFS with more support to implement scientific forest management to solve the problem. However, Bosworth and Blackwell failed to state that, with the National Environmental Policy Act and the National Forest Management Act, USFS already has the tools it needs to address the crisis. In fact, USFS has had at least 50 years to use those tools and employ scientific management to prevent the development of what was a predictable crisis. Instead of advocating scientific management, foresters like Bosworth and Blackwell used NEPA and NFMA to perpetuate single use management and fire suppression. 

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In Eastern Oregon, A Quieter Battle Over Federal Land Is Unfolding

by Andrew Selsky
Associated Press in the Oregon Public Broadcasting
December 22, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West


On a recent wintry evening, members of the Grant County Public Forest Commission walked into the warmth of a rustic diner and took seats at their customary table for their bimonthly meeting. They voiced anger and frustration. At this meeting, they were officially a non-entity. A judge this fall dissolved the commission at the behest of a former county supervisor who worried it was becoming a risk, citing the takeover of a federal wildlife refuge in a neighboring county. …But now, the forest commissioners say, the government is tightening access to the same natural resources by closing roads and curtailing logging and other industries that allowed previous generations to be self-sufficient. The commissioners feel they lost, by the stroke of a judge’s pen, a tool voters gave them to fight back.

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Slow timber sales lead to wood piling up for area loggers

By Rick Olivo
Ashland Daily Press
December 22, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

A soft market for timber is causing many loggers to either postpone cutting or to leave logs piled up at landings until they can find buyers for their wood. According to Ashland County Forest Administrator Chris Hoffman, the slowdown has already had an impact on Ashland County stumpage sales. “We opened bids here three weeks ago and the money that we are getting in, the stumpage we are selling is less than it was last year at this time, but the loggers are still producing wood,” he said. Hoffman said markets for timber cut in Wisconsin’s north woods has become “extremely soft.”

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Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy

Seeing the Forest for the Trees, Part Five

Editorial By Bill Hudson
Pagosa Daily Post
December 22, 2016
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: United States, US West

…Over the past 20 years, forestry science has been formulating new theories about the connection between fire and forest health. Some experts feel that, by suppressing wildfire in our Western forests, we have created unhealthy — and dangerous — conditions that will, if left treated, inevitably lead to ever-more-disastrous wildfires. When Pagosa businessman J.R Ford began assembling the partnership that eventually named itself Renewable Forest Energy LLC, he had a very different view of forestry resources from what had been exhibited by New Mexico Lumber Company and Pagosa Lumber Company a hundred years earlier. Rather than viewing the Archuleta County wilderness as a place to extract a valuable building material, Renewable Forest Energy looked at the vast Ponderosa forest as a sick patient in serious need of treatment.

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How Much Biofuel Do Santa’s Reindeer Need?

By Michael McDonald
Oil Price.com
December 22, 2016
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy

Each Christmas, around the world billions of children sit quietly in their beds at night pondering one of life’s biggest mysteries about a fat man in a red suit; ‘what are the propulsion specs on Santa’s sleigh and what is the relative level of its fuel economy?’… Now that Santa is focused on going green though, it’s time to consider how much biofuel the reindeer need. Or more precisely, how much biofuel could be created through the biomass ingested by Santa’s reindeer? And what is the cost of all that biomass?… Since Santa has 9 reindeer including newcomer Rudolph, he needs 1 billion pounds or about 500,000 tons of switchgrass. That 500,000 tons of switchgrass could have been used to produce about 10 million gallons of ethanol. Santa’s furry helpers require food from 67,000 acres of North Pole land at a cost of $2.0 million total. What a bargain!

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