Tree Frog Forestry News

Daily Archives: January 16, 2017

Today’s Takeaway

On the Eve of the US Inauguration…

Tree Frog Forestry News
January 16, 2017
Category: Today's Takeaway

Not surprisingly, on the eve of the US inauguration, stories abound on the repercussions of a Donald Trump presidency.

First up, the American Forest Resources Council “thinks it may able to reverse President Barack Obama’s expansion of the Cascade-Siskiyou National Monument in Southern Oregon”, and the American Loggers Council has published its priorities for the Trump Administration: “to protect family-wage jobs and keep American loggers working in the woods”.

Meanwhile, north of the 49th, pundit Vaughn Palmer (Vancouver Sun) opines on how “Trump’s tariffs on wood could hurt some BC communities” and a CFJC Kamloops story speaks to how the Trump presidency brings uncertainty for both the “forest and cattle industries”. Looking for the silver lining, Michael Den Tandt (National Post) notes “five ways Canada could benefit from a Trump Presidency”. Spoiler alert: he references “the original Canada-US free trade deal”.

Finally, Ottawa isn’t making any new friends with their decision “to appeal $13.8 million award to Vancouver Island First Nation” related to logging contracts going back to 1948.

— Tree Frog Editors

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Froggy Foibles

Bears dancing to ‘Jungle Boogie’

BBC Earth
November 11, 2016
Category: Froggy Foibles
Region: Canada, Canada West

Sometimes bears have an itch they just have to scratch! Watch this footage from the Canadian Rockies set to music. 

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Forestry

Development has affected 7 percent of virgin forests since 2000: Study

By Ellen Powell
Christian Science Monitor
January 15, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada

On the surface, it’s just a vast expanse of land. But look closer, and the untouched areas of Canada’s boreal forest are a teeming mass of life – one that may hold some life-sustaining answers. Yet in Canada and worldwide, untouched wilderness is coming under increased pressure, according to research published Friday in the journal Science Advances. The study’s authors, who have been using satellite data to track changes in the world’s intact landscapes for more than a decade, report that 7.2 percent of these areas have been compromised since 2000. As these landscapes disappear or are sliced up by human activity, the multiplicity of species that inhabit these pristine corners of the earth are threatened. 

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Ottawa to appeal $13.8 million award to Vancouver Island First Nation

By Katie Derosa
Victoria Times Colonist
January 15, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

The federal government is appealing a decision by a special claims tribunal to award $13.8 million in compensation to a Vancouver Island First Nation over a historic logging dispute. The Huu-ay-aht First Nation, based in Anacla near Bamfield, received notice of appeal on Thursday. The specific-claims tribunal, which hears claims by First Nations against the federal government regarding past wrongs, found the federal government failed in its duty to the community relating to logging contracts between 1948 and 1969. “This decision to appeal is outrageous,” said Huu-ay-aht First Nations Chief Coun. Robert Dennis. “Part of our reconciliation to this long-term dispute was to seek fair compensation. 

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Elphinstone Logging Focus hoping to strike deal with Island Timberlands

By Sean Eckford
Coast Reporter
January 13, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Island Timberlands has begun logging on a parcel of private managed forest land it owns in the upper Lockyer Road area of Roberts Creek, and the group Elphinstone Logging Focus (ELF) is asking the company to protect a section of its cutblock. In a release this week, ELF said it was “in discussions with [Island Timberlands] to protect a section of the Elphinstone Health Trail that crosses through a northwest corner of the cutblock from being logged across.” …Makenzie Leine, manager of community and government relations with Island Timberlands, did not confirm if any discussions with ELF were taking place, but did tell Coast Reporter, “When managing our forests we consider key public values such as water quality, wildlife and soils, and we reforest our areas promptly.”

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West Van’s big old trees are important in many ways

Letter by David Cook, Biologist
The North Shore News
January 15, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

The letter West Van’s Tree Bylaw: Let Common Sense Prevail, Jan. 8 Mailbox has some inaccuracies which should be pointed out. The term “overgrown tree” used in the Jan. 8 article implies the tree has outlived its usefulness. Quite the contrary; in addition to their esthetic value, old trees have ecological value. Perhaps the most important ecological roles they play as far as our area is concerned are as perch and nesting trees for the bald eagle whose prime feeding habitat extends along the entire shoreline of the highly productive Burrard Inlet and its estuaries. Fortunately the lower elevation residentially developed areas of West Vancouver have the highest concentration of old trees along the shores of Burrard Inlet, allowing the bald eagle to use these old trees for nesting and what is called perch hunting

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Forest industry knows it has to look after the land

By Paul Whittaker, CEO Alberta Forest Products Association
Calgary Herald
January 15, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Re: “We must protect waterways,” Stephen Legault, Opinion, Jan. 7. There has been a lot of talk about our headwaters recently – and that’s a good thing. The very lifeblood of our communities deserves the best stewardship we can give it. Alberta’s forestry producers commend MLA Cameron Westhead for his efforts to pass a motion in the legislature to recognize the importance of headwaters and discuss what we can do to manage them for future generations. In a recent column, Stephen Legault added his perspective to the conversation. There is no questioning Legault’s passion for our environment, but when it comes to his recommendations for how forestry on the eastern slopes of Alberta’s Rockies should be handled, he’s simply barking up the wrong tree. Legault has openly called for a ban on “clear-cut logging” from the Ghost River to the Montana border. 

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Satellites reveal forest loss is more serious in N.S. than the government would have you believe

By Donna Crossland – former member of the forest panel of expertise for the Natural Resources Strategy 2010 and a board member of Medway Community Forest Co-op
The Chronicle Herald
January 14, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

It’s hard to know who to believe regarding the forest situation in Nova Scotia. Some folks say we need not be concerned about clear-cutting because our government is using “progressive”, “ecosystem-based” forest management practices on Crown lands. Others, like me, suggest you need to be concerned, very concerned. The images accompanying this article portray an unbiased truth. The clear-cut expanses from only the 13 years preceding 2014 will allow you to draw your own conclusions. Satellites do not discriminate among the causes of forest loss, whether they are clear-cuts, high intensity fires or blueberry operations.

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Call of the wild: can America’s national parks survive?

The Guardian
January 15, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: United States

… This is one of 59 national parks which range across the United States, from the depths of the Grand Canyon in Arizona to the turrets of the Rocky Mountains in Colorado. All – plus hundreds of monuments and historic sites – are run by the National Park Service (NPS), which celebrated its centenary last year. The parks were created so that America’s natural wonders would be accessible to everyone, rather than sold off to the highest bidder… Yosemite saw subalpine forests moving up into subalpine meadows over the last century and small mammals, including mice and ground squirrels, shifting 500m uphill. “As temperatures warm,” he said, “things on higher elevations get warmer and things on lower elevations move up.” Bark beetles, once killed by cold winters, are now surviving and wreaking havoc with trees. “You go to Rocky Mountains, Yellowstone… hillsides formerly covered in a green canopy of trees are now just rust-coloured areas.” 

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University of Colorado Boulder battling to save oaks from feasting bugs

By Sarah Kuta
The University of Colorado Daily Camera
January 15, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Bugs are feasting on some of the old oak trees that shade the University of Colorado’s Boulder campus, causing serious damage that’s threatening the overall health of the mature trees. CU’s lead arborist Vince Aquino said the campus is battling allokermes and lecanium scales, two types of insects that like to feast on the sap inside oak twigs. So far, nine campus red oak trees have fallen prey to the bugs. The campus sprayed a soybean-based oil on the trees this week, while students are away on winter break. A small test of the treatment last winter seems to have been effective at stopping the bugs. There are roughly 125 red oaks on the Boulder campus, the oldest of which were planted in the late 1800s.

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Timber Industry May Challenge Cascade-Siskiyou Monument Expansion

By Jeff Mapes
Oregon Public Broadcasting
January 13, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

The timber industry thinks it may able to reverse President Barack Obama’s expansion of the Cascade-Siskiyou National Monument in Southern Oregon. The president’s decision to add 48,000 acres to the 65,000-acre national monument was praised by environmentalists and Oregon’s two senators, Democrats Ron Wyden and Jeff Merkley. But a timber industry trade group argued that Obama misused his power under the 1906 Antiquities Act. Travis Joseph, president of the Portland-based American Forest Resource Council, said Friday the expansion improperly included several thousand acres of federal land that Congress has prioritized for logging. “Can an administration come and change the meaning of a statute through the Antiquities Act?” he asked. “That’s the legal question, and our answer is no.”

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Proposed forest thinning will sabotage natural forest climate adaptation, resistance to drought, fire, insect outbreaks

by Derek E. Lee, Phd,The Wild Nature Institute
Phys.org
January 16, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

The USDA Forest Service is proposing widespread forest thinning on our public lands across the West in a misguided attempt to reduce the impact of drought, fire, and insects (see National Forest Restoration Projects, Sierra Nevada National Forest Land Management Plan Revisions, news articles). These logging schemes are the latest in a series of Forest Service attempts to chainsaw their way out of a perceived problem. However, forests in the western United States have evolved to naturally self-thin uncompetitive trees through forest fires, insects, or disease. Forest fires and other disturbances are natural elements of healthy, dynamic forest ecosystems, and have been for millennia. These processes cull the weak and make room for the continued growth and reproduction of stronger, climate-adapted trees.

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Soil fungi help tree seedlings survive, influence forest diversity

By The University of Montana
EurekAlert
January 13, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

MISSOULA – A new paper published Jan. 13 in Science reveals that the relationship between soil fungi and tree seedlings is more complicated than previously known. The paper was co-written by Ylva Lekberg, an assistant professor of soil community ecology at the University of Montana. Lekberg and her collaborators studied 55 species and 550 populations of North American trees. Scientists have long known that plants and soil biota can regulate one another, but the new findings highlight the complexity of the feedback loop. “Fungi differ in their ability to protect tree seedlings from pathogens, and this has implications for seedling recruitment and therefore forest community patterns,” Lekberg said.

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Monument expansion strikes a balance

Editorial Board
Mail Tribune
January 15, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Supporters of a larger Cascade-Siskiyou National Monument got some of what they wanted when President Barack Obama designated 47,624 acres as new monument land. Opponents, including the timber industry and the Jackson County commissioners, were disappointed, but the move is unlikely to bring the negative consequences they fear. In one of his last official acts as president, Obama used his power under the Antiquities Act to expand the monument, just as President Bill Clinton did to create it in 2000, just before he left office… Supporters of the Cascade-Siskiyou expansion had sought 66,500 acres, and Oregon Sens. Ron Wyden and Jeff Merkley actively supported and worked for the larger designation.

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Scientists aid forest protection project

University of Edinburgh
January 15, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: International

University researchers are to provide expertise in a prominent international project to protect the world’s tropical forests. The Forests 2020 project, worth more than £14 million in total, is funded by the UK Space Agency’s International Partnership Programme. Forests 2020 is led by Edinburgh-based sustainability software and data company Ecometrica, who will collaborate with experts from the Universities of Edinburgh and Leicester. Also taking part is University of Edinburgh spin-out company Carbomap, which specialises in LiDAR forest mapping – a remote sensing method that uses light to measure variable distances to the Earth.

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Over 200 firefighters battling wildfire in Aberdare National Park (Kenya)

By Irene Mugo
Daily Nation
January 14, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: International

Nearly 6,000 hectares of the Aberdare National Park has been destroyed by a wildfire that has continued to spread for the second day. The fire, which began Friday morning is spreading quickly due to windy weather. According to the Acting Assistant Director in charge of Mountain Conservation Simon Gitau the fire has consumed the lower moorlands in the northern part of the Aberdare. “We are trying to prevent the fire from getting to the main natural forest .What is burning can regenerate fast since its shrubs, heath and moorland grasses,” said Mr Gitau.

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Company & Business News

Here are five ways Canada could benefit from a Trump presidency

By Michael Den Tandt
National Post
January 15, 2017
Category: Company & Business News
Region: Canada, United States

The imminent accession of Donald J. Trump to the presidency of the United States and de facto leadership of the free world, judging from online chatter, has several Democrat-leaning Canadians in an ornery (read terrified) mood. The President-elect’s daily tweetblasts, it is fair to say, have contributed to this unease. But there are, just maybe, ways in which Canadians may benefit from Trump’s presidency… Boosting trade. This is counter-intuitive, but bear with me. Trump has vowed to rescind the North American Free Trade Agreement, calling it the worst deal of its kind ever made. Few trade hands believe he will follow through on this promise, due to the pain it would cause American businesses and workers. But should the NAFTA go awry, the original Canada-U.S. free trade deal, struck by Prime Minister Brian Mulroney and President Ronald Reagan in 1988, goes back into effect.

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Donald Trump’s tariffs on wood could hurt some B.C. communities

By Vaughn Palmer
Vancouver Sun
January 14, 2017
Category: Company & Business News
Region: Canada

Victoria — The B.C. Liberals are increasingly concerned that the rising threat of lumber tariffs in the United States could generate a punishing fallout for the dozens of B.C. communities and thousands of workers dependent on the forest industry. “I’m worried,” Finance Minister Mike de Jong conceded during a media scrum this week, reacting to news that the Americans had issued a preliminary finding of unfair trade against softwood lumber imports from Canada. “I hope it doesn’t happen,” de Jong added, referring to the prospect of tariffs or other restrictions on access to the U.S. market. “Forestry remains a cornerstone of our B.C. economy. Employment-wise, countless communities rely upon our forest sector.”… Still, history suggests that at the end of the day, the U.S. government response will be determined, not by American consumers, but by the protectionist interests of the country’s lumber industry. 

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US border tax aimed squarely at Canada

By Peter Ewart
250 News
January 16, 2017
Category: Company & Business News
Region: Canada, Canada West

There has been much furor and controversy over the last while about president-elect Donald Trump’s threat to penalize any US company that attempts to move operations to another country. Now we have learned on Friday, January 13th that Trump’s threat also applies to auto companies moving some or all of their operations to Canada. This will be part of a “border adjustment tax” applied to auto products imported into the US. Sean Spicer, spokesman for Donald Trump, stated that “’When a company that’s in the U.S. moves to a place, whether it’s Canada or Mexico, and any other country seeking to put U.S. workers at a disadvantage’, then the incoming U.S. president ‘is going to do everything he can to deter that’.”

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Trump Presidency brings uncertainty for forest and cattle industries

By Vanessa Ybarra
CFJC Today Kamloops
January 13, 2017
Category: Company & Business News
Region: Canada, Canada West

KAMLOOPS — No one will argue Donald Trump is a man of many words. Whether he will follow through on this promises, including settling North American trade disputes, is what has people like TRU Political Science Professor Terry Kading on pins and needles. His concern, B.C’s lumber industry. “I think we’re in a difficult position moving forward, whether it means higher tariffs, which is likely,” said Kading. The Softwood Lumber Dispute has been an ongoing battle Canada and the U.S for more than 30 years. “The root of the problem is they use a bidding process and up here we allocate certain forest areas to companies based on a stumpage rate,” said Kading. “They’ve always hated that system.”

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American Loggers Council Outlines Priorities for New President, Congress

Release by The American Loggers Council
PR Web
January 16, 2017
Category: Company & Business News
Region: United States

The American Loggers Council (ALC) today outlined key priorities for the 115th United States Congress and the Trump Administration’s first two years. As the national organization representing America’s professional timber harvesters, ALC believes the new Congress and President should take advantage of an historic opportunity to protect and create family-wage jobs. “Voters sent a clear message that it’s time to put Americans back to work, and strengthening the forest products industry is one way to accomplish that goal in communities across the country,” said Daniel Dructor, ALC Executive Vice President.

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Deficit solutions

Ketchikan Daily News
January 15, 2017
Category: Company & Business News
Region: United States, US West

It’s a crossroads of sorts for both Ketchikan and the state. The crux is budget deficits. It begins with the state, which sought a solution to a $3.5 billion deficit in the past legislative session and continues to seek ways to whittle that figure down. As the state has started, the Ketchikan Gateway Borough picked up a state responsibility or two, and that has contributed to the borough’s own almost $1 million budget deficit for fiscal 2018. The deficit is expected to be thoroughly discussed in the next few months before the next budget is approved by the Assembly. New revenue and spending cuts — the same as for the state — will be the specific discussion… Ketchikan, the region and the state need resource development. It’s the basis for Alaskan jobs, rebuilding community and state economies and, as a result, eliminating government budget deficits.

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New plant manager settling in at Maibec mill

By Anthony Brino
Bangor Daily News
January 16, 2017
Category: Company & Business News
Region: US East, United States

Kevin Paradis has been working as a logger and in mills for much of his life, and now he’s overseeing one of the largest in northern Maine’s Route 11 forestry cluster. Paradis started the job of plant manager at the Maibec softwood lumber mill in Masardis in July. So far, “it’s going good,” said Paradis, who’s originally from Portage. “It’s kind of a learning experience.” …The purchase of the Fraser mill marked Maibec’s first lumber mill in the U.S. Maibec’s Quebec production facilities are in St. Pamphile, about 35 miles west of Allagash, and Saint-Theophile de Beauce, across the border from Jackman, and the company also owns a mill in in Balmoral, New Brunswick.

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Mississippi Logging finds Business Opportunities Across the Pond

By Delaney Howell
Iowa Public Television
January 13, 2017
Category: Company & Business News
Region: US East, United States


Better known for its production in cotton, catfish, and sweet potatoes, Mississippi is one of the leading producers in another agricultural industry: forests. Across Mississippi, some 350,000 private landowners control approximately 75 percent of all the forest area in the state, which contributed $1.16 billion to the state’s economy in 2015. A majority of these private owners sell their wood to companies like Weyerhaeuser. Controlling more than 26 million acres of forestland around the world, the company thins the timber to retain high value trees for use as dimensional lumber and plywood. The remaining majority of the smaller, lower value trees are used to make pulp and paper products. However, over the past two decades a decline in print and paper use has taken its toll on the forest industry.

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Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy

We can learn so much from natural world

By David Suzuki
Cowichan Valley Citizen
January 15, 2017
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: Canada, Canada West

If you fly over a forest and look down, you’ll see every green tree and plant reaching to the heavens to absorb the ultimate energy source: sunlight. What a contrast when you look down on a city or town with its naked roofs, asphalt roads and concrete sidewalks, all ignoring the sun’s beneficence! Research shows we might benefit by thinking more like a forest. Solar roads could be a step in that direction. Roads, sidewalks and parking lots cover massive areas. Using them to generate power means less environmental disturbance, as no new land is needed to house solar power operations.

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Wood, Paper & Green Building

Things you didn’t know you could make out of wood

By Andrew Reuter
St. Louis Post-Dispatch
January 16, 2017
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: United States

The world long ago moved away from wood for making most products. Plastic is cheaper. Steel is stronger. Cardboard is lighters. But it’s hard to beat wood for its jack-of-all-trades abilities. It’s still cheap, strong and light enough for plenty of DIY projects. And it’s one of the easier materials to work with. For those reasons, I present you this list of some of he most interesting projects that most of us didn’t realize could be made of wood.

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New Energy Works Timberframers is Raising the First Complete Cross Laminated Timber Building in New York State in January 2017

Release by New Energy Works Timberframers
PR Web
January 15, 2017
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: US East, United States

Beginning on January 23, 2017 New Energy Works Timberframers will raise the first complete Cross Laminated Timber (CLT) building in New York State. New Energy Works is combining the strength of timber frame construction and CLT panels cutting the wake for New York State in this innovative construction method with their campus expansion. The public is welcome to view the raising on January 25 and 26, 2017. CLT construction is an economically and environmentally conscious alternative to steel and concrete construction, a material that is new to the U.S. building industry. 

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Not your grandfather’s two-by-fours: A new exhibition showcases modern wood construction

By Amanda Kolson Hurley
The Architect’s Newspaper
January 13, 2017
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: US East, United States


Here we are in the year 2016, getting ready to ride in robot cars and eat meat grown in labs, but a skyscraper built out of wood still seems outlandish. Why? Today we have an innate distrust of tall wood buildings, a sense that they’ll roar into flame at the first spark. But it’s the 21st century, and a new exhibition at the National Building Museum in Washington challenges us to let go of our fear and embrace the future. The structural wood products that have recently entered the market are not your grandfather’s two-by-fours. Engineered timber beams have been proven in tests to be just as fireproof as steel, and arguably more so, since their cores as less likely to melt in a fire. They are also surprisingly strong.

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Belarusian Domostroenie to double export of wooden houses to France

Belarus News
January 16, 2017
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: International

MOGILEV –The Domostroenie branch of the Shklov-based newsprint mill will build and ship more than 70 frame-panel houses to France in 2017 or twice as much as in 2016, representatives of the company told BelTA. The negotiations with French real estate development companies started several years ago. The first orders for building 37 stick-frame houses were signed only in 2016. “The product is popular with French customers because our houses are delivered almost ready to use, have good heat-insulating properties, and their installation along with finishing works take under three months. French companies also appreciate the high quality and competitive prices of our products,” the source said.

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