Tree Frog Forestry News

Daily Archives: January 24, 2017

Today’s Takeaway

Forests help tackle climate change by ‘holding their breath’

Tree Frog Forestry News
January 24, 2017
Category: Today's Takeaway

In a bit of scare mongering of his own – NDP strategist Bill Tieleman claims that Premier “Christy Clark’s reckless cheap shots at vindictive Donald Trump will mean huge cost for BC workers”. This in response to Clark’s earlier response to what Trump had said about women and her more recent claim that “time after time, without regard for the facts, the American government has accepted all of the allegations … filed by the U.S. lumber industry.

Drought and a changing climate are impacting forests in both hemispheres. In Chile, because of “a drought that has built up over the past eight years”, vast woodland fires have caused “the biggest forestry disaster in our history,” according to Chilean President Michelle Bachelet. The Prince George 250 News has a story on how spruce beetle outbreaks “have been exacerbated by climate change, as warmer winters allow the beetle to have multiple life cycles”.

Finally, a UK study highlights the importance of ecosystem respiration as a key control of land carbon sinks. The authors claim that the recent period of global warming slowdown (1998-2012) can in part be explained by worldwide forests that “breathed in carbon dioxide through photosynthesis, but reduced the rate at which they breathe out”. Co-author Pekka Kauppi, from Helsinki University adds that the results were “as if forests have been holding their breath“.

–Tree Frog Editors

Read More

Forestry

In a ‘Post-Truth’ Era, Greenpeace Lies to Raise Money

By Amy Payne
National Review
January 24, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada

The organization uses false accusations to support its environmentalist stunts. Free speech is one thing. It’s another to lie about a company just because you don’t like it. And environmental organizations like Greenpeace go even further — they try to raise money through pitches based on lies. Green groups say they have been fundraising like crazy since the election. It’s going to take commitment to defeat their smear campaigns, which threaten jobs and communities. In this fight, Americans can learn a lot from our northern neighbors in Canada’s boreal forest, who are refusing to take the abuse.

Read More

Spruce Beetle Strategy for Region

By Elaine Macdonald-Meisner
250 News
January 23, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Prince George, B.C.- The newest threat to forests in B.C. is the Spruce Beetle, and various stakeholders have worked with the Province in the development of a strategy to minimize its impact. The new strategy lays out five areas on how stakeholders will approach the outbreak across the Omineca region …The most recent mapping of the Omineca region ( which includes Prince George and Mackenzie) indicates about 210 thousand hectares of forest have been impacted by spruce beetles but there is progress being made says Spruce Beetle Manager Heather Weibe “We have a couple of things that are working for us right now. We have an excellent mapping process that shows us where we are. The aerial overview flights , all the heli-work we’ve done, we’ve done almost 80 hours of helicopter work in Mackenzie, and all the ground surface information , we are able to put all of that information in one location. So that’s fantastic.”

Read More

Firms face fines, bans for destroying fish habitat near Kumdis Bay

By Andrew Hudson
Haida Gwaii Observer
January 20, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Two local and one off-island company will pay up to $2.2 million for logging that destroyed fish-bearing streams and a wetland near Kumdis Bay. Two of the firms, Howe Sound Forest Products Ltd. and I. Crosby Contracting Ltd., are also banned from logging for five years and six months, respectively. …At trial, experts said that with seven streams, tidal flats, plenty of shaded water and varieties of stream flow, the area was once “ideal for spawning, rearing, and growing fish.” It is also unlikely to recover quickly— unaided, it could take a century or longer.

Read More

Merv George Jr. Selected as Keynote Speaker at 79th Oregon Logging Conference

Construction Equipment Guide
January 23, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West


Jeff Wimer, Oregon Logging Conference president, has selected Merv George Jr., the forest supervisor of Six Rivers National Forest in northern California, as keynote speaker at the 79th Annual OLC. The keynote address will be presented on Feb. 23 at 8:30 a.m., in the Wheeler Pavilion at the Lane Events Center and Fairgrounds. George has worked for the U.S. Forest Service since 2008. He has served as forest supervisor for more than two years. Prior to his position as forest supervisor, he was acting forest supervisor in early 2014. George has served the U.S. Forest Service at both the regional and forest levels.

Read More

Meetings scheduled on new Helena-Lewis and Clark forest plan

By Tom Kuglin
Helena Independent Record
January 23, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

A series of meetings to answer questions and take public comment on a new forest plan for the Helena-Lewis and Clark National Forest begin this week with meetings in Lincoln, Helena, Townsend and White Sulphur Springs. A forest plan provides overarching guidance to land managers on future projects, and is required under federal environmental law. The current plans for the former Helena and Lewis and Clark national forests were drafted in 1986 and are considered outdated with ecological changes including climate shifts, insect infestations and endangered species listings for bull trout and Canada lynx. After beginning the forest plan revision process nearly two years ago, in December the Forest Service released its “proposed action,” essentially a draft document driving future management of 2.9 million acres for activities such as protected lands, timber, recreation and wildlife.

Read More

Port of Port Angeles to state: Allow highest volume of timber harvest

By Jesse Major
Peninsula Daily News
January 24, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

PORT ANGELES — Port of Port Angeles commissioners will urge the state Board of Natural Resources to pick a sustainable harvest calculation that allows Clallam County to recover lost revenue from unsold timber throughout the past decade. On Monday, the board approved a statement urging the Board of Natural Resources to allow the highest volume of timber harvest in Clallam County out of five alternatives eyed by the state Department of Natural Resources. The state is considering setting a new sustainable harvest level for the 2015 to 2024 planning decade for forested state trust land in Western Washington.

Read More

Pinchot Wildfire

Satellite PR News
January 23, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Fire managers with the Coconino National Forest are utilizing a lightning-caused fire in the Dick Hart Ridge area southeast of Clints Well to benefit the landscape and maintain a healthy ecosystem by allowing fire to fulfill its natural role in the environment. The forest thrives on fires such as these that are low severity and creep across the forest floor. They reduce fuels and the risk of severe wildfire, create safer conditions for residents, the public and firefighters, and also restore wildlife habitat by stimulating understory vegetation growth. The Pinchot Fire is located approximately eight and a half miles southeast of Clints Well and six miles southwest of C.C. Cragin (Blue Ridge) Reservoir. This low-intensity wildfire is being managed to achieve multiple benefits and objectives. 

Read More

Mental Health Trust backs off Southeast timber sales

By Ed Schoenfeld
KFSK Community Radio
January 23, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

The Alaska Mental Health Trust Land Office will not pursue timber sales at controversial sites in Petersburg and Ketchikan – at least for now. The trust had planned for sales at what’s known as Petersburg P-1, as well as Ketchikan’s Deer Mountain. Both met with community opposition. Deputy Director Wyn Menefee said the trust land office will focus instead on trading those and other parcels for Tongass National Forest timberlands. Bills introduced in the U.S. House and Senate call for that exchange — and to speed up the process. “While we’re pursuing this exchange we’re not pursuing any sort of timber harvest activity on Petersburg P-1 or Deer Mountain. We are fully trying to get this exchange through,” he said.

Read More

Forestry officials forecast high fire danger for Oklahoma

Associated Press in NewsOK
January 23, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

OKLAHOMA CITY — Oklahoma forestry officials say the danger of wildfires is increasing as a dry weather pattern persists across much of the state. Officials say the fire danger will be high on Tuesday and that Oklahomans should limit outdoor activities that might spark a blaze. Grasses and other vegetation are dry, dormant and readily available to burn. Officials say the fire danger is already high in western and southwestern Oklahoma as strong winds, low humidity and increasing drought indices affect the area. Mark Goeller, the fire management chief for Oklahoma Forestry Services, says conditions on Tuesday will also bring much drier fuel conditions to eastern Oklahoma.

Read More

Chile fires cause ‘worst forestry disaster’ in its history

By Miguel Sanchez
Agence France-Presse in Yahoo News
January 23, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: International


Santiago – Vast woodland fires in the center and south of Chile have caused “the biggest forestry disaster in our history,” President Michelle Bachelet said Monday, canceling a trip abroad to supervise the emergency. A total of 130 square kilometers (500 square miles) have been charred, mainly in sparsely populated rural areas, according to the National Emergency Office. Although most of 150 fires that broke out this summer season were under control or extinguished, 48 are still raging. Three firefighters have died and another three were wounded battling the flames. Soldiers and dozens of aircraft have been brought in to help. Bachelet scrapped a trip to the Dominican Republic for a summit of Latin American and Caribbean leaders in order to oversee the official response.

Read More

We are destroying rainforests so quickly they may be gone in 100 years

By John Vidal
The Guardian
January 24, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: International

If you want to see the world’s climate changing, fly over a tropical country. Thirty years ago, a wide belt of rainforest circled the earth, covering much of Latin America, south-east Asia and Africa. Today, it is being rapidly replaced by great swathes of palm oil trees and rubber plantations, land cleared for cattle grazing, soya farming, expanding cities, dams and logging. People have been deforesting the tropics for thousands of years for timber and farming, but now, nothing less than the physical transformation of the Earth is taking place. Every year about 18m hectares of forest – an area the size of England and Wales – is felled. In just 40 years, possibly 1bn hectares, the equivalent of Europe, has gone. Half the world’s rainforests have been razed in a century, and the latest satellite analysis shows that in the last 15 years new hotspots have emerged from Cambodia to Liberia. At current rates, they will vanish altogether 

Read More

Photographing one of the world’s tallest trees in Tasmania’s Styx Valley

January 24, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: International

It took 67 days, 12,000 images and a climb to stomach-churning heights, but photographer Steven Pearce finally got the image he was after of the world’s tallest flowering plant, Tasmania’s eucalyptus regnans. The Styx Valley, past the township of Maydena, about 100 kilometres north-west from Hobart, is often damp, cold and foggy. It is also home to the world’s tallest flowering plant and one of the world’s tallest trees — the eucalyptus regnans, often called mountain ash or swamp gum. These towering gums are thought to grow to 100 metres or more, with the tallest living tree on record being Centurion in Tasmania at a confirmed 99.6 metres.

Read More

Company & Business News

Saskatchewan wood company fined $45K after worker’s arm seriously injured

Canadian Press in Journal of Commerce
January 23, 2017
Category: Company & Business News
Region: Canada, Canada West

GLASLYN, Sask. – A Saskatchewan company that makes wood products has been fined more than $45,000 after a worker was seriously injured on the job. The province says L & M Wood Products (2011) Ltd. pleaded guilty on Jan. 17 to violating one count under Occupational Health and Safety legislation. On Feb. 10, 2015 an employee was cleaning a piece of machinery at its business near Glaslyn when his arm got caught in a sprocket and was seriously injured.

Read More

Christy Clark’s reckless cheap shots at vindictive Donald Trump will mean huge cost for BC workers, businesses

By Bill Tieleman, former NDP strategist
Vancouver 24hrs
January 23, 2017
Category: Company & Business News
Region: Canada, Canada West

Premier Christy Clark has publicly attacked the most powerful and vindictive man in the world, condemning him as “disgraceful” – and British Columbia workers and industries will pay for it. The problem is that half of BC’s exports go to the U.S. In 2015 that meant $3.3 billion in lumber, $2.1 billion in petroleum and natural gas products and $727 million in zinc, annually. Clark’s condemnation of Trump needlessly risked BC workers’ jobs and businesses’ survival. And she did it to score BC headlines – because her comments obviously wouldn’t affect the election. What’s more, Clark attacked Trump after the U.S.-Canada softwood lumber agreement expired, and was well aware that American forest companies want damaging new tariffs on Canadian softwood lumber.

Read More

Five years later, Burns Lake mill explosion leaves families seeking justice and healing

By Shannon Waters
My Prince Geoge Now
January 20, 2017
Category: Company & Business News
Region: Canada, Canada West

Five years ago tonight, an explosion at the Babine Forest Products Mill in Burns Lake killed two workers and injured 20 more. Maureen Luggi lost her husband Robert that night. She says, while the pain of that loss has faded, the incident still affects the lives of all involved – including the 20 workers who survived. “Some of them, their lives have not been the same. They’re still recovering and still moving forward from all of the trauma that occurred that night. I always consider the parents of Robert and Carl because I don’t have any idea what it’s like to lose a child but unfortunately they do.” Luggi says she and other affected families still want justice but most are focused on healing.

Read More

Botwood biofuel plant one step closer to green light

By Ryan Cooke
CBC News
January 23, 2017
Category: Company & Business News
Region: Canada East, Canada

An $185-million biofuel facility in Botwood is coming closer to getting a green light. NewGreen Technology Inc, the company behind the project, will soon be offered a tentative deal by Newfoundland and Labrador’s provincial government for the allocation of wood fibres on crown lands, CBC News has learned. Fisheries, Forestry and Agrifoods Minister Steve Crocker would not confirm the agreement on Monday afternoon, but said he was confident his department could give the go-ahead for NewGreen Technology to move on to the next step. “As for the fibre that the company requires, I’m quite confident as a province we are able to supply that fibre,” he said.

Read More

Nonprofit group tackling Clean Water Act violations by lumber company

By David Hutton
Northern California Record
January 23, 2017
Category: Company & Business News
Region: United States, US West

SAN FRANCISCO — A San Francisco-based law firm handling a case alleging Clean Water Act violations against an Arcata-based lumber company is hoping that a quick settlement can be reached. Christopher Sproul is an attorney with Environmental Advocates, which is representing the Ecological Rights Foundation in the case. He told The Northern California Record that the foundation filed the complaint Dec. 30 in U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California against Schmidbauer Lumber Inc. and Schmidbauer Building Supply LLC. … Sproul also said that Schmidbauer hasn’t implemented a stormwater-runoff pollution plan at its facility and it hasn’t created best practices.

Read More

Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy

Squamish’s clean wood waste used as carbon-rich material

By Jennifer Thuncher
Squamish Chief
January 23, 2017
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: Canada, Canada West

What happens to wood waste created by construction, demolition, tossed-out furniture and yard scraps that end up at the Squamish landfill? The Squamish Chief asked the District of Squamish about the process of disposing our wood waste. Clean wood, such as untreated lumber and pallets, dirty wood, such as stained wood or partible board, and treated wood that has been preserved or has creosote on it, all gets collected at the Squamish landfill. The so-called dirty wood is ground up and transported to Port Mellon’s Howe Sound Pulp and Paper where the waste is used to produce energy to run the mill, according to Chris Wyckham, the district’s director of engineering.

Read More

Forests ‘held their breath’ during global warming hiatus, research shows

By the University of Exeter
Phys.org
January 23, 2017
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: United States, International

Global forest ecosystems, widely considered to act as the lungs of the planet, ‘held their breath’ during the most recent occurrence of a warming hiatus, new research has shown. The international study examined the full extent to which these vital ecosystems performed as a carbon sink from 1998-2012 – the most recent recorded period of global warming slowdown. The researchers, including Professor Pierre Friedlingstein from the University of Exeter, demonstrated that the global carbon sink—where carbon dioxide is removed from the atmosphere and stored in the natural environment – was particularly robust during this 14 year period.

Read More

Endangered Species: How Environmental Rollback Could Hit Forest Owners Hard Ecosystem Marketplace

By Steve Zwick
Ecosystem Marketplace
January 24, 2017
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: United States, US West

A few years back, the Yurok people of California started tapping carbon markets to save their forest; they’ve since raised millions from companies like Chevron, Tesoro, and Calpine Energy Services by doing so – and they’re not alone. In 2015, owners of farms and private forests across the country earned $63.2 million from those and other companies to keep 6.5 million metric tons of carbon dioxide from flowing into the atmosphere, according to Ecosystem Marketplace’s most recent State of Forest Finance Report – and that’s just through California’s cap-and-trade program. It’s a nice chunk of change, but it’s nothing compared to what could lie ahead – if legislators spare federal initiatives that already funnel billions to rural communities across the country and help drive sustainable land use.

Read More

Wood, Paper & Green Building

CaGBC calls for applications to Zero Carbon Initiative pilot project

Journal of Commerce
January 23, 2017
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: Canada

OTTAWA – The Canada Green Building Council (CaGBC) is calling for Canadian projects to participate in an immersive two-year program for developers and designers working on near-net zero developments in new or existing Canadian buildings over 25,000 square feet.
CaGBC calls for applications to Zero Carbon Initiative pilot project. Up to 10 projects from across the country will be accepted to the program. Pilots must present an approved project with the intent to design or develop a near-net zero building over the next two years and be willing to be evaluated using the five key components from the CaGBC’s zero carbon framework.

Read More

Laminated timber viable for structural applications

Cape Business News
January 23, 2017
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: International

As a country whose available natural resources need to be conserved and used optimally, the South African construction trade can benefit from making use of laminated timber beams for structural applications. So says Abe Stears, Managing Director, South Africa Technical Auditing Services (SATAS) who offer certification and inspection services for the timber, chemical, metallurgical and plastic pipe industries. He also issues a word of caution with respect to manufacturing and using this material correctly and according to national regulations. “Unfortunately, not many people know how to use structural laminated beams properly, and in some instances they are used in structural applications for their aesthetic appeal without any consideration for their load bearing ability or capacity.”

Read More

General

Photographing one of the world’s tallest trees in Tasmania’s Styx Valley

January 24, 2017
Category: Uncategorised

It took 67 days, 12,000 images and a climb to stomach-churning heights, but photographer Steven Pearce finally got the image he was after of the world’s tallest flowering plant, Tasmania’s eucalyptus regnans. The Styx Valley, past the township of Maydena, about 100 kilometres north-west from Hobart, is often damp, cold and foggy. It is also home to the world’s tallest flowering plant and one of the world’s tallest trees — the eucalyptus regnans, often called mountain ash or swamp gum. These towering gums are thought to grow to 100 metres or more, with the tallest living tree on record being Centurion in Tasmania at a confirmed 99.6 metres.

Read More